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History UsefulNotes / Mexico

11th May '16 2:11:58 PM DaNuke
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Cable access and satellite TV in Mexico, like rock music and videogames, basically took off after 1994 thanks to the NAFTA, which allowed private TV operators to import foreign TV programming. Prior to that it was still technically possible to watch foreign TV, but for that you required a huge satellite dish, some ''very'' expensive decoding equipment, and on top of that you had to learn at least English in order to understand untranslated, uncaptioned foreign programs. Satellite TV later came around 1997-1998, when [=DirecTV=] started operations in Mexico, later followed by Televisa's own service SKY. While its impact on Mexican culture was initially limited since few people were initially capable of affording it, cable and satellite TV eventually managed to create some cultural impact in part by showing off how Mexican broadcasting media content regulations did not apply to paid TV and capitalizing on the moral panic caused by the new foreign shows that suddenly arrived in the country. Paid TV is how Mexico got to know and love shows like ''SouthPark'', ''PimpMyRide'', ''BeakmansWorld'' (which aired initially on Warner Channel and later on Once TV while ''BillNyeTheScienceGuy'' was never even aired), ''{{Jackass}}'', ''DigimonAdventure'', ''MalcolmInTheMiddle'', the old ''DiscoveryKids'' that was initially more focused on 9-12 year olds instead of toddlers, and the fondly remembered TV channel ''Locomotion / Animax'' which, despite being unpopular, never failed to surprise its viewers with its assortment that covered everything from ''SouthPark'' to ''SerialExperimentsLain''.
10th May '16 11:48:25 AM DaNuke
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Traditional and cellular telephone services are quite inefficient and charge some of the highest service rates in the world. This in part due to the fact that most traditional phone land lines are serviced by a company called Telmex, property of Carlos Slim, the richest man on the planet, whose company enjoys a monopoly grant from the government. This has been changing as cable companies are entering the traditional phone services at a lower rate than Telmex, and recent laws allow people to switch companies without having to change phone numbers. In 2015, Iusacell and Nextel decided to mere together to create AT&T Mexico, which will be a competitor to other cellular phone companies like Telcel and Movistar.

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Traditional and cellular telephone services are quite inefficient and charge some of the highest service rates in the world. This in part due to the fact that most traditional phone land lines are serviced by a company called Telmex, property of Carlos Slim, the richest man on the planet, whose company enjoys a monopoly grant from the government. This has been changing as cable companies are entering the traditional phone services at a lower rate than Telmex, and recent laws allow people to switch companies without having to change phone numbers. In 2015, Iusacell and Nextel decided to mere together to create AT&T Mexico, which will be a competitor to other cellular phone companies like Telcel and Movistar.
Movistar. On the flip side, however, Mexican [=ISPs=] are pretty much net-neutral and don't really care much about how you use your internet connection; you can torrent freely without getting a warning, they won't inject advertisements into your everyday browsing, you always get the same performance regardless of whether you're doing media streaming, large downloads or online gaming, and the only ISP that meters your bandwidth is Izzi and it's only one out of many different [=ISPs=] such as Telmex, Cablevisión, Axtel, Totalplay or Megacable.
10th May '16 11:35:39 AM DaNuke
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* Creator/AlejandroGonzalezInarritu -- Film director, currently best known for directing ''{{Revenant}}'', the movie that gave LeonardoDiCaprio his first Oscar.

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* Creator/AlejandroGonzalezInarritu -- Film director, currently best known for directing ''{{Revenant}}'', ''Film/TheRevenant'', the movie that gave LeonardoDiCaprio his first Oscar.
10th May '16 11:33:54 AM DaNuke
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* Creator/AlejandroGonzalezInarritu -- Film director.

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* Creator/AlejandroGonzalezInarritu -- Film director.director, currently best known for directing ''{{Revenant}}'', the movie that gave LeonardoDiCaprio his first Oscar.
6th May '16 12:46:31 PM Jhonny
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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgrhog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgrhog'' ''SonicTheHedgehog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
6th May '16 8:41:50 AM DaNuke
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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 4 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that that, unlike Nintendo's game cartridges, didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 4 2.50 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Sega, however, never sold any of their consoles in Mexico; as such, don't expect a Mexican to understand references to ''SonicTheHedgrhog'' or any other videogame series from Sega. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
5th May '16 4:59:28 PM DaNuke
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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 4 US dollars). Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.

to:

Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 4 US dollars). On top of that, arcade machines got quite popular in the country, with one of the most famous games being ''KingOfFighters'' -- the archetypal kid who snuck away from school or spent the tortillas' change on his local SNK arcade was actually one of the main reasons why this saga became so popular in Mexico, enough to motivate SNK to create an entire Mexican fighter team. Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
5th May '16 4:55:36 PM DaNuke
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The pop music industry is quite influential in the Spanish speaking world but it's very hampered because Mexico is a haven of copyright piracy. Local music that plays harder than 2 in the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness was actively ostracized by mainstream media for decades, specially after the fiasco caused by the "Rock y Ruedas sobre Avándaro", in which the government had to step in due to a sudden MoralPanic. Another factor that stifled the genre preferences was ''[[http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siempre_en_Domingo Siempre en Domingo]]'', a musical variety show displayed on Sundays, which, with a few exceptions, it was more a showcase of the presenter's favourite artists rather than a real musical variety show. The breaking point of rock music in Mexico was the NAFTA in 1994, which brought a massive, sudden influx of foreign music into Mexico that actually caused a certain amount of moral panic during the [=90s=] as millions of distraught parents found their sons listening to hard rock, metal and other kinds of music that were well around level 9 in the aforementioned music hardness scale. Then the internet brought all the music in MP3 format the early [=P2P=] networks had to offer, and by 2005 rock music was already widely accepted in Mexico. As of 2016, some radio stations have begun occasionally playing hard rock, nobody will bat an eye if they see your phone full of heavy-ish metal, many top name bands like Iron Maiden have begun to routinely perform in Mexico, and the popularity, convenience and low cost of media streaming has led many people to forego piracy (both online and physical) and turn over to legal services like Spotify or iTunes.

to:

The pop music industry is quite influential in the Spanish speaking world but it's very hampered because Mexico is a haven of copyright piracy. Local music that plays harder than 2 in the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness was actively ostracized by mainstream media for decades, specially after the fiasco caused by the "Rock y Ruedas sobre Avándaro", in which the government had to step in due to a sudden MoralPanic. Another factor that stifled the genre preferences was ''[[http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siempre_en_Domingo Siempre en Domingo]]'', a musical variety show displayed on Sundays, which, with a few exceptions, it was more a showcase of the presenter's favourite artists rather than a real musical variety show. The breaking point of rock music in Mexico was the NAFTA in 1994, which brought a massive, sudden influx of foreign music into Mexico that actually caused a certain amount of moral panic during the [=90s=] as millions of distraught parents found their sons listening to hard rock, metal and other kinds of music that were well around level 9 in the aforementioned music hardness scale. Then the internet brought all the music in MP3 format the early [=P2P=] networks had to offer, and by 2005 rock music was already widely accepted in Mexico. As of 2016, some radio stations have begun occasionally playing hard rock, nobody will bat an eye if they see your phone full of heavy-ish metal, many top name bands like Iron Maiden have begun to routinely perform in Mexico, and the popularity, convenience and low cost of media streaming has led many people to forego piracy (both online and physical) and turn over to legal services like Spotify or iTunes.


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Videogames had it better to some degree than other forms of media in Mexico, thanks in large part to the NAFTA's enaction in 1994 taking place when the game industry was still not quite as mature as today. Like rock music, their arrival caused ''widespread'' moral panic as many parents saw their children ripping the spinal cord from their opponents in ''MortalKombat'' and happily causing massive chaos in the early ''GrandTheftAuto'' releases; obviously, because ThereIsNoSuchThingAsBadPublicity, this moral panic just ended up backfiring and making videogames even more popular. As the generation that got to play the first videogames aged and started having children of their own, videogames started gaining increasingly more acceptance in the country, and nowadays they're no longer "those weird games today's kids play" anymore but instead just another form of entertainment. Piracy played a very big role in the popularity of videogames by making bootlegged consoles readily available, especially with the first PlayStation, whose games didn't lose much build quality by account of being easily reproducible CDs that didn't require any assembly -- you just needed a modded console to unlock a whole new world of games that could cost as low as $30 pesos per disc (about 4 US dollars). Like music, videogame piracy has dropped noticeably since 2010 thanks to [[{{Steam}} Gabe Newell]]'s incredible bargains on PC games and the relative ease of acquiring cheap computer parts thanks to the NAFTA as well.
5th May '16 4:27:24 PM DaNuke
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The pop music industry is quite influential in the Spanish speaking world but it's very hampered because Mexico is a haven of copyright piracy. Local music that plays harder than 2 in the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness was actively ostracized by mainstream media for decades, specially after the fiasco caused by the "Rock y Ruedas sobre Avándaro", in which the government had to step in due to a sudden MoralPanic. Another factor that stifled the genre preferences was ''[[http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siempre_en_Domingo Siempre en Domingo]]'', a musical variety show displayed on Sundays, which, with a few exceptions, it was more a showcase of the presenter's favourite artists rather than a real musical variety show. Rock music has been more accepted in recent years than before.

to:

The pop music industry is quite influential in the Spanish speaking world but it's very hampered because Mexico is a haven of copyright piracy. Local music that plays harder than 2 in the MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness was actively ostracized by mainstream media for decades, specially after the fiasco caused by the "Rock y Ruedas sobre Avándaro", in which the government had to step in due to a sudden MoralPanic. Another factor that stifled the genre preferences was ''[[http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siempre_en_Domingo Siempre en Domingo]]'', a musical variety show displayed on Sundays, which, with a few exceptions, it was more a showcase of the presenter's favourite artists rather than a real musical variety show. Rock The breaking point of rock music has been more in Mexico was the NAFTA in 1994, which brought a massive, sudden influx of foreign music into Mexico that actually caused a certain amount of moral panic during the [=90s=] as millions of distraught parents found their sons listening to hard rock, metal and other kinds of music that were well around level 9 in the aforementioned music hardness scale. Then the internet brought all the music in MP3 format the early [=P2P=] networks had to offer, and by 2005 rock music was already widely accepted in recent years than before.
Mexico. As of 2016, some radio stations have begun occasionally playing hard rock, nobody will bat an eye if they see your phone full of heavy-ish metal, many top name bands like Iron Maiden have begun to routinely perform in Mexico, and the popularity, convenience and low cost of media streaming has led many people to forego piracy (both online and physical) and turn over to legal services like Spotify or iTunes.
5th May '16 4:08:22 PM DaNuke
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Please keep this article from sneaking into UsefulNotesOnAmerica -- being this is an American wiki, "America" here stands for the USA, with the continent(s) being referred as "American continent(s)".

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Please keep this article from sneaking into UsefulNotesOnAmerica -- being this is an American US-born wiki, "America" here stands for the USA, with the continent(s) being referred as "American continent(s)".continent(s)" or "the Americas".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Mexico