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History UsefulNotes / MotorcycleSafety

10th May '16 11:16:18 AM WikiWitness
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*** It is important to note that plenty of people will dismiss this advice, and will even advise newbies otherwise, under the idea that a powerful engine can only put you in trouble if you actually let it express its power. According to this rationale, you should get a more powerful bike and just keep it low-powered in the beginning, so as to avoid getting bored of it once you level-up. '''This is bad advice''' for a number of reasons, among which the geometry of powerful bikes being much more aggressive and less forgiving, the ''extreme'' temptation of opening up on the engine when you're not yet capable of handling it, and various other non-obvious pitfalls that can get you when you're not expecting it (just to name one: if you hit a sizable bump on the road the handlebars will slightly rotate in the trasversal sense. If you're not prepared with your hand the throttle handle will stay in the same place. The net result is a rapid power fluctuation; on a very powerful engine, this can cause the bike to wheelie and/or dump your ass on the road).

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*** It is important to note that plenty of people will dismiss this advice, and will even advise newbies otherwise, under the idea that a powerful engine can only put you in trouble if you actually let it express its power. According to this rationale, you should get a more powerful bike and just keep it low-powered in the beginning, so as to avoid getting bored of it once you level-up. '''This is bad advice''' for a number of reasons, among which the geometry of powerful bikes being much more aggressive and less forgiving, the ''extreme'' temptation of opening up on the engine when you're not yet capable of handling it, and various other non-obvious pitfalls that can get you when you're not expecting it (just to name one: if you hit a sizable bump on the road the handlebars will slightly rotate in the trasversal sense. If you're not prepared with your hand the throttle handle will stay in the same place. The net result is a rapid power fluctuation; on a very powerful engine, this can cause the bike to wheelie and/or dump your ass on the road).road, possibly breaking your tailbone at minimum and ''definitely'' crashing the motorcycle).
5th Jul '15 6:25:24 AM Fallingwater
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*** It is important to note that plenty of people will dismiss this advice, and will even advise newbies otherwise, under the idea that a powerful engine can only put you in trouble if you actually let it express its power. According to this rationale, you should get a more powerful bike and just keep it low-powered in the beginning, so as to avoid getting bored of it once you level-up. '''This is bad advice''' for a number of reasons, among which the geometry of powerful bikes being much more aggressive and less forgiving, the ''extreme'' temptation of opening up on the engine when you're not yet capable of handling it, and various other non-obvious pitfalls that can get you when you're not expecting it (just to name one: if you hit a sizable bump on the road the handlebars will slightly rotate in the trasversal sense. If you're not prepared with your hand the throttle handle will stay in the same place. The net result is a rapid power fluctuation; on a very powerful engine, this can cause the bike to wheelie and/or dump your ass on the road).
4th Jul '15 1:07:43 PM Exxolon
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* Before you ride again, make sure your bike is in operable condition and any damage to it that could make it less safe is repaired, and buy a new helmet.

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* Before you ride again, make sure your bike is in operable condition and any damage to it that could make it less safe is repaired, and buy a new helmet.helmet.

!!In the event you are first on the scene of an accident involving a motorcyclist.
* Call the emergency services IMMEDIATELY.
* If you are first on the scene of a motorcycle accident, consider stopping your vehicle in a position that protects the rider in the position they have landed in so they don't have to be moved while awaiting rescue.
* DON'T move the motorcyclist unless the risk of being hit by another vehicle exceeds the danger of aggravating existing injuries.
* DO NOT remove their helmet under ANY circumstances unless you are a trained medical professional - it might be the only thing holding their skull together. Current CPR guidelines mandate chest compressions only, so you don't need to remove the helmet to provide rescue breathing.
30th Jun '15 5:22:53 PM Exxolon
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* '''Be visible'''. Wear bright, reflective clothing, keep your headlights on (most motorcycles won't let you turn them off anyway), turn the high beams on during the day (though there's some debate if this is necessary/a safety hazard), and use your signals to convey what you're doing.

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* '''Be visible'''. Wear bright, reflective clothing, keep your headlights on (most motorcycles won't let you turn them off anyway), turn the high beams on during the day (though there's some debate if this is necessary/a safety hazard), and use your signals to convey what you're doing. Consider purchasing a motorcycle with high contrast daytime running lights (usually purple) as these can enhance your ability to be seen.
30th Jun '15 5:20:27 PM Exxolon
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* Don't ride if you're tired, drunk, under any medication that impairs your ability to think or make quick decisions. You need to be alert at all times on the road.

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* Don't ride if you're tired, drunk, under any medication medication/suffering any illness that impairs your ability to think or think, make quick decisions.decisions or physically react. You need to be alert at all times on the road.
30th Jun '15 5:19:30 PM Exxolon
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** Likewise in very hot weather, overheating or even heatstroke is a distinct possibility, especially in slow stop/start urban traffic. Stay hydrated and try and avoid riding in extreme temperatures. If you feel sick or dizzy, STOP and don't continue your journey until you are sure you are safe to ride.
30th Jun '15 5:13:10 PM Exxolon
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* '''Wear appropriate clothing''' EVERY time you ride - ATGATT (All The Gear All The Time) is the rule. This means proper motorcycle leathers (possibly with "armour" inserts) or strong fabrics like Kevlar, proper padded riding gloves, proper motorcycle boots together with your helmet. Even "strong" fabrics like denim will provide very little protection in an accident and shorts, t-shirts, flimsy shoes or anything loose or flowing that might get caught in the moving parts of the motorcycle is a very stupid idea.

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* '''Wear appropriate clothing''' clothing EVERY time you ride ride''' - ATGATT (All The Gear All The Time) is the rule. This means proper motorcycle leathers (possibly with "armour" inserts) or strong fabrics like Kevlar, proper padded riding gloves, proper motorcycle boots together with your helmet. Even "strong" fabrics like denim will provide very little protection in an accident and shorts, t-shirts, flimsy shoes or anything loose or flowing that might get caught in the moving parts of the motorcycle is a very stupid idea.
30th Jun '15 5:12:34 PM Exxolon
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* '''Wear appropriate clothing''' any time you ride. Ideally this means real leather or strong fabrics like Kevlar. But at the minimum, you should have long sleeves and pants. Leave the shorts, dresses, and anything else that can get caught up in the bike or its parts at home.
** It's highly recommended to get a pair of riding gloves. This will ensure there's always a good grip to the handlebars.

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* '''Wear appropriate clothing''' any EVERY time you ride. Ideally this ride - ATGATT (All The Gear All The Time) is the rule. This means real leather proper motorcycle leathers (possibly with "armour" inserts) or strong fabrics like Kevlar. But at the minimum, you should have long sleeves Kevlar, proper padded riding gloves, proper motorcycle boots together with your helmet. Even "strong" fabrics like denim will provide very little protection in an accident and pants. Leave the shorts, dresses, and t-shirts, flimsy shoes or anything else loose or flowing that can might get caught up in the bike or its moving parts at home.
** It's highly recommended to get a pair
of riding gloves. This will ensure there's always a good grip to the handlebars.motorcycle is a very stupid idea.



** Secure your belongs in a zippered pocket, backpack, or a secure side bag. You want to have your wallet and phone, for example, where they cannot fly out of your pockets. The same goes for passengers. The possibility of either of you freaking out over a lost item may cause an accident.

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** Secure your belongs in a zippered pocket, backpack, or a secure side bag.bag or mount proper panniers on your bike (make sure the load is balanced between them). You want to have your wallet and phone, for example, where they cannot fly out of your pockets. The same goes for passengers. The possibility of either of you freaking out over a lost item may cause an accident.



* Before you ride again, make sure your bike is in operable condition and any damage to it that could make it less safe is repaired, and buy a new helmet.

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* Before you ride again, make sure your bike is in operable condition and any damage to it that could make it less safe is repaired, and buy a new helmet.
30th Jun '15 4:58:38 PM Exxolon
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* '''Buy a new, certified helmet and wear it any time you ride'''.In the US, road legal helmets must have a DOT approved logo somewhere. Old or inadequate helmets (especially those that have been in a crash before) will not protect your head in the event of a crash. If you ever plan to let anyone else ride with you, buy a second helmet that a passenger can wear.

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* '''Buy a new, certified helmet and wear it any time you ride'''.In the US, road legal helmets must have a DOT approved logo somewhere. Old or inadequate helmets (especially those that have been in a crash before) will not protect your head in the event of a crash. If you ever plan to let anyone else ride with you, buy a second helmet that a passenger can wear. There are organisations that destructively test helmets and give them ratings on their protection - more expensive does not always mean better protection - so do your research before purchasing.
30th Nov '14 12:42:30 PM xenol
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!Preparing Yourself For the Ride

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\n!Preparing Yourself For # Be courteous and respectful of others on the Rideroad.

!Preparations before your ride




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** Unlike licenses for cars, a motorcycle permit is almost as good as a license, so you can buy a motorcycle (within limits) to use as practice.



** If you absolutely must ride in unfamiliar terrain, make sure to give yourself plenty of room in front of you and pay close attention to your surroundings.

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** If you absolutely must ride in unfamiliar terrain, make sure to ride at a reasonable speed, give yourself plenty of room in front of you you, and pay close attention to your surroundings.



** At the very least, you should provide them with a helmet, a place to securely store their belongings, and instruction as to the safest way to hold on. Make sure they are informed of when it's safe to get on and off and to not make any sudden movements if possible.

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** At the very least, you should provide them with a helmet, a place to securely store their belongings, and instruction as to the safest way to hold on. Make sure they are informed of to tell them when it's safe to get on and off and to not make any sudden movements if possible.



* '''Buy a new, certified helmet and wear it any time you ride''' [[note]]In the US, road legal helmets must have a DOT approved logo somewhere[[/note]]. Old or inadequate helmets (especially those that have been in a crash before) will not protect your head in the event of a crash. If you ever plan to let anyone else ride with you, buy a second helmet that a passenger can wear.

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* '''Buy a new, certified helmet and wear it any time you ride''' [[note]]In ride'''.In the US, road legal helmets must have a DOT approved logo somewhere[[/note]].somewhere. Old or inadequate helmets (especially those that have been in a crash before) will not protect your head in the event of a crash. If you ever plan to let anyone else ride with you, buy a second helmet that a passenger can wear.



** That said, read the manual for maintenance and cleaning. Especially cleaning.
** It's also recommended to get a full face helmet or a compound helmet (this allows the front face plate to lift up if you need some fresh air). "Skid lids" and other such barely legal helmets don't protect much.
* Wearing helmets is the law in many places. Even if it's not the law, wear one anyway as it will greatly reduce the chance of a severe head injury. Make sure any passenger you have wears one. No exceptions. Needless to say, if you crash, buy a new helmet before you ride again.

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** That said, read the manual for maintenance and cleaning. Especially cleaning.
with cleaning, as you may want to wash the liner once in a while.
** It's also recommended to get a full face helmet or a compound helmet (this allows the front face plate to lift up if you need some fresh air).helmet. "Skid lids" and other such barely legal helmets don't protect much.
* Wearing helmets is the law in many places. Even if it's not the law, wear one anyway as it will greatly reduce the chance of a severe head injury. Make sure any passenger you have wears one. No exceptions. Needless to say, if If you crash, buy a new helmet before you ride again.



** It's highly recommended to get a pair of riding gloves. There's a good chance your palms can get sweaty, which can cause you to lose grip on the handlebars.
** This isn't just for protection; sometimes it gets ''cold'' with the wind chill factor, and cyclists have gotten hypothermia or frostbite when dressed inappropriately and riding under adverse conditions. The outer layer should be some kind of windbreaker in this case.

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** It's highly recommended to get a pair of riding gloves. There's This will ensure there's always a good chance your palms can get sweaty, which can cause you to lose grip on to the handlebars.
handlebars.
** This Motorcycle gear isn't just for protection; sometimes it gets ''cold'' with the wind chill factor, and cyclists have gotten hypothermia or frostbite when dressed inappropriately and riding under adverse conditions. The outer layer should be some kind of windbreaker in this case.conditions.



* You may want to invest in some hearing protection. If it's not loud engine noise, it's the wind noise that may be loud enough that long term exposure will permanently damage your hearing. Mke sure that it doesn't block too much sound that you can't hear important things like horns and emergency vehicle sirens.

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* You may want to invest in some hearing protection. If it's not loud engine noise, it's the wind noise that may be loud enough that long term exposure will permanently damage your hearing. Mke Make sure that it doesn't block too much sound that you can't hear important things like horns and emergency vehicle sirens.



* Motorcycles have manual tranmissions, which means you must know how to work the clutch and shift levers. Scooters on the other hand, are more or less automatic. Mopeds and two-wheeled vehicles of smaller displacement may only have one gear.

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* Motorcycles have Most motorcycles are manual tranmissions, transmission vehicles, which means you must know how to work the clutch and shift levers. Scooters on the other hand, are more or less automatic. Mopeds and Other two-wheeled vehicles of smaller displacement may like scooters and mopeds, are either automatic/continuous transmission or have only have one gear.gear.
** When testing out a new motorcycle with manual transmission, it's a very good idea before you even take it out to feel the clutch point. Unfamiliarity with the clutch point will more than like cause stalls or sudden starts that will freak you out.



* Lane splitting (or as motorcyclists insist, lane sharing) is a legal gray area. In the US, California is the only state where it's officially been stated that lane splitting is legal ''as long as it's done safely''. In other words, don't be an ass about it like going really fast relative to traffic or weaving in and out between lanes and cars.
** If you don't know what this is, lane splitting is when a motorcyclist goes between two cars. There's usually enough room to do so provided the cars are within their lanes.

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* Lane Understand where lane splitting (or as motorcyclists insist, lane sharing) (where a motorcyclist goes between cars) is a legal gray area. and where it's not. In the US, California is the only state where it's to officially been stated that allow lane splitting is legal ''as long as it's done safely''. In other words, don't be an ass about Other countries where two-wheeled vehicles are common usually allow this anywhere. Some tips for lane splitting:
** Do
it like going really fast relative to when traffic is 30MPH or weaving less.
** Don't exceed 10MPH above the flow of traffic
** Don't be a jerk. Cutting people off
in and out between a highly stressful area is going to really aggravate them. Always convey your intentions with your turn signal.
** Be highly aware of cars in both
lanes and cars.
** If you don't know what this is,
be mindful of the possibility that someone's going to change lanes. Big gaps in front of you, being closer to the right side of the road (or left side if your country drives on the left), and jerkwad drivers all factor in the possibility of lane splitting is when a motorcyclist goes between two cars. There's usually enough room to do so provided the cars are within their lanes.
changes.
*** On that note, avoid riding in people's blind spots.
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