History UsefulNotes / Mali

12th Jul '16 7:16:56 PM Discar
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All of this blew out of the window when [[OutsideContextVillain the Europeans discovered seafaring as a swift way to trade, which rendered desert-crossing obsolete, followed by them arriving at coastal Western Africa to begin their incursion as part of the Scramble]]. Though most of the territories were still under nominal rule by the sultans and kings, the French won the area in the late 19th century and incorporated it as the French Sudan colony. In the mid-1950s, it was renamed the Sudanese Republic and united with the Senegal Colony to its west. The union gained independence from France together in 1960 as the Mali Federation, but Senegal opted out a few months afterward, leaving Mali on its own.

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All of this blew out of the window when [[OutsideContextVillain [[OutsideContextProblem the Europeans discovered seafaring as a swift way to trade, which rendered desert-crossing obsolete, followed by them arriving at coastal Western Africa to begin their incursion as part of the Scramble]]. Though most of the territories were still under nominal rule by the sultans and kings, the French won the area in the late 19th century and incorporated it as the French Sudan colony. In the mid-1950s, it was renamed the Sudanese Republic and united with the Senegal Colony to its west. The union gained independence from France together in 1960 as the Mali Federation, but Senegal opted out a few months afterward, leaving Mali on its own.
5th May '16 10:35:04 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 10:34:10 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach it. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach it.the city. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 10:32:55 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying to reach it. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who spent centuries trying unsuccessfully to reach it. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, Westerners finally reached the city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 10:32:20 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for spent centuries afterward regarded trying to reach it. During this time, Europeans came to regard Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. CityOfGold, an African El Dorado. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which Westerners finally put an end to reached the conception city only to find that it had gone into decline since the time of it as an African El Dorado.Leo Africanu and that its fabled riches did not exist. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 9:16:33 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and thus may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 8:53:45 AM Random888
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In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".

to:

In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a quasi-mythical place and may be subject to the EskimosArentReal trope. It's especially common for Timbuktu to be used as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
5th May '16 8:41:34 AM Random888
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Added DiffLines:


In the West, the best-known aspect of Mali is the city of Timbuktu. This fame originated in the sixteenth century with a Christianized Moor named Leo Africanu. His description of Timbuktu's wealth caught the attention of European explorers, who for centuries afterward regarded Timbuktu as a fabled CityOfGold. In the early nineteenth century, American sailor Robert Adams became the first Westerner to provide a firsthand account of Timbuktu, which finally put an end to the conception of it as an African El Dorado. Nevertheless, Timbuktu is still often evoked in Western culture as a shorthand for a faraway place, e.g. the phrase "from here to Timbuktu".
26th Apr '16 4:20:36 AM Dimas28
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Mali, also known officially as the Republic of Mali ('''French:''' ''République du Mali'') is a large country in a country in the Eastern Sahara very close to the Atlantic coast, although it doesn't reach it. Like other Saharan states, it's huge (8th biggest in Africa), but has a comparatively small population of about 14 million, which are concentrated in the fertile south since the triangular-shaped northern part is nothing but [[CrossingTheDesert gigantic patches of desert and dry valleys]].

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Mali, also known officially as the Republic of Mali ('''French:''' ''République du Mali'') is a large country in a country in the Eastern Western Sahara very close to the Atlantic coast, although it doesn't reach it. Like other Saharan states, it's huge (8th biggest in Africa), but has a comparatively small population of about 14 million, which are concentrated in the fertile south since the triangular-shaped northern part is nothing but [[CrossingTheDesert gigantic patches of desert and dry valleys]].
26th Apr '16 4:11:26 AM Dimas28
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-> The tricolor, which contains pan-African colors, consists of green, yellow, and red, symbolizing fertility, mineral wealth, and the blood of the martyrs for independence, respectively. The flag had the same origin as the flag of Senegal (which also contains the tricolor in the same order), both originating from the flag of the Mali Federation, except that Mali did away with the human figure in the center, while Senegal replaced it with a green star.

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-> The tricolor, which contains pan-African colors, consists of green, yellow, and red, symbolizing fertility, mineral wealth, and the blood of the martyrs for independence, respectively. The flag had the same origin as the flag of Senegal (which also contains the tricolor in the same order), both originating from the flag of the Mali Federation, except that Mali did away with the human figure in the center, while Senegal replaced it with a green star.star.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Mali