History UsefulNotes / Mormonism

29th Aug '15 3:41:39 AM SeptimusHeap
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The author Creator/OrsonScottCard is also a practicing Mormon who has also written some Mormon fiction, and Mormon themes and ideas show up in a lot of his speculative fiction works. Literature/TheTalesOfAlvinMaker is a fantastic retelling by Card of Joseph Smith Jr.'s life, and some of the metaphysics of [[Literature/EndersGame the Enderverse]] are lifted directly from Mormon doctrine. His Homecoming series is more or less a [[RecycledInSpace space-faring]] adaptation of specific sections of the Book of Mormon.
29th Jun '15 1:38:13 AM SeptimusHeap
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One popular television series with Mormon influences was ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'', created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the [[Series/BattlestarGalacticaClassic original series]] were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.

to:

One popular television series with Mormon influences was ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'', created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the [[Series/BattlestarGalacticaClassic [[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 original series]] were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.
24th Dec '14 3:19:52 AM SeptimusHeap
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One popular television series with Mormon influences was BattlestarGalactica, created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the original series were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.

to:

One popular television series with Mormon influences was BattlestarGalactica, ''Franchise/BattlestarGalactica'', created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the [[Series/BattlestarGalacticaClassic original series series]] were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.
17th Mar '14 10:34:46 PM shimaspawn
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The LDS Church is well known for its missionary efforts and they have 65,000 full-time missionaries serving in most countries of the world as of 2013 (with most missionaries serving in the United States or various nations of South America, but they can be found almost everywhere - the Islamic nations in the Middle East are a notable exception). Within the USA most people's image of the LDS Church may be a pair of polite young teenagers in white shirts and ties, knocking on your door and wanting to share some unspecified 'good news' with you and give you a free book. (Though they could just as easily be Jehovah's Witnesses, especially outside the USA). The LDS Church expects and encourages every worthy male member to prepare for and serve a 2-year mission, usually starting at age 19. Young women members are not commanded, but sometimes encouraged, to serve an 18-month mission beginning at age 18.[[note]] (It is believed by the members of the LDS church that all young men are commanded by church doctrine to serve a full time mission. Certain extenuating circumstances sometimes apply, such as physical or mental health, but barring one of these, all young men are taught from a young age that they are expected to go on a mission. Most young women, however, never serve a mission. Most women within the church are married by the time they hit 21 and it isn't considered a commandment for them to go.) [[/note]]

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The LDS Church is well known for its missionary efforts and they have 65,000 full-time missionaries serving in most countries of the world as of 2013 (with most missionaries serving in the United States or various nations of South America, but they can be found almost everywhere - the Islamic nations in the Middle East are a notable exception). Within the USA most people's image of the LDS Church may be a pair of polite young teenagers in white shirts and ties, knocking on your door and wanting to share some unspecified 'good news' with you and give you a free book. (Though they could just as easily be Jehovah's Witnesses, especially outside the USA). The LDS Church expects and encourages every worthy male member to prepare for and serve a 2-year mission, usually starting at age 19. Young women members are not commanded, but sometimes encouraged, to serve an 18-month mission beginning at age 18.19.[[note]] (It is believed by the members of the LDS church that all young men are commanded by church doctrine to serve a full time mission. Certain extenuating circumstances sometimes apply, such as physical or mental health, but barring one of these, all young men are taught from a young age that they are expected to go on a mission. Most young women, however, never serve a mission. Most women within the church are married by the time they hit 21 and it isn't considered a commandment for them to go.) [[/note]]
17th Mar '14 10:34:14 PM shimaspawn
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The LDS Church is well known for its missionary efforts and they have 65,000 full-time missionaries serving in most countries of the world as of 2013 (with most missionaries serving in the United States or various nations of South America, but they can be found almost everywhere - the Islamic nations in the Middle East are a notable exception). Within the USA most people's image of the LDS Church may be a pair of polite young teenagers in white shirts and ties, knocking on your door and wanting to share some unspecified 'good news' with you and give you a free book. (Though they could just as easily be Jehovah's Witnesses, especially outside the USA). The LDS Church expects and encourages every worthy male member to prepare for and serve a 2-year mission, usually starting at age 19. Young women members are not commanded, but sometimes encouraged, to serve an 18-month mission beginning at age 21.[[note]] (It is believed by the members of the LDS church that all young men are commanded by church doctrine to serve a full time mission. Certain extenuating circumstances sometimes apply, such as physical or mental health, but barring one of these, all young men are taught from a young age that they are expected to go on a mission. Most young women, however, never serve a mission. Most women within the church are married by the time they hit 21 and it isn't considered a commandment for them to go.) [[/note]]

to:

The LDS Church is well known for its missionary efforts and they have 65,000 full-time missionaries serving in most countries of the world as of 2013 (with most missionaries serving in the United States or various nations of South America, but they can be found almost everywhere - the Islamic nations in the Middle East are a notable exception). Within the USA most people's image of the LDS Church may be a pair of polite young teenagers in white shirts and ties, knocking on your door and wanting to share some unspecified 'good news' with you and give you a free book. (Though they could just as easily be Jehovah's Witnesses, especially outside the USA). The LDS Church expects and encourages every worthy male member to prepare for and serve a 2-year mission, usually starting at age 19. Young women members are not commanded, but sometimes encouraged, to serve an 18-month mission beginning at age 21.18.[[note]] (It is believed by the members of the LDS church that all young men are commanded by church doctrine to serve a full time mission. Certain extenuating circumstances sometimes apply, such as physical or mental health, but barring one of these, all young men are taught from a young age that they are expected to go on a mission. Most young women, however, never serve a mission. Most women within the church are married by the time they hit 21 and it isn't considered a commandment for them to go.) [[/note]]
2nd Feb '14 7:07:39 PM Willbyr
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--> ''"11. We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may."''

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--> -> ''"11. We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may."''



Another temple-related item is the wearing of the ''temple garment'' or "Mormon underwear" as it is commonly known (it's basically a white t-shirt and white boxers that extend to the knee). Much like a priest's collar or cardinal's vestments, the garment is an article of sacred clothing (almost exclusively simple white cotton/poly) [[note]] There are other materials available, all in white. The only exception is for military personnel, who have the option of wearing brown shirts designed to aesthetically match the shirts worn wih uniforms [[/note]] worn under regular clothing to remind practicing members of the covenants they have made. It is sometimes believed to provide spiritual and/or physical protection, much in the same way that other Christians might view a cross/crucifix or pocket bible. Another purpose is to maintain modesty; the general rule is that if one's outfit would expose the garment, it's too skimpy (the outfit, not the garment).

to:

Another temple-related item is the wearing of the ''temple garment'' or "Mormon underwear" as it is commonly known (it's basically a white t-shirt and white boxers that extend to the knee). Much like a priest's collar or cardinal's vestments, the garment is an article of sacred clothing (almost exclusively simple white cotton/poly) [[note]] There are other materials available, all in white. The only exception is for military personnel, who have the option of wearing brown shirts designed to aesthetically match the shirts worn wih with uniforms [[/note]] worn under regular clothing to remind practicing members of the covenants they have made. It is sometimes believed to provide spiritual and/or physical protection, much in the same way that other Christians might view a cross/crucifix or pocket bible. Another purpose is to maintain modesty; the general rule is that if one's an outfit is too skimpy if it would expose the garment, it's too skimpy (the outfit, not the garment).
garment.
30th Dec '13 12:01:46 PM system
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30th Dec '13 10:26:02 AM thisismyotherhandle
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The new territory had a bumpy relationship with the Federal government, owing to disputes over the amount of influence Brigham Young wielded over the population as both political and spiritual leader and the LDS practice of polygamy. Poor communication and disgruntled federal officials who found it difficult to work with unresponsive LDS citizens caused the brief but highly-publicized Utah War in 1857-58, when an entire Army division was sent to remove Young as governor because President James Buchanan had been led to believe that Utah was in open rebellion. Sensationalist media reports, pumped by allegations of heathen polygamy, predicted a bloodbath when the division reached Salt Lake City. In the end there were no actual battles fought. It was in this climate, however, that a band of LDS militiamen waylaid a pioneer wagon train from Arkansas as it was passing through southern Utah. In an event known as the Mountain Meadows Massacre, they killed most of the travelers, sparing their children under 8 years old (the age of accountability in Mormon doctrine, mentioned above) and sending them to be raised by local families. John D. Lee, the militia leader, was executed by the territorial government twenty years later after being excommunicated by the Church. He was the only participant to be convicted. Allegations have been made that high officials in the Church (including Brigham Young himself) sanctioned the massacre, but they remain unproven.

Eventually, a non-LDS governor was installed in Young's place, as Young continued to lead the Church. During this time, the building of settlements went on, including the construction of more temples (including the iconic [[http://www.ldschurchtemples.com/saltlake/ Salt Lake Temple]]). They also continued the practice of polygamy until after the deaths of Young and his successor, John Taylor, despite the passage of several Acts of Congress that explicitly outlawed it and even took steps to curtail LDS power in the territory. Wilford Woodruff became prophet in 1887. Faced with the arrests of dozens of practitioners of polygamy and the probable seizure of all Church property by the federal government, he issued the 1890 Manifesto, which declared that no marriages against the law of the land would be recognized by the Church. In response, several fundamentalist groups broke away from the LDS Church and fled to isolated areas in the US, Canada, and Mexico in order to continue practicing polygamy (some of which continue doing so today).

to:

The new territory had a bumpy relationship with the Federal government, owing to disputes over the amount of influence Brigham Young wielded over the population as both political and spiritual leader and the LDS practice of polygamy. Poor communication and disgruntled federal officials who found it difficult to work with unresponsive LDS citizens caused the brief but highly-publicized Utah War in 1857-58, when an entire Army division was sent to remove Young as governor because President James Buchanan had been led to believe that Utah was in open rebellion. Sensationalist media reports, pumped by allegations of heathen polygamy, predicted a bloodbath when the division reached Salt Lake City. In the end there were no actual battles fought. It was in this climate, however, that a band of LDS militiamen waylaid a pioneer wagon train from Arkansas as it was passing through southern Utah. In an event known as the Mountain Meadows Massacre, they killed most of the travelers, sparing their children under 8 years old (the age of accountability in Mormon doctrine, mentioned above) and sending them to be raised by local families. John D. Lee, the militia leader, was executed by the territorial government twenty years later after being and excommunicated by the Church. He was the only participant to be convicted. Allegations have been made that high officials in the Church (including Brigham Young himself) sanctioned the massacre, but they remain unproven.

Church.

Eventually, a non-LDS governor was installed in Young's place, as Young continued to lead the Church. During this time, the building of settlements went on, including the construction of more temples (including the iconic [[http://www.ldschurchtemples.com/saltlake/ Salt Lake Temple]]). They also continued the practice of polygamy until after the deaths of Young and his successor, John Taylor, despite the passage of several Acts of Congress that explicitly outlawed it and even took steps to curtail LDS power in the territory.successor. Wilford Woodruff became prophet in 1887. Faced with the arrests of dozens of practitioners of polygamy and the probable seizure of all Church property by the federal government, he issued the 1890 Manifesto, which declared that no marriages against the law of the land would be recognized by the Church. In response, several fundamentalist groups broke away from the LDS Church and fled to isolated areas in the US, Canada, and Mexico in order to continue practicing polygamy (some of which continue doing so today).



At one time the LDS Church forbade people of African descent from holding the priesthood or participating in temple ordinances. The exact reasons for this position are a point of some debate, and some of the statements made by Church leaders justifying it would certainly be viewed as racist today. The policy was officially changed in 1978, with "every worthy male" now being eligible to be ordained to the priesthood and participate in temple ordinances. Since this is a particularly controversial matter--even within the Church--we will [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment leave it at that]].

to:

At one time the LDS Church forbade people of African descent from holding the priesthood or participating in temple ordinances. The exact reasons for this position are a point of some debate, and some ordinances to protect the African members from the persecution in certain parts of the statements made by Church leaders justifying it would certainly be viewed as racist today. United States in particular. The policy was officially changed in 1978, with "every worthy male" now being eligible to be ordained to the priesthood and participate in temple ordinances. Since this is a particularly controversial matter--even within the Church--we will [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment leave it at that]].
priesthood.



One popular television series with Mormon influences was BattlestarGalactica, created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the original series were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.

to:

One popular television series with Mormon influences was BattlestarGalactica, created by Glen A. Larson, a member of the LDS Church. This is seen with the Quorum of Twelve, the ruling council of the Twelve Colonies of Kobol, which references the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church, and Kobol clearly being inspired from Kolob, the star near which where God is said to dwell. Commander Adama is a Moses figure, but also somewhat reminiscent of Brigham Young. SufficientlyAdvancedAliens in the original series were also depicted which somewhat resembled Mormon angels, and the phrase used by those aliens: "what you are now we once were. What we are now you may one day become" is straight out of Mormon theology.
29th Dec '13 11:25:32 AM Bense
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Most of the LDS leadership were in polygamous marriages up until the cessation of the practice, and much of the core church membership in the Western US today have polygamist ancestors. Records of plural marriages are available in the Church's genealogical records, which are freely available to non-members, and despite the cessation of the practice they are still considered "valid" marriages to Church members. Due to current shame over the practice, it is hard to get any solid information from the Church.

to:

Most of the LDS leadership were in polygamous marriages up until the cessation of the practice, and much of the core church membership in the Western US today have polygamist ancestors. Records of plural marriages are available in the Church's genealogical records, which are freely available to non-members, and despite the cessation of the practice they are still considered "valid" marriages to Church members. Due to current shame over Even at its height in the practice, late 1800s it is hard seems that only a minority of Church membership ever actually practiced plural marriage. Members considered exceptionally faithful were invited by Church leadership to get any solid information from select plural wives when they were considered able to support additional wives. The consent of the Church.
first wife on a specific potential second wife was required before a second wife could be chosen, consent of the first and second wives was required for a third, etc.
23rd Dec '13 6:21:24 AM ManCalledTrue
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Most of the LDS leadership were in polygamous marriages up until the cessation of the practice, and much of the core church membership in the Western US today have polygamist ancestors. Records of plural marriages are available in the Church's genealogical records, which are freely available to non-members, and despite the cessation of the practice they are still considered "valid" marriages to Church members. Even at its height in the late 1800s it seems that only a minority of Church membership ever actually practiced plural marriage. Members considered exceptionally faithful were invited by Church leadership to select plural wives when they were considered able to support additional wives. The consent of the first wife on a specific potential second wife was required before a second wife could be chosen, consent of the first and second wives was required for a third, etc.

to:

Most of the LDS leadership were in polygamous marriages up until the cessation of the practice, and much of the core church membership in the Western US today have polygamist ancestors. Records of plural marriages are available in the Church's genealogical records, which are freely available to non-members, and despite the cessation of the practice they are still considered "valid" marriages to Church members. Even at its height in Due to current shame over the late 1800s practice, it seems that only a minority of Church membership ever actually practiced plural marriage. Members considered exceptionally faithful were invited by Church leadership is hard to select plural wives when they were considered able to support additional wives. The consent of get any solid information from the first wife on a specific potential second wife was required before a second wife could be chosen, consent of the first and second wives was required for a third, etc.
Church.
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