History UsefulNotes / MoscowCentre

8th Dec '17 2:47:44 AM TechPriest90
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* Getting five agents, later known as the Cambridge Five, into pretty high positions in British intelligence, including the infamous Kim Philby, who wound up running the Russia desk. Apparently the irony was not lost on him. They almost got Philby to the head of SIS itself before SIS caught on and he defected to the USSR.

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* Getting five agents, later known as the Cambridge Five, into pretty high positions in British intelligence, including the infamous Kim intelligence. Their names were Harold "Kim" Philby, who Donald Maclean, Anthony Blunt, Guy Burgess and John "Fiery" Cairncross. Kim Philby wound up running the Russia desk. Apparently desk - the irony was not lost on him. They almost got Philby to the head of SIS itself before SIS [[OhCrap caught on on]] and he defected to the USSR.



* Cultivating a British mole Melita Norwood, who worked at the Woolwich Arsenal and who supplied secrets pertaining to the British nuclear program to the KGB right until the USSR dissolved. Unlike Walker, she was not caught until long after the fall of the USSR, [[KarmaHoudini and escaped conviction due to old age]].




The KGB also engaged in some other assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, with no one being brought to justice. They ''may'' have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. But then, they would say that, wouldn't they?

However, not all of these attacks were successful. One low moment for the KGB in 1954 being when an officer by the name of Nikolai Khokhlov sent to supervise the assassination of a lead figure of a Frankfurt-based group of Russian anti-communists, went to his target's flat, told the guy that had been sentenced to death by Moscow and that he was in charge of the group sent to kill him... but that he wasn't going to kill him. Then (once the target had presumably calmed down) Khokhlov, who had an attack of conscience, went to the authorities to defect and much publicity ensued. His wife back in the USSR (who said she would leave him if he did the murder) got sentenced to five years of internal exile and three years later, tried to kill him with thallium or polonium, but he survived. He eventually ended up a psychology professor in California and survived until 2006.

In addition to killing people, the KGB also liked to engage in sexual compromise operations and sent forged documents purporting to be from Western intelligence agencies etc. to unsuspecting or friendly journalists. It's alleged that their successor, the FSB, still does the honey pot thing. Any comment on the relevance of this to current affairs is best discussed elsewhere.

After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated into several independent agencies, such as the FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. For several years, this KGB successor was the main domestic security service, the FSB (Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, called the SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers tend to forget.

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\n* Several other acts of sabotage and assassination. It isn't unusual for Police in European states to occasionally dig up booby traps (called ''Molniya'' Devices - Russian for "Lightning") and document piles left behind by the KGB. [[RagnarokProofing Some are still active]], often with fatal consequences for the ones making the discovery.

The KGB also engaged in some other assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgi_Markov Georgi Markov, Markov]], a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. Ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, [[KarmaHoudini with no one being brought to justice. justice]]. They ''may'' were suspected to have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981.1981 by Mehmet Ali Agca - which turned out to be a false assumption as the assassin claimed that it had been ordered by the Iranians. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. [[ImplausibleDeniability But then, they would say that, wouldn't they?

they?]]

However, not all of these attacks were successful. One low moment for the KGB in 1954 being when an officer by the name of Nikolai Khokhlov sent to supervise the assassination of a lead figure of a Frankfurt-based group of Russian anti-communists, went to his target's flat, told the guy that had been sentenced to death by Moscow and that he was in charge of the group sent to kill him... but that he wasn't going to kill him. Then (once the target had presumably calmed down) Khokhlov, who had an attack of conscience, went to the authorities to defect and much publicity ensued. His wife back in the USSR (who said she would leave him if he did the murder) got sentenced to five years of internal exile and three years later, the KGB tried to kill him with thallium or polonium, but he survived. [[OutGambitted He eventually ended up a psychology professor in California and survived until 2006.

2006.]]

In addition to killing people, the KGB also liked to engage in sexual compromise operations (which they called ''Kompromat'') and sent forged documents purporting to be from Western intelligence agencies etc. to unsuspecting or friendly journalists. It's alleged that their successor, the FSB, still does the honey pot trap thing. Any comment on the relevance of this to current affairs [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement is best discussed elsewhere.

elsewhere.]]

After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated into several independent agencies, such as the FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. For several years, this KGB successor was the main domestic security service, the FSB (Federal (''Federal'naya Sluzhba Bezopasnosti'' - Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, called the SVR (Foreign (''Sluzhba Vneshnei Razvedki'' - Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers [[CriticalResearchFailure tend to forget.forget]].



* First Chief Directorate (Foreign Operations): [[ShapedLikeItself Dealt with foreign operations]].
** Possibly included Vympel, a special operations group dealing in things like sabotage.
** This moved out of the overcrowded Lubayanka to a dedicated facility (now SVR HQ) in Yasenevo in the early 1970s... during which time, the man assigned to move the archives took extensive notes on them, which he would later take to the UK...
* Second Chief Directorate: Internal political control.

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* First Chief Directorate (Foreign Operations): [[ShapedLikeItself Dealt with foreign operations]].
operations]]. This moved out of the overcrowded Lubyanka Building to a dedicated facility (now SVR HQ) in Yasenevo in the early 1970s. During this time, the man assigned to move the archives - a chap called Vasiliy Mitrokhin - took extensive notes on them, [[TheMole which he would later take to the UK.]] Most of what we know of the KGB today comes from his work.
** Possibly This included Vympel, Vympel - also known as Directorate T. It was a special operations group dealing in things like sabotage.
** This moved out of The most infamous part, however, was Directorate S - also known as the overcrowded Lubayanka to a dedicated facility (now SVR HQ) in Yasenevo in Illegals Division. These were the early 1970s... during spies who [[TheInfiltration infiltrated into other nations]], with [[DeepCoverAgent deep-cover identities]] and [[ConvenientlyUnverifiableCoverStory perfect secrecy]]. [[ParanoiaFuel Many of them are still active.]]
** There was also Service A - whose job was disinformation. They did stuff like putting fake articles and news items into Newspapers, Journals, Radio and TV Broadcasts, and generally screwing with the public's mind. That's right, [[UrExample these guys were dealing in "Fake News" before it was even a thing]]. How effective it was, is somewhat hazy, [[MilesGloriosus since they had the bad habit of exaggerating their success]]. They're still at it, just more discreet. The actual impacts of this, or lack thereof, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement are best discussed elsewhere]].
** There was Line X - who stole scientific and technological data. They infiltrated firms like Lockheed Martin and Boeing to swipe their plans, as well as details on defence contracts by the US Military and other military secrets worldwide. The biggest Line X source was Japan, [[CorruptCorporateExecutive
which time, was prone to corporate corruption]] and which, consequently, provided a wealth of data on classified military projects as well as vital science and technology data. The overall failure was simply that the man assigned USSR's economic model was [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption too inefficient to move apply the archives took stolen concepts properly]].
** In addition to all of this, it also carried out
extensive notes on them, analysis and study of the situation outside the USSR, which he would later take to shaped the UK...
Soviet foreign policy view quite considerably. However, they had the bad habit of telling the Politburo what they wanted to hear, [[HoistByHisOwnPetard with unfortunate results like the Cuban Missile Crisis]].
* Second Chief Directorate: Internal political control. These were the guys people called [[ThePoliticalOfficer Commissars]].


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* Eighth Chief Directorate - [[BigBrotherIsWatching Monitored all internal, foreign and overseas communications.]] Handled cryptologic equipment, as well as all R&D on them.
25th Nov '17 1:07:08 AM Omeganian
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Stalin [[EvenEvilHasStandards never trusted or liked Beria]], who had a well-deserved reputation as a [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil depraved sexual predator]], even if he did consider him a useful attack dog. Stalin once went crazy with worry upon hearing that his own beloved daughter was alone in a house with the NKVD chief, and sent armed men to escort her away. Even as early as 1942, he told Beria's personal aide to "Send me everything this asshole writes down," just in case the need arose to have him purged like his predecessors.

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Stalin [[EvenEvilHasStandards never trusted or liked Beria]], who had a well-deserved reputation as a [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil depraved sexual predator]], even if he did consider him a useful attack dog. Stalin once went crazy with worry upon hearing that his own beloved daughter was alone in a house with the NKVD chief, and sent armed men to escort her away. Even as early as 1942, he told Beria's personal aide to "Send me everything this asshole writes down," just in case the need arose to have him purged like his predecessors.predecessors (doesn't say that much, actually; in Stalin's times, it was normal and none too secret procedure with all officials, since he could feel the need to purge anyone sooner or later).
23rd Nov '17 12:21:35 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* Getting five agents called the Cambridge Five into pretty high positions in British intelligence, including almost getting one, Kim Philby, to the head of SIS itself before he defected to the USSR.

to:

* Getting five agents called agents, later known as the Cambridge Five Five, into pretty high positions in British intelligence, including almost getting one, the infamous Kim Philby, who wound up running the Russia desk. Apparently the irony was not lost on him. They almost got Philby to the head of SIS itself before SIS caught on and he defected to the USSR.



However, not all of these attacks were successful. One low moment for the KGB in 1954 being when an officer by the name of Nikolai Khokhlov sent to supervise the assassination of a lead figure of a Frankfurt-based group of Russian anti-communists, went to his target's flat, told the guy that had been sentenced to death by Moscow and that he was in charge of the group sent to kill him... but that he wasn't going to kill him. Then (once the target had presumably calmed down) Khokhlov, who had an attack of consicence, went to the authorities to defect and much publicity ensued. His wife back in the USSR (who said she would leave him if he did the murder) got sentenced to five years of internal exile and three years later, tried to kill him with thallium or polonium, but he survived. He eventually ended up a psychology professor in California and survived until 2006.

In addition to killing people, the KGB also liked to engage in sexual compromise operations and sent forged documents purporting to be from Western intelligence agencies etc. to unsuspecting or friendly journalists. Any comment on the relevance of this to current affairs is best discussed elsewhere.

to:

However, not all of these attacks were successful. One low moment for the KGB in 1954 being when an officer by the name of Nikolai Khokhlov sent to supervise the assassination of a lead figure of a Frankfurt-based group of Russian anti-communists, went to his target's flat, told the guy that had been sentenced to death by Moscow and that he was in charge of the group sent to kill him... but that he wasn't going to kill him. Then (once the target had presumably calmed down) Khokhlov, who had an attack of consicence, conscience, went to the authorities to defect and much publicity ensued. His wife back in the USSR (who said she would leave him if he did the murder) got sentenced to five years of internal exile and three years later, tried to kill him with thallium or polonium, but he survived. He eventually ended up a psychology professor in California and survived until 2006.

In addition to killing people, the KGB also liked to engage in sexual compromise operations and sent forged documents purporting to be from Western intelligence agencies etc. to unsuspecting or friendly journalists. It's alleged that their successor, the FSB, still does the honey pot thing. Any comment on the relevance of this to current affairs is best discussed elsewhere.



[[/folder]]

[[folder: ComicBooks]]



* Marvel's ComicBook/BlackWidow was an ex-KGB agent.

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* Marvel's ComicBook/BlackWidow was an ex-KGB agent.agent, while her successor, Yelena Belova, worked for the FSB.
** Additionally, ComicBook/BuckyBarnes was, as the Winter Soldier, the KGB's most feared assassin.
10th Nov '17 9:28:40 AM Omeganian
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It's said that Beria [[DirtyCoward begged for his life before he was shot]], something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy. Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in Creator/DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].

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It's said that Beria [[DirtyCoward begged for his life before he was shot]], something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy.mercy (to give a measure of the difference in accounts about him, other rumors claim he actually tried an OpenShirtTaunt, but failed due to the high quality of said shirt). Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in Creator/DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].
10th Nov '17 9:24:58 AM Omeganian
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By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]Who had run the purges in Trauscaucasia.[[/note]] within two years.

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By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]Who had run the purges in Trauscaucasia.Transcaucasia.[[/note]] within two years.



Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]]. That said, another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess the Great Purges turned into.

to:

Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]]. That said, another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess the Great Purges turned into. \n Since he was the first person to lose in the political infighting which came after Stalin's death, there is plenty of opportunity to suspect WrittenByTheWinners and scapegoating in his case, with a number of researchers denying the sexual crimes as well, but that's [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment a subject yet to be resolved]].
22nd Oct '17 1:20:03 PM SilentHunterUK
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The KGB also engaged in some assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, with no one being brought to justice. They ''may'' have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. But then, they would say that, wouldn't they.

to:

The KGB also engaged in some other assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, with no one being brought to justice. They ''may'' have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. But then, they would say that, wouldn't they.
they?

However, not all of these attacks were successful. One low moment for the KGB in 1954 being when an officer by the name of Nikolai Khokhlov sent to supervise the assassination of a lead figure of a Frankfurt-based group of Russian anti-communists, went to his target's flat, told the guy that had been sentenced to death by Moscow and that he was in charge of the group sent to kill him... but that he wasn't going to kill him. Then (once the target had presumably calmed down) Khokhlov, who had an attack of consicence, went to the authorities to defect and much publicity ensued. His wife back in the USSR (who said she would leave him if he did the murder) got sentenced to five years of internal exile and three years later, tried to kill him with thallium or polonium, but he survived. He eventually ended up a psychology professor in California and survived until 2006.

In addition to killing people, the KGB also liked to engage in sexual compromise operations and sent forged documents purporting to be from Western intelligence agencies etc. to unsuspecting or friendly journalists. Any comment on the relevance of this to current affairs is best discussed elsewhere.



The current President of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service." In late 2016, this was made literal when Putin folded the SVR back into the FSB and renamed the combined organization [[RecycledTitle the MGB]].

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The current President of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service." In late 2016, this was made literal when Putin folded the SVR back into the FSB and renamed the combined organization [[RecycledTitle the MGB]].
"


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** This moved out of the overcrowded Lubayanka to a dedicated facility (now SVR HQ) in Yasenevo in the early 1970s... during which time, the man assigned to move the archives took extensive notes on them, which he would later take to the UK...
23rd Aug '17 2:11:45 PM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/TheBourneSupremacy'': Kirill (played by Creator/KarlUrban) is an FSB agent who works as a gun-for-hire for oligarch Yuri Gretkov to assassinate Bourne and frame him for the theft of CIA documents. This fails, so Bourne later tracks him to Moscow.
[[/folder]]
13th Jul '17 6:07:04 PM Coolnut
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* ''[[VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry Leisure Suit Larry 2]]'' has Larry evade the KGB after he accidentally steals an onklunk holding top secret U.S. government microfiche, unbeknownst to him. If he ever gets captured. he will be '''TORTURED TO DEATH''' by the KGB with... alto saxophone reeds.
11th Jun '17 1:08:52 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* Appear as the secondary group of antagonists in ''[[VideoGame/DestroyAllHumans Destroy All Humans! 2]]'', where they destroy the Furon mothership, killing Orthopox, before attempting to kill Crypto. Most of the {{Mook}}s are depicted as [[VodaDrunkenski vodka-drinking]] people with an obsession of cabbage and rabbits.

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* Appear as the secondary group of antagonists in ''[[VideoGame/DestroyAllHumans Destroy All Humans! 2]]'', where they destroy the Furon mothership, killing Orthopox, before attempting to kill Crypto. Most of the {{Mook}}s are depicted as [[VodaDrunkenski [[VodkaDrunkenski vodka-drinking]] people with an obsession of cabbage and rabbits.
16th May '17 9:33:37 AM nombretomado
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By the way, the [[UsefulNotes/{{Belarus}} Belarussian]] branch of the KGB wasn't dissolved. [[TheRemnant It still exists under this very name]]. Contrast with neighboring former Soviet republic Lithuania, which has turned their old KGB building into a museum of sorts against such forces (having been subject to [[TsaristRussia the Okhrana]], the [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Gestapo]], ''and'' the KGB will give you a healthy distaste for secret police).

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By the way, the [[UsefulNotes/{{Belarus}} Belarussian]] branch of the KGB wasn't dissolved. [[TheRemnant It still exists under this very name]]. Contrast with neighboring former Soviet republic Lithuania, which has turned their old KGB building into a museum of sorts against such forces (having been subject to [[TsaristRussia [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia the Okhrana]], the [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Gestapo]], ''and'' the KGB will give you a healthy distaste for secret police).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.MoscowCentre