History UsefulNotes / MagicTheGathering

3rd Jun '17 2:49:03 PM Morgenthaler
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* '''Aggro-Control''' is based around playing a few fast creatures while using control elements to protect your resources and take out your opponent's. For instance, the "U/G Madness" deck archetype (not to be confused with [[UGMadness a webcomic named after it]]) uses Blue counterspells and removal to keep the board clear while Green creatures press the attack. This style is sometimes also referred to as "Countersliver", which replaced the Green creatures with a [[TheSwarm Swarm]]-style family of creatures called "slivers." (Slivers have the additional useful quality of making themselves stronger with every copy you play, which can get OffTheRails fast.) The Faeries archetype is the most recent example of a powerful aggro-control deck.

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* '''Aggro-Control''' is based around playing a few fast creatures while using control elements to protect your resources and take out your opponent's. For instance, the "U/G Madness" deck archetype (not to be confused with [[UGMadness [[Webcomic/UGMadness a webcomic named after it]]) uses Blue counterspells and removal to keep the board clear while Green creatures press the attack. This style is sometimes also referred to as "Countersliver", which replaced the Green creatures with a [[TheSwarm Swarm]]-style family of creatures called "slivers." (Slivers have the additional useful quality of making themselves stronger with every copy you play, which can get OffTheRails fast.) The Faeries archetype is the most recent example of a powerful aggro-control deck.
7th Mar '17 9:06:28 PM mlsmithca
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* '''Artifacts''' and '''Enchantments''' are the other "permanent" cards, representing magic items and spells with lasting effects, respectively. Artifacts typically use colorless mana & activation costs, meaning that any deck can employ them. They often fall into two categories - BoringButPractical, with features that WordOfGod felt any color should have access to, but less efficiently than the color that specializes in it (more limited card drawing than blue, more expensive direct damage than red, less aggressive creatures than white or green, etc.), and SoCoolItsAwesome, in a deliberate attempt by Wizards to evoke the "LostTechnology" trope. Meanwhile, Enchantments are always colored and can thus be more powerful and specific in their effects. Both types of card might feature abilities that need to be "activated" (by paying mana for them) ''or'' abilities that are "always on."

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* '''Artifacts''' and '''Enchantments''' are the other "permanent" cards, representing magic items and spells with lasting effects, respectively. Artifacts typically use colorless mana & activation costs, meaning that any deck can employ them. They often fall into two categories - BoringButPractical, with features that WordOfGod felt any color should have access to, but less efficiently than the color that specializes in it (more limited card drawing than blue, more expensive direct damage than red, less aggressive creatures than white or green, etc.), and SoCoolItsAwesome, pure awesome, in a deliberate attempt by Wizards to evoke the "LostTechnology" trope. Meanwhile, Enchantments are always colored and can thus be more powerful and specific in their effects. Both types of card might feature abilities that need to be "activated" (by paying mana for them) ''or'' abilities that are "always on."
6th Feb '17 3:13:22 PM Serac
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When assembling their decks, the player is ''not'' required to stick to one color; there have been tournament-winning decks involving two, three, four, five or even ''no'' colors (often colloquially referred to as "mono-brown" after the brown color of the original card frame for artifacts). Adding more colors allows access to a greater variety of spells, but also makes you statistically less likely to, on any given turn, have spell cards in your hand that you can actually cast with the lands currently available to you. And, just for fun, there are Gold multicolor cards, which mix colors and so bring the strengths of both, sometimes compounding or removing the individual colors' weaknesses. Two-, three-, four- and five-color cards have been published, in varying amounts (there's only been [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107090 five]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107091 four]]-[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 color]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107093 cards]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107094 ever]], for instance).

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When assembling their decks, the player is ''not'' required to stick to one color; there have been tournament-winning decks involving two, three, four, five or even ''no'' colors (often colloquially referred to as "mono-brown" after the brown color of the original card frame for artifacts). Adding more colors allows access to a greater variety of spells, but also makes you statistically less likely to, on any given turn, have spell cards in your hand that you can actually cast with the lands currently available to you. And, just for fun, there are Gold multicolor cards, which mix colors and so bring the strengths of both, sometimes compounding or removing the individual colors' weaknesses. Two-, three-, four- and five-color cards have been published, in varying amounts (there's only been [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107090 five]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107091 four]]-[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107092 color]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107093 cards]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=107094 ever]], for instance).
amounts.
12th Jan '17 4:02:52 AM HeerHagelslag
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## ''Declare Attackers Step'': At the beginning of the step, the active player chooses which creatures, if any, will attack. He also chooses which player or planeswalker each creature will attack. If no creatures are declared as attackers, skip to the End of Combat Step.

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## ''Declare Attackers Step'': At the beginning of the step, the active player chooses which creatures, if any, will attack. He They also chooses choose which player or planeswalker each creature will attack. If no creatures are declared as attackers, skip to the End of Combat Step.



# Another '''Main Phase.''' You can still only play one land per turn, so if you played one during the first main phase, you've got to wait until next turn. However (free tip), a lot of players just attack first and don't use their first Main Phase to do anything. This is because newly-cast creatures have what's called "Summoning Sickness," which prevents them from doing anything except blocking until your next Untap Step. Thus, summoning new creatures before attacking doesn't actually gain you anything. In fact, it may actually hamper your efforts: if you attack first, your opponent may commit creatures, mana, spells or other resources that he could otherwise use to mess with your Main-Phase spells. Plus, if your plan is to bait your opponent into committing those resources to stop Creature A, only to play Creature B afterwards and ''really'' ruin his day, then playing Creature B ''first'' could, y'know, tip him off. And casting Creature B might tie up mana and other resources you could otherwise have used to play Instants and swing the battle in your favor. (So why use the first Main Phase at all? Well, some creatures have triggered abilities that you might want to take advantage of: Creatures with "Landfall" bonuses get stronger when you play a land, so it benefits you to play your Land during your first phase and then attack with your newly-buffed army.)

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# Another '''Main Phase.''' You can still only play one land per turn, so if you played one during the first main phase, you've got to wait until next turn. However (free tip), a lot of players just attack first and don't use their first Main Phase to do anything. This is because newly-cast creatures have what's called "Summoning Sickness," which prevents them from doing anything except blocking until your next Untap Step. Thus, summoning new creatures before attacking doesn't actually gain you anything. In fact, it may actually hamper your efforts: if you attack first, your opponent may commit creatures, mana, spells or other resources that he they could otherwise use to mess with your Main-Phase spells. Plus, if your plan is to bait your opponent into committing those resources to stop Creature A, only to play Creature B afterwards and ''really'' ruin his their day, then playing Creature B ''first'' could, y'know, tip him them off. And casting Creature B might tie up mana and other resources you could otherwise have used to play Instants and swing the battle in your favor. (So why use the first Main Phase at all? Well, some creatures have triggered abilities that you might want to take advantage of: Creatures with "Landfall" bonuses get stronger when you play a land, so it benefits you to play your Land during your first phase and then attack with your newly-buffed army.)



## ''Cleanup Step'': Damage built up over the course of the turn wears off here, and simultaneously, abilities which last "Until End of Turn'' end here. The active player then discards down to his maximum hand size [[labelnote:*]]Usually seven, unless a card effect specifies otherwise.[[/labelnote]]. Instants cannot be cast here, and activated abilities cannot be activated, though there are a small number of effects which trigger here (and some, such as that of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189904 Megrim]], which can trigger off the discard at this time). If any of these effects happen, Instants and activated abilities may be played during this step, and then there will be additional cleanup steps until nothing more triggers.

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## ''Cleanup Step'': Damage built up over the course of the turn wears off here, and simultaneously, abilities which last "Until End of Turn'' end here. The active player then discards down to his their maximum hand size [[labelnote:*]]Usually seven, unless a card effect specifies otherwise.[[/labelnote]]. Instants cannot be cast here, and activated abilities cannot be activated, though there are a small number of effects which trigger here (and some, such as that of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189904 Megrim]], which can trigger off the discard at this time). If any of these effects happen, Instants and activated abilities may be played during this step, and then there will be additional cleanup steps until nothing more triggers.



* Emptying your opponent's library (known as "decking" him, or alternatively "milling" him, after Millstone, one of the earliest cards to support such a strategy). He will lose if unable to draw a card when required to do so, so if you can somehow manage to force him to draw 54 cards, you've won.

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* Emptying your opponent's library (known as "decking" him, them, or alternatively "milling" him, them, after Millstone, one of the earliest cards to support such a strategy). He They will lose if unable to draw a card when required to do so, so if you can somehow manage to force him them to draw 54 cards, you've won.



* '''Instants''' and '''Sorceries''' are the ''non''-"permanent" spells, in that they provide one-time, on-the-spot effects and go immediately to the discard pile when they've done their task. The primary difference between the two is when they are allowed be played: sorceries can only be cast during your Main Phase, while instants can be used at basically any time, including during the combat phase ''and'' during your opponent's turn. This has enormous tactical value. A Sorcery that makes your creature stronger has basically one use: buff your creature and hope your opponent is dumb enough to put a RedShirt in the way. (Note: [[GenreSavvy he probably isn't.]]) An ''Instant'' that has the same effect can be used to lure your opponent into a false sense of security--"Whatever, my MauveShirt can handle it"--''or'' can be used at a later time to save your creature from GreatBallsOfFire or something by giving it extra HitPoints. For this reason, Instants are often weaker or more expensive than Sorceries of comparable effect.\\

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* '''Instants''' and '''Sorceries''' are the ''non''-"permanent" spells, in that they provide one-time, on-the-spot effects and go immediately to the discard pile when they've done their task. The primary difference between the two is when they are allowed be played: sorceries can only be cast during your Main Phase, while instants can be used at basically any time, including during the combat phase ''and'' during your opponent's turn. This has enormous tactical value. A Sorcery that makes your creature stronger has basically one use: buff your creature and hope your opponent is dumb enough to put a RedShirt in the way. (Note: [[GenreSavvy he they probably isn't.aren't.]]) An ''Instant'' that has the same effect can be used to lure your opponent into a false sense of security--"Whatever, my MauveShirt can handle it"--''or'' can be used at a later time to save your creature from GreatBallsOfFire or something by giving it extra HitPoints. For this reason, Instants are often weaker or more expensive than Sorceries of comparable effect.\\



* '''Legendary:''' Legendary cards depict figures that, in their own worlds, are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin spoken of in legends.]] They are usually more powerful than non-legendary cards, and only one legendary card of the same name can be under any one player's control at a time: if a player controls more than one legendary card with the same name, he or she chooses one and the rest die.

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* '''Legendary:''' Legendary cards depict figures that, in their own worlds, are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin spoken of in legends.]] They are usually more powerful than non-legendary cards, and only one legendary card of the same name can be under any one player's control at a time: if a player controls more than one legendary card with the same name, he or she chooses they choose one and the rest die.



** Originally the rule was that if two legendary cards with the same name were on the battlefield, the newest one would be put in the graveyard immediately. This was changed in the ''Kamigawa'' block to encourage the use of legends (a major ''Kamigawa'' theme). Then, if two or more legendary permanents with the same name are on the battlefield, all are put in the graveyard ([[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74555 although, of course, there are ways to circumvent that rule]]). As of Magic 2014, if a player controls two or more legendary permanents with the same name, that player chooses one and places the rest in his or her graveyard.

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** Originally the rule was that if two legendary cards with the same name were on the battlefield, the newest one would be put in the graveyard immediately. This was changed in the ''Kamigawa'' block to encourage the use of legends (a major ''Kamigawa'' theme). Then, if two or more legendary permanents with the same name are on the battlefield, all are put in the graveyard ([[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74555 although, of course, there are ways to circumvent that rule]]). As of Magic 2014, if a player controls two or more legendary permanents with the same name, that player chooses one and places the rest in his or her their graveyard.



** Black also has a variant called "Reanimator," which uses cheap spells that [[TheUndead bring dead creatures back from the graveyard]]. This allows you to get around the usual requirement of "hard-casting" your AwesomeButImpractical 8-mana badass creature; instead you find a way to put that creature card ''directly'' into your graveyard, with the express intent of using cheap zombification to get it onto the battlefield. Players using the most successful Reaminator decks do this ''long'' before their opponent has 8 mana of his own for an effective defense. And, even if he does manage to kill your creature, well, [[DeathIsCheap you can rez it again]]! HilarityEnsues! (Fortunately for the opponent, there are spells that make creatures DeaderThanDead.)

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** Black also has a variant called "Reanimator," which uses cheap spells that [[TheUndead bring dead creatures back from the graveyard]]. This allows you to get around the usual requirement of "hard-casting" your AwesomeButImpractical 8-mana badass creature; instead you find a way to put that creature card ''directly'' into your graveyard, with the express intent of using cheap zombification to get it onto the battlefield. Players using the most successful Reaminator decks do this ''long'' before their opponent has 8 mana of his their own for an effective defense. And, even if he does they do manage to kill your creature, well, [[DeathIsCheap you can rez it again]]! HilarityEnsues! (Fortunately for the opponent, there are spells that make creatures DeaderThanDead.)



* '''Control''', the StoneWall deck. In theory, a Control deck is all about endurance: You use countermeasures until your opponent has thrown everything he has at you, and failed to kill you, after which you send something big and nasty over to mangle him at their leisure. In practice, Control is about limiting your opponent's options. Whenever he tries to do something you don't like, you stop it. Where precisely along the process he gets stopped is something that depends on the deck itself, but when played right, Control gradually establish a complete lockdown. If this sounds fun, it isn't if you're on the receiving end; and it can be very stressful on the playing end too, since your goal is not so much "to win" as it is "to avoid losing."
** "MUC", or '''M'''ono Bl'''u'''e '''C'''ontrol, is exclusively ("mono") Blue, though some variations exist which get help from White. They rely on "[[AntiMagic counterspells]]," which create a PhlebotinumBreakdown in a spell your opponent is casting; his spell fails and his mana is wasted. These have been called "Draw-Go" decks because that's what your turn consists of ("I draw a card; your turn, go"), and also "Permission" decks because the opponent feels like he needs to have your permission before he does anything. However, don't try to play this unless you're GenreSavvy to the {{Metagame}}; you need to know which of his spells to counter, which means knowing what his deck ''does''. (And no, you can't just [[NoSell blithely counter everything he casts]]; you don't have the mana, and your supply of counterspells is limited anyways.)

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* '''Control''', the StoneWall deck. In theory, a Control deck is all about endurance: You use countermeasures until your opponent has thrown everything he has they have at you, and failed to kill you, after which you send something big and nasty over to mangle him them at their its leisure. In practice, Control is about limiting your opponent's options. Whenever he tries they try to do something you don't like, you stop it. Where precisely along the process he gets they get stopped is something that depends on the deck itself, but when played right, Control gradually establish a complete lockdown. If this sounds fun, it isn't if you're on the receiving end; and it can be very stressful on the playing end too, since your goal is not so much "to win" as it is "to avoid losing."
** "MUC", or '''M'''ono Bl'''u'''e '''C'''ontrol, is exclusively ("mono") Blue, though some variations exist which get help from White. They rely on "[[AntiMagic counterspells]]," which create a PhlebotinumBreakdown in a spell your opponent is casting; his their spell fails and his their mana is wasted. These have been called "Draw-Go" decks because that's what your turn consists of ("I draw a card; your turn, go"), and also "Permission" decks because the opponent feels like he needs they need to have your permission before he does they do anything. However, don't try to play this unless you're GenreSavvy to the {{Metagame}}; you need to know which of his their spells to counter, which means knowing what his their deck ''does''. (And no, you can't just [[NoSell blithely counter everything he casts]]; they cast]]; you don't have the mana, and your supply of counterspells is limited anyways.)



*** In particular, Board Control decks these days are generally one descendant of either "Mono-Black Control" or "Dead Guy Ale" or another - That is, Discard & Board Control together. MBC decks are, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin pure Black]], and rely on discarding, coupled with spells which force your opponent to sacrifice his creatures. Dead Guy Ale, on the other hand, is a White & Black deck relying on most of the same cards from MBC, especially the discarding cards, but uses white for more versatile field control; this can be anything from just adding in 4 copies of [[http://magiccards.info/query?q=!Vindicate&v=card&s=cname a single multi-colored spell called Vindicate]], to making half the deck white to add in the best spot-removal cards in the game as well as strong creatures whose damage causes you to gain HP, in order to offset the life you'll be paying to draw extra cards.
** A new variant has emerged called "Pillowfort," which uses PowerLimiter and PowerNullifier-style enchantments to limit the opponent's options. Anything he does? You defang. Every time he attacks? You benefit from it, and he has to pay outrageous costs either for attacking or to attack again. Quoth Travis Woo, "itís not fun to play against. Thatís kind of the point."

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*** In particular, Board Control decks these days are generally one descendant of either "Mono-Black Control" or "Dead Guy Ale" or another - That is, Discard & Board Control together. MBC decks are, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin pure Black]], and rely on discarding, coupled with spells which force your opponent to sacrifice his their creatures. Dead Guy Ale, on the other hand, is a White & Black deck relying on most of the same cards from MBC, especially the discarding cards, but uses white for more versatile field control; this can be anything from just adding in 4 copies of [[http://magiccards.info/query?q=!Vindicate&v=card&s=cname a single multi-colored spell called Vindicate]], to making half the deck white to add in the best spot-removal cards in the game as well as strong creatures whose damage causes you to gain HP, in order to offset the life you'll be paying to draw extra cards.
** A new variant has emerged called "Pillowfort," which uses PowerLimiter and PowerNullifier-style enchantments to limit the opponent's options. Anything he does? they do? You defang. Every time he attacks? they attack? You benefit from it, and he has they have to pay outrageous costs either for attacking or to attack again. Quoth Travis Woo, "itís not fun to play against. Thatís kind of the point."



** Remember what we were saying above about how different Control decks stop your opponent at different times? Here's where we qualify that statement. The previous decks have all dealt with an opponent's spells ''after'' he plays them, except MUC which stops them ''while'' he plays them. Well, now we get into "Land Destruction," which stops him ''before'' he plays them. Land Destruction destroys lands in play, on the theory that, if the opponent has no mana, he can't do anything. Most such cards are Red, though Black and Green have a few options as well. Wizards has been watering down the strength of such spells in recent years. The archetypal land-destruction spell, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2307 Stone Rain]], is a second-turn cast if you used your first turn to drop an artifact source; if you went first, you would be able to destroy your opponent's only land in play. And then do it again next turn. And the turn after that. And the turn after that... Your opponent is unlikely to be entertained, and now land destruction spells typically cost 4 mana or more.

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** Remember what we were saying above about how different Control decks stop your opponent at different times? Here's where we qualify that statement. The previous decks have all dealt with an opponent's spells ''after'' he plays they play them, except MUC which stops them ''while'' he plays they play them. Well, now we get into "Land Destruction," which stops him them ''before'' he plays they play them. Land Destruction destroys lands in play, on the theory that, if the opponent has no mana, he they can't do anything. Most such cards are Red, though Black and Green have a few options as well. Wizards has been watering down the strength of such spells in recent years. The archetypal land-destruction spell, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2307 Stone Rain]], is a second-turn cast if you used your first turn to drop an artifact source; if you went first, you would be able to destroy your opponent's only land in play. And then do it again next turn. And the turn after that. And the turn after that... Your opponent is unlikely to be entertained, and now land destruction spells typically cost 4 mana or more.



** Discard is almost exclusively Black, because Black has most of the spells which force the opponent to discard cards from their hand. It strikes even lower on the food-chain than does Land Destruction; after all, if your opponent has no hand, he can do even less. Because the point of Discard is to take cards from your opponent's hand and put them in the graveyard, it is essentially immune to Permission: even if he counters your discard spell, [[HeadsIWinTailsYouLose a card from his hand has still gone to his graveyard]]!

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** Discard is almost exclusively Black, because Black has most of the spells which force the opponent to discard cards from their hand. It strikes even lower on the food-chain than does Land Destruction; after all, if your opponent has no hand, he they can do even less. Because the point of Discard is to take cards from your opponent's hand and put them in the graveyard, it is essentially immune to Permission: even if he counters they counter your discard spell, [[HeadsIWinTailsYouLose a card from his their hand has still gone to his their graveyard]]!



* '''Combo''', or the ''ASimplePlan'' deck. A combo deck is one that relies on a combination of cards, that, when used together, produce an extremely powerful and hopefully game-winning effect. Because ''Magic'' has so many different cards, all of which can be played in the same deck (assuming the tournament format you're playing hasn't restricted or banned some of them), combo decks can sometimes break the game in ways that other decks can't hope to match. On the other hand, combo decks often end up being AwesomeButImpractical, because there are many ways to stop a combo from coming together: use AntiMagic on a critical component, or KillItWithFire if it's a creature; or even [[NoNonsenseNemesis just shoot him]] while he's putting his IKEAWeaponry together. If you don't, then you deserve to be stuck with the OverlyLongFightingAnimation that results.

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* '''Combo''', or the ''ASimplePlan'' deck. A combo deck is one that relies on a combination of cards, that, when used together, produce an extremely powerful and hopefully game-winning effect. Because ''Magic'' has so many different cards, all of which can be played in the same deck (assuming the tournament format you're playing hasn't restricted or banned some of them), combo decks can sometimes break the game in ways that other decks can't hope to match. On the other hand, combo decks often end up being AwesomeButImpractical, because there are many ways to stop a combo from coming together: use AntiMagic on a critical component, or KillItWithFire if it's a creature; or even [[NoNonsenseNemesis just shoot him]] while he's they're putting his their IKEAWeaponry together. If you don't, then you deserve to be stuck with the OverlyLongFightingAnimation that results.



* Banding: ThatOneRule of Magic. Possibly the TropeCodifier. Intended to be IAmLegion, on the offensive, it allows any number of banding creature and ONE additional creature to attack and be blocked as a single unit and allowed the attacker to assign damage to his creatures rather than the controller of the blocking creature as normal. On the defensive, same as above, only the defender chose how the attacking creatures dealt damage to the defenders, not the attacking player. The problem is that other creatures have abilities like First Strike, Trample, Fear, Flying, and these were NOT transferred to the rest of the Band, so tramplers automatically did all damage through to the defender, flying creatures broke off and continued attacking as normal, all first strike creatures broke off to become a second Band while still being blocked by the current blockers... When Wizards realized it added NOTHING to the basic strategy of the game besides allowing players to decide how damage is done to their own creatures, and created mass confusion otherwise, they publicly dropped it like a brick. AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. Originally mostly white, and intended to be white's trademark move (since it's dropping First Strike has become basically white's signature ability instead)

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* Banding: ThatOneRule of Magic. Possibly the TropeCodifier. Intended to be IAmLegion, on the offensive, it allows any number of banding creature and ONE additional creature to attack and be blocked as a single unit and allowed the attacker to assign damage to his their creatures rather than the controller of the blocking creature as normal. On the defensive, same as above, only the defender chose how the attacking creatures dealt damage to the defenders, not the attacking player. The problem is that other creatures have abilities like First Strike, Trample, Fear, Flying, and these were NOT transferred to the rest of the Band, so tramplers automatically did all damage through to the defender, flying creatures broke off and continued attacking as normal, all first strike creatures broke off to become a second Band while still being blocked by the current blockers... When Wizards realized it added NOTHING to the basic strategy of the game besides allowing players to decide how damage is done to their own creatures, and created mass confusion otherwise, they publicly dropped it like a brick. AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. Originally mostly white, and intended to be white's trademark move (since it's dropping First Strike has become basically white's signature ability instead)
4th Jan '17 7:08:45 PM slvstrChung
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However, there is a converse to the color system, in the form of "AwesomeButImpractical". Every spell has a casting cost, and this casting cost can involve numbers and/or colored-mana symbols. When written out on the Internet, players typically just use the letters above--WUBRG--and we'll be using the same convention. So [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5747 Blanchwood Treefolk]], say, would be marked as "4G". What does "4G" mean? It means that, to cast this spell, you need 1 Green mana (the "G") and 4 more additional mana of any color(s) (the "4"). However, some spells require more than one colored mana to cast. This makes them impractical, and accordingly they become more awesome.

Let's compare Blanchwood Treefolk, who does 4 damage and has 5 HitPoints, to the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197856 Leatherback Baloth]], which has the same "body" but costs GGG instead of 4G. It seems ridiculous: the Baloth has a "Converted Mana Cost" of 3, while the Treefolk is 5! What gives? Well, the answer is simple: the Treefolk are ''way'' easier to play in a multicolored deck. They only need 1 Forest out. The Baloth needs three... and if you're playing a two-color deck, it's not unreasonable for you to not have 3 Forests out until Turn 5--which, [[BlatantLies by what is undoubtedly pure coincidence]], is the same time the Treefolk become playable. In the same vein, Gold multicolor cards get an additional power boost because their casting costs are even more difficult to obtain, at least unless you've essentially designed the deck around accessing them. Simply put, the more colored-mana symbols a spell has, the more powerful it is likely to be... but, accordingly, the harder it is to cast. 3R and 2RR have the same Converted Mana Cost, but ''very'' different practical costs.

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However, there is a converse to the color system, in the form of "AwesomeButImpractical". Every spell has a casting cost, and this casting cost can involve numbers and/or colored-mana symbols. When written out on the Internet, players typically just use the letters above--WUBRG--and we'll be using the same convention. So [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5747 Blanchwood Treefolk]], say, would be marked as "4G". What does "4G" mean? It means that, to cast this spell, you need 1 Green mana (the "G") and 4 more additional mana of any color(s) (the "4"). "4").

However, some spells require more than one colored mana to cast. This makes them impractical, and accordingly they become more awesome.

awesome. Let's compare Blanchwood Treefolk, who does 4 damage and has 5 HitPoints, to the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=197856 Leatherback Baloth]], which has the same "body" but costs GGG instead of 4G. It seems ridiculous: the Baloth has a "Converted Mana Cost" of 3, while the Treefolk is 5! What gives? Well, the answer is simple: the Treefolk are ''way'' easier to play in a multicolored deck. They only need 1 Forest out. The Baloth needs three... and if you're playing a two-color deck, it's not unreasonable for you to not have 3 Forests out until Turn 5--which, [[BlatantLies by what is undoubtedly pure coincidence]], is the same time the Treefolk become playable. In the same vein, Gold multicolor cards get an additional power boost because their casting costs are even more difficult to obtain, at least unless you've essentially designed the deck around accessing them. Simply put, the more colored-mana symbols a spell has, the more powerful it is likely to be... but, accordingly, the harder it is to cast. 3R and 2RR have the same Converted Mana Cost, but ''very'' different practical costs.
costs.

The existence of cards that have only 1 colored mana symbol has given rise to the practice of "[[http://mtgsalvation.gamepedia.com/Splash splashing]]" a color into your deck. Your main emphasis might be on, say, blue-black Faeries, but without too much alteration to your mana base you can sneak in some spells of another color (say Lightning Bolt), so long as those spells only require 1 of that other color of mana. The resulting deck is not so much three colors as it is two-and-a-half.
2nd Dec '16 1:24:19 PM MrBadAxe
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** Reach: Green's answer to its lack of flyers, creatures with "Reach" can block flying creatures despite not being fliers themselves. Typically, this is represented in the card art as them having a bow and arrow, or by being a giant spider that weaves dragon-snaring webs. Nearly always in green; if not, it'll be white or red.

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** Reach: Green's answer to its lack of flyers, creatures with "Reach" can block flying creatures despite not being fliers themselves. Typically, this is represented in the card art as them having a bow and arrow, or by being a [[http://magiccards.info/al/en/107.html giant spider spider]] that weaves dragon-snaring webs. Nearly always in green; if not, it'll be white or red.
2nd Dec '16 1:19:02 PM MrBadAxe
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* Fear / Intimidate: The original keyword, "Fear", meant that when attacking, the creature with Fear cannot be blocked except by black or artifact creatures (the idea being that these creatures are so fearsome that only black creatures, unafraid of death, and artifact creatures, with no mind of their own, are willing to do battle with them). It appeared almost exclusively on Black creatures. It has since been reworked into an ability called "Intimidate", which makes the creature unblockable save for artifact creatures and ''creatures that share a color'' with the attacker--a subtle difference, but one that allows the developers to put it Red and Green creatures as well, in addition to its original Black.
* [[FanNickname Firebreathing]]: Denotes a specific activated ability which is allows the player to spend any amount of mana to pump up the creatures' power by 1 for each mana spent for the remainder of the turn. Usually takes the form of "R: (This) gets +1/+0 until end of turn," but variants have existed through Magic's history. It is most usually associated with the Dragon subtype. Almost always a Red ability, and is often considered Red's most devastating combat ability - an unblocked Firebreather with a lot of untapped Red mana behind it can potentially end the game right there.

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* Fear / Intimidate: The original keyword, "Fear", meant that when attacking, the Alpha magic set had a creature enchantment called [[http://magiccards.info/al/en/17.html Fear]]. The creature enchanted with Fear cannot be blocked except by black or artifact creatures (the idea being that these creatures are so fearsome that only black creatures, unafraid of death, and artifact creatures, with no mind of their own, are willing to do battle with them). It appeared eventually started appearing innately on other cards, almost exclusively on Black creatures. creatures, but still often enough that Wizards decided to make it a keyword ability, [[NamesTheSame called, appropriately enough, "Fear"]]. It has since been reworked into an ability called "Intimidate", which makes the creature unblockable save for artifact creatures and ''creatures that share a color'' with the attacker--a subtle difference, but one that allows the developers to put it on Red and Green creatures as well, in addition to its original Black.
* [[FanNickname Firebreathing]]: Denotes a specific activated ability which is allows the player to spend any amount of mana to pump up the creatures' power by 1 for each mana spent for the remainder of the turn. Usually takes the The original form of is "R: (This) gets +1/+0 until end of turn," but variants have existed through Magic's history.history. Like Fear above, this ability gets its name from [[http://magiccards.info/al/en/151.html a card]] that granted that ability to the creature enchanted with it. It is most usually associated with the Dragon subtype. Almost always a Red ability, and is often considered Red's most devastating combat ability - an unblocked Firebreather with a lot of untapped Red mana behind it can potentially end the game right there.



* Flying: A creature with flying, for [[CaptainObvious fairly obvious reasons]], can only be blocked by other creatures with Flying (or with Reach; more on that later). This is one of the oldest "evasion" abilities - ways to make a creature harder to block. Note that creatures with flying ''can'' block landbound creatures. All colors besides green get flying; blue and white get most of them. (Failed attempts at replicating Flying include [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Flanking Flanking]], [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Shadow Shadow]] and [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Horsemanship Horsemanship]], which is practically identical to Flying but still fell flat because the word itself is not self-explanatory. The fact that Horsemanship is exclusive to the Portal Three Kingdoms set also does not help.)

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* Flying: A creature with flying, for [[CaptainObvious fairly obvious reasons]], can only be blocked by other creatures with Flying (or with Reach; more on that later).see below). This is one of the oldest "evasion" abilities - ways to make a creature harder to block. Note that creatures with flying ''can'' block landbound creatures. All colors besides green get flying; blue and white get most of them. (Failed attempts at replicating Flying include [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Flanking Flanking]], [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Shadow Shadow]] and [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Horsemanship Horsemanship]], which is practically identical to Flying but still fell flat because the word itself is not self-explanatory. The fact that Horsemanship is exclusive to the Portal Three Kingdoms set also does not help.))
** Reach: Green's answer to its lack of flyers, creatures with "Reach" can block flying creatures despite not being fliers themselves. Typically, this is represented in the card art as them having a bow and arrow, or by being a giant spider that weaves dragon-snaring webs. Nearly always in green; if not, it'll be white or red.



* Reach: Green's answer to its lack of flyers, creatures with "Reach" can block flying creatures despite not being fliers themselves. Typically, this is represented in the card art as them having a bow and arrow, or by being a giant spider that weaves dragon-snaring webs. Nearly always in green; if not, it'll be white or red.
16th Nov '16 9:06:06 PM slvstrChung
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## ''Draw Step:'' The active player draws a card. The only exception is the person who takes the first turn of a two-player game.

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## ''Draw Step:'' The active player draws a card. The only exception is the person who takes the first turn of a two-player game. Cards come in two basic types: ''Land'', which tap for {{Mana}} once per turn, and ''Spells'', which consume mana to be cast and typically can only have their specified effect once before going to the "Graveyard" pile.



** Cast any number of spells from your hand, as long as you have sufficient mana to cast them.[[note]]Mana "evaporates" at the end of each step or phase, though [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130494 there are]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=259295 cards that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=380446 get around]] this rule as well.[[/note]] Some cards require additional, non-mana costs to cast, such as sacrificing creatures or paying life. The majority of spells summon things such as creatures or artifacts, and almost all of them can only be cast during your Main Phase (and ''yours'', not your opponent's).

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** Cast any number of spells from your hand, as long as you have sufficient mana to cast them.[[note]]Mana "evaporates" at the end of each step or phase, though [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130494 there are]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=259295 cards that]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=380446 get around]] this rule as well.[[/note]] Some cards require additional, non-mana costs to cast, such as sacrificing creatures or paying life. The majority of spells summon things such as creatures or artifacts, and almost all of them can only be cast during your Main Phase (and ''yours'', not your opponent's). Spells are broken down in more detail further down the page.



* '''White:''' (Plains) The color of order: LightEmUp, civilization, and law (but [[LightIsNotGood not necessarily good]] -- white is also the color of [[KnightTemplar Knights Templar]], {{Cult}}s, and AllOfTheOtherReindeer). White cards focus on [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=25886 healing]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83027 preventing damage]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=14481 changing the rules of the game]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129572 strengthening its own creatures]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=14500 clearing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129808 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5637 playing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=41168 field]]. White doesn't like killing a single creature, but it has no problem [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=141817 destroying everything]]; a core strategy with white is breaking the symmetry of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2321 its supposedly "fair" effects]] and MutualDisadvantage. It uses its discipline to create armies, composed of lots of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=44212 small]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129668 fast]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48988 weak]] ([[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79217 but efficient]]) creatures, with an [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=42049 occasional large champion]]. Its strategies lend themselves to either [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136148 defensive control]] decks or aggressive "[[RedshirtArmy weenie]]" decks that commit everything in a single rush. A more in-depth discussion of white can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr57 here]].
* '''Blue:''' (Island) The color of cold: logic, reason, MakingASplash, BlowYouAway, and TheTrickster. Blue's intellect makes it good at strategy and research, but it has nothing but contempt for [[ThePowerOfLove The Powers of Love]] and [[ThePowerOfFriendship Friendship]], so it can be distant and uncaring. The strengths of blue include the ability to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5677 draw extra cards]], a wide array of powerful spells, and the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=178092 ability]] to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=153966 counter]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=111057 enemy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4706 effects]]. Blue is also the color of AwesomenessByAnalysis, allowing it to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=176435 work]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=8883 best]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=51634 with]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194980 artifacts]], and is able to apply raw power to simply alter reality, getting a new, unusual, unique effect (which has caused problems in the past; look no further than the [[GameBreaker/MagicTheGathering Power Nine]], of which six are artifacts, and the other three are blue). They have trouble causing damage, as most blue creatures are quite weak; further, blue is a slow starter, and involves a lot of ''re''action instead of action. However, blue is ''the'' color of strategy, and given enough time, it can become a powerhouse of steady damage behind an [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10421 impenetrable wall]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=19809 of defense]]. A more in-depth discussion of blue can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr84 here]]. Blue has historically been the strongest color in Magic, due to its power set; card drawing alone is a borderline GameBreaker, since every card you draw is another chance to win the game.
* '''Black:''' (Swamp) The color of ambition: death, [[ItsAllAboutMe selfishness]], [[DespairEventHorizon despair]], and power at all costs (but [[DarkIsNotEvil not necessarily evil]] -- black is also the color of self-improvement, individualism, and {{Anti Hero}}es). Black's strength is death; they can [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45988 kill]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83046 enemy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6097 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=174967 quickly]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=50210 cheaply]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21160 bring]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21155 their]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83220 own]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10655 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5629 back]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48588 from]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6103 the grave]]. Black can use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129544 fear]] to make its creatures almost unstoppable, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=27171 force]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4653 your]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24619 opponent]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29746 to]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5187 discard]]. [[YouCantMakeAnOmelette Black is among the most versatile of colors,]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=69 willing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29952 to]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15193 do]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=89088 anything]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29953 make]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=20361 any]] [[DealWithTheDevil dark]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3629 deal]], in order to achieve their goals, but often at the cost of AnArmAndALeg -- literally. "CastFromHitPoints" is a rare penalty in the other colors, a way of life in Black. "IDidWhatIHadToDo," indeed. In addition, a good chunk of its spells can't be used against certain creatures, most often black creatures themselves (artifact creatures being a second, green creatures being a far third), or care about creature types. Lastly, Black can have trouble with a target if it's not a creature or player; enchantments particularly can stymie a black mage. A more in-depth discussion of black can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr109 here]].
* '''Red:''' (Mountain) The color of heat: PlayingWithFire, ShockAndAwe, DishingOutDirt, passion, creativity, anarchy. Red is the color of aggressiveness and war, but it is also a force of passion, art, and change. (These aspects of its personality [[InformedAbility do not often come through in cards]], due to the game's focus on war and conflict.) Red can deal [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23087 massive]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24650 damage]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4040 to the enemy]] ([[KillItWithFire fire]] and [[LightningCanDoAnything lightning]] are common damage-dealing motifs, though it can even do NonElemental damage), and has [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=108835 the most]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87972 cards]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79223 for directly]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26260 destroying]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5817 an opponent's]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5544 lands]], but [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4031 many]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39737 of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45127 its]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=108922 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=145981 are]] [[GlassCannon Glass Cannons]]. Red's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=78606 affinity]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1326 for chaos]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3167 makes randomness]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2615 an integral part]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45395 of many Red cards]]. Red [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87971 trades long term survivability]] for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=80275 early game power]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2288 sacrificing long-term resources and life points for direct and immediate damage]]. It's the ZergRush color, and a Red deck often wins either fast or not at all. Red is the TropeNamer for the BloodKnight. A more in-depth discussion of red can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr133 here]].
* '''Green:''' (Forest) The color of life: GreenThumb, beasts, nature, instinct. Green can be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130506 highly dangerous]] due to its [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136288 unthinking primal tendencies]]; on the other hand, Green can also be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3150 tender]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11517 nurturing]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11540 even peaceful]]. The rare Green villain rages [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159215 against the corrupting influence]] of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3970 civilization and artifice]], but Green also ''defines'' the NatureHero. Green creatures [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22892 have]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4505 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=35166 strongest]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=8820 stats]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39669 making]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121264 them]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152068 mountains]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24671 on]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74613 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83977 battlefield]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23120 and]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=184692 many]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=146777 of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12433 its]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=122367 spells]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5720 make]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26838 those]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=81702 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74049 even]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=75366 stronger]]; however, Green has difficulty dealing direct damage and destroying enemy creatures. Green is a color that lacks flying and other evasive creatures, causing them difficulty in punching through some defenses, though it's also one of the better colors for defense against aerial attacks. Green is also the "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10422 mana color]]," having the most ways to get [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=49437 land into play]], the most [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189878 creatures that can make mana]], and has [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2203 the easiest time]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=73565 generating mana of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=139502 the other four colours]]. Green is typically seen as BoringButPractical, being good for beginners and the foundation of many-colored decks but lacking the flash, dazzle, and jaw-drop factors of the other colors. A more in-depth discussion of green can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr43 here]].

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* '''White:''' (Plains) The color of order: peace. Its trademarks include LightEmUp, civilization, and law (but [[LightIsNotGood not necessarily good]] -- white is also the color of [[KnightTemplar Knights Templar]], {{Cult}}s, and AllOfTheOtherReindeer). White cards focus on [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=25886 healing]] or [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83027 preventing damage]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=14481 changing the rules of the game]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129572 strengthening its own creatures]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=14500 clearing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129808 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5637 playing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=41168 field]]. White doesn't like killing a single creature, but it has no problem [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=141817 destroying everything]]; a core strategy with white is breaking the symmetry of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2321 its supposedly "fair" effects]] and MutualDisadvantage. It uses its discipline to create armies, composed of lots of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=44212 small]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129668 fast]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48988 weak]] ([[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79217 but efficient]]) creatures, with an [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=42049 occasional large champion]]. Its strategies lend themselves to either [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136148 defensive control]] decks or aggressive "[[RedshirtArmy weenie]]" decks that commit everything in a single rush. A more in-depth discussion of white can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr57 here]].
* '''Blue:''' (Island) The color of cold: perfection. Blue's hallmarks are logic, reason, MakingASplash, coldness (MakingASplash, BlowYouAway, AnIcePerson, etc), and TheTrickster. Blue's intellect makes it good at strategy and research, but it has nothing but contempt for [[ThePowerOfLove The Powers of Love]] and [[ThePowerOfFriendship Friendship]], so it can be distant and uncaring.Friendship]]. The strengths of blue include the ability to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5677 draw extra cards]], a wide array of powerful spells, and the [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=178092 ability]] to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=153966 counter]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=111057 enemy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4706 effects]]. Blue is also the color of AwesomenessByAnalysis, allowing it to [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=176435 work]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=8883 best]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=51634 with]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=194980 artifacts]], and is able to apply raw power to simply alter reality, getting a new, unusual, unique effect (which has caused problems in the past; look no further than the [[GameBreaker/MagicTheGathering Power Nine]], of which six are artifacts, and the other three are blue). They have trouble causing damage, as most blue creatures are quite weak; further, blue is a slow starter, and involves a lot of ''re''action instead of action. However, blue is ''the'' color of strategy, and given enough time, it can become a powerhouse of steady damage behind an [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10421 impenetrable wall]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=19809 of defense]]. A more in-depth discussion of blue can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr84 here]]. Blue has historically been the strongest color in Magic, due to its power set; card drawing alone is a borderline GameBreaker, since every card you draw is another chance to win the game.
* '''Black:''' (Swamp) The color of ambition: power. Black utilizes death, [[ItsAllAboutMe selfishness]], [[DespairEventHorizon despair]], ambition, [[TheCombatPragmatist pragmatism]] and power at all costs (but [[DarkIsNotEvil not necessarily evil]] -- black is also the color of self-improvement, individualism, and {{Anti Hero}}es). Black's strength is death; they can [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45988 kill]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83046 enemy]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6097 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=174967 quickly]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=50210 cheaply]], and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21160 bring]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=21155 their]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83220 own]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10655 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5629 back]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=48588 from]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=6103 the grave]]. Black can use [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=129544 fear]] to make its creatures almost unstoppable, and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=27171 force]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4653 your]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24619 opponent]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29746 to]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5187 discard]]. [[YouCantMakeAnOmelette Black is among the most versatile of colors,]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=69 willing]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29952 to]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=15193 do]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=89088 anything]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29953 make]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=20361 any]] [[DealWithTheDevil dark]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3629 deal]], in order to achieve their goals, but often at the cost of AnArmAndALeg -- literally. "CastFromHitPoints" is a rare penalty in the other colors, a way of life in Black. "IDidWhatIHadToDo," indeed. In addition, a good chunk of its spells can't be used against certain creatures, most often black creatures themselves (artifact creatures being a second, green creatures being a far third), or care about creature types. Lastly, Black can have trouble with a target if it's not a creature or player; enchantments particularly can stymie a black mage. A more in-depth discussion of black can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr109 here]].
* '''Red:''' (Mountain) The color of heat: freedom. Red trades in PlayingWithFire, ShockAndAwe, DishingOutDirt, passion, creativity, anarchy. Red is the color of aggressiveness and war, but it is also a force of passion, art, and change. (These aspects of its personality [[InformedAbility do not often come through in cards]], due to the game's focus on war and conflict.) Red can deal [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23087 massive]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24650 damage]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4040 to the enemy]] ([[KillItWithFire fire]] and [[LightningCanDoAnything lightning]] are common damage-dealing motifs, though it can even do NonElemental damage), and has [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=108835 the most]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87972 cards]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=79223 for directly]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26260 destroying]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5817 an opponent's]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5544 lands]], but [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4031 many]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39737 of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45127 its]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=108922 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=145981 are]] [[GlassCannon Glass Cannons]]. Red's [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=78606 affinity]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1326 for chaos]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3167 makes randomness]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2615 an integral part]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=45395 of many Red cards]]. Red [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=87971 trades long term survivability]] for [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=80275 early game power]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2288 sacrificing long-term resources and life points for direct and immediate damage]]. It's the ZergRush color, and a Red deck often wins either fast or not at all. Red is the TropeNamer for the BloodKnight. A more in-depth discussion of red can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr133 here]].
* '''Green:''' (Forest) The color of life: acceptance. Green loves its GreenThumb, beasts, nature, instinct.nature and instinct; it believes that the natural world is already perfect, and thus is inherently conservative. Green can be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=130506 highly dangerous]] due to its [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136288 unthinking primal tendencies]]; on the other hand, Green can also be [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3150 tender]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11517 nurturing]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=11540 even peaceful]]. The rare Green villain rages [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=159215 against the corrupting influence]] of [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=3970 civilization and artifice]], but Green also ''defines'' the NatureHero. Green creatures [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=22892 have]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=4505 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=35166 strongest]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=8820 stats]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=39669 making]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=121264 them]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=152068 mountains]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=24671 on]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74613 the]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83977 battlefield]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23120 and]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=184692 many]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=146777 of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=12433 its]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=122367 spells]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=5720 make]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=26838 those]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=81702 creatures]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74049 even]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=75366 stronger]]; however, Green has difficulty dealing direct damage and destroying enemy creatures. Green is a color that lacks flying and other evasive creatures, causing them difficulty in punching through some defenses, though it's also one of the better colors for defense against aerial attacks. Green is also the "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=10422 mana color]]," having the most ways to get [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=49437 land into play]], the most [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=189878 creatures that can make mana]], and has [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=2203 the easiest time]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=73565 generating mana of]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=139502 the other four colours]]. Green is typically seen as BoringButPractical, being good for beginners and the foundation of many-colored decks but lacking the flash, dazzle, and jaw-drop factors of the other colors. A more in-depth discussion of green can be found [[http://www.wizards.com/Magic/Magazine/Article.aspx?x=mtgcom/daily/mr43 here]].



Each card also has (sometimes more than) one of eight card types.
* '''Lands''' are cards that represent your sources of {{mana}}, the magical energy you use to do just about everything in the game; it is almost impossible to design a deck without Lands in it (and can be just as difficult to ''play'' the deck if you don't draw enough of them during the game). Lands are tapped to produce mana, but may also have other abilities. Lands don't cost mana to play, but only one may be played per turn. The BoringButPractical foundation of ''Magic'' for nearly two decades, Lands have recently been put in the spotlight gameplay-wise and graphically fancified up by the Zendikar set.

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Each card also has (sometimes more than) As mentioned above, cards in ''Magic'' basically fall into one of eight two categories: Land and Spells. They also (especially the spells) have specific card types.
''types'', which we will cover now:
* '''Lands''' are cards that represent your sources of {{mana}}, the magical energy you use to do just about everything in the game; it is almost impossible to design a deck without Lands in it (and it, and can be just as difficult to ''play'' the deck if you don't draw enough of them during the game).game. Lands are tapped to produce mana, but may also have other abilities. Lands don't cost mana to play, but only one may be played per turn. The BoringButPractical foundation of ''Magic'' for nearly two decades, Lands have recently been put in the spotlight gameplay-wise and graphically fancified up by the Zendikar set.



* '''[[SummonMagic Creatures]]''' (known in older sets as "Summon (creature type)") are the most common type of card -- making up more than half the total cards published; one set was even ''entirely composed of creatures'' -- they represent the magical army summoned by the player/planeswalker to do battle on their behalf. They have two numerical values associated with them, found in the bottom right corner of the card and separated by a slash: "power", the amount of damage they deal in combat, and "toughness", the amount of damage it takes to destroy them. As a rule, any damage a creature takes only lasts until end of turn, and it goes away if the creature is still alive at that point. This leaves it completely unhurt again at the start of the next turn; however, all damage taken over the same turn does [[HitPoints add up]]. Creatures are one of the most popular aspects of ''Magic'', and most decks use them; the few that don't are often notorious for that reason, and treated with some skepticism by newer players. (For the curious, the ''second''-most-popular aspect of ''Magic'', and the only ''other'' theme to get an entire set built around it, are the Gold multicolor cards.)

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* '''[[SummonMagic Creatures]]''' (known in older sets as "Summon (creature type)") are the most common type of card -- making up more than half the total cards published; one set was even ''entirely composed of creatures'' -- they and represent the magical army summoned by the player/planeswalker to do battle on their behalf. They have two numerical values associated with them, found in the bottom right corner of the card and separated by a slash: "power", the amount of damage they deal in combat, and "toughness", the amount of damage it takes to destroy them. As a rule, any damage a creature takes only lasts until end of turn, and it goes away if the creature is still alive at that point. This leaves it completely unhurt again at the start of the next turn; however, all damage taken over the same turn does [[HitPoints add up]]. Creatures are one of the most popular aspects of ''Magic'', and most decks use them; the few that don't are often notorious for that reason, and treated with some skepticism by newer players. (For the curious, the ''second''-most-popular aspect of ''Magic'', and the only ''other'' theme to get an entire set built around it, are the Gold multicolor cards.)
12th Nov '16 7:18:24 PM DustSnitch
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** Black also has a variant called "Reanimator," which uses cheap spells that [[TheUndead bring dead creatures back from the graveyard]]. This allows you to get around the usual requirement of "hard-casting" your AwesomeButImpractical 8-mana BadAss creature; instead you find a way to put that creature card ''directly'' into your graveyard, with the express intent of using cheap zombification to get it onto the battlefield. Players using the most successful Reaminator decks do this ''long'' before their opponent has 8 mana of his own for an effective defense. And, even if he does manage to kill your creature, well, [[DeathIsCheap you can rez it again]]! HilarityEnsues! (Fortunately for the opponent, there are spells that make creatures DeaderThanDead.)

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** Black also has a variant called "Reanimator," which uses cheap spells that [[TheUndead bring dead creatures back from the graveyard]]. This allows you to get around the usual requirement of "hard-casting" your AwesomeButImpractical 8-mana BadAss badass creature; instead you find a way to put that creature card ''directly'' into your graveyard, with the express intent of using cheap zombification to get it onto the battlefield. Players using the most successful Reaminator decks do this ''long'' before their opponent has 8 mana of his own for an effective defense. And, even if he does manage to kill your creature, well, [[DeathIsCheap you can rez it again]]! HilarityEnsues! (Fortunately for the opponent, there are spells that make creatures DeaderThanDead.)
13th Sep '16 2:38:53 AM ShadictheHedgehog
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Added DiffLines:

** This keyword has been phased out in favour of simply stating "This creature can't be blocked."
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