History UsefulNotes / MoscowMetro

16th Jan '16 7:58:39 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Cut natter.
** There's also an interesting gaffe as the movie changed the address of one of the characters, moving their home two stations down the orange line. As a result, a scene involving a crowd rushing into the train at Anton when he tries to get off happens on Botanicheskiy Sad, a station that mostly sees passengers getting ''off'' the northbound trains, what few of them ride this far, as the main rush happens on VDNKh, the original station used in the book. Of course, only Muscovites residing that far up the orange line will even notice that. *** That's mainly because the initial segment was based [[WriteWhatYouKnow on location of Lukianenko's own apartment]] at the time of writing in the late Nineties. Obviously, that was changed for the movie.
16th Jan '16 7:58:18 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The Metrorat urban legend is true in ''AgeOfAquarius''.
to:
* The Metrorat urban legend is true in ''AgeOfAquarius''.''TabletopGame/AgeOfAquarius''.
4th Dec '15 10:33:29 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them. One other thing that can sometimes be confusing is the exits. Many stations have two or more exits - some leading to the surface, others to long tunnels which lead to other stations, sometimes even crossing over each other. Taking a wrong turn can put you surprisingly far from where you wanted to go. However these passages are clearly marked (in Russian) - it sometimes just takes a minute to figure out what tunnel goes where.
to:
Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them. One other thing that can sometimes be confusing is the exits. Many Most stations have two or more exits - some leading to the surface, others to long tunnels which lead to other stations, sometimes even crossing over each other. Taking a wrong turn can put you surprisingly far from where you wanted to go. However these passages are clearly marked (in Russian) - it sometimes just takes a minute to figure out what tunnel goes where.
4th Dec '15 10:31:03 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them. Unfortunately, finding the exact exit to get to desired location may be a bit more troublesome. Most stations have 2 and some 1 exit, but they often lead to an underground passage under a crossroad, and the passage system may be very complex and unnatural.
to:
Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them. Unfortunately, finding One other thing that can sometimes be confusing is the exact exit to get to desired location may be a bit more troublesome. Most exits. Many stations have 2 and two or more exits - some 1 exit, but they often leading to the surface, others to long tunnels which lead to an underground passage under other stations, sometimes even crossing over each other. Taking a crossroad, and the passage system may be very complex and unnatural. wrong turn can put you surprisingly far from where you wanted to go. However these passages are clearly marked (in Russian) - it sometimes just takes a minute to figure out what tunnel goes where.
4th Dec '15 10:19:03 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The Metro is a lifeline for notoriously traffic-jammed Moscow, as it's often the only means to reliably reach the desired destination when major highways are jammed for hours, and any accident in the Metro leads to the city grinding a standstill. Fortunately, the accidents are pretty rare, and even The One Under is rarely a fatality -- taking into account [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London's example]], there's a deep trench between the rails on every station. It also has another feature based on the English experience -- until recently there was exactly ''one'' station with a curved platform, and only recently the second one was built (both with quite large radius of curvature and not by choice), so the distinctive caution to mind the gap is simply unneeded there. It is replaced, however by the another, no less iconic phrase: "Ostorozhno, dveri zakryvayutsya," or "Be careful, the doors are closing." Sometimes you can hear another phrase: "Be careful when leaving through last door of last car," because some stations are not long enough to fully guarantee that train will actually fit. However, the more common concern is that on some such station and extremely strong wind may blow from the tunnel, strong enough to knock down a clumsy unsuspecting person. Another interesting feature is that there are ''no'' fare zones -- in contrast to much of the other world's subway systems, the fare is flat and each and every trip costs the same amount (30 r. or ~$1 as for now) regardless of its length or number of transfers. The Metro uses smartcards as tickets, with 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 or 60 uses and limited lifetime (45 days for a 60-use ticket), unlimited-but-no-more-than-once-per-7-minutes replenishable plastic smartcards with 30, 90 and 365 days of use and recently added "90-minutes" tickets and "Trojka" smartcards doubling for use in the other city transportation. There are social monthly tickets and replenishable cards as well. In USSR times it used common coins (~$0.007 as of 1985), then inflation forced the switch to special tokens, then counterfeiting prompted the switch to magnetic cards and smartcards. The system has been under constant overuse for last 20 years, so many wish to stay in traffic jams rather use the Metro. Ironically enough, there are human-jams on hub stations at rush hours, though the travel time is much more predictable than above the ground.
to:
The Metro is a lifeline for notoriously traffic-jammed Moscow, as it's often the only means to reliably reach the desired destination when major highways are jammed for hours, and any accident in the Metro leads to the city grinding a standstill. Fortunately, the accidents are pretty rare, and even The One Under is rarely a fatality -- taking into account [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London's example]], there's a deep trench between the rails on every station. It also has another feature based on the English experience -- until recently there was exactly ''one'' station with a curved platform, and only recently the second one was built (both with quite large radius of curvature and not by choice), so the distinctive caution to mind the gap is simply unneeded there. It is replaced, however by the another, no less iconic phrase: "Ostorozhno, dveri zakryvayutsya," or "Be careful, the doors are closing." Sometimes you can hear another phrase: "Be careful when leaving through last door of last car," because some stations are not long enough to fully guarantee that train will actually fit. However, the more common concern is that on some such station and extremely strong wind may blow from the tunnel, strong enough to knock down a clumsy unsuspecting person. Another interesting feature is that there are ''no'' fare zones -- in contrast to much of the other world's subway systems, the fare is flat and each and every trip costs the same amount (30 (50 r. as of 2015 or ~$1 as for now) ~$1) regardless of its length or number of transfers. The Metro uses smartcards as tickets, with 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 or 60 uses and limited lifetime (45 days for a 60-use ticket), unlimited-but-no-more-than-once-per-7-minutes replenishable plastic smartcards with 30, 90 and 365 days of use and recently added "90-minutes" tickets and "Trojka" smartcards doubling for use in the other city transportation. There are social monthly tickets and replenishable cards as well. In USSR times it used common coins (~$0.007 as of 1985), then inflation forced the switch to special tokens, then counterfeiting prompted the switch to magnetic cards and smartcards. The system has been under constant overuse for last 20 years, so many wish to stay in traffic jams rather use the Metro. Ironically enough, there are human-jams on hub stations at rush hours, though the travel time is much more predictable than above the ground.
5th Sep '15 6:57:52 PM permeakra
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The Metro is a lifeline for notoriously traffic-jammed Moscow, as it's often the only means to reliably reach the desired destination when major highways are jammed for hours, and any accident in the Metro leads to the city grinding a standstill. Fortunately, the accidents are pretty rare, and even The One Under is rarely a fatality -- taking into account [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London's example]], there's a deep trench between the rails on every station. It also has another feature based on the English experience -- there's exactly ''one'' station with a curved platform, so the distinctive caution to mind the gap is simply unneeded there. It is replaced, however by the another, no less iconic phrase: "Ostorozhno, dveri zakryvayutsya," or "Be careful, the doors are closing." Sometimes you can hear another phrase: "Be careful when leaving through last door of last car," because some stations are not long enough to fully guarantee that train will actually fit. Another interesting feature is that there are ''no'' fare zones -- in contrast to much of the other world's subway systems, the fare is flat and each and every trip costs the same amount (30 r. or ~$1 as for now) regardless of its length or number of transfers. The Metro uses smartcards as tickets, with 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 or 60 uses and limited lifetime (45 days for a 60-use ticket), unlimited-but-no-more-than-once-per-7-minutes replenishable plastic smartcards with 30, 90 and 365 days of use. There are social monthly tickets and replenishable cards as well. In USSR times it used common coins (~$0.007 as of 1985), then inflation forced the switch to special tokens, then counterfeiting prompted the switch to magnetic cards and smartcards. The system has been under constant overuse for last 20 years, so many wish to stay in traffic jams rather use the Metro. Ironically enough, there are human-jams on hub stations at rush hours.
to:
The Metro is a lifeline for notoriously traffic-jammed Moscow, as it's often the only means to reliably reach the desired destination when major highways are jammed for hours, and any accident in the Metro leads to the city grinding a standstill. Fortunately, the accidents are pretty rare, and even The One Under is rarely a fatality -- taking into account [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London's example]], there's a deep trench between the rails on every station. It also has another feature based on the English experience -- there's until recently there was exactly ''one'' station with a curved platform, and only recently the second one was built (both with quite large radius of curvature and not by choice), so the distinctive caution to mind the gap is simply unneeded there. It is replaced, however by the another, no less iconic phrase: "Ostorozhno, dveri zakryvayutsya," or "Be careful, the doors are closing." Sometimes you can hear another phrase: "Be careful when leaving through last door of last car," because some stations are not long enough to fully guarantee that train will actually fit. However, the more common concern is that on some such station and extremely strong wind may blow from the tunnel, strong enough to knock down a clumsy unsuspecting person. Another interesting feature is that there are ''no'' fare zones -- in contrast to much of the other world's subway systems, the fare is flat and each and every trip costs the same amount (30 r. or ~$1 as for now) regardless of its length or number of transfers. The Metro uses smartcards as tickets, with 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 or 60 uses and limited lifetime (45 days for a 60-use ticket), unlimited-but-no-more-than-once-per-7-minutes replenishable plastic smartcards with 30, 90 and 365 days of use.use and recently added "90-minutes" tickets and "Trojka" smartcards doubling for use in the other city transportation. There are social monthly tickets and replenishable cards as well. In USSR times it used common coins (~$0.007 as of 1985), then inflation forced the switch to special tokens, then counterfeiting prompted the switch to magnetic cards and smartcards. The system has been under constant overuse for last 20 years, so many wish to stay in traffic jams rather use the Metro. Ironically enough, there are human-jams on hub stations at rush hours. hours, though the travel time is much more predictable than above the ground.

Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them.
to:
Trains are very frequent, less than a minute apart during rush hour, and a supposedly horrendously long 7 minutes apart after midnight (stations open at 05:30 and close at 01:00 for maintenance), so no schedule is available to passengers -- you'd never wait long enough to warrant it. Direction can be determined by the gender of the announcer (male for into the city or clockwise, female out or counter-clockwise[[note]]As the saying goes, "Your boss calls you to work, your wife calls you home". Yep, we know...[[/note]]). It's also almost impossible to get lost there, as there's only one branch in the whole system, maps are plastered on every imaginable surface, columns equipped with a voice link to information bureaus and emergency services stand on every station, and signs showing where you can get from here abound -- in fact, it is only second to the Tokyo subway in usability and usefulness of its signage -- if you [[SarcasmMode just so happen to know Russian]], of course, as there's very little in the way of international signs. This is slowly changing with time, with addition of English signage on the maps and floor and wall transfer direction indicators on the few stations that have them. them. Unfortunately, finding the exact exit to get to desired location may be a bit more troublesome. Most stations have 2 and some 1 exit, but they often lead to an underground passage under a crossroad, and the passage system may be very complex and unnatural.
17th Apr '15 1:07:31 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The world's busiest subway system and second only to [[TokyoIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse Tokyo]] in the general rapid transit systems category, Moscow's Metro system is both an impressive feat of engineering and architecture. The plans for it sprang up [[OlderThanTheyThink back in 1880's]], but due to the city government hating all public works as a matter of principle, and ridiculously rich Moscow merchants being tightfisted about anything that wasn't fueling their ego, it wasn't until Stalin that work actually began (actually thanks to Lazar Kaganovich, then railways minister) in 1935, when both the funds and workforce were finally available. The deep underground tunnels and stations were explicitly envisioned as bomb shelters for the people of Moscow, and the wisdom of this move was proved during WorldWarII, when most stations served as such, and some were converted to house various important military installations -- like Chistye Prudy station that was an Air Defense HQ.
to:
The world's busiest subway system and second only to [[TokyoIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse Tokyo]] in the general rapid transit systems category, Moscow's Metro system is both an impressive feat of engineering and architecture. The plans for it sprang up [[OlderThanTheyThink back in the 1880's]], but due to the city government hating all public works as a matter of principle, and ridiculously rich Moscow merchants being tightfisted about anything that wasn't fueling their ego, it wasn't until Stalin that work actually began (actually thanks to Lazar Kaganovich, then railways minister) in 1935, when both the funds and workforce were finally available. The deep underground tunnels and stations were explicitly envisioned as bomb shelters for the people of Moscow, and the wisdom of this move was proved during WorldWarII, when most stations served as such, and some were converted to house various important military installations -- like Chistye Prudy station that was an Air Defense HQ.
1st Apr '15 4:08:47 PM jeez
Is there an issue? Send a Message
[[caption-width-right:300:My liege, two blue trains seem to be loose in your réfectoire. It's just like in [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo's]] [[WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine house!]]]]
to:
[[caption-width-right:300:My liege, [[caption-width-right:300:What are those two blue trains seem to be loose doing in your réfectoire. It's just like in here? What is this, [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo's]] [[WesternAnimation/YellowSubmarine house!]]]] house?!]]]]
27th Jan '15 3:16:29 AM aurora369
Is there an issue? Send a Message
There ''are'' some "ghost stations," that were built, but never used for passengers. Passengers still can see them from car windows, yet mostly without lights except from the train itself. The last full-sized ghost station is scheduled to open in 2014. After that only short evacuation chambers will remain. Unused platforms on some active stations will remain too.
to:
There ''are'' In the past there existed some "ghost stations," that were built, but never used for passengers. Passengers still can could see them from car windows, yet mostly without lights except from the train itself. The last full-sized ghost station is scheduled to open was opened in 2014. After that Right now, only short evacuation chambers will remain. Unused and unused platforms on some active stations will remain too. in the "ghost" state.
8th Jun '14 2:44:24 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Metrorats (Метрокрысы ''Metrokrysy'') are another famous urban legend about the metro, fueled by a series of entirely fictitious stories published by newspapers to boost ratings in the early 1990s. They are, reportedly, extremely big and smart [[RodentsOfUnusualSize rats at least 1 meter in size]] who live in metro tunnels and can eat strangers. The legend is so popular, that it became ironical explanation for some stupid metro-questions -- or a reason for an instaban on some forums. One of explanations for its origin is seeing a stray brown pit bull terrier in the times when the breed was near-unknown in the USSR.
to:
Metrorats (Метрокрысы ''Metrokrysy'') are another famous urban legend about the metro, fueled by a series of entirely fictitious stories published by newspapers to boost ratings in the early 1990s. They are, reportedly, extremely big and smart [[RodentsOfUnusualSize rats at least 1 meter in size]] who live in metro tunnels and can eat strangers. people. The legend is so popular, that it became an ironical explanation for some stupid metro-questions -- or a reason for an instaban on some forums. One of explanations for its origin is seeing a stray brown pit bull terrier in the times when the breed was near-unknown in the USSR.
This list shows the last 10 events of 29. Show all.