History UsefulNotes / Mexico

11th Oct '17 1:18:46 AM FireCrawler2002
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Home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.

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Home A Middle/Northern American country and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.
11th Oct '17 1:18:46 AM FireCrawler2002
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26th Sep '17 10:23:12 PM lakingsif
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* Creator/SaraRamirez -- Broadway and television actress best known as [[Theatre/{{Spamalot}} the Lady of the Lake]] or [[Series/GreysAnatomy Callie Torres]].
30th Aug '17 3:12:42 AM HalcyonDayz
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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.



-> A bit of history. The red, white and green were the colors of Agustín de Iturbide's Ejército Trigarante (Army of the Three Guarantees), called thus because it guaranteed three things: Independence (from Spain), Religion (Catholic) and Union (All Caste systems were abolished, and all people living in México, whether indigenous, black, criollos, mestizos, or spanish-born were now considered to be equal). The flag was designed by Iturbide himself, it featured the three colors in a diagonal pattern and a golden 8-pointed star on each color. When the Independence was won, Iturbide and his government took the colors of the Trigarante flag, and added a coat of arms based on an old Aztec legend, wherein the gods sent them a vision: they would have to settle on whichever place they found a Golden (we call it Royal) Eagle, devouring a snake, sitting atop a nopal (is that Metal or what?). That place is today's México City. To distinguish the flag from that of UsefulNotes/{{Italy}}, this flag uses a shorter height than the Italian flag, has distinctively darker colors, and adds the coat-of-arms.

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-> A bit of history. The red, white and green were the colors of Agustín de Iturbide's Ejército Trigarante (Army of the Three Guarantees), called thus because it guaranteed three things: Independence (from Spain), Religion (Catholic) and Union (All Caste systems were abolished, and all people living in México, whether indigenous, black, criollos, mestizos, or spanish-born were now considered to be equal). The flag was designed by Iturbide himself, it featured the three colors in a diagonal pattern and a golden 8-pointed star on each color. When the Independence was won, Iturbide and his government took the colors of the Trigarante flag, and added a coat of arms based on an old Aztec legend, wherein the gods sent them a vision: they would have to settle on whichever place they found a Golden (we call it Royal) Eagle, devouring a snake, sitting atop a nopal (is that Metal or what?). That place is today's México City. To distinguish the flag from that of UsefulNotes/{{Italy}}, this flag uses a shorter height than the Italian flag, has distinctively darker colors, and adds the coat-of-arms.
8th Aug '17 6:57:37 PM matruz
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* ''WesternAnimation/KatyLaOruga''


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* ''Film/{{Desiertos}}''
6th Jul '17 4:43:42 AM Erkhyan
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In the midst of this, Santa Anna, who was exiled, came in touch with the U.S invaders. He promised them that, if they let him through their blockade, he would use his fame and reputation to make México give up without a fight, and resign half of his territory over to the U.S. A MagnificentBastard, Santa Anna went back on his word, and, upon reaching the capital, quickly became president again, organized the Mexican forces and rose armies to defend. However, the inner political turmoil, and conservatives vs liberals openly fighting as the war was waging on, made the situation unsustainable. The brave mexican defenders were not getting any resources and rapidly began fighting an uphill, doomed battle. One famed regiment of american forces, made up of 200 irishmen and other assorted nationalities, defected the U.S and fought for México, as "El Batallón de San Patricio". They are remembered as heroes even today in México. Despite the brave efforts of it's inhabitants, México lost. Santa Anna escaped south, planning on continuing resisting, but was intercepted by the U.S and exiled. It was an interim president, José Manuel de la Peña y Peña, that signed the infamous Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which saw the U.S annexing over half of the Mexican territory. Santa Anna is thus, though an unashamed egomaniacal, innocent of this loss of territory, not that most modern Mexicans know that. For them, him being unable to win the war is enough to condemn the man.

The waters did not calm down after that. Liberals won, politically. Their reform laws saw the church and the military losing their privilege (this, however, conveniently did not applied to the political class). Many church-owned and operated establishments, such as schools and orphanages were extricated from them. The church losing it's political power was a worldwide trend, however, in México, it was wildly antidemocratic, as most of the population was, and still is, feverishly catholic. Then president Ignacio Comonfort was not as comfortable as his name suggests. He got a mixed cabinet of both liberals and conservatives and then self-coup d' état'ed. As it turns out, both groups engaged in mature and constructive debate for the betterment of the country via nasty war. This was called the Reform War. Benito Juárez gained the presidency after Comonfort was forced to step down (he wasn't elected, but he became acting president in such a crisis, as President of the Supreme Justice Court). He then fled the capital, declaring he had Emergency Powers and that the government would be wherever he was. In the capital though, two other presidents arose. The interim president and the newly-elected Conservador president, Miguel Miramón. Miramón fought as a child during the defense of the Chapultepec Castle in the Mexican-American war, and was truly a military ace. Under his command, los conservadores started gaining the upper hand, until Juárez was forced to fortify his position in Veracruz. Meanwhile, the U.S government couldn't decide on whose presidency it would recognize. It dictated terms, wherein México would give the U.S perpetual rights to use the narrower part of México as a canal for commerce (what would end up happening with the Canal of Panamá). The conservadores couldn't compromise, but Juárez and the liberals did. After Juárez' representatives signed the McLane-Ocampo treaty, which is fairly unknown but constitutes a violation by the president of national sovereignty, the U.S agreed to back Juárez's government, and it essentially won the war for the liberals. This, in turn, convinced the defeated conservadores to fight fire with fire. If the liberals had U.S backing, then they would secure European support for their side.

to:

In the midst of this, Santa Anna, who was exiled, came in touch with the U.S invaders. He promised them that, if they let him through their blockade, he would use his fame and reputation to make México give up without a fight, and resign half of his territory over to the U.S. A MagnificentBastard, Santa Anna went back on his word, and, upon reaching the capital, quickly became president again, organized the Mexican forces and rose armies to defend. However, the inner political turmoil, and conservatives vs liberals openly fighting as the war was waging on, made the situation unsustainable. The brave mexican defenders were not getting any resources and rapidly began fighting an uphill, doomed battle. One famed regiment of american forces, made up of 200 irishmen and other assorted nationalities, defected the U.S and fought for México, as "El Batallón de San Patricio". They are remembered as heroes even today in México. Despite the brave efforts of it's its inhabitants, México lost. Santa Anna escaped south, planning on continuing resisting, but was intercepted by the U.S and exiled. It was an interim president, José Manuel de la Peña y Peña, that signed the infamous Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which saw the U.S annexing over half of the Mexican territory. Santa Anna is thus, though an unashamed egomaniacal, innocent of this loss of territory, not that most modern Mexicans know that. For them, him being unable to win the war is enough to condemn the man.

The waters did not calm down after that. Liberals won, politically. Their reform laws saw the church and the military losing their privilege (this, however, conveniently did not applied to the political class). Many church-owned and operated establishments, such as schools and orphanages were extricated from them. The church losing it's its political power was a worldwide trend, however, in México, it was wildly antidemocratic, as most of the population was, and still is, feverishly catholic. Then president Ignacio Comonfort was not as comfortable as his name suggests. He got a mixed cabinet of both liberals and conservatives and then self-coup d' état'ed. As it turns out, both groups engaged in mature and constructive debate for the betterment of the country via nasty war. This was called the Reform War. Benito Juárez gained the presidency after Comonfort was forced to step down (he wasn't elected, but he became acting president in such a crisis, as President of the Supreme Justice Court). He then fled the capital, declaring he had Emergency Powers and that the government would be wherever he was. In the capital though, two other presidents arose. The interim president and the newly-elected Conservador president, Miguel Miramón. Miramón fought as a child during the defense of the Chapultepec Castle in the Mexican-American war, and was truly a military ace. Under his command, los conservadores started gaining the upper hand, until Juárez was forced to fortify his position in Veracruz. Meanwhile, the U.S government couldn't decide on whose presidency it would recognize. It dictated terms, wherein México would give the U.S perpetual rights to use the narrower part of México as a canal for commerce (what would end up happening with the Canal of Panamá). The conservadores couldn't compromise, but Juárez and the liberals did. After Juárez' representatives signed the McLane-Ocampo treaty, which is fairly unknown but constitutes a violation by the president of national sovereignty, the U.S agreed to back Juárez's government, and it essentially won the war for the liberals. This, in turn, convinced the defeated conservadores to fight fire with fire. If the liberals had U.S backing, then they would secure European support for their side.
6th Jul '17 4:40:13 AM Erkhyan
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After this, comes the Texan conflict at which point Mexicans become {{Red Shirt}}s to attack The Alamo. By the way, don't bring this up in the company of polite Mexicans unless you want to hear an earful about how the US supported Texas' independence only to annex it and use it as a ''casus belli'' once Mexico attacked. Bring it up in the company of impolite Mexicans and, well... let's just say they can hold a grudge for centuries (just ask Spain). Worth noting is how Antonio de Padua Marí­a Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (try to say that without stopping to breath), mostly known as Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna or just Santa Anna, went from Independence hero to eleven times president/dictator to national traitor, first class, due to the loss of the war and secession of almost half of their land to the victorious United States. It's because of his merry-go-round presidencies that Mexicans, ''to this day,'' distrust re-election on principle [[note]]Although after Santa Anna at least three more presidents (Juárez, Díaz and Obregón) got themselves reelected in the 70 years that followed[[/note]]. Funnily enough, though Mexican's distrust their government as a rule, they always believe the history that said government wrote for them, and thus, hate Santa Anna with a passion, even though he is in fact not responsible, either for the loss of Texas or for the loss of half of México's territory (which came 10 years later, so don't mix the two conflicts, please). Santa Anna got cocky in Texas and was surprise as his 700-man force was resting. Decimated, Santa Anna was soon captured, and forced to sign a document wherein he ordered Mexican forces to withdraw. See, Santa Anna had split his army in 3, and the other two groups combined were over 2000 strong, better trained, equipped and much more than a match for Houston's forces. General Urrea, third in command (who became second in command after Santa Anna's capture) wanted to attack the Texans, but Vicente Filisola, promoted to first in command, failed to use his advantage and eventually chose to obey Santa Anna even if he, as a captured man, no longer had any political power. In fact, though Mexico withdrew, the opinion in México for the next 10 years was that Texas was still it's territory, and that eventually they'll send forces to bring it back in... it didn't quite happened like that. Santa Anna went on to tour the U.S, meet the president, and surprisingly, being hailed as a hero by minorities such as blacks because of México's novel approach to slavery, namely, abolishing it. Oh, and he also was partly responsible for the creation of chewing gum.

Then came the Mexican-American war, which, in México, is characterized as an unjust conflict of a more powerful nation bullying a far weaker and less established one. Following a shady event at the border, and the U.S annexation of Texas (which México still regarded as it's territory), war was declared. The problem, however, was that Mexico was politically fractured. On one side were the Conservadores, who believed that México's culture laid with it's Hispanic roots (like it's language, religion, some customs) and that many mechanisms that worked well in Colonial Mexico should be maintained. Some wanted a return to monarchy, since a frankly still largely uneducated nation like México couldn't really trust it's population to elect the most convenient ruler. They also were a bit justified in thinking that a republic led to instability every election, civil war and bloodshed (because up to that point, and still in the near future, it had, and it would.) On the other side were the Liberales, mostly freemasons, who disliked the Catholic Church, and believed México should eschew it's hispanic roots and try to emulate it's northern neighbor to a t in everything it could. What is important is recognizing that, although the faulty education system didn't educate us with this belief, there usually never are good guys vs bad guys situations, and neither of these groups could fit squarely into either category. There were also moderated liberals, who advocated a more reserved lberal agenda, recognizing how ingrained catholicism and hispanic culture was in México.

to:

After this, comes the Texan conflict at which point Mexicans become {{Red Shirt}}s to attack The Alamo. By the way, don't bring this up in the company of polite Mexicans unless you want to hear an earful about how the US supported Texas' independence only to annex it and use it as a ''casus belli'' once Mexico attacked. Bring it up in the company of impolite Mexicans and, well... let's just say they can hold a grudge for centuries (just ask Spain). Worth noting is how Antonio de Padua Marí­a Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (try to say that without stopping to breath), mostly known as Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna or just Santa Anna, went from Independence hero to eleven times president/dictator to national traitor, first class, due to the loss of the war and secession of almost half of their land to the victorious United States. It's because of his merry-go-round presidencies that Mexicans, ''to this day,'' distrust re-election on principle [[note]]Although after Santa Anna at least three more presidents (Juárez, Díaz and Obregón) got themselves reelected in the 70 years that followed[[/note]]. Funnily enough, though Mexican's distrust their government as a rule, they always believe the history that said government wrote for them, and thus, hate Santa Anna with a passion, even though he is in fact not responsible, either for the loss of Texas or for the loss of half of México's territory (which came 10 years later, so don't mix the two conflicts, please). Santa Anna got cocky in Texas and was surprise as his 700-man force was resting. Decimated, Santa Anna was soon captured, and forced to sign a document wherein he ordered Mexican forces to withdraw. See, Santa Anna had split his army in 3, and the other two groups combined were over 2000 strong, better trained, equipped and much more than a match for Houston's forces. General Urrea, third in command (who became second in command after Santa Anna's capture) wanted to attack the Texans, but Vicente Filisola, promoted to first in command, failed to use his advantage and eventually chose to obey Santa Anna even if he, as a captured man, no longer had any political power. In fact, though Mexico withdrew, the opinion in México for the next 10 years was that Texas was still it's its territory, and that eventually they'll send forces to bring it back in... it didn't quite happened like that. Santa Anna went on to tour the U.S, meet the president, and surprisingly, being hailed as a hero by minorities such as blacks because of México's novel approach to slavery, namely, abolishing it. Oh, and he also was partly responsible for the creation of chewing gum.

Then came the Mexican-American war, which, in México, is characterized as an unjust conflict of a more powerful nation bullying a far weaker and less established one. Following a shady event at the border, and the U.S annexation of Texas (which México still regarded as it's its territory), war was declared. The problem, however, was that Mexico was politically fractured. On one side were the Conservadores, who believed that México's culture laid with it's its Hispanic roots (like it's its language, religion, some customs) and that many mechanisms that worked well in Colonial Mexico should be maintained. Some wanted a return to monarchy, since a frankly still largely uneducated nation like México couldn't really trust it's its population to elect the most convenient ruler. They also were a bit justified in thinking that a republic led to instability every election, civil war and bloodshed (because up to that point, and still in the near future, it had, and it would.) On the other side were the Liberales, mostly freemasons, who disliked the Catholic Church, and believed México should eschew it's its hispanic roots and try to emulate it's its northern neighbor to a t in everything it could. What is important is recognizing that, although the faulty education system didn't educate us with this belief, there usually never are good guys vs bad guys situations, and neither of these groups could fit squarely into either category. There were also moderated liberals, who advocated a more reserved lberal agenda, recognizing how ingrained catholicism and hispanic culture was in México.



The second Mexican empire lasted 3 years. Really, it was because the U.S was too busy with it's Civil War. Once that whole nasty business was settled (more or less), the U.S resumed their backing of the liberals and Juárez, whilst the French, facing the impending doom of the Franco-Prussian war, withdrew their support of Maximilian in turn, who decided to remain and fight, until he was defeated, summarily executed along with Miguel Miramón and General Mejía, and Conservadores everywhere shot. The Liberales may have won the Civil War, but many political fights happened inside the victorious party as [[EvilPowerVacuum everybody wanted to be president]]. President Juárez, still clinging to his Emergency powers went for reelection, again. Causing war hero and budding MagnificentBastard Porfirio Díaz to rebel... and fail at it. Better luck next time! But, as good national heroes always do, Juárez died just in time (in 1872, merely one year after his reelection) to avoid going the way of Santa Ana into Infamy. In fact, Juárez won only his last election (during which he was president with emergency powers) and for 15 years, that is, until his death, he never let go of the presidency (but good luck trying to bust the myth on Juárez). Mexican "heroes" tend to [[FallenHero end that way]]. ([[Film/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]] was right about that). He was succeeded by the next in line for the job, Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (Sebastián, not Miguel, as both brothers were very important in the Liberal party), then after his time was up he also tried to postulate himself for reelection. Porfirio Díaz rebelled again... and won, won so hard that he got to rule Mexico for the next 30 years. He first ruled for 4 years or so, then put his compadre (godsib) Manuel González on the presidency, but his presidency sucked ass and Díaz decided to reelect himself (after all, where did it say people could get reelected in different president terms?). The [[{{Hypocrite}} hypocrisy]] of rebelling against a president for trying to rewrite the constitution to get reelected, then doing so for thirty years himself, was probably not lost on him, as he actually ''exalted'' the character and justified the actions of Juárez, to justify his own by proxy.

to:

The second Mexican empire lasted 3 years. Really, it was because the U.S was too busy with it's its Civil War. Once that whole nasty business was settled (more or less), the U.S resumed their backing of the liberals and Juárez, whilst the French, facing the impending doom of the Franco-Prussian war, withdrew their support of Maximilian in turn, who decided to remain and fight, until he was defeated, summarily executed along with Miguel Miramón and General Mejía, and Conservadores everywhere shot. The Liberales may have won the Civil War, but many political fights happened inside the victorious party as [[EvilPowerVacuum everybody wanted to be president]]. President Juárez, still clinging to his Emergency powers went for reelection, again. Causing war hero and budding MagnificentBastard Porfirio Díaz to rebel... and fail at it. Better luck next time! But, as good national heroes always do, Juárez died just in time (in 1872, merely one year after his reelection) to avoid going the way of Santa Ana into Infamy. In fact, Juárez won only his last election (during which he was president with emergency powers) and for 15 years, that is, until his death, he never let go of the presidency (but good luck trying to bust the myth on Juárez). Mexican "heroes" tend to [[FallenHero end that way]]. ([[Film/TheDarkKnight Harvey Dent]] was right about that). He was succeeded by the next in line for the job, Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (Sebastián, not Miguel, as both brothers were very important in the Liberal party), then after his time was up he also tried to postulate himself for reelection. Porfirio Díaz rebelled again... and won, won so hard that he got to rule Mexico for the next 30 years. He first ruled for 4 years or so, then put his compadre (godsib) Manuel González on the presidency, but his presidency sucked ass and Díaz decided to reelect himself (after all, where did it say people could get reelected in different president terms?). The [[{{Hypocrite}} hypocrisy]] of rebelling against a president for trying to rewrite the constitution to get reelected, then doing so for thirty years himself, was probably not lost on him, as he actually ''exalted'' the character and justified the actions of Juárez, to justify his own by proxy.
5th Jun '17 12:45:21 PM matruz
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* Creator/DiegoLuna -- Actor, known for his role as Cassian Andor on ''Film/RogueOne''.
27th May '17 9:18:18 AM matruz
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Coco}}''
15th Jan '17 6:59:53 AM jamespolk
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* ''Film/PansLabyrinth''
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