History UsefulNotes / Mexico

20th May '18 8:59:08 AM costanton11
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In the midst of this, Santa Anna, who was exiled, came in touch with the U.S invaders. He promised them that, if they let him through their blockade, he would use his fame and reputation to make México give up without a fight, and resign half of his territory over to the U.S. A MagnificentBastard, Santa Anna went back on his word, and, upon reaching the capital, quickly became president again, organized the Mexican forces and rose armies to defend. However, the inner political turmoil, and conservatives vs liberals openly fighting as the war was waging on, made the situation unsustainable. The brave mexican defenders were not getting any resources and rapidly began fighting an uphill, doomed battle. One famed regiment of american forces, made up of 200 irishmen and other assorted nationalities, defected the U.S and fought for México, as "El Batallón de San Patricio". They are remembered as heroes even today in México. Despite the brave efforts of its inhabitants, México lost. Santa Anna escaped south, planning on continuing resisting, but was intercepted by the U.S and exiled. It was an interim president, José Manuel de la Peña y Peña, that signed the infamous Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which saw the U.S annexing over half of the Mexican territory. Santa Anna is thus, though an unashamed egomaniacal, innocent of this loss of territory, not that most modern Mexicans know that. For them, him being unable to win the war is enough to condemn the man.

to:

In the midst of this, Santa Anna, who was exiled, came in touch with the U.S invaders. He promised them that, if they let him through their blockade, he would use his fame and reputation to make México give up without a fight, and resign half of his territory over to the U.S. A MagnificentBastard, Santa Anna went back on his word, and, upon reaching the capital, quickly became president again, organized the Mexican forces and rose armies to defend. However, the inner political turmoil, and conservatives vs liberals openly fighting as the war was waging on, made the situation unsustainable. The brave mexican defenders were not getting any resources and rapidly began fighting an uphill, doomed battle. One famed regiment of american forces, made up of 200 irishmen and other assorted nationalities, defected the U.S and fought for México, as "El Batallón de San Patricio". They are remembered as heroes even today in México. Despite the brave efforts of its inhabitants, México lost. Santa Anna escaped south, planning on continuing resisting, but was intercepted by the U.S and exiled. It was an interim president, José Manuel de la Peña y Peña, that signed the infamous Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which saw the U.S annexing over half of the Mexican territory. Santa Anna is thus, though an unashamed egomaniacal, innocent of this loss of territory, not that most modern Mexicans know that. For them, him being unable to win the war is enough to condemn the man.



The second Mexican empire lasted 3 years. Really, it was because the U.S was too busy with its Civil War. Once that whole nasty business was settled (more or less), the U.S resumed their backing of the liberals and Juárez, whilst the French, facing the impending doom of the Franco-Prussian war, withdrew their support of Maximilian in turn, who decided to remain and fight, until he was defeated, summarily executed along with Miguel Miramón and General Mejía, and Conservadores everywhere shot. The Liberales may have won the Civil War, but many political fights happened inside the victorious party as [[EvilPowerVacuum everybody wanted to be president]]. President Juárez, still clinging to his Emergency powers went for reelection, again. Causing war hero and budding MagnificentBastard Porfirio Díaz to rebel... and fail at it. Better luck next time! But, as good national heroes always do, Juárez died just in time (in 1872, merely one year after his reelection) to avoid going the way of Santa Ana into Infamy. In fact, Juárez won only his last election (during which he was president with emergency powers) and for 15 years, that is, until his death, he never let go of the presidency (but good luck trying to bust the myth on Juárez). Mexican "heroes" tend to [[FallenHero end that way]]. ([[Film/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]] was right about that). He was succeeded by the next in line for the job, Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (Sebastián, not Miguel, as both brothers were very important in the Liberal party), then after his time was up he also tried to postulate himself for reelection. Porfirio Díaz rebelled again... and won, won so hard that he got to rule Mexico for the next 30 years. He first ruled for 4 years or so, then put his compadre (godsib) Manuel González on the presidency, but his presidency sucked ass and Díaz decided to reelect himself (after all, where did it say people could get reelected in different president terms?). The [[{{Hypocrite}} hypocrisy]] of rebelling against a president for trying to rewrite the constitution to get reelected, then doing so for thirty years himself, was probably not lost on him, as he actually ''exalted'' the character and justified the actions of Juárez, to justify his own by proxy.

to:

The second Mexican empire lasted 3 years. Really, it was because the U.S was too busy with its Civil War. Once that whole nasty business was settled (more or less), the U.S resumed their backing of the liberals and Juárez, whilst the French, facing the impending doom of the Franco-Prussian war, withdrew their support of Maximilian in turn, who decided to remain and fight, until he was defeated, summarily executed along with Miguel Miramón and General Mejía, and Conservadores everywhere shot. The Liberales may have won the Civil War, but many political fights happened inside the victorious party as [[EvilPowerVacuum everybody wanted to be president]]. President Juárez, still clinging to his Emergency powers went for reelection, again. Causing war hero and budding MagnificentBastard Porfirio Díaz to rebel... and fail at it. Better luck next time! But, as good national heroes always do, Juárez died just in time (in 1872, merely one year after his reelection) to avoid going the way of Santa Ana into Infamy. In fact, Juárez won only his last election (during which he was president with emergency powers) and for 15 years, that is, until his death, he never let go of the presidency (but good luck trying to bust the myth on Juárez). Mexican "heroes" tend to [[FallenHero end that way]]. ([[Film/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]] was right about that). He was succeeded by the next in line for the job, Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (Sebastián, not Miguel, as both brothers were very important in the Liberal party), then after his time was up he also tried to postulate himself for reelection. Porfirio Díaz rebelled again... and won, won so hard that he got to rule Mexico for the next 30 years. He first ruled for 4 years or so, then put his compadre (godsib) Manuel González on the presidency, but his presidency sucked ass and Díaz decided to reelect himself (after all, where did it say people could get reelected in different president terms?). The [[{{Hypocrite}} hypocrisy]] of rebelling against a president for trying to rewrite the constitution to get reelected, then doing so for thirty years himself, was probably not lost on him, as he actually ''exalted'' the character and justified the actions of Juárez, to justify his own by proxy.
13th May '18 12:48:46 AM Wariolander
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A North American country[[note]]Geologically speaking, the border between Central America and North America proper lies in Mexico, but Central America is usually considered part of North America. People mistaking Mexico for "South America" is probably due to the fact that most Mexicans speak Spanish[[/note]] and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.

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A North American country[[note]]Geologically speaking, the border between Central America and North America proper (also known as Northern America) lies in Mexico, but Central America is usually considered part of North America. People mistaking Mexico for "South America" is probably due to the fact that most Mexicans speak Spanish[[/note]] and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.
17th Apr '18 3:38:32 PM costanton11
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Cable access and satellite TV in Mexico, like rock music and videogames, basically took off after 1994 thanks to the NAFTA, which allowed private TV operators to import foreign TV programming. Prior to that it was still technically possible to watch foreign TV, but for that you required a huge satellite dish, some ''very'' expensive decoding equipment, and on top of that you had to learn at least English in order to understand untranslated, uncaptioned foreign programs. Satellite TV later came around 1997-1998, when [=DirecTV=] started operations in Mexico, later followed by Televisa's own service SKY. While its impact on Mexican culture was initially limited since few people were initially capable of affording it, cable and satellite TV eventually managed to create some cultural impact in part by showing off how Mexican broadcasting media content regulations did not apply to paid TV and capitalizing on the moral panic caused by the new foreign shows that suddenly arrived in the country. Paid TV is how Mexico got to know and love shows like ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', ''Series/PimpMyRide'', ''Series/BeakmansWorld'' (which aired initially on Warner Channel and later on Once TV while ''Series/BillNyeTheScienceGuy'' was never even aired), ''Series/{{Jackass}}'', ''DigimonAdventure'', ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'', the old ''DiscoveryKids'' that was initially more focused on 9-12 year olds instead of toddlers, and the fondly remembered TV channel ''Locomotion / Animax'' which, despite being unpopular, never failed to surprise its viewers with its assortment that covered everything from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' to ''Anime/SerialExperimentsLain''.

to:

Cable access and satellite TV in Mexico, like rock music and videogames, basically took off after 1994 thanks to the NAFTA, which allowed private TV operators to import foreign TV programming. Prior to that it was still technically possible to watch foreign TV, but for that you required a huge satellite dish, some ''very'' expensive decoding equipment, and on top of that you had to learn at least English in order to understand untranslated, uncaptioned foreign programs. Satellite TV later came around 1997-1998, when [=DirecTV=] started operations in Mexico, later followed by Televisa's own service SKY. While its impact on Mexican culture was initially limited since few people were initially capable of affording it, cable and satellite TV eventually managed to create some cultural impact in part by showing off how Mexican broadcasting media content regulations did not apply to paid TV and capitalizing on the moral panic caused by the new foreign shows that suddenly arrived in the country. Paid TV is how Mexico got to know and love shows like ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', ''Series/PimpMyRide'', ''Series/BeakmansWorld'' (which aired initially on Warner Channel and later on Once TV while ''Series/BillNyeTheScienceGuy'' was never even aired), ''Series/{{Jackass}}'', ''DigimonAdventure'', ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'', ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'', the old ''DiscoveryKids'' that was initially more focused on 9-12 year olds instead of toddlers, and the fondly remembered TV channel ''Locomotion / Animax'' which, despite being unpopular, never failed to surprise its viewers with its assortment that covered everything from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' to ''Anime/SerialExperimentsLain''.
11th Apr '18 9:49:14 PM EdnaWalker
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Added DiffLines:

->''"Mexico, why do I feel as I do? I simply fell under they spell of you."''
-->-- '''"Mexico"song in Disney/TheThreeCaballeros'''
10th Apr '18 10:50:51 PM acrobox
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Calacas}}
6th Apr '18 9:09:13 PM nombretomado
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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because there is NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because there is NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
1st Apr '18 1:07:50 AM Wariolander
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* ''Film/{{Eréndira}}''

to:

* ''Film/{{Eréndira}}''''Eréndira''



Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, there is NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.




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Please keep this article from sneaking into UsefulNotesOnAmerica -- being this is an US-born wiki, "America" here stands for the USA, with the continent(s) being referred as "American continent(s)" or "the Americas".
23rd Mar '18 11:09:37 PM QuinlanVos
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Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, all because of the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior (especially "chilangos" for the capital city, who tend to be violent and assholes), who actually inhabit these slums. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them. Some are even worse, and more dangerous, for example the "barrios bravos" like Tepito in Mexico City.

to:

Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, all because of the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior (especially "chilangos" for from the capital city, who tend to be violent and assholes), who actually inhabit these slums. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them. Some are even worse, and more dangerous, for example the "barrios bravos" like Tepito in Mexico City.
23rd Mar '18 11:08:57 PM QuinlanVos
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Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, all because of the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior, who actually inhabit these slums. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them.

to:

Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, all because of the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior, interior (especially "chilangos" for the capital city, who tend to be violent and assholes), who actually inhabit these slums. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them.
them. Some are even worse, and more dangerous, for example the "barrios bravos" like Tepito in Mexico City.
23rd Mar '18 10:54:53 PM QuinlanVos
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Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, so don't judge us from those places, ''please''. (No offense to the brothers on the Border) [[note]]''None taken, after all, it's the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior who actually inhabit these slums''[[/note]]. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them.

to:

Also, but don't expect any tour to take you there, you can find astoundingly poor mountain villages with Indians, starving to death and forgotten to the world. The slum village you seem in the movies can be found almost exactly as pictured in several places of the North, and it is worth mentioning the towns bordering the US aren't considered examples of the best of the country, so don't judge us from those places, ''please''. (No offense to the brothers on the Border) [[note]]''None taken, after all, it's all because of the legions of fellow Mexicans immigrating from the south and the interior interior, who actually inhabit these slums''[[/note]].slums. This is not to say that the rest of the country has no slums at all, but they look different from the Hollywood depiction of them.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Mexico