History UsefulNotes / Mexico

24th Nov '17 8:56:50 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/{{Frida Kahlo}} -- Famous surrealist painter, subject of the film ''Film/{{Frida}}''.

to:

* Creator/{{Frida Kahlo}} Creator/FridaKahlo -- Famous surrealist painter, subject of the film ''Film/{{Frida}}''.



* ''Film/{{Frida}}''


Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/{{Frida}}''
24th Nov '17 8:47:53 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[index]]



* ''Film/{{Biutiful}}''



* ''Film/Canoa''
* ''Film/Eréndira''
* ''Film/Mexico 2000''


to:

* ''Film/Canoa''
''Film/{{Canoa}}''
* ''Film/Eréndira''
''Film/{{Eréndira}}''
* ''Film/Mexico 2000''

''Film/{{Mexico 2000}}''





to:

[[/index]]
15th Nov '17 6:29:11 AM UchuuFlamenco
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
29th Oct '17 3:57:39 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/OutToLunch'': The fourth stage takes place here.
21st Oct '17 8:25:22 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A Northern American country and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.

to:

A Northern North American country country[[note]]Geologically speaking, the border between Central America and North America proper lies in Mexico, but Central America is usually considered part of North America. People mistaking Mexico for "South America" is probably due to the fact that most Mexicans speak Spanish[[/note]] and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.
19th Oct '17 9:29:27 PM FireCrawler2002
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A Middle/Northern American country and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.

to:

A Middle/Northern Northern American country and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.
11th Oct '17 1:18:46 AM FireCrawler2002
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.

to:

Home A Middle/Northern American country and home of WesternAnimation/SpeedyGonzales, [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bumblebee Man]], and Creator/GuillermoDelToro, Mexico can stir up more emotion in three syllables than can be wrought from a {{Wangst}} filled RomanticPlotTumor. Whether it's love or hate depends entirely on the person.
11th Oct '17 1:18:46 AM FireCrawler2002
Is there an issue? Send a Message
26th Sep '17 10:23:12 PM lakingsif
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Creator/SaraRamirez -- Broadway and television actress best known as [[Theatre/{{Spamalot}} the Lady of the Lake]] or [[Series/GreysAnatomy Callie Torres]].
30th Aug '17 3:12:42 AM HalcyonDayz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first UsefulNotes/PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs [=CDs=] that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.



-> A bit of history. The red, white and green were the colors of Agustín de Iturbide's Ejército Trigarante (Army of the Three Guarantees), called thus because it guaranteed three things: Independence (from Spain), Religion (Catholic) and Union (All Caste systems were abolished, and all people living in México, whether indigenous, black, criollos, mestizos, or spanish-born were now considered to be equal). The flag was designed by Iturbide himself, it featured the three colors in a diagonal pattern and a golden 8-pointed star on each color. When the Independence was won, Iturbide and his government took the colors of the Trigarante flag, and added a coat of arms based on an old Aztec legend, wherein the gods sent them a vision: they would have to settle on whichever place they found a Golden (we call it Royal) Eagle, devouring a snake, sitting atop a nopal (is that Metal or what?). That place is today's México City. To distinguish the flag from that of UsefulNotes/{{Italy}}, this flag uses a shorter height than the Italian flag, has distinctively darker colors, and adds the coat-of-arms.

to:

-> A bit of history. The red, white and green were the colors of Agustín de Iturbide's Ejército Trigarante (Army of the Three Guarantees), called thus because it guaranteed three things: Independence (from Spain), Religion (Catholic) and Union (All Caste systems were abolished, and all people living in México, whether indigenous, black, criollos, mestizos, or spanish-born were now considered to be equal). The flag was designed by Iturbide himself, it featured the three colors in a diagonal pattern and a golden 8-pointed star on each color. When the Independence was won, Iturbide and his government took the colors of the Trigarante flag, and added a coat of arms based on an old Aztec legend, wherein the gods sent them a vision: they would have to settle on whichever place they found a Golden (we call it Royal) Eagle, devouring a snake, sitting atop a nopal (is that Metal or what?). That place is today's México City. To distinguish the flag from that of UsefulNotes/{{Italy}}, this flag uses a shorter height than the Italian flag, has distinctively darker colors, and adds the coat-of-arms.
This list shows the last 10 events of 200. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Mexico