History UsefulNotes / MoscowCentre

6th Jan '17 11:50:54 AM StFan
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-->''Knock knock''
-->Who's there?
-->''The KGB''
-->KGB who?
-->[[TalkToTheFist (SLAP)]]
-->''We're asking the questions here.''

to:

-->''Knock knock''
-->Who's there?
-->''The KGB''
-->KGB who?
-->[[TalkToTheFist (SLAP)]]
-->''We're
->''Knock knock''\\
Who's there?\\
''The KGB''\\
KGB who?\\
[[TalkToTheFist (SLAP)]]\\
''We're
asking the questions here.''



[[AC:Anime and Manga]]

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[[AC:Anime and Manga]]
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[[folder:Anime & Manga]]




[[AC:ComicBooks]]
* Supervillain [=KGBeast=] from the Franchise/DCUniverse.
** And then of course, there's his protégé, [=NKVDemon=].
* ''ComicBook/SpirouAndFantasio In Moscow'' has the duo "recruited" to help KGB track down Fantasio's cousin Santafio, who is posing as the rightful Heir to the Czar.

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\n[[AC:ComicBooks]]\n* Supervillain [=KGBeast=] from the Franchise/DCUniverse.
**
Franchise/DCUniverse. And then of course, there's his protégé, [=NKVDemon=].
* ''ComicBook/SpirouAndFantasio In in Moscow'' has the duo "recruited" to help KGB track down Fantasio's cousin Santafio, Zantafio, who is posing as the rightful Heir to the Czar.




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* A quite sympathetic, if indirect, portrayal of a Soviet secret police officer in DoctorZhivago. Zhivago's half brother, Yevgraf, is a high-ranking secret police official. His help is indispensable in ensuring Zhivago's survival.

[[AC:LiveActionTV]]

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* A quite sympathetic, if indirect, portrayal of a Soviet secret police officer in DoctorZhivago.''Literature/DoctorZhivago''. Zhivago's half brother, Yevgraf, is a high-ranking secret police official. His help is indispensable in ensuring Zhivago's survival.

[[AC:LiveActionTV]]
survival.
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[[folder:Live-Action TV]]




[[AC:VideoGames]]

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\n[[AC:VideoGames]][[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]




[[AC:WebOriginal]]
* ''Roleplay/{{Covert 81}}'' features a fictional black ops section of the KGB called Chameleon[[note]]The word is almost identical in Russian and English, except in Russian it's [[XtremeKoolLetterz Khameleon]][[/note]]. It is placed under the Fifteen Directorate (Security of Government Installations) for concealment reasons.

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\n[[AC:WebOriginal]]\n[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''Roleplay/{{Covert 81}}'' ''Roleplay/Covert81'' features a fictional black ops section of the KGB called Chameleon[[note]]The word is almost identical in Russian and English, except in Russian it's [[XtremeKoolLetterz Khameleon]][[/note]]. It is placed under the Fifteen Directorate (Security of Government Installations) for concealment reasons.reasons.
[[/folder]]
11th Dec '16 11:49:11 AM SkylaNoivern
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Added DiffLines:

* Appear as the secondary group of antagonists in ''[[VideoGame/DestroyAllHumans Destroy All Humans! 2]]'', where they destroy the Furon mothership, killing Orthopox, before attempting to kill Crypto. Most of the {{Mook}}s are depicted as [[VodaDrunkenski vodka-drinking]] people with an obsession of cabbage and rabbits.
** Natalya Ivanova, Crypto's ally and LoveInterest, is a rogue member of the KGB, who is aware of their corruption. Her boyfriend, Sergei, is also a member.
5th Nov '16 9:56:21 PM zunger
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After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated in several independent agencies, such as FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. This KGB's successor is now the main domestic security service, the FSB (Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, and is now called SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers tend to forget.

to:

After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated in several independent agencies, such as FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. This KGB's For several years, this KGB successor is now was the main domestic security service, the FSB (Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, and is now called the SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers tend to forget.
forget.



The current President of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service."

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The current President of Russia, UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin, was a KGB officer; he has brought many of his ex-KGB colleagues into powerful positions in government. Ever since Putin took power, the joke about the SVR and FSB (and especially the FSB) has been "new name, same friendly service."
" In late 2016, this was made literal when Putin folded the SVR back into the FSB and renamed the combined organization [[RecycledTitle the MGB]].
14th Aug '16 6:21:42 PM FordPrefect
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* First Chief Directorate (Foreign Operations): [[ShapedLikeItself Who dealt with foreign operations]].

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* First Chief Directorate (Foreign Operations): [[ShapedLikeItself Who dealt Dealt with foreign operations]].



*** Officially named simply "A" Directorate (originally it was the "A" Team of the 7th Main Directorate) in 1972 after the Munich Olympics attacks, when it's became apparent that the terrorist threat is only to increase.

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*** Officially named simply "A" Directorate (originally it was the "A" Team of the 7th Main Directorate) in 1972 after the Munich Olympics attacks, when it's it became apparent that the terrorist threat is would only to increase.
14th Aug '16 6:20:39 PM FordPrefect
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After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated in several independent agencies, such as FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. This KGB's successor is now the main domestic security service is the FSB (Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, and is now called SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers tend to forget.

to:

After its role in the failed August 1991 coup, the organisation was dissolved, being separated in several independent agencies, such as FSO (Federal Protection Service), FSK (Federal Counterintelligence Service), etc. This model, however, proved largely unworkable, and most of these services were later reamalgamated into one. This KGB's successor is now the main domestic security service is service, the FSB (Federal Security Service). Foreign intelligence, on the other hand, remained independent, and is now called SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), something that fiction writers tend to forget.
14th Aug '16 6:16:41 PM FordPrefect
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During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes in turn.

to:

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), upravlenie''") later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes in turn.
9th Aug '16 12:25:06 PM Morgenthaler
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By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[{{NaziGermany}} certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]Who had run the purges in Trauscaucasia.[[/note]] within two years.

to:

By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[{{NaziGermany}} [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]Who had run the purges in Trauscaucasia.[[/note]] within two years.
6th Aug '16 3:03:19 PM nombretomado
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* Supervillain [=KGBeast=] from the DCUniverse.

to:

* Supervillain [=KGBeast=] from the DCUniverse.Franchise/DCUniverse.



* Marvel's Black Widow was an ex-KGB agent.

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* Marvel's Black Widow ComicBook/BlackWidow was an ex-KGB agent.
30th Jul '16 12:55:03 PM nombretomado
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It's said that Beria [[DirtyCoward begged for his life before he was shot]], something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy. Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].

to:

It's said that Beria [[DirtyCoward begged for his life before he was shot]], something people considered a kind of poetic justice given that he sent so many others to their deaths without mercy. Another rumor is that during his arrest he, surprised and agitated, was personally shot by [[FourStarBadass Marshal Georgy Zhukov]], whom Khruschev reportedly brought specifically in case of him resisting, and his later public process was actually a sham. This rumor probably inspired the similar scene in DavidWeber's Creator/DavidWeber's ''[[Literature/HonorHarrington Ashes of Victory]]'', with [[spoiler:Admiral Theisman shooting the Committee of Public Safety Chairman and StateSec's head Oscar Saint-Just, allegedly based in large part on Beria]].
22nd Jul '16 9:25:05 PM Fireblood
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It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary under 'Iron Felix' Dzherzhinsky. Indicative of Iron Felix's status within the party was that he was the only one who ignored Lenin's smoking ban (in party meetings) and got away with it. Fortunately for the country, Dzherzhinsky's unfortunate death of a heart attack in 1925 prevented the organisation from amassing even more power. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes.

By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[{{NaziGermany}} certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]who had ran the purges in Trauscaucasia[[/note]] within two years.

to:

It was originally formed in 1917 as the Cheka/[=VCheKa=] ("Extraordinary Commission"/''Vserossiyskaya Cherezvychaynaya Komissiya''), shortly after the October Revolution and led by Felix Dzerzhinsky. It was originally supposed to be a temporary body to ensure security during the 'extraordinary" circumstances of the Russian Civil War (hence the name). But, by the end of the war, it had grown powerful enough to make itself... somewhat less temporary under 'Iron Felix' Dzherzhinsky. Indicative of Iron Felix's status within the party was that he was the only one who ignored Lenin's smoking ban (in party meetings) and got away with it. Fortunately for the country, Dzherzhinsky's unfortunate death of from a heart attack in 1925 1926 prevented the organisation from amassing even more power. Also, it originally dealt only with suppressing dissidents, but acquired a foreign intelligence section in 1920.

During Stalin's time, the OGPU ("Joint State Political Directorate/''gosudarstvennoye politicheskoye upravlenie''"), later merged into the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs/''Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del''), which played a central role in the Purges. After the purge of NKVD Chief Yagoda in the first show trials of '36, the purges were extended to wider society in the so-called the "Yezhovshchina" or Great Purges after the replacement NKVD chief Nikolai [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "The Bloody Dwarf"]] Yezhov. To fulfill the inflated quotas set by overzealous local leaders and approved by senior leaders (including, ultimately, Stalin in Order 00447), several branches of the NKVD resorted to pulling in just about everyone who was using a fake passport or had a criminal record. Once it became clear that they had interrogated and imprisoned, or even executed, at least a hundred thousand people who had not been guilty of the specific crimes they were accused of, numerous NKVD officers were imprisoned or executed for their crimes.crimes in turn.

By 1938, Stalin realized that Yezhov's purges had been killing off an irreplaceable amount of the expertise needed for national defense and industrial production, especially against a [[{{NaziGermany}} certain]] growing threat to the west. Cue the latter's [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness removal]], [[{{Unperson}} unperson-ing]], and replacement with trusted subordinate Lavrentiy Beria[[note]]who Beria[[note]]Who had ran run the purges in Trauscaucasia[[/note]] Trauscaucasia.[[/note]] within two years.



Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]]. That said, another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess that Great Purges turned into.

to:

Beria was less trigger-happy but, unfortunately, [[AxeCrazy completely insane]]. That said, another take on Beria views him as a pragmatic man (and also a serial rapist) who was brought in specifically to do something with the unholy mess that the Great Purges turned into.



Luckily, Beria proved to be a ruthless, but efficient administrator, and quickly [[IDidWhatIHadToDo cleaned up the house]] and reined the purges in, even starting a judicial review on the cases tried during his predecessors. In fact, some people who suffered the Great Purges were rehabilitated during the Stalin's regime already. After that, Beria continued to serve as a Stalin's right hand man,[[note]]Including management of both Soviet nuclear and ICBM projects[[/note]] using his sinister reputation as a motivational tool. It proved [[HoistByHisOwnPetard to be his undoing later]], though.

As for NKVD itself, after the war it became the MGB (Ministry for State Security) in 1946. It lost foreign intelligence for a while and in 1953 was merged into the Ministry for Internal Affairs for a year by Beria. After Stalin's death Beria, as well as many other Politburo members, took part in a fierce competition to get supreme power. The first part of this consisted of everyone joining forces against Beria, who was considered too dangerous to live, let alone rule the USSR. After he was safely dead, the remaining Politburo members could have a nice, civilized power struggle in which the losers were merely disgraced and demoted, as opposed to being shot.

to:

Luckily, Beria proved to be a ruthless, but efficient administrator, and quickly [[IDidWhatIHadToDo cleaned up the house]] and reined the purges in, even starting a judicial review on the cases tried during his predecessors. In fact, some people who suffered the Great Purges were rehabilitated during the Stalin's regime already. regime. After that, Beria continued to serve as a Stalin's right hand man,[[note]]Including management of both Soviet nuclear and ICBM projects[[/note]] projects.[[/note]] using his sinister reputation as a motivational tool. It proved [[HoistByHisOwnPetard to be his undoing later]], later]] though.

As for the NKVD itself, after the war it became the MGB (Ministry for State Security) in 1946. It lost foreign intelligence for a while and in 1953 was merged into the Ministry for Internal Affairs for a year by Beria. After Stalin's death Beria, as well as many other Politburo members, took part in a fierce competition to get supreme power. The first part of this consisted of everyone joining forces against Beria, who was considered too dangerous to live, let alone rule the USSR. After he was safely dead, the remaining Politburo members could have a nice, civilized power struggle in which the losers were merely disgraced and demoted, as opposed to being shot.



* Finding and assassinating Leon Trotsky, one of the original leaders of the October Revolution, who just wouldn't shut up in his criticism of Stalin. Stalin was convinced that Trotsky was an all-powerful leader with an army of revolutionaries who was going to kick his ass, when really, he was just an old man whose son's chief adviser was a (KGB) agent. Still he was noisy as hell and ''extremely'' politically inconvenient when Stalin was trying to improve the USSR's foreign relations.

The KGB also engaged in some assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, with no one being brought to justice. ''May'' have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. But then, they would say that wouldn't they.

to:

* Finding and assassinating Leon Trotsky, one of the original leaders of the October Revolution, who just wouldn't shut up in his criticism of Stalin. Stalin was convinced that Trotsky was an all-powerful leader with an army of revolutionaries who was going to kick his ass, when really, he was just an old man whose son's chief adviser was himself a (KGB) KGB agent. Still he was noisy as hell and ''extremely'' politically inconvenient when Stalin was trying to improve the USSR's foreign relations.

The KGB also engaged in some assassination operations, mainly of defectors, working with other allied organisations to do this. The most infamous was the 1978 assassination of Georgi Markov, a Bulgarian living in London, involved an umbrella firing pellets filled with ricin. The statute of limitations recently expired on that case, with no one being brought to justice. ''May'' They ''may'' have been behind the attempted assassination of (Polish) Pope John Paul II in 1981. Allegations that Lee Harvey Oswald was in the KGB's employ have little to substantiate them. The service itself, however, naturally denied all these accusations, stating that they renounced such methods since just after the war. But then, they would say that that, wouldn't they.



FSB also inherited the Border Guard service from KGB, including its maritime component, and as such is also responsible for Coast Guard duty. This FSB's pocket navy is not that big and is armed with relatively small warships, but most of them are quite modern and well equipped, compared with the Navy proper, as FSB tended to be better financed and had lower operational expenses, so it could afford ordering new ships. Same is the situation with the land component, the Border Troops. In times of war both are to be folded into the regular military.

to:

The FSB also inherited the Border Guard service from the KGB, including its maritime component, and as such is also responsible for Coast Guard duty. This FSB's pocket navy is not that big and is armed with relatively small warships, but most of them are quite modern and well equipped, compared with the Navy proper, as the FSB tended to be better financed and had lower operational expenses, so it could afford ordering new ships. Same is the situation with the land component, the Border Troops. In times of war both are to be folded into the regular military.



By the way, the [[UsefulNotes/{{Belarus}} Belarussian]] branch of KGB wasn't dissolved. [[TheRemnant It still exists under this very name]]. Contrast with neighboring former Soviet nation, Lithuania which has turned their old KGB building into a museum of sorts against such forces (having been subject to [[TsaristRussia the Okhrana]], the [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Gestapo]], ''and'' the KGB will give you a healthy distaste for secret police).

to:

By the way, the [[UsefulNotes/{{Belarus}} Belarussian]] branch of KGB wasn't dissolved. [[TheRemnant It still exists under this very name]]. Contrast with neighboring former Soviet nation, Lithuania republic Lithuania, which has turned their old KGB building into a museum of sorts against such forces (having been subject to [[TsaristRussia the Okhrana]], the [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Gestapo]], ''and'' the KGB will give you a healthy distaste for secret police).



The difference is similar to the difference between the CIA and the NIS (Naval Intelligence Service) or USAMI (US Army Military Intelligence). The two services also notoriously [[InterserviceRivalry don't get along]], largely because GRU considers itself the heir to the old Tsarist military intelligence (given how large a percentage of the former Tsarist officers joined the Red Army, bringing their institutional experience, it isn't much of a stretch), while KGB/FSB were/are "those Bolshevik upstarts". On their part, During the early Soviet period Cheka/NKVD regarded GRU as "those bourgeois remnants", and so the mutual hostility was born.

to:

The difference is similar to the difference between the CIA and the NIS (Naval Intelligence Service) or USAMI (US Army Military Intelligence). The two services also notoriously [[InterserviceRivalry don't get along]], largely because GRU considers itself the heir to the old Tsarist military intelligence (given how large a percentage of the former Tsarist officers joined the Red Army, bringing their institutional experience, it isn't much of a stretch), while KGB/FSB were/are "those Bolshevik upstarts". On For their part, During during the early Soviet period the Cheka/NKVD regarded the GRU as "those bourgeois remnants", and so the mutual hostility was born.



* A quite sympathetic, if indirect, portrayal of a Soviet secret police officer in DoctorZhivago. Zhivago's half brother, Yevgraf, is stated to be a high ranking secret police official. His help is indispensable in ensuring Zhivago's survival.

to:

* A quite sympathetic, if indirect, portrayal of a Soviet secret police officer in DoctorZhivago. Zhivago's half brother, Yevgraf, is stated to be a high ranking high-ranking secret police official. His help is indispensable in ensuring Zhivago's survival.survival.



* The main characters in ''Series/TheAmericans'' are [[DeepCoverAgent deep cover agents]] in early 1980s USA.

to:

* The main characters in ''Series/TheAmericans'' are [[DeepCoverAgent deep cover KGB agents]] in early 1980s USA.
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