History UsefulNotes / MisplacedNationalism

19th Apr '17 9:38:16 PM sayaleviathan
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*** Lampshaded much in the first ever ''Asia's Got Talent'' held in Marina Bay, Singapore. All of the Filipino contestants who proudly joined the contest were showered with praise from the country. Even though, when you look at their history, most of them lived in poverty caused by their country's corrupt politicians. Seen here in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ReuOnKSi0s this video]] containing the presentation of the dance group El Gamma Penumbra during one segment of the show. Their dance was about how the World treated mother nature and how destructive she can be if things went overboard. The dance was so well-received, that judges gave it a standing ovation, and that Filipinos just overwhelmingly praised it with patriotic fever. What's ironic, was that the dance actually presented negative Filipino traits such as their habit of throwing their garbage everywhere, as well as dynamite fishing (traits unheard of in Singapore, the place where the contest took place). And yet even so, the Filipino viewers didn't get the message and they just applaud it.


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** Criticizing UsefulNotes/RodrigoDuterte, particularly on his war on drugs, would earn you a truckload of hate from his diehard supporters. Whether you're a journalist regardless if you're local or international, a diplomat or a human rights' group, supporters would condemn you to hell. If you're a Filipino too who disagrees with Duterte, they would call you "DILAWAN!" regardless of affiliation and [[WithUsOrAgainstUs forced you to accept their beliefs or else, you're their enemy]].
12th Mar '17 2:17:35 PM Jhonny
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* Similar to above, the very mention of culture in something that will draw the rage of many in Latin America due to calling the US a cultureless country in contrast with the Latin ones. This is somewhat justified in the fact that the majority of people of Latin America are descended from both the Native Amerindians and the Spaniards that came afterwards [[note]] this is because Spain actively integrated the Amerindians inside the Viceroyalty system, even giving them legal protection to a degree [[/note]], hence they can claim a continuity of the cultures that existed before in sharp contrast to the US, whose policies towards the Natives are [[TheSavageIndian already]] [[UsefulNotes/ManifestDestiny infamous]]. While there are indeed white Americans who can claim "one sixteenth Cherokee" blood or something of the likes, the majority of (even non indigenous descendant) nationals being fluent in an indigenous language (as is the case for Peru and Guaraní) or the national flag being based of an indigenous origin myth (Mexico with [[CoolvsAwesom the eagle fighting a snake on a cactus]]) would be unthinkable in the US.

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* Similar to above, the very mention of culture in something that will draw the rage of many in Latin America due to calling the US a cultureless country in contrast with the Latin ones. This is somewhat justified in the fact that the majority of people of Latin America are descended from both the Native Amerindians and the Spaniards that came afterwards [[note]] this is because Spain actively integrated the Amerindians inside the Viceroyalty system, even giving them legal protection to a degree [[/note]], hence they can claim a continuity of the cultures that existed before in sharp contrast to the US, whose policies towards the Natives are [[TheSavageIndian already]] [[UsefulNotes/ManifestDestiny infamous]]. While there are indeed white Americans who can claim "one sixteenth Cherokee" blood or something of the likes, the majority of (even non indigenous descendant) nationals being fluent in an indigenous language (as is the case for Peru and Guaraní) or the national flag being based of an indigenous origin myth (Mexico with [[CoolvsAwesom [[CoolvsAwesome the eagle fighting a snake on a cactus]]) would be unthinkable in the US.
12th Mar '17 2:16:51 PM Jhonny
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* Similar to the usage of "Yankee" above, there can often be issues over the term "American" itself and who exactly can use the term. Citizens of the United States will often maintain that only citizens of the United States can be termed "Americans" because their country is ''called'' the United States of ''America''; which in turn draws the ire of some from Southern and Latin America who view people from the US as haughty by using the phrase. Since, according to them, being simply located in the continent of North or South America qualifies them to identify as American. Americans tend to be rather disgruntled by this, as they see it as Hispanics/Latinos/etc as trying to 'usurp' or 'repudiate' their cultural identity, and will often point out the absurdity and unwieldiness of other monikers: e.g., "What are we suppose to call ourselves? United Statians?" This isn't helped by the fact that in Spanish, "United Statian" actually sounds pretty good (as ''estadounidense''--try saying it, it's fun) and is in common usage; many Latin Americans simply don't get that "United Statian" (like any of the other proffered alternatives) sounds like nails on a chalkboard to an English-speaker, and could just as easily apply to citizens of Estados Unidos Mexicanos (The United Mexican States). However, another term, "Usonian", used by Frank Lloyd Wright as the name of his style of (then revolutionary) single-story house (which weirdly was a [[ItWillNeverCatchOn flop]] at the time), is used sometimes to refer to people from the United States; in fact, the demonym for someone from the United States in [[UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage Esperanto]] is "Usonano".
** In Spanish you always say "Gringo", though whether that term is (meant to be) offensive is a whole other can of worms.

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* Similar to the usage of "Yankee" above, there can often be issues over the term "American" itself and who exactly can use the term. Citizens of the United States will often maintain that only citizens of the United States can be termed "Americans" because their country is ''called'' the United States of ''America''; which in turn draws the ire of some from Southern and Latin America who view people from the US as haughty by using the phrase. Since, according to them, being simply located in the continent of North or South America qualifies them to identify as American. Americans tend to be rather disgruntled by this, as they see it as Hispanics/Latinos/etc as trying to 'usurp' or 'repudiate' their cultural identity, and will often point out the absurdity and unwieldiness of other monikers: e.g., "What are we suppose supposed to call ourselves? United Statians?" This isn't helped by the fact that in Spanish, "United Statian" actually sounds pretty good (as ''estadounidense''--try saying it, it's fun) and is in common usage; many Latin Americans simply don't get that "United Statian" (like any of the other proffered alternatives) sounds like nails on a chalkboard to an English-speaker, and could just as easily apply to citizens of Estados Unidos Mexicanos Unidos (The United Mexican States). However, another term, "Usonian", used by Frank Lloyd Wright as the name of his style of (then revolutionary) single-story house (which weirdly was a [[ItWillNeverCatchOn flop]] at the time), is used sometimes to refer to people from the United States; in fact, the demonym for someone from the United States in [[UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage Esperanto]] is "Usonano".
** In In colloquial Spanish you always say "Gringo", "Gringo" is a common term for "estadounidenses", though whether that term is (meant to be) offensive is a whole other can of worms.



*** Prior to UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the state identity actually often superseded the "US-ian" identity, as evidenced by the phrase ''these'' United States ''are'', instead of the post 1865 ''The'' United States ''is''. The best known example of state first US second is Robert E Lee, who justified rejecting command of the Union (north) army despite being personally opposed to secession with the fact that he was from Virginia and Virginia had seceded and [[MyCountryRightOrWrong he had to do what his state demanded]].
* Similar to above, the very mention of culture in something that will draw the rage of many in Latin America due to calling the US a cultureless country in contrast with the Latin ones. This is somewhat justified in the fact that the majority of people of Latin America are descended from both the Native Amerindians and the Spaniards that came afterwards [[note]] this is because Spain actively integrated the Amerindians inside the Viceroyalty system, even giving them legal protection [[/note]], hence they can claim a continuity of the cultures that existed before in sharp contrast to the US, whose policies towards the Natives are [[TheSavageIndian already]] [[UsefulNotes/ManifestDestiny infamous]].

to:

*** Prior to UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the state identity actually often superseded the "US-ian" identity, as evidenced by the phrase ''these'' United States ''are'', instead of the post 1865 ''The'' United States ''is''. The best known example of state first US second is Robert E E. Lee, who justified rejecting command of the Union (north) (North) army despite being personally opposed to secession with the fact that he was from Virginia and Virginia had seceded and [[MyCountryRightOrWrong he had to do what his state demanded]].
* Similar to above, the very mention of culture in something that will draw the rage of many in Latin America due to calling the US a cultureless country in contrast with the Latin ones. This is somewhat justified in the fact that the majority of people of Latin America are descended from both the Native Amerindians and the Spaniards that came afterwards [[note]] this is because Spain actively integrated the Amerindians inside the Viceroyalty system, even giving them legal protection to a degree [[/note]], hence they can claim a continuity of the cultures that existed before in sharp contrast to the US, whose policies towards the Natives are [[TheSavageIndian already]] [[UsefulNotes/ManifestDestiny infamous]].infamous]]. While there are indeed white Americans who can claim "one sixteenth Cherokee" blood or something of the likes, the majority of (even non indigenous descendant) nationals being fluent in an indigenous language (as is the case for Peru and Guaraní) or the national flag being based of an indigenous origin myth (Mexico with [[CoolvsAwesom the eagle fighting a snake on a cactus]]) would be unthinkable in the US.
12th Mar '17 10:54:53 AM Matthewbr523
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* Similar to the usage of "Yankee" above, there can often be issues over the term "American" itself and who exactly can use the term. Citizens of the United States will often maintain that only citizens of the United States can be termed "Americans" because their country is ''called'' the United States of ''America''; which in turn draws the ire of some from Southern and Latin America who view people from the US as haughty by using the phrase. Since, according to them, being simply located in the continent of North or South America qualifies them to identify as American. Americans tend to be rather disgruntled by this, as they see it as Hispanics/Latinos/etc as trying to 'usurp' or 'repudiate' their cultural identity, and will often point out the absurdity and unwieldiness of other monikers: e.g., "What are we suppose to call ourselves? United Statians?" This isn't helped by the fact that in Spanish, "United Statian" actually sounds pretty good (as ''estadounidense''--try saying it, it's fun) and is in common usage; many Latin Americans simply don't get that "United Statian" (like any of the other proffered alternatives) sounds like nails on a chalkboard to an English-speaker, and could just as easily apply to citizens of Estados Unidos Mexicanos (The United Mexican States). However, another term, "Usonian", used by Frank Lloyd Wright as the name of his style of (then revolutionary) single-story house (which weirdly was a [[ItWillNeverCatchOn flop]] at the time), is used sometimes to refer to people from the United States; in fact, the demonym for someone from the United States in [[UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage Esperanto]] is "Usono".

to:

* Similar to the usage of "Yankee" above, there can often be issues over the term "American" itself and who exactly can use the term. Citizens of the United States will often maintain that only citizens of the United States can be termed "Americans" because their country is ''called'' the United States of ''America''; which in turn draws the ire of some from Southern and Latin America who view people from the US as haughty by using the phrase. Since, according to them, being simply located in the continent of North or South America qualifies them to identify as American. Americans tend to be rather disgruntled by this, as they see it as Hispanics/Latinos/etc as trying to 'usurp' or 'repudiate' their cultural identity, and will often point out the absurdity and unwieldiness of other monikers: e.g., "What are we suppose to call ourselves? United Statians?" This isn't helped by the fact that in Spanish, "United Statian" actually sounds pretty good (as ''estadounidense''--try saying it, it's fun) and is in common usage; many Latin Americans simply don't get that "United Statian" (like any of the other proffered alternatives) sounds like nails on a chalkboard to an English-speaker, and could just as easily apply to citizens of Estados Unidos Mexicanos (The United Mexican States). However, another term, "Usonian", used by Frank Lloyd Wright as the name of his style of (then revolutionary) single-story house (which weirdly was a [[ItWillNeverCatchOn flop]] at the time), is used sometimes to refer to people from the United States; in fact, the demonym for someone from the United States in [[UsefulNotes/EsperantoTheUniversalLanguage Esperanto]] is "Usono"."Usonano".
10th Mar '17 4:19:47 PM DavidDelony
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* Similar to Europe, right-wing Americans look at Canada as a "socialist nightmare" for its famous national healthcare program and progressive social policies. This naturally irritates most Canadians, who are just of proud of their single-payer healthcare systems as Brits are of the NHS, while left-leaning Americans admire Canada for the same reasons right-wingers loathe it.

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* Similar to Europe, right-wing Americans look at Canada as a "socialist nightmare" for its famous national healthcare program and progressive social policies. This naturally irritates most Canadians, who are just of proud of their single-payer healthcare systems as Brits are of the NHS, while left-leaning Americans admire Canada for the same reasons right-wingers loathe it.
it. Canadians will also point to Stephen Harper's nearly decade-long tenure as prime minister as proof that Canada isn't nearly as left-wing as its American admirers and detractors imagine it to be.
10th Mar '17 3:59:25 PM DavidDelony
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* Costa Ricans also feel very proud of the fact that they abolished the Army. [[ValuesDissonance Probably hard to understand]] for people in other countries that, on the contrary, are proud of their armies and military power, but for ticos is the other way around feeling that they are a particularly exemplary democratic and peaceful country that can lecture the world about pacifism and non-violence, something like the Gandhi of the countries. The fact that one of their presidents won the Nobel Price of Peace and that the country has mediate in many international peace agreements reinforce those believes.

to:

* Costa Ricans also feel very proud of the fact that they abolished the Army. [[ValuesDissonance Probably hard to understand]] for people in other countries that, on the contrary, are proud of their armies and military power, but for ticos is the other way around feeling that they are a particularly exemplary democratic and peaceful country that can lecture the world about pacifism and non-violence, something like the Gandhi of the countries. The fact that one of their presidents won the Nobel Price of Peace and that the country has mediate mediated in many international peace agreements reinforce those believes.beliefs.
13th Feb '17 11:59:41 AM Eilevgmyhren
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** Then, there is the Sami question. Because of massive cultural suppression, ''any'' discussion on ownership to the Finnmark Plateau might end up in a fistfight - and Norwegians may be despised as "bloody southerners" for the heck of it.
30th Jan '17 2:53:08 AM Crosell
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** Western Australia vs. everyone else. Western Australia, even before Federation, has been clamouring to become its own nation (they've tried it twice before, and have failed both times). The eastern states in turn see Western Australians as spoiled moochers who would become a failed state if they actually go through with it. Not helping is Western Australia's flip-flopping attitude: they're vocal about separation during times of prosperity, but when the going gets tough, talks of separation die down quit significantly.

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** Western Australia vs. everyone else. Western Australia, even before Federation, has been clamouring to become its own nation (they've tried it twice before, and have failed both times). The eastern states in turn see Western Australians as spoiled moochers who would become a failed state if they actually go through with it. Not helping is Western Australia's flip-flopping attitude: they're vocal about separation during times of prosperity, but when the going gets tough, talks of separation die down quit quite significantly.
16th Jan '17 11:21:43 AM Jhonny
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* Does the Quesadillas[[hottip:*:a tortilla filled with cheese and usually with other ingredients such as meat, ham, or whatever you like]] [[SeriousBusiness have cheese or not?]] For the people of Central Mexico (Estado de México, Mexico City and Morelos), that dish does not need to contain cheese, and it's just a tortilla with any kind of filling within. Those from outside this area (and especially in northern Mexico) will say that Quesadillas will always have cheese, and anyone suggesting otherwise must get out of their sight immediately.

to:

* Does the Quesadillas[[hottip:*:a Quesadilla[[hottip:*:a tortilla filled with cheese and usually with other ingredients such as meat, ham, or whatever you like]] [[SeriousBusiness have cheese or not?]] For the people of Central Mexico (Estado de México, Mexico City and Morelos), that dish does not need to contain cheese, and it's just a tortilla with any kind of filling within. Those from outside this area (and especially in northern Mexico) will say that Quesadillas will always have cheese, and anyone suggesting otherwise must get out of their sight immediately.
15th Jan '17 9:21:37 PM Tovarishch
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* Does Quesadillas[[hottip:*:a tortilla filled with cheese and usually with other ingredients such as meat, ham, or whatever you like]] [[SeriousBusiness have cheese or not?]] For the people of Central Mexico (Estado de México, Mexico City and Morelos), that dish does not need to contain cheese, and it's just a tortilla with any kind of filling within. Those from outside this area (and especially in northern Mexico) will say that Quesadillas will always have cheese, and anyone suggesting otherwise must get out of their sight immediately.
*

to:

* Does the Quesadillas[[hottip:*:a tortilla filled with cheese and usually with other ingredients such as meat, ham, or whatever you like]] [[SeriousBusiness have cheese or not?]] For the people of Central Mexico (Estado de México, Mexico City and Morelos), that dish does not need to contain cheese, and it's just a tortilla with any kind of filling within. Those from outside this area (and especially in northern Mexico) will say that Quesadillas will always have cheese, and anyone suggesting otherwise must get out of their sight immediately.
*



* Do not ever mention the Rio San Juan (a border river that due to some 19th century quirk belongs entirely to Nicaragua) when either Nicaraguans or Costa Ricans could overhear it. Most citizens of either country have never even ''been'' to the river (which is pretty but relatively remote and sparsely populated), but there is a lot of nationalistic bickering over it and both countries have sued each other in international courts repeatedly, especially during the Ortega (Nicaragua) and Chinchilla (Costa Rica) administrations

to:

* Do not ever mention the Rio San Juan (a border river that due to some 19th century quirk belongs entirely to Nicaragua) when either Nicaraguans or Costa Ricans could overhear it. Most citizens of either country have never even ''been'' to the river (which is pretty but relatively remote and sparsely populated), but there is a lot of nationalistic bickering over it and both countries have sued each other in international courts repeatedly, especially during the Ortega (Nicaragua) and Chinchilla (Costa Rica) administrations
administrations.
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