History UsefulNotes / NationalHockeyLeague

18th Nov '17 11:26:06 PM KYCubbie
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** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron.

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** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin began play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's season.[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. dollar.[[/note]] An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be Golden Knights are the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Marc-André Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron.



While both draw from the same pool of youth hockey players, once a player has committed to one or the other there's no switching -- the NCAA considers (ex-)CHL players professionals ineligible for their ‘amateur’ sport while a player with a year in an NCAA program under his belt would be, at 19, too old to start out in the CHL (although both retain existing players up to age 22–23). The USHL, on the other hand, is strictly amateur, which allows players to go to the NCAA.

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While both draw from the same pool of youth hockey players, once a player has committed to one or the other there's no switching -- the NCAA considers (ex-)CHL players professionals ineligible for their ‘amateur’ "amateur" sport while a player with a year in an NCAA program under his belt would be, at 19, too old to start out in the CHL (although both retain existing players up to age 22–23). The USHL, on the other hand, is strictly amateur, which allows players to go to the NCAA.
18th Oct '17 2:32:41 PM Rytex
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** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron. Their first official regular-season game will be held on 6 October 2017 in Dallas against the Stars.

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** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron. Their first official regular-season game will be held on 6 October 2017 in Dallas against the Stars.
17th Oct '17 11:45:46 AM KYCubbie
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** Jacques Plante: ‘[[AwesomeMcCoolname Jake the Snake]]’. Innovated the modern goalie mask, and was the first to wear it regularly. Also innovated the concept of skating behind the net to stop the puck. Won the Vezina Trophy seven times (note that the criterion then was different than the one used now). His habit of [[RealMenWearPink knitting to relax]] helped establish goaltender as the likely position of any CloudCuckooLander that laced up their skates. Moved to Switzerland after his retirement.
** Gerry Cheever, a good goalie in his own right (two time cup champion, hall of famer), began the tradition of decorating goalie masks when he would put a cartoon stitch mark on his mask where he got hit. Today, goalie masks are much more ornate, but the tradition started with him.

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** Jacques Plante: ‘[[AwesomeMcCoolname Jake the Snake]]’. Innovated the modern goalie mask, and was the first to wear it regularly. Also innovated the concept of skating behind the net to stop the puck. Won the Vezina Trophy seven times (note that the criterion then was different than the one used now). His habit of [[RealMenWearPink knitting to relax]] helped establish goaltender as the likely position of any CloudCuckooLander that laced up their skates. Moved to Switzerland after his retirement.
retirement and died there.
** Gerry Cheever, Cheevers, a good goalie in his own right (two time cup champion, hall of famer), began the tradition of decorating goalie masks when he would put a cartoon stitch mark on his mask where he got hit. Today, goalie masks are much more ornate, but the tradition started with him.



** Ryan Miller: Goalie for the Ducks (Formerly Canucks) and Team USA. Has made an art of stealing, or at least keeping 'em in games his teams might have no business being in. Comes from a hockey family out of Lansing, UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}}: his brother Drew plays for Detroit, cousins Kevin, Kelly, and Kip (all brothers) are retired [=NHLers=], and all five starred for Michigan State.

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** Ryan Miller: Goalie for the Ducks (Formerly (formerly Canucks) and Team USA. Has made an art of stealing, or at least keeping 'em in games his teams might have no business being in. Comes from a hockey family out of Lansing, UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}}: his brother Drew plays for Detroit, cousins Kevin, Kelly, and Kip (all brothers) are retired [=NHLers=], and all five starred for Michigan State.



** Tom Barrasso: American-born goaltender who, despite his good start with the Buffalo Sabres, is [[MyRealDaddy much better known for his stint with the Pittsburgh Penguins]]. Stepped up into the big leagues ''[[JumpedAtTheCall at the age of 18]]'', a feat that has hardly been equaled ever since and proved to be one of the best marquee goalies of his time thanks to his impressive agility and stick-handling skills and became the first American goalie to amass 300 wins. [[TheMentor He's currently mentoring Cam Ward]] as the Carolina Hurricanes' goaltending coach.

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** Tom Barrasso: American-born goaltender who, despite his good start with the Buffalo Sabres, is [[MyRealDaddy much better known for his stint with the Pittsburgh Penguins]]. Stepped up into the big leagues ''[[JumpedAtTheCall at the age of 18]]'', a feat that has hardly been equaled ever since since, and proved to be one of the best marquee goalies of his time thanks to his impressive agility and stick-handling skills and became the first American goalie to amass 300 wins. [[TheMentor He's currently mentoring Cam Ward]] as the Carolina Hurricanes' goaltending coach.
17th Oct '17 11:33:33 AM KYCubbie
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** Paul ‘[=BizNasty=]’ Bissonette: Enforcer for the Coyotes who is more notable for his Website/{{Twitter}} account than his playing. Aside from frequently [[DefyingTheCensors bringing the league PR team to tears]], he revels in SelfDeprecation about being a perennial fourth-liner and/or “healthy scratch” and has built up a solid fanbase in doing so. May be the reason the league has now instituted a social media blackout for players on gamedays. You can (and should) follow him right [[http://www.twitter.com/biznasty2point0 here]].

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** Paul ‘[=BizNasty=]’ Bissonette: Enforcer Former enforcer for the Coyotes Coyotes, now color commentator with the Coyotes' radio broadcast team, who is more notable for his Website/{{Twitter}} account than his playing. Aside from frequently [[DefyingTheCensors bringing the league PR team to tears]], he revels in SelfDeprecation about being a perennial fourth-liner and/or “healthy scratch” and has built up a solid fanbase in doing so. May be the reason the league has now instituted a social media blackout for players on gamedays. You can (and should) follow him right [[http://www.twitter.com/biznasty2point0 here]].
12th Oct '17 4:33:05 PM Gsueagle31049
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The '''National Hockey League''' is a professional UsefulNotes/IceHockey league in North America. Founded in 1917, it is currently composed of thirty teams: 23 in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates and seven in UsefulNotes/{{Canada}}. This number will go up to 31 since it was announced that UsefulNotes/LasVegas will get an expansion team to start play for the 2017–18 season. UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup represents the league's championship, and is the oldest challenge trophy in North America; traditionally, each member of the championship team gets possession of Lord Stanley's Bowl for a day, and it has had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditions_and_anecdotes_associated_with_the_Stanley_Cup#Misadventures some odd misadventures]] in its time.

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The '''National Hockey League''' is a professional UsefulNotes/IceHockey league in North America. Founded in 1917, it is currently composed of thirty 31 teams: 23 24 in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates and seven in UsefulNotes/{{Canada}}. This number will go up to 31 since it was announced that UsefulNotes/LasVegas will get an expansion team to start play for UsefulNotes/{{Canada}}, with the 2017–18 season.[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights as the league's newest team. UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup represents the league's championship, and is the oldest challenge trophy in North America; traditionally, each member of the championship team gets possession of Lord Stanley's Bowl for a day, and it has had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditions_and_anecdotes_associated_with_the_Stanley_Cup#Misadventures some odd misadventures]] in its time.



** ''Winnipeg Jets'': Formerly the UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} Thrashers, they're currently the only currently-existing franchise in the league to have never won a playoff game (having been swept by the Rangers in their only appearance as the Thrashers in 2007 and getting swept by the Ducks in their first appearance as the Jets in 2015). On May 31, 2011, the team was sold and moved to Winnipeg[[note]]The ''second'' time a team moved from Atlanta, the first being the Flames in 1980.[[/note]] for the next season, resurrecting the previous team's name due to overwhelming fan support for it (this has also led to a ''massive'' ContinuitySnarl, as the history of the original Winnipeg Jets is now entrenched in the backstory of the Phoenix/Arizona Coyotes,[[note]]Meanwhile, the NFL's Cleveland Browns, the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, and MLS' San Jose Earthquakes all either retained (Browns and Earthquakes) or eventually reclaimed (Hornets) the history of their original franchises after their relocations to Baltimore, New Orleans, and Houston, respectively.[[/note]] a [[BerserkButton severely contentious issue among Jets purists]]). The Jets play in the smallest ''standalone'' market among the Big Four of Professional Sports and are one of two teams based in a metropolitan area with less than one million residents.[[note]]While the Green Bay metropolitan area is half the size of Winnipeg's, the Packers are also part of the larger UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} media market.[[/note]] Season tickets for Winnipeg's 2011–12 season sold out in 17 minutes. The team then remained two years geographically miscast in the Southeast Division[[note]]OK, Winnipeg ''is'' in the southeastern part of Manitoba.[[/note]] before the league and the players' union accepted a new realignment.

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** ''Winnipeg Jets'': Formerly the UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} Thrashers, they're currently the only currently-existing franchise in the league to have never won a playoff game (having been swept by the Rangers in their only appearance as the Thrashers in 2007 and getting swept by the Ducks in their first appearance as the Jets in 2015). On May 31, 2011, the team was sold and moved to Winnipeg[[note]]The ''second'' time a team moved from Atlanta, the first being the Flames in 1980.[[/note]] for the next season, resurrecting the previous team's name due to overwhelming fan support for it (this has also led to a ''massive'' ContinuitySnarl, as the history of the original Winnipeg Jets is now entrenched in the backstory of the Phoenix/Arizona Coyotes,[[note]]Meanwhile, the NFL's Cleveland Browns, the NBA's Charlotte Hornets, and MLS' San Jose Earthquakes all either retained (Browns and Earthquakes) or eventually reclaimed (Hornets) the history of their original franchises after their relocations to Baltimore, New Orleans, and Houston, respectively.[[/note]] a [[BerserkButton severely contentious issue among Jets purists]]). The Jets play in the smallest ''standalone'' market among the Big Four of Professional Sports sports leagues and are one of two teams based in a metropolitan area with less than one million residents.[[note]]While the Green Bay metropolitan area is half the size of Winnipeg's, the Packers are also part of the larger UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} media market.[[/note]] Season tickets for Winnipeg's 2011–12 season sold out in 17 minutes. The team then remained two years geographically miscast in the Southeast Division[[note]]OK, Winnipeg ''is'' in the southeastern part of Manitoba.[[/note]] before the league and the players' union accepted a new realignment.



The NHL also recognizes two minor leagues for player development: the American Hockey League and the ECHL (an ArtifactTitle, it was known before 2003 as the East Coast Hockey League, but now has teams throughout North America, including Alaska), roughly equivalent to AAA and AA in baseball, respectively.

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The NHL also recognizes two minor leagues for player development: the American Hockey League and the ECHL (an ArtifactTitle, it was known before 2003 as the East Coast Hockey League, but now has teams throughout North America, including Alaska), America), roughly equivalent to AAA and AA in baseball, respectively.
10th Oct '17 7:16:12 PM AriRockefeller
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** ''UsefulNotes/StLouis Blues'': One of the teams created in the 1967 expansion. The oldest franchise still without a championship, although they made the Finals in their first three seasons (due largely to divisional alignments of the time guaranteeing one of the 1967 expansion teams facing an Original Six team in the Finals). They were once owned by Ralston Purina, and nearly moved to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan before a new owner was found that would keep the team in St. Louis. Brett Hull had his best years as a Blue.

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** ''UsefulNotes/StLouis Blues'': One of the teams created in the 1967 expansion. The oldest franchise still without a championship, although they made the Finals in their first three seasons (due largely to divisional alignments of the time guaranteeing one of the 1967 expansion teams facing an Original Six team in the Finals). They were once owned by Ralston Purina, Purina (who penny-pinched the hell out of the team), and nearly moved to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan before a new owner was found that would keep the team in St. Louis. [[note]]The preceding year was so bad for them, though, that the arena got padlocked and they didn't even participate in the draft.[[/note]] Brett Hull had his best years as a Blue.
10th Oct '17 7:13:25 PM AriRockefeller
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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Red Wings'': Consistently good for almost all of the last 30 years—the 2016–17 season was the first since 1990 in which they missed the playoffs—therefore [[TheScrappy hated outside Detroit]]. The general dislike is newer than a lot of people think, since the post-expansion revival came after almost twenty years of being somewhat of a league ButtMonkey and a strenuous rebuilding process. Before then, there just weren't as many teams to pass the Cup around to, but they were the most dominant of the American-based teams. Fans have a habit of chucking [[EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods octopodes]] onto the ice during the playoffs (in the Original Six days a playoff team needed to beat two teams in best-of-seven, thus eight wins, to win the Cup). The feelings between them and Chicago are mutual, but Detroit fans tend to have [[SarcasmMode more creative chants]]. Opening the league's newest arena, Little Caesars Arena, for the 2017–18 season.[[note]]While that same season is the first for the Vegas Golden Knights, their home ice, T-Mobile Arena, opened nearly a year earlier.[[/note]]

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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Red Wings'': The team of Steve Yzerman. Consistently good for almost all of the last 30 years—the 2016–17 season was the first since 1990 in which they missed the playoffs—therefore [[TheScrappy hated outside Detroit]]. The general dislike is newer than a lot of people think, since the post-expansion revival came after almost twenty years of being somewhat of a league ButtMonkey and a strenuous rebuilding process. Before then, there just weren't as many teams to pass the Cup around to, but they were the most dominant of the American-based teams. Fans have a habit of chucking [[EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods octopodes]] onto the ice during the playoffs (in the Original Six days a playoff team needed to beat two teams in best-of-seven, thus eight wins, to win the Cup). The feelings between them and Chicago are mutual, but Detroit fans tend to have [[SarcasmMode more creative chants]]. Opening the league's newest arena, Little Caesars Arena, for the 2017–18 season.[[note]]While that same season is the first for the Vegas Golden Knights, their home ice, T-Mobile Arena, opened nearly a year earlier.[[/note]]



** ''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Flyers'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion, and the first of the expansion-era teams to win the Stanley Cup. Historically known as the Broad Street Bullies of the '70s, where they pretty much [[GoodOldFisticuffs punched their way to the Cup]].[[note]]Although Bernie Parent's skimpy less-than-two-goals-against average probably had a little to do with it. Many Philadelphia cars at the time sported bumper stickers declaring “Only God saves more than Bernie Parent”.[[/note]] Has chronically lacked a permanent goaltender in recent years. Their arena has been named after four different banks that ate each other up one after the other. They have particularly notable rivalries with the Rangers, the Devils, and Penguins, the [[ArchEnemy latter of which they hate the most]] and divides within the state of Pennsylvania.
** ''UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}} Penguins'': Current StanleyCup Champions. Another of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion. The team of Sidney "Sid the Kid" Crosby and Evgeni Malkin, but really, it's Mario Lemieux's team. He's saved them from bankruptcy at least twice; first as the hot number-one pick in 1984 that revitalized the team and won two Cups in 1991 and 1992, and then again by buying the team outright, and then coming out of retirement to put butts back in the seats and thereby becoming the first ever player/owner in the NHL. Although they faced potential relocation a few years ago, first to Hamilton, Ontario and then to Kansas City, a new arena deal was struck in 2007, and the new building opened in 2010. Under Crosby and Malkin's leadership, got to two straight finals in 2008 and 2009, winning the latter, and following a long stretch with postseason shortcomings and/or injuries to several of their core players (most infamously the concussion that sidelined Crosby for all but a handful games in 2011), won the Penguins' fourth and fifth Cups back-to-back in 2016 and 2017.
** ''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Capitals'': The team of Alexander Ovechkin. Their first season saw them with the worst winning percentage in modern NHL history (8 wins in 80 games). For several years they usually had much more regular-season success, but EveryYearTheyFizzleOut in the first or second round of the playoffs; they then lost even their regular season success, as while Ovechkin remains potent offensively, his support all but crumbled, and without any real defense to back him up, they dropped in the standings until finally missing the playoffs in 2014, but bounced back to finish with the league best record in 2016. Their first and so far only Stanley Cup Final appearance was in 1998, in which they were swept by the Detroit Red Wings.

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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Flyers'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion, and the first of the expansion-era teams to win the Stanley Cup. Historically known as the Broad Street Bullies of the '70s, where they pretty much [[GoodOldFisticuffs punched their way to the Cup]].[[note]]Although Bernie Parent's skimpy less-than-two-goals-against average probably had a little to do with it. Many Philadelphia cars at the time sported bumper stickers declaring “Only God saves more than Bernie Parent”.[[/note]] Has chronically lacked a permanent goaltender in recent years. On the subject of goaltenders: the first ever goalie to score a goal was Flyers' Ron Hextall. Their arena has been named after four different banks that ate each other up one after the other. They have particularly notable rivalries with the Rangers, the Devils, and Penguins, the [[ArchEnemy latter of which they hate the most]] and divides within the state of Pennsylvania.
** ''UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}} Penguins'': Current StanleyCup Champions. Another of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion. The team of Sidney "Sid the Kid" Crosby and Evgeni Malkin, but really, it's Mario "Super Mario" Lemieux's team. He's saved them from bankruptcy at least twice; first as the hot number-one pick in 1984 that revitalized the team and won two Cups in 1991 and 1992, and then again by buying the team outright, and then coming out of retirement to put butts back in the seats and thereby becoming the first ever player/owner in the NHL. Although they faced potential relocation a few years ago, first to Hamilton, Ontario and then to Kansas City, a new arena deal was struck in 2007, and the new building opened in 2010. Under Crosby and Malkin's leadership, got to two straight finals in 2008 and 2009, winning the latter, and following a long stretch with postseason shortcomings and/or injuries to several of their core players (most infamously the concussion that sidelined Crosby for all but a handful games in 2011), won the Penguins' fourth and fifth Cups back-to-back in 2016 and 2017.
** ''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Capitals'': The team of Alexander Ovechkin. Their first season saw them with the worst winning percentage in modern NHL history (8 wins in 80 games). ('74/'75 record: 8-''67''-5). For several years they usually had much more regular-season success, but EveryYearTheyFizzleOut in the first or second round of the playoffs; playoffs (typically at the hands of the Islaners, Rangers, or Penguins); they then lost even their regular season success, as while Ovechkin remains potent offensively, his support all but crumbled, and without any real defense to back him up, they dropped in the standings until finally missing the playoffs in 2014, but bounced back to finish with the league best record in 2016. Their first and so far only Stanley Cup Final appearance was in 1998, in which they were swept by the Detroit Red Wings.
25th Sep '17 10:33:52 AM Rytex
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Added DiffLines:

** Connor [=McDavid=]: 'Connor [=McJesus=] / TheChosenOne'. Centerpiece for the Edmonton Oilers starting in the Late '10s, a prodigy on par with Sid the Kid himself, though unlike Crosby, he was designated The Next One by The Great One himself. At the beginning of the 2016/17 Season, Connor was named the youngest captain of an NHL team in history, at 19 years 256 days. He is also the fourth-fastest person ever to reach 100 points in the NHL (behind Crosby, Evgeni Malkin, and Alex Ovechkin), and the third-youngest player to win the Art Ross trophy, with only Gretzky and Crosby being any younger, and also won the Hart Memorial and Ted Lindsay trophies in 2017 to complete the trifecta. Currently holds the highest contract in the NHL at his age, and serves as the cover athlete for NHL '18. He has also gone on record saying his favorite players happened to be Crosby and Tyler Bozak, as he was a fan of the Penguins and Maple Leafs, and his play style of "pass-first" reflects that.
12th Sep '17 11:23:12 AM Rytex
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!!"[[IReadItForTheArticles I watch it for the fights!]]"
As noted on the main UsefulNotes/IceHockey page, The NHL is notable for being one of the only sports leagues where fighting (referred to in the rule book as "fisticuffs") is considered part of the game and players are not automatically suspended for it. Among NHL players, [[LetsFightLikeGentlemen fighting is mostly an honorable affair]], and breaking "The Code" is a serious no-no, usually resulting in [[TheBigGuy one of the other team's enforcers]] marking you for the rest of the evening and most games after, as well as painting a target on your back for the rest of the league.

To be succinct, fight with your fists, no sucker punches, and only fight if you are already on the ice when it starts. Breaking any of these rules gets you ejected for a game misconduct. In addition, if you participate in a fight, you receive an automatic five-minute major penalty (you sit out for five minutes but are replaced in the lineup. But get three of them and you're ejected), and if you started it, you get an additional two minutes for instigation (get two of those and you're ejected as well). Most times, to circumvent the instigation rule, players will try to drop their gloves at the same time, though if they're just that pissed, they won't care.

When a fight is going on, play stops completely. The refs only intervene when either nothing is happening, a player is getting utterly shit-stomped, or both players fall to the ice. If someone else tries to come in and double-team, the refs will put a stop to it immediately. Almost always, the fight will cause the crowd to get into it, even if the home team is down by several goals, and is an effective way at livening up an otherwise-dull affair.

Generally speaking, mano a mano fights aren't as common as one would think. While often sheer animosity can lead to two players [[ThrowingDownTheGauntlet dropping their gloves,]] most fights are usually done strategically, either as retaliation for a big or unnecessarily-brutal hit or by enforcers to give the crowd something to cheer for and get the players mentally reinvigorated on adrenaline. Considering that players often toe the line with what they can do without getting penalized (including slashes, water bottle squirts, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and Your Mom! jokes]]), it takes something special to elicit this reaction from the players, but if taken too far, it results in a line brawl.

Line brawls are very rare, and almost always stem from rivalries or anger. Almost always, all five skaters on each side throw down, and sometimes [[BigFun even the two goalies]] [[UpToEleven will go at it]]. All players participating get five-minute majors, only the one who sparked the conflict gets the instigator penalty, and everyone has to skate on over to the penalty box to wait out the five minutes rather than just running off five minutes from the clock.
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'''Eastern Conference'''

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'''Eastern Conference'''[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Eastern Conference]]




'''Western Conference'''

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\n'''Western Conference'''[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Conference]]




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[[/folder]]
1st Sep '17 12:15:54 AM KYCubbie
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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Red Wings'': Consistently good for almost all of the last 30 years—the 2016–17 season is the first since 1990 in which they've missed the playoffs—therefore [[TheScrappy hated outside Detroit]]. The general dislike is newer than a lot of people think, since the post-expansion revival came after almost twenty years of being somewhat of a league ButtMonkey and a strenuous rebuilding process. Before then, there just weren't as many teams to pass the Cup around to, but they were the most dominant of the American-based teams. Fans have a habit of chucking [[EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods octopodes]] onto the ice during the playoffs (in the Original Six days a playoff team needed to beat two teams in best-of-seven, thus eight wins, to win the Cup). The feelings between them and Chicago are mutual, but Detroit fans tend to have [[SarcasmMode more creative chants]].

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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Red Wings'': Consistently good for almost all of the last 30 years—the 2016–17 season is was the first since 1990 in which they've they missed the playoffs—therefore [[TheScrappy hated outside Detroit]]. The general dislike is newer than a lot of people think, since the post-expansion revival came after almost twenty years of being somewhat of a league ButtMonkey and a strenuous rebuilding process. Before then, there just weren't as many teams to pass the Cup around to, but they were the most dominant of the American-based teams. Fans have a habit of chucking [[EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods octopodes]] onto the ice during the playoffs (in the Original Six days a playoff team needed to beat two teams in best-of-seven, thus eight wins, to win the Cup). The feelings between them and Chicago are mutual, but Detroit fans tend to have [[SarcasmMode more creative chants]]. Opening the league's newest arena, Little Caesars Arena, for the 2017–18 season.[[note]]While that same season is the first for the Vegas Golden Knights, their home ice, T-Mobile Arena, opened nearly a year earlier.[[/note]]



** ''UsefulNotes/{{Nashville}} Predators'': A consistently decent team since about 2004, which has problems both with other people knowing they exist and staying solvent: the fanbase is pretty decent, but corporate sponsors are lacking for them, not to mention attempts in 2007 to move the team to be the "Hamilton Predators" that fell through and then to Kansas City. Part of this situation might be the defensive-minded approach that its coach Barry Trotz (the only coach the team had since it started playing in 1998, until 2014) has implemented -- [[BoringButPractical it's effective in winning games but doesn't make for exciting play that can draw fans in]], but that changed with the addition of Mike Fisher (after being traded from the Senators, where he was a fan favorite), husband of country superstar Music/CarrieUnderwood and current team captain, as well as making it past the first round of the playoffs twice. Have had a few dominating defencemen with Ryan Suter (currently in Minnesota), Shea Weber (captain for six years, even warranting a massive contract of $110M for 14 years) and P.K. Subban (traded from Montreal for Weber), with the last one leading the team to their first Stanley Cup final in 2017.
** ''UsefulNotes/StLouis Blues'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion. The oldest franchise still without a championship, although they made the Finals in their first three seasons (due largely to divisional alignments of the time guaranteeing one of the 1967 expansion teams facing an Original Six team in the Finals). They were once owned by Ralston Purina, and nearly moved to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan before a new owner was found that would keep the team in St. Louis. Brett Hull had his best years as a Blue.

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** ''UsefulNotes/{{Nashville}} Predators'': A consistently decent team since about 2004, which has problems both with other people knowing they exist and staying solvent: the fanbase is pretty decent, but corporate sponsors are lacking for them, not to mention attempts in 2007 to move the team to be the "Hamilton Predators" that fell through and then to Kansas City. Part of this situation might be the defensive-minded approach that its coach Barry Trotz (the only coach the team had since it started playing in 1998, until 2014) has implemented -- [[BoringButPractical it's effective in winning games but doesn't make for exciting play that can draw fans in]], but that changed with the addition of Mike Fisher (after being traded from the Senators, where he was a fan favorite), husband of country superstar Music/CarrieUnderwood and current team captain, captain until his retirement in the 2017 offseason, as well as making it past the first round of the playoffs twice. Have had a few dominating defencemen with Ryan Suter (currently in Minnesota), Shea Weber (captain for six years, even warranting a massive contract of $110M for 14 years) and P.K. Subban (traded from Montreal for Weber), with the last one leading the team to their first Stanley Cup final in 2017.
** ''UsefulNotes/StLouis Blues'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion.expansion. The oldest franchise still without a championship, although they made the Finals in their first three seasons (due largely to divisional alignments of the time guaranteeing one of the 1967 expansion teams facing an Original Six team in the Finals). They were once owned by Ralston Purina, and nearly moved to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan before a new owner was found that would keep the team in St. Louis. Brett Hull had his best years as a Blue.



** ''Anaheim Ducks'': Formerly the "Mighty Ducks of Anaheim", this team was founded by Creator/{{Disney}} [[{{Defictionalization}} following the success]] of ''Film/TheMightyDucks'' movies (and subsequently the real team's mascot, Wildwing Flashblade, became the protagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheMightyDucks'' cartoon featuring him and other duck aliens fighting evil whilst being NHL players).[[note]]In a strange twist, their first Stanley Cup appearance in 2003, while under Disney ownership, was against the New Jersey Devils who was once called a "Mickey Mouse organization" by Wayne Gretzky in the early 80s due to their ineptitude at that time.[[/note]] Thankfully, they dropped the "Mighty" from their name in 2006, then won the Stanley Cup the very next year, the first Californian team to do so. Have since become a competitive team aside from [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut their inability]] [[http://www.cbssports.com/nhl/eye-on-hockey/25569450/ducks-lose-fourth-straight-game-7-at-home-waste-remarkable-turnaround to win home game sevens]][[note]]They were able to defeat the Edmonton Oilers in 7 games at home in the 2017 Western Conference Semifinal, but many fans ([[BerserkButton especially of Edmonton]]) found the series win to be incredibly dubious due to accusations of missed calls and general poor officiating.[[/note]] They have a fierce geographic [[TheRival rivalry]] with the Los Angeles Kings known to fans as the Freeway Face-Off, and the both of them have equally-fierce rivalries against their northern neighbors, the San Jose Sharks. Known for being "the bullies of the league," due to their physical style of play, high penalty minutes per season, and reputation for toeing the line of how much hitting they can legally get away with.

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** ''Anaheim Ducks'': Formerly the "Mighty Ducks of Anaheim", this team was founded by Creator/{{Disney}} [[{{Defictionalization}} following the success]] of ''Film/TheMightyDucks'' movies (and subsequently the real team's mascot, Wildwing Flashblade, became the protagonist of ''WesternAnimation/TheMightyDucks'' cartoon featuring him and other duck aliens fighting evil whilst being NHL players).[[note]]In a strange twist, their first Stanley Cup appearance in 2003, while under Disney ownership, was against the New Jersey Devils who was once called a "Mickey Mouse organization" by Wayne Gretzky in the early 80s due to their ineptitude at that time.[[/note]] Thankfully, they dropped the "Mighty" from their name in 2006, then won the Stanley Cup the very next year, the first Californian team to do so. Have since become a competitive team aside from [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut their inability]] [[http://www.cbssports.com/nhl/eye-on-hockey/25569450/ducks-lose-fourth-straight-game-7-at-home-waste-remarkable-turnaround to win home game sevens]][[note]]They were able to defeat the Edmonton Oilers in 7 games at home in the 2017 Western Conference Semifinal, but many fans ([[BerserkButton especially of Edmonton]]) found the series win to be incredibly dubious due to accusations of missed calls and general poor officiating.[[/note]] They have a fierce geographic [[TheRival rivalry]] with the Los Angeles Kings known to fans as the Freeway Face-Off, and the both of them have equally-fierce rivalries against their northern neighbors, the San Jose Sharks. Known for being "the bullies of the league," league" due to their physical style of play, high penalty minutes per season, and reputation for toeing the line of how much hitting they can legally get away with.



** ''Edmonton Oilers'': The last surviving team from [[TheRival the World Hockey Association]] that remains in its original city, and the only one of the four that joined the NHL (Quebec Nordiques, Winnipeg Jets, Hartford Whalers) that never actually won a WHA title. The team most people think of when they talk about UsefulNotes/WayneGretzky. Once had an epic rivalry with the Los Angeles Kings during the '80s, but it was more one-sided in favor of the former; the Oilers won the Cup five times in seven years (1984, '85, '87, '88, and '90; a fluke own-goal cost them the chance to play for the 1986 trophy, and Gretzky was traded in the 1988 off-season). Simply put, they were an offensive juggernaut in the '80s, shattering records. The '90s, though, were a different story: changing economics forced management to dismantle the team (by the start of the 1992 season, most of the players from the dynasty years were gone), though they did make the playoffs somewhat consistently in the late 1990s. They last made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in 2006, only to be defeated by the Carolina Hurricanes in the seventh game. Since then, they've had a string of last or next-to-last-place finishes in their division (including finishing dead last in the league twice in a row), and subsequently a lot of high draft picks -- most notably, four first-overall in a period of six years between 2010 and 2015. And yet the accumulation of young talent didn't translate into a winning season until 2016–17 (which made the rest of the league [[TheScrappy kind of hate the Oilers …]] but not their fans, [[TheWoobie whom they agree deserve a break someday]]). Currently playing in the league's newest arena, having opened Rogers Place for the 2016–17 season, although the Red Wings are set to open their new Little Caesars Arena for 2017–18.
** ''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Kings'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion. The team traded for Wayne Gretzky in 1988, a move which probably saved the Kings but almost caused the Canadian government to interfere (SeriousBusiness doesn't begin to describe hockey in Canada). Was the NHL's first team in a warm-weather city. Has a rather large and loyal fanbase. Stanley Cup champs of 2012, their victory being the first since their inception, with an impressive 16–4 playoff record. They were billed as one of the favorites to contend for the Cup at the beginning of the season, but they didn't have it easy in the regular season, even firing their coach at one point. Then [[TookALevelInBadass they took serious levels in badass]] after squeaking in as the eighth seed and defeated Vancouver, St. Louis and Phoenix, all of them being the top three seeds in the Western Conference! This only makes their playoff run all the more remarkable. To cap that run off, they went on to defeat the New Jersey Devils (102 points), who were one of four teams in the Atlantic Division with 100-plus-point seasons, with more points than the third-seeded Southeast Division champion Florida Panthers (94) and third-seeded Pacific Division champion Phoenix Coyotes (97), and the same points as second-seeded Northeast Division champion Boston Bruins (102).

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** ''Edmonton Oilers'': The last surviving team from [[TheRival the World Hockey Association]] that remains in its original city, and the only one of the four that joined the NHL (Quebec Nordiques, Winnipeg Jets, Hartford Whalers) that never actually won a WHA title. The team most people think of when they talk about UsefulNotes/WayneGretzky. Once had an epic rivalry with the Los Angeles Kings during the '80s, but it was more one-sided in favor of the former; the Oilers won the Cup five times in seven years (1984, '85, '87, '88, and '90; a fluke own-goal cost them the chance to play for the 1986 trophy, and Gretzky was traded in the 1988 off-season). Simply put, they were an offensive juggernaut in the '80s, shattering records. The '90s, though, were a different story: changing economics forced management to dismantle the team (by the start of the 1992 season, most of the players from the dynasty years were gone), though they did make the playoffs somewhat consistently in the late 1990s. They last made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in 2006, only to be defeated by the Carolina Hurricanes in the seventh game. Since then, they've had a string of last or next-to-last-place finishes in their division (including finishing dead last in the league twice in a row), and subsequently a lot of high draft picks -- most notably, four first-overall in a period of six years between 2010 and 2015. And yet the accumulation of young talent didn't translate into a winning season until 2016–17 (which made the rest of the league [[TheScrappy kind of hate the Oilers …]] but not their fans, [[TheWoobie whom they agree deserve a break someday]]). Currently playing in one of the league's newest arena, having opened arenas, namely Rogers Place (opened for the 2016–17 season, although the Red Wings are set to open their new Little Caesars Arena for 2017–18.
2016–17).
** ''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Kings'': One of the teams created in the 1967 Expansion.expansion. The team traded for Wayne Gretzky in 1988, a move which probably saved the Kings but almost caused the Canadian government to interfere (SeriousBusiness doesn't begin to describe hockey in Canada). Was the NHL's first team in a warm-weather city. Has a rather large and loyal fanbase. Stanley Cup champs of 2012, their victory being the first since their inception, with an impressive 16–4 playoff record. They were billed as one of the favorites to contend for the Cup at the beginning of the season, but they didn't have it easy in the regular season, even firing their coach at one point. Then [[TookALevelInBadass they took serious levels in badass]] after squeaking in as the eighth seed and defeated Vancouver, St. Louis and Phoenix, all of them being the top three seeds in the Western Conference! This only makes their playoff run all the more remarkable. To cap that run off, they went on to defeat the New Jersey Devils (102 points), who were one of four teams in the Atlantic Division with 100-plus-point seasons, with more points than the third-seeded Southeast Division champion Florida Panthers (94) and third-seeded Pacific Division champion Phoenix Coyotes (97), and the same points as second-seeded Northeast Division champion Boston Bruins (102).



** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron. Their first official regular season game will be held on 6 October 2017 in Dallas Texas against the Stars.

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** ''[[UsefulNotes/LasVegas Vegas]] Golden Knights'': As part of the 2013 conference realignment, the two conferences were set with an imbalanced number of teams on order to allow for future expansion. The league officially began accepting bids in 2015 with proposals from Las Vegas and Quebec City, and Vegas was awarded a franchise in 2016 that will begin play at the new T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in the 2017–18 season[[note]]Quebec's bid was rejected largely due to requiring an existing east team to move to the west and the weak Canadian dollar[[/note]]. An initial season ticket drive prior to the official bid earned commitments from over 14,000 people. The team will be the first Big Four sports team in the city's history, it being the largest metro area in the country without one[[note]]Vegas will become the new home of the NFL's Oakland Raiders once a new stadium is built there, likely in 2020[[/note]]. Billionaire owner Bill Foley appears dead set on avoiding most of the issues that have plagued Sun Belt teams in the past[[note]]especially the perpetually unstable Coyotes who are poised to be their main rival[[/note]] and so far has been taking the right steps in doing so, including hiring longtime Capitals general manager George [=McPhee=]. Before the team was announced, Foley publicly stated that it would either be Desert Knights, Golden Knights, or Silver Knights, and not any name related to gambling, per league requirements. His original preference was ''Black Knights'', as a nod to his days at [[MilitaryAcademy West Point]], but he wasn't able to claim that name.[[note]]The team's ownership group calls itself Black Knight Sports & Entertainment. Sharing a conference with the Blackhawks didn't help him get the name.[[/note]] On November 22, 2016, Foley officially revealed the name and logos of the new team as the Golden Knights, and in June of 2017, their expansion draft was held, making Vegas the new home of 3-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury, former Nashville centerpiece James Neal, and former St. Louis Blue David Perron. Their first official regular season regular-season game will be held on 6 October 2017 in Dallas Texas against the Stars.



** Maurice "the Rocket" Richard: One of the greatest players in his generation and best goalscorers of any. First player to ever score fifty goals in fifty games. Just ''four'' other men have followed. The trophy given to the league's top regular-season goal scorer is named after him.
** Bobby Hull & Brett Hull: Father and son who, while they never played during the same years, were both feared for their booming shot. Bobby stunned the hockey world in 1972 for jumping to [[TheRival the World Hockey Association]] and the first million-dollar contract in hockey history. Between them, they've scored over 1300 NHL goals. ‘The Golden Jet’ and ‘The Golden Brett,’ respectively.
** Stan Mikita: Along with Bobby Hull is considered one of the greatest Blackhawks of all time, having developed a distinct RedOniBlueOni playing style with Hull that proved highly effective[[note]]Modern Hawk stars Jonathan Toews (blue) and Patrick Kane (red) mirror it to a degree.[[/note]] and led to the team's 1961 Cup. The two were honored in 2011 with life-size bronze statues outside the United Center right by [[UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan that one guy who tends to be associated with great Chicago athletes.]] Mikita is the actual career leader in ‘Gordie Howe hat tricks’ (see above).

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** Maurice "the Rocket" Richard: One of the greatest players in his generation and best goalscorers of any. First player to ever score fifty goals in fifty games. Just ''four'' other men have followed. [[note]]Gretzky three times (with one being a ''50 in 40'' season), Brett Hull twice, and Mike Bossy and Mario Lemieux once each.[[/note]] The trophy given to the league's top regular-season goal scorer is named after him.
** Bobby Hull & Brett Hull: Father and son who, while they never played during the same years, were both feared for their booming shot. Bobby stunned the hockey world in 1972 for jumping to [[TheRival the World Hockey Association]] and the first million-dollar contract in hockey history. Between them, they've scored over 1300 NHL goals. ‘The Golden Jet’ and ‘The Golden Brett,’ Brett’, respectively.
** Stan Mikita: Along with Bobby Hull Hull, is considered one of the greatest Blackhawks of all time, having developed a distinct RedOniBlueOni playing style with Hull that proved highly effective[[note]]Modern Hawk stars Jonathan Toews (blue) and Patrick Kane (red) mirror it to a degree.[[/note]] and led to the team's 1961 Cup. The two were honored in 2011 with life-size bronze statues outside the United Center right by [[UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan that one guy who tends to be associated with great Chicago athletes.]] Mikita is the actual career leader in ‘Gordie Howe hat tricks’ (see above).



** Mark Messier: The [[LastOfHisKind last WHA-era player to retire after the merger]]. ‘The Moose.’ Won the Stanley Cup five times with his hometown team in Edmonton, but is better known for winning it with the Rangers in 1994 -- he's the only player ever to captain two different teams to the Cup. He is often considered to be one of the greatest leaders to play hockey, sometimes nicknamed 'The Messiah' in New York for his legendary playoff performance with the Rangers in 1994. When he retired, he was second to Gretzky in all-time points scored, though by a ''wide'' margin (1,887 points to Gretzky's 2,857; he's since been passed by Jágr). In 2004, Messier retired when he was on his second stint with the Rangers -- in-between he had [[DorkAge a short and failed stint in Vancouver]] [[FanonDiscontinuity which most try to forget]], and made Messier hated in BC to this very day.

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** Mark Messier: The [[LastOfHisKind last WHA-era player to retire after the merger]]. ‘The Moose.’ Moose’. Won the Stanley Cup five times with his hometown team in Edmonton, but is better known for winning it with the Rangers in 1994 -- he's the only player ever to captain two different teams to the Cup. He is often considered to be one of the greatest leaders to play hockey, sometimes nicknamed 'The Messiah' in New York for his legendary playoff performance with the Rangers in 1994. When he retired, he was second to Gretzky in all-time points scored, though by a ''wide'' margin (1,887 points to Gretzky's 2,857; he's since been passed by Jágr). In 2004, Messier retired when he was on his second stint with the Rangers -- in-between he had [[DorkAge a short and failed stint in Vancouver]] [[FanonDiscontinuity which most try to forget]], and made Messier hated in BC to this very day.



** Bob Probert: Considered one of the greatest enforcers ever to play the game. But he was far from a one-dimensional fighter, averaging around 15 goals a year in his early seasons and once putting up 29 to go with 62 points and 398 penalty minutes. A member of the fairly exclusive 3000-penalty-minute career club in the NHL, with 3300 in 935 games. Paired up with Joey Kocur in Detroit, they were known as the [[BashBrothers Bruise Brothers]] until Kocur went to the Rangers; as opponents, they would sometimes laugh through a fight. Probert was also known for his hard living; he missed most of the 1989-90 season and all of the lockout-shortened 1994-95 season due to drug and alochol-related suspensions, which strained his relationship with the Red Wings organization and led him to joining the rival Blackhawks as a free agent. Nevertheless, he remained popular in Detroit, and he would reconcile with the Wings in the years before his untimely death in 2010.

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** Bob Probert: Considered one of the greatest enforcers ever to play the game. But he was far from a one-dimensional fighter, averaging around 15 goals a year in his early seasons and once putting up 29 to go with 62 points and 398 penalty minutes. A member of the fairly exclusive 3000-penalty-minute career club in the NHL, with 3300 in 935 games. Paired up with Joey Kocur in Detroit, they were known as the [[BashBrothers Bruise Brothers]] until Kocur went to the Rangers; as opponents, they would sometimes laugh through a fight. Probert was also known for his hard living; he missed most of the 1989-90 season and all of the lockout-shortened 1994-95 season due to drug and alochol-related alcohol-related suspensions, which strained his relationship with the Red Wings organization and led him to joining the rival Blackhawks as a free agent. Nevertheless, he remained popular in Detroit, and he would reconcile with the Wings in the years before his untimely death in 2010.



** Mike Bossy: Known as one of the game's great goal-scorers, Bossy scored at least 50 goals in every year of his career until his last. Unfortunately he left the game after just ten years due to a debilitating back injury. Became OvershadowedByAwesome due to his four-year dynasty with the Islanders immediately preceding Gretzky's golden years (in fact, the fifth consecutive Islanders final was against the Oilers, who proceeded to start their dynasty).

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** Mike Bossy: Known as one of the game's great goal-scorers, goal scorers, Bossy scored at least 50 goals in every year of his career until his last. Unfortunately he left the game after just ten years due to a debilitating back injury. Became OvershadowedByAwesome due to his four-year dynasty with the Islanders immediately preceding Gretzky's golden years (in fact, the fifth consecutive Islanders final was against the Oilers, who proceeded to start their dynasty).



** Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry: A duo that, along with Dustin Penner, led the "Kid Line" that pushed the Ducks to the Stanley Cup. Both are the same age, form a one-two punch that even lead to a goal in the 2010 Olympics final, and got some commends: Getzlaf is the current captain, and Perry won both the Hart and the Rocket Richard Trophies in 2011. While Getzlaf appears to be getting better with age, Perry has been slowing down as of late, though a shift back to teh same line as Getzlaf produced dividends in the 2017 playoffs.

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** Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry: A duo that, along with Dustin Penner, led the "Kid Line" that pushed the Ducks to the Stanley Cup. Both are the same age, form a one-two punch that even lead to a goal in the 2010 Olympics final, and got some commends: Getzlaf is the current captain, and Perry won both the Hart and the Rocket Richard Trophies in 2011. While Getzlaf appears to be getting better with age, Perry has been slowing down as of late, though a shift back to teh the same line as Getzlaf produced dividends in the 2017 playoffs.



** Tim Thomas: Panthers goalie, former goalie for the Bruins who helped them win the Cup in 2011. Fifth goaltender and only second American player to win the Conn Smythe Trophy for playoff MVP. Known for making lots of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8XfuoWLCpI ridiculously hard saves]] and a ''very'' unorthodox playing style. Didn't actually become a starting goalie in the NHL until he was well into his thirties, having played in Europe and minor leagues over the years. Also known for his controversial opinions on the federal government and refusing to meet UsefulNotes/BarackObama.[[note]]When the Boston Bruins were invited to the White House following their Stanley Cup-win in 2011 (as is traditional for U.S.-based Stanley Cup-winning teams), Thomas opted not to go, citing his opposition to "big government."[[/note]]
** Patrick Roy: Revolutionized the goaltending position in the '80s with a new butterfly style to stop low shots. Is considered one of the best goalies when the game is on the line, and has an uncanny knack to dominate playoff overtime. Among Montreal fans, he shares a reputation with Ken Dryden (see below) as a brilliant young goaltender who left the team when he was at the top of his game.[[note]]Roy, after the Canadiens fell behind 9–1 at home against Detroit on December 2, 1995 (the final score was [[CurbStompBattle 11–1]] for the Wings), angrily declared that that would be the last game he would ever play in Montreal, and he got his wish, spending the rest of his career with the Colorado Avalanche.[[/note]] One of the fiercest competitors ever to play. In 2013, he was hired as Colorado's new coach, and lead them back to both the playoffs and a division title.

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** Tim Thomas: Panthers goalie, former goalie for the Bruins who helped them win the Cup in 2011. Fifth goaltender and only second American player to win the Conn Smythe Trophy for playoff MVP. Known for making lots of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8XfuoWLCpI ridiculously hard saves]] and a ''very'' unorthodox playing style. Didn't actually become a starting goalie in the NHL until he was well into his thirties, having played in Europe and minor leagues over the years. Also known for his controversial opinions on the federal government and refusing to meet UsefulNotes/BarackObama.[[note]]When the Boston Bruins were invited to the White House following their Stanley Cup-win in 2011 (as is traditional for U.S.-based Stanley Cup-winning teams), Thomas opted not to go, citing his opposition to "big government."[[/note]]
government".[[/note]]
** Patrick Roy: Revolutionized the goaltending position in the '80s with a new butterfly style to stop low shots. Is considered one of the best goalies when the game is on the line, and has an uncanny knack to dominate playoff overtime. Among Montreal fans, he shares a reputation with Ken Dryden (see below) as a brilliant young goaltender who left the team when he was at the top of his game.[[note]]Roy, after the Canadiens fell behind 9–1 at home against Detroit on December 2, 1995 (the final score was [[CurbStompBattle 11–1]] for the Wings), angrily declared that that would be the last game he would ever play in Montreal, and he got his wish, spending the rest of his career with the Colorado Avalanche.[[/note]] One of the fiercest competitors ever to play. In 2013, he was hired as Colorado's new coach, and lead led them back to both the playoffs and a division title.



** The Sutter Family: Six brothers from Viking, Alberta that have played in the NHL for a combined total of over 5,000 games -- Darryl, Duane, Brian, Brent, and twins Ron and Rich. These six men have all said their older brother, Gary, was better at hockey than any of them … he just ''chose'' to stay at home and help operate the family farm. Several have gone on to coach in the league as well (with Darryl leading both of the Kings titles). The second generation of Sutters are breaking into the NHL as well, with Brandon and Brett having played at the top level, and several more possibly on the way in coming years.

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** The Sutter Family: Six brothers from Viking, Alberta that have played in the NHL for a combined total of over 5,000 games -- Darryl, Duane, Brian, Brent, and twins Ron and Rich. These six men have all said their older brother, Gary, was better at hockey than any of them … them… he just ''chose'' to stay at home and help operate the family farm. Several have gone on to coach in the league as well (with Darryl leading both of the Kings titles). The second generation of Sutters are breaking into the NHL as well, with Brandon and Brett having played at the top level, and several more possibly on the way in coming years.



** Brendan Shanahan: Already well-known by hockey fans for his time as a player (1,354 points and three Stanley Cups won with Detroit), Shanahan became a rather polarizing figure in 2011 when he replaced Colin Campbell as the league's disciplinarian. As opposed to Campbell, who gained much criticism for punishing some incidents and letting many others slide, Shanahan's agenda seemed to be to hand out suspensions for absolutely everything (which, given that he earned 2,489 penalty minutes as a player, has opened up the HypocriticalHumor gate). Before long, half the fans were complaining that he was even worse than Campbell, and the other half argued that he was exactly what the game needed. Shanahan is also a firm {{defie|dTrope}}r of NewMediaAreEvil as he appeared in online videos explaining every suspension he handed out in detail, so fans weren't scratching their heads wondering about his application of the rules. Left his NHL post at the end of the 2013–14 season to become president (effectively overseeing all operations) of the Maple Leafs.

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** Brendan Shanahan: Already well-known by hockey fans for his time as a player (1,354 points and three Stanley Cups won with Detroit), Shanahan became a rather polarizing figure in 2011 when he replaced Colin Campbell as the league's disciplinarian. As opposed to Campbell, who gained much criticism for punishing some incidents and letting many others slide, Shanahan's agenda seemed to be to hand out suspensions for absolutely everything (which, given that he earned 2,489 penalty minutes as a player, has opened up the HypocriticalHumor gate). Before long, half the fans were complaining that he was even worse than Campbell, and the other half argued that he was exactly what the game needed. Shanahan is also a firm {{defie|dTrope}}r of NewMediaAreEvil as he appeared in online videos explaining every suspension he handed out in detail, so fans weren't scratching their heads wondering about his application of the rules. Left his NHL post at the end of the 2013–14 season to become president (effectively overseeing all hockey operations) of the Maple Leafs.
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