History UsefulNotes / NaziGermany

17th Feb '17 5:10:53 AM Saveelich
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* ''Der Ewige Jude'' (''The Eternal Jew''), 1940 -- A propaganda film presented as a documentary, one of the most virulent theatrically released antisemitic pieces ever produced.

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* ''Der Ewige Jude'' (''The Eternal Jew''), 1940 -- A propaganda film presented as a documentary, one of the most virulent theatrically released antisemitic pieces films ever produced.
17th Feb '17 5:10:12 AM Saveelich
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Jud Süß'' (''Süss the Jew''), 1940 -- A notoriously antisemitic historical film.
* ''Der Ewige Jude'' (''The Eternal Jew''), 1940 -- A propaganda film presented as a documentary, one of the most virulent theatrically released antisemitic pieces ever produced.
9th Feb '17 12:37:55 PM Jhonny
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** The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for, but in matters of economics, they were a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck).

to:

** The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for, but in matters of economics, they were a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, Röhm, his SA, and Goebbels) Goebbels, as well as the Strasser brothers who were pushed aside before 1933) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm Röhm and the SA were purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck).
9th Feb '17 12:34:46 PM JulianLapostat
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* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. The full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for, but in matters of economics, they were a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union, aspects which fit the ideas of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herrenvolk_democracy herrenvolk democracy]] whereby government programs and benefits are doled out exclusively and partially to a herrenvolk (German for MasterRace) who are identified to be equal amongst themselves and superior above others, by publicly excluding and persecuting those who are part of the out-group.[[note]]Socialism was in many variants international and equal for all, whereas the Nazi idea of socialism was specifically and deliberately limited to a few, equal among themselves who are superior and special over all others[[/note]]

to:

* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. The full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for, but in matters of economics, they were a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union, aspects which fit the ideas of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herrenvolk_democracy herrenvolk democracy]] whereby government programs and benefits are doled out exclusively and partially to a herrenvolk (German for MasterRace) who are identified to be equal amongst themselves and superior above others, by publicly excluding and persecuting those who are part of the out-group.[[note]]Socialism was in many variants international and equal for all, whereas the Nazi idea of socialism was specifically and deliberately limited to a few, equal among themselves who are superior and special over all others[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

** The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for, but in matters of economics, they were a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck).
** They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union, aspects which fit the ideas of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herrenvolk_democracy herrenvolk democracy]] whereby government programs and benefits are doled out exclusively and partially to a herrenvolk (German for MasterRace) who are identified to be equal amongst themselves and superior above others, by publicly excluding and persecuting those who are part of the out-group.[[note]]Socialism was in many variants international and equal for all without any special distinctions whatsoever (at least in theory) whereas the Nazi idea of socialism was specifically and deliberately limited to a few, equal among themselves who are superior and special over all others[[/note]] "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy and internationalist socialism for being "divisive".
9th Feb '17 12:30:26 PM JulianLapostat
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* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. In truth, this gets complicated. As noted above, the full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for. On most other issues - especially economics - they were actually quite hazy and divided. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof. At least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming. At which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were eventually killed or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, the Nazis came to power as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union.

to:

* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. In truth, this gets complicated. As noted above, the The full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for. On most other issues - especially economics - for, but in matters of economics, they were actually quite hazy and divided. a little flexible, at least at first. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof. At aloof at least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming. At becoming, at which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were eventually killed or purged and/or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, [[EvilReactionary the Nazis came to power power]] as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union. Union, aspects which fit the ideas of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herrenvolk_democracy herrenvolk democracy]] whereby government programs and benefits are doled out exclusively and partially to a herrenvolk (German for MasterRace) who are identified to be equal amongst themselves and superior above others, by publicly excluding and persecuting those who are part of the out-group.[[note]]Socialism was in many variants international and equal for all, whereas the Nazi idea of socialism was specifically and deliberately limited to a few, equal among themselves who are superior and special over all others[[/note]]
9th Feb '17 11:44:44 AM Jhonny
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* ''Film/{{Kolberg}}'', 1945 -- A film about the heroic resistance of the Pomeranian city of Kolberg during Useful/TheNapoleonicWars. The most expensive picture to be produced during the Third Reich era, it saw a ''very limited'' release in early 1945 due to Germany being invaded and roads being under constant Allied air attacks. Somehow, Joseph Goebbels was persuaded that the film would inspire the German people into resisting till the very end to the Allies and Soviets. It didn't work, of course.

to:

* ''Film/{{Kolberg}}'', 1945 -- A film about the heroic resistance of the Pomeranian city defense of Kolberg during Useful/TheNapoleonicWars. The most expensive picture to be produced during the Third Reich era, it saw a ''very limited'' release in early 1945 due to Germany being invaded and roads being under constant Allied air attacks. Somehow, Joseph Goebbels The movie paints a picture of Kolberg being successfully defended against overwhelming odds (glossing over such "minor details" as Britain and Russia being Prussian allies at the time) which was persuaded that the film would intended to inspire Germans to fight to their last breath rather than to [[KnowWhenToFoldEm give up on the German people into resisting till the very end to the Allies hopeless and Soviets. It didn't work, of course.
lost war]].
9th Feb '17 5:25:42 AM jamespolk
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* ''Kolberg'', 1945 -- A film about the heroic resistance of the Pomeranian city of Kolberg during Useful/TheNapoleonicWars. The most expensive picture to be produced during the Third Reich era, it saw a ''very limited'' release in early 1945 due to Germany being invaded and roads being under constant Allied air attacks. Somehow, Joseph Goebbels was persuaded that the film would inspire the German people into resisting till the very end to the Allies and Soviets. It didn't work, of course.

to:

* ''Kolberg'', ''Film/{{Kolberg}}'', 1945 -- A film about the heroic resistance of the Pomeranian city of Kolberg during Useful/TheNapoleonicWars. The most expensive picture to be produced during the Third Reich era, it saw a ''very limited'' release in early 1945 due to Germany being invaded and roads being under constant Allied air attacks. Somehow, Joseph Goebbels was persuaded that the film would inspire the German people into resisting till the very end to the Allies and Soviets. It didn't work, of course.
2nd Feb '17 10:50:06 AM LtFedora
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!Important figures of Nazi Germany : see [[Characters/NaziGermany here]]
31st Jan '17 10:22:00 PM Abodos
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* The Nazis also enacted conservation laws to preserve German forests.

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* The Nazis also enacted conservation laws to preserve German forests. This was motivated in large part by their beliefs that the physical strength and hardy character supposedly emblematic of the Germanic peoples were originally forged over many millennia in the primeval woods of northern and northeastern Europe through their struggles against the rough environment and the ferocious beasts that lived there. Göring and some Nazi scientists decided in 1941 to apply these hypotheses to the newly-conquered forest of Bialowieza in Poland (covered in a kind of untouched woodland once common across northeastern Europe in ancient times) by forcing out its human inhabitants, filling it with horses and cattle bred to resemble their wild ancestors, and turning it into the world's largest game preserve where Germans could once again satisfy their primal urges. The Red Army pushed the Nazis out of the region before this revived {{Prehistoria}} could be fully realized, but the communists decided to implement their own conservation laws for the area.[[note]]Incidentally, the Belorussian portion of the forest preserve is also the signing location of the Belavezha Accords (so named after the Russian name for Bialowieza) which formally dissolved the Soviet Union.[[/note]] Today, the descendants of those horses and cattle still roam the forest, having been named Heck horses and Heck cattle after Lutz Heck, the man who organized the breeding project; the latter also known as "Hell cattle" because of their reputation for being very aggressive towards people.



* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. In truth, this gets complicated. The full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for. On most other issues - especially economics - they were actually quite hazy and divided. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof. At least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming. At which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were eventually killed or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, the Nazis came to power as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union.

to:

* It is often brought up that "socialist" was in the Nazi Party's full name. In truth, this gets complicated. The As noted above, the full name of the Party - "National Socialist German Workers' Party" - would have sounded to a German living in the 1920s and 30s something like "Democratic Republican Liberal Conservative Party" would sound to an American living today. "National" and "German" were right-wing conservative catchphrases (the main conservative party at the time was called the German National Party), and "Socialist" and "Workers" were of course left-wing catchphrases. The name was meant to sound vague and all-embracing, to attract as wide an audience as possible. This reflected the Nazis' nationalist ideology: they always insisted that they were the party of ALL Germans, and opposed democracy for being "divisive". The one constant element in Nazi ideology and practice was genocidal racism and brutal dictatorship, which is what they are remembered for. On most other issues - especially economics - they were actually quite hazy and divided. They had both "left-wing" and "right-wing" factions on economic matters, with the "left" (led by Ernst Rohm, his SA, and Goebbels) advocating nationalization of industry, while the "right" (led by Himmler, the SS, and Schacht) advocated an alliance with the wealthy capitalists and big business, with Hitler making a pretext at being willfully aloof. At least until it became clear how important the alliances with Germany's old school industrialists and militarists was to gaining power and how much of a thorn and threat Roehm's SA was becoming. At which point Hitler swung behind the SS, the "right-wing" faction quickly gained the upper hand, and Rohm and the SA were eventually killed or driven into hiding during the Night of Long Knives. In the end, the Nazis came to power as part of an alliance with conservative political forces, and they mostly continued the economic policies of mainstream German conservatism (which included a 60-year-old tradition of limited welfare state measures, going back to Bismarck). They also placed price and wage controls on the economy, cartelized industries, and the work force was strictly controlled by the government Labor Front when unions were banned, with Four-Year Plans to rival the Five-Year Plans of the Soviet Union.
22nd Jan '17 1:58:58 PM Jhonny
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* It was the first country to run high-speed rail.



* As mentioned before, it was the first country to develop an interstate highway system.
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