History UsefulNotes / Mali

19th Jul '17 12:36:41 PM HelloLamppost
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* The story of Sundiata, Mali's most famous king, is the national epic, passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as ''Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''

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* The story of Sundiata, Mali's most famous king, is the national epic, passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis.(or "jelis"). Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as ''Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''
19th Jul '17 12:35:41 PM HelloLamppost
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* The Epic of Sundiata is the national epic and the story of Mali's most famous king. The story was passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as ''Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''

to:

* The Epic of Sundiata is the national epic and the story of Sundiata, Mali's most famous king. The story was king, is the national epic, passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as ''Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''
19th Jul '17 12:33:43 PM HelloLamppost
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* The Epic of Sundiata is the national epic and the story of Mali's most famous king. The story was passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as "Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''

to:

* The Epic of Sundiata is the national epic and the story of Mali's most famous king. The story was passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as "Sundiata, ''Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''
19th Jul '17 12:33:31 PM HelloLamppost
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[[AC: Literature]]
* The Epic of Sundiata is the national epic and the story of Mali's most famous king. The story was passed along as an oral tradition by the griots or delis. Probably the most famous version is that told by the griot Mamadou Kouyaté and transcribed and published by Djibril Tamsir Niane as "Sundiata, An Epic of Old Mali.''
5th Jul '17 12:19:01 PM Random888
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[[AC: Video Games]]
* One of the missions in ''[[VideoGame/WhereInTimeIsCarmenSandiego1997 Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego?]]'' involves helping Mansa Musa get some salt for his pilgrimage to Mecca, after the original was stolen by Carmen's thief.
5th Jul '17 12:09:29 PM Random888
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* In ''Disney/TheAristocats'', Edgar attempts to mail the cats to Timbuktu. The movie incorrectly places Timbuktu in French Equatorial Africa. In 1910, when the film takes place, Timbuktu would have been located in French West Africa.
13th Jan '17 12:30:06 PM jamespolk
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!!Works set in Mali

[[AC: Film]]
* ''Film/{{Timbuktu}}'' is about the 2012-2013 occupation of the city by radical jihadists.

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12th Jul '16 7:16:56 PM Discar
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All of this blew out of the window when [[OutsideContextVillain the Europeans discovered seafaring as a swift way to trade, which rendered desert-crossing obsolete, followed by them arriving at coastal Western Africa to begin their incursion as part of the Scramble]]. Though most of the territories were still under nominal rule by the sultans and kings, the French won the area in the late 19th century and incorporated it as the French Sudan colony. In the mid-1950s, it was renamed the Sudanese Republic and united with the Senegal Colony to its west. The union gained independence from France together in 1960 as the Mali Federation, but Senegal opted out a few months afterward, leaving Mali on its own.

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All of this blew out of the window when [[OutsideContextVillain [[OutsideContextProblem the Europeans discovered seafaring as a swift way to trade, which rendered desert-crossing obsolete, followed by them arriving at coastal Western Africa to begin their incursion as part of the Scramble]]. Though most of the territories were still under nominal rule by the sultans and kings, the French won the area in the late 19th century and incorporated it as the French Sudan colony. In the mid-1950s, it was renamed the Sudanese Republic and united with the Senegal Colony to its west. The union gained independence from France together in 1960 as the Mali Federation, but Senegal opted out a few months afterward, leaving Mali on its own.
5th May '16 10:35:04 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 10:34:10 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach it. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach it.the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
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