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History UsefulNotes / MoscowCentre

11th May '16 8:37:36 PM btawng
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During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes. Yezhov himself was purged for the crime of purging innocent people, and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria.

to:

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes. Yezhov himself was purged

By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed
for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[{{NaziGermany}} certain]] growing threat to the crime of purging innocent people, west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replaced replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria.
Beria[[note]]who had ran the purges in Trauscaucasia[[/note]] within two years.



In the 1970s the popular historian Robert Conquest heard that one man had denounced 69 individuals and another had denounced an entire factory with 250 employees, he told his readers that they had probably all been arrested as a result. Closer examination has led to the conclusion that in reality, the insane ramblings of both men were entirely ignored in both cases. Denunciations meant nothing. Prior convictions, on the other hand, were critical.

to:

In the 1970s the popular historian Robert Conquest heard that one man had denounced 69 individuals and another had denounced an entire factory with 250 employees, he employees. He told his readers that they had probably all been arrested as a result. Closer examination has led to the conclusion that in reality, the insane ramblings of both men were entirely ignored in both cases. Denunciations meant nothing. Prior convictions, on the other hand, were critical.



It's said that Beria begged for his life before he was shot, something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy. Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].

to:

It's said that Beria [[DirtyCoward begged for his life before he was shot, shot]], something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy. Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].
23rd Mar '16 8:59:26 AM MAI742
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During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes. Yezhov himself was purged for the crime of purging innocent people, and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].

Another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess that Great Purges turned into. You see, original plan was reportedly to make a nice, neat clean-up of the house, removing the remains of the Lenin's Old Guard from power, and, maybe not even shooting, just exiling them. Unfortunately, the NKVD very soon lost control of the process, not helped by the hands-off attitude of its previous heads and utter craziness of two last ones before Beria, Genrikh Yagoda and Nikolai Yezhov.

to:

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes. Yezhov himself was purged for the crime of purging innocent people, and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria.

During the purges themselves, people from the persecuted classes (criminals, intellectuals, 'Kulaks' and their family members) felt that almost any one of them could be taken at any time. Consequently, many of them liked to believe that denunciations were important in determining whom the NKVD arrested. In fact, denunciations were irrelevant. The NKVD decided who to arrest independently of denunciations, and paid heed to or ignored them entirely as they wished. Believing in the power of the denunciations was a psychological defense mechanism by which people from persecuted demographics could feel that they had some measure of control over the fates of themselves and those close to them.

In the 1970s the popular historian Robert Conquest heard that one man had denounced 69 individuals and another had denounced an entire factory with 250 employees, he told his readers that they had probably all been arrested as a result. Closer examination has led to the conclusion that in reality, the insane ramblings of both men were entirely ignored in both cases. Denunciations meant nothing. Prior convictions, on the other hand, were critical.

Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].

Another
insane]]. That said, another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess that Great Purges turned into. You see, original plan was reportedly to make a nice, neat clean-up of the house, removing the remains of the Lenin's Old Guard from power, and, maybe not even shooting, just exiling them. Unfortunately, the NKVD very soon lost control of the process, not helped by the hands-off attitude of its previous heads and utter craziness of two last ones before Beria, Genrikh Yagoda and Nikolai Yezhov.into.



It finally spiraled to such proportions that often some completely innocent and apolitical people would report another completely innocent and apolitical people as traitors to a) not be seen as traitors themselves when some ''third'' people report the second, and b) so the second people won't report them ''first''. A lot of personal vendettas were also waged this way, as a sort of bizarre "assassination by cop". Needless to say, this wasn't a very productive atmosphere, and Soviet economy and military have started to suffer.
23rd Mar '16 4:02:57 AM MAI742
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It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary under 'Iron Felix' Dzherzhinsky, though his unfortunate death of a heart attack in 1925 put paid to its plans to become even more powerful. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of the, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes including. Yezhov himself was purged for the crime of purging innocent people, and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].

to:

It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary under 'Iron Felix' Dzherzhinsky, though his Dzherzhinsky. Indicative of Iron Felix's status within the party was that he was the only one who ignored Lenin's smoking ban (in party meetings) and got away with it. Fortunately for the country, Dzherzhinsky's unfortunate death of a heart attack in 1925 put paid to its plans to become prevented the organisation from amassing even more powerful.power. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of the, of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes including.crimes. Yezhov himself was purged for the crime of purging innocent people, and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].
23rd Mar '16 4:00:26 AM MAI742
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It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. The Great Purge of 1936-38 was called the "Yezhovshchina" after the then-NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. The organization was not exempt from the purges, with officers denouncing others then getting denounced themselves. Eventually, Yezhov ''himself'' was purged (for the crime of purging innocent people, ironically enough), and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Who was less trigger-happy, but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].

to:

It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary.temporary under 'Iron Felix' Dzherzhinsky, though his unfortunate death of a heart attack in 1925 put paid to its plans to become even more powerful. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. The Great Purge After the purge of 1936-38 was called NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the then-NKVD replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. The organization To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not exempt from been guilty of the purges, with specific crimes they were accused of the, numerous NKVD officers denouncing others then getting denounced themselves. Eventually, were imprisoned or executed for their crimes including. Yezhov ''himself'' himself was purged (for for the crime of purging innocent people, ironically enough), and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Who Beria was less trigger-happy, trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]].
7th Jan '16 7:46:43 PM trumpetmarietta
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The KGB (''Komitet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnosti''- "Committee for State Security", not to be confused with the Centre of Moscow, that is only a nickname for the part of Moscow within Sadovoye (Garden) Ring) and its predecessors, the StateSec of the USSR as well as its (technically) civilian foreign intelligence agency, though it used a military ranking system.

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The KGB (''Komitet (Комитет Государственной Безопасности, ''Komitet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnosti''- Bezopasnosti'' = "Committee for State Security", Security"), not to be confused with the Centre of Moscow, that is only a nickname for the part of Moscow within Sadovoye (Garden) Ring) and its predecessors, the StateSec of the USSR as well as its (technically) civilian foreign intelligence agency, though it used a military ranking system.
4th Oct '15 4:53:01 AM demonfiren
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It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/VCheKa ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

to:

It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/VCheKa Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.
4th Oct '15 4:52:32 AM demonfiren
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-->(SLAP)

to:

-->(SLAP)-->[[TalkToTheFist (SLAP)]]
4th Oct '15 4:52:19 AM demonfiren
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-->(*SLAP)

to:

-->(*SLAP)-->(SLAP)
2nd Oct '15 6:19:39 PM Berrenta
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The current [[WhyDoYouKeepChangingJobs President]] of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service."

to:

The current [[WhyDoYouKeepChangingJobs President]] President of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service."
26th Aug '15 1:19:58 PM YT45
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During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. The Great Purge of 1936-38 was called the "Yezhovshchina" after the then-NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. The organization was not exempt from the purges, with officers denouncing others then getting denounced themselves. Eventually, Yezhov ''himself'' was purged (for the crime of purging innocent people, ironically enough), and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Who was less trigger-happy, but, unfortunately, completely insane.

to:

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. The Great Purge of 1936-38 was called the "Yezhovshchina" after the then-NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. The organization was not exempt from the purges, with officers denouncing others then getting denounced themselves. Eventually, Yezhov ''himself'' was purged (for the crime of purging innocent people, ironically enough), and replaced with Lavrentiy Beria. Who was less trigger-happy, but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane.
insane]].
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