History UsefulNotes / MagicTheGathering

14th Feb '18 1:02:26 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Trample: Normally, any excess damage in combat between two creatures is ignored; "YouShallNotPass", played straight. A creature with trample doesn't fall for this: if it has damage left over after its blocker is dead, that damage ''does'' go through to the defending player. This only works if the creature with trample is ''attacking''; if you block with it, the excess damage is still wasted[[note]]imagine that, when attacking, creatures travel to the enemy territory, and it becomes obvious why a blocking creature wouldn't trample over[[/note]]. Trample can be found in all colors, but green has the most.

to:

* Trample: Normally, any excess damage in combat between two creatures is ignored; "YouShallNotPass", played straight. A creature with trample doesn't fall for this: if it has damage left over after its blocker is dead, that damage ''does'' go through to the defending player. This only works if the creature with trample is ''attacking''; if you block with it, the excess damage is still wasted[[note]]imagine that, when attacking, creatures travel to the enemy territory, and it becomes obvious why a blocking creature wouldn't trample over[[/note]]. Trample can be found in all colors, but green has the most.most; it has even showed up on a spell, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=439486 Super-Duper Death Ray]], but only in a joke set to keep the rules from exploding. Again.
8th Feb '18 2:49:58 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


# Another '''Main Phase.''' You can still only play one land per turn, so if you played one during the first main phase, you've got to wait until next turn. However (free tip), a lot of players just attack first and don't use their first Main Phase to do anything. This is because newly-cast creatures have what's called "Summoning Sickness," which prevents them from doing anything except blocking until your next Untap Step. Thus, summoning new creatures before attacking doesn't actually gain you anything. In fact, it may actually hamper your efforts: if you attack first, your opponent may commit creatures, mana, spells or other resources that they could otherwise use to mess with your Main-Phase spells. Plus, if your plan is to bait your opponent into committing those resources to stop Creature A, only to play Creature B afterwards and ''really'' ruin their day, then playing Creature B ''first'' could, y'know, tip them off. And casting Creature B might tie up mana and other resources you could otherwise have used to play Instants and swing the battle in your favor. (So why use the first Main Phase at all? Well, some creatures have triggered abilities that you might want to take advantage of: Creatures with "Landfall" bonuses get stronger when you play a land, so it benefits you to play your Land during your first phase and then attack with your newly-buffed army.)

to:

# Another '''Main Phase.''' You can still only play one land per turn, so if you played one during the first main phase, you've got to wait until next turn. However (free tip), a lot of players just attack first and don't use their first First Main Phase to do anything.only for land drops. This is because newly-cast creatures have what's called "Summoning Sickness," which prevents them from doing anything except blocking until your next Untap Step. Thus, summoning new creatures before attacking doesn't actually gain you anything. In fact, it may actually hamper your efforts: if you attack first, your opponent may commit creatures, mana, spells or other resources that they could otherwise use to mess with your Main-Phase spells. Plus, if your plan is to bait your opponent into committing those resources to stop Creature A, only to play Creature B afterwards and ''really'' ruin their day, then playing Creature B ''first'' could, y'know, tip them off. And casting Creature B might tie up mana and other resources you could otherwise have used to play Instants and swing the battle in your favor. (So (None of these limitations really affect land, which is why use the first it's safe to play one during your First Main Phase at all? Well, Phase. Additionally, some creatures have triggered abilities that you might want to take advantage of: Creatures with "Landfall" bonuses get stronger when you play a land, so it benefits you to play your Land during your first phase and then do so ''before'' you attack with your newly-buffed army.them.)



* Through the use of a variety of cards [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23216 which]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136048 set]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83133 up]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=135259 alternate]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29978 win]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=33697 conditions]]. These are what we call "{{Golden Snitch}}es," and there is a big list of them on the main page.

to:

* Through the use of a variety of cards [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=23216 which]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=136048 set]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=83133 up]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=135259 alternate]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=29978 win]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=33697 conditions]]. These are what we call TVTropes calls "{{Golden Snitch}}es," and there is a big list of them on the main trope page.
31st Jan '18 6:33:34 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Another honorable mention to "''Last'' Strike", from the Unstable [[JokeCharacter Joke Card]] [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=439443 Extremely Slow Zombie]]. It too creates an additional damage-assignment phase, but this one ''after'' everyone else is done. It was immediately followed up by [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=439488 Three-Headed Goblin]], which (of course) has Triple Strike and does first-strike, regular and last-strike combat damage.



** Another honorable mention: Super Haste. This ability, found on [[JokeCharacter Joke Card]] "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74324 Rocket Powered Turbo Slug]]", let the creature attack the turn ''before'' you played it. Although it was originally a joke, the mechanic was recycled completely seriously in the TimeTravel-heavy ''Time Spiral'' block, albeit not for creatures.

to:

** Another honorable mention: Super Haste. This ability, found on [[JokeCharacter Joke Card]] "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74324 Rocket Powered Turbo Slug]]", let the creature attack the turn ''before'' you played it. Although it was originally a joke, it, albeit at the mechanic was recycled fairly heavy cost of either paying its mana cost the next turn or [[CriticalExistanceFailure losing the game]]. Because Mark Rosewater uses the joke sets as a place to experiment with more outlandish mechanics, this idea came back, completely seriously completely straight, on spells in the TimeTravel-heavy ''Time Spiral'' block, albeit not for creatures.block.
21st Jan '18 4:53:03 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


"Tapping", where one turns a card to a 90-degree angle, represents the usage of the card's available resource (whether extracting mana from a land or attacking with a creature). Players untap all their permanents at the beginning of their turn. WizardsOfTheCoast has issued a controversial patent on the "tapping" mechanic, and can legally challenge any card game which involves turning cards to a 90-degree angle to show that the card has been expended somehow.

to:

"Tapping", where one turns a card to a 90-degree angle, represents the usage of the card's available resource (whether extracting mana from a land or attacking with a creature). Players untap all their permanents at the beginning of their turn. WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast has issued a controversial patent on the "tapping" mechanic, and can legally challenge any card game which involves turning cards to a 90-degree angle to show that the card has been expended somehow.



** A quick note: While not "''Officially Sanctioned Casual''" such as EDH or Momir Basic, it has been recognized by WizardsOfTheCoast to the point that Cube exists as a format on MTGO, and the 2014 non-Standard set, ''Conspiracy,'' was created partially with Cube in mind.

to:

** A quick note: While not "''Officially Sanctioned Casual''" such as EDH or Momir Basic, it has been recognized by WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast to the point that Cube exists as a format on MTGO, and the 2014 non-Standard set, ''Conspiracy,'' was created partially with Cube in mind.



*** [[WizardsOfTheCoast Wizards']] original intent was for each player in a Planechase game to have their own Planar Deck of 15 Plane cards that they customized to suit and support their personal strategy. [[OffTheRails This was immediately ignored by the players themselves, who chose to follow a more-intuitive, and less-expensive, method of play]], whereby all players use a single, communal Planar Deck instead.[[note]]Planes were introduced in a series of 5 special side-products that cost over $20 each; so, to make individual customized Planar Decks, the way Wizards had intended the variant to be played, meant that players might easily have to spend between $40 and $100 for cards that can't even be used in serious tournaments. It was just simpler for each player to spend $20 or one player to spend $100 and have everyone share a single deck, in addition to simply being a more straightforward way to play the variant, anyway.[[/note]] While Wizards has never publicly stated either denouncement or endorsement of this player-driven change, [[AscendedFanon subsequent support products for Planechase hint that they realized how people were REALLY playing it, and just went with it, design-wise]].

to:

*** [[WizardsOfTheCoast [[Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast Wizards']] original intent was for each player in a Planechase game to have their own Planar Deck of 15 Plane cards that they customized to suit and support their personal strategy. [[OffTheRails This was immediately ignored by the players themselves, who chose to follow a more-intuitive, and less-expensive, method of play]], whereby all players use a single, communal Planar Deck instead.[[note]]Planes were introduced in a series of 5 special side-products that cost over $20 each; so, to make individual customized Planar Decks, the way Wizards had intended the variant to be played, meant that players might easily have to spend between $40 and $100 for cards that can't even be used in serious tournaments. It was just simpler for each player to spend $20 or one player to spend $100 and have everyone share a single deck, in addition to simply being a more straightforward way to play the variant, anyway.[[/note]] While Wizards has never publicly stated either denouncement or endorsement of this player-driven change, [[AscendedFanon subsequent support products for Planechase hint that they realized how people were REALLY playing it, and just went with it, design-wise]].
24th Dec '17 1:58:52 PM jrh150482
Is there an issue? Send a Message


## ''Beginning of Combat Step'': No turn-based actions happen here, but activated abilities can be activated here, and "Instants" can be cast. Instants are spells which, as the name suggests, are "fast" enough to be cast at any time, even during your opponent's turn.

to:

## ''Beginning of Combat Step'': No turn-based actions happen here, but activated Activated abilities can be activated here, and "Instants" can be cast. Instants are spells which, as the name suggests, are "fast" enough to be cast at any time, even during your opponent's turn. Additionally, abilities that trigger "at the beginning of combat" trigger here.
22nd Nov '17 1:22:33 AM emillang1000
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Planeswalkers have analogous but separate planeswalker types, which are typically their given names; for example "Chandra Nalaar" and "Chandra Ablaze" both have the subtype "Chandra". Only one planeswalker with the same name can be in play at any one time, similar to the Legend rule.

to:

* Planeswalkers have analogous but separate planeswalker types, '''Planeswalker Types''', which are typically their given names; for example "Chandra Nalaar" and "Chandra Ablaze" both have the subtype "Chandra". Only one planeswalker with As of the same name can ''Ixalan'' set, every castable Planeswalker has been retconned to also be a Legendary permanent, and all Planeswalkers going forward will be printed as Legendary Planeswalkers (this is because Planeswalkers are supposed to be unique, and the main characters of the Magic storyline, though this retcon opens the possibility of "generic" planeswalkers at rarities below Mythic being a real possibility in play at the future). Prior to this rule, Planeswalkers were more restrictive than even Legendary permanents, because you could only have 1 Planeswalker of each TYPE under your control
** The impetus for this change was an attempt to streamline the uniqueness rules of the game, prevent like-typed Planeswalkers being "dead cards" in hand, and make deckbuilding easier. Additionally, it's believed this was also done due to a desire from R&D to remove the limiting quality of the Planeswalker card-type (Supertypes are ostensibly what dictate
any one time, similar to deviation from normal quantity limitations of the Legend rule.game; World, Legendary, & Basic are all Supertypes that alter the "X copies per deck / unlimited copies in play" nature of the game, while Planeswalkers were the only straight Type which had built-in limits - a major design snarl from everything else).
26th Oct '17 12:50:43 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Flash: this started out as a modifier on creature cards, which, like sorceries, can only be played during your turn. "Flash" allows them to enter the battlefield at "instant speed" and at any time. Gradually "Flash" began to appear on artifacts and enchantments as well, and Mark Rosewater is now on record as stating that he would prefer to make "Instant" into a supertype which grants the Flash ability. [[labelnote:Explanation]]For instance, just as one would have a "Legendary Creature - Warrior", one could have an "Instant Enchantment - Aura" or something similar.[[/labelnote]] Until (and unless) that day comes, you'll mostly find Flash spells in green, blue and white.

to:

* Flash: this started out as a modifier on creature cards, which, like sorceries, can only be played during your turn. "Flash" allows them to enter the battlefield at "instant speed" and at any time. Gradually "Flash" began to appear on artifacts and enchantments as well, and Mark Rosewater is now on record as stating that that, if he would prefer to could, he'd make "Instant" into a supertype which grants the Flash ability. [[labelnote:Explanation]]For instance, just as one would have a "Legendary Creature - Warrior", one could have an "Instant Enchantment - Aura" or something similar.[[/labelnote]] Until (and unless) that day comes, you'll But he can't, because it would cause the rules to explode. So Flash continues as a keyword, mostly find Flash spells found in green, blue and white.



* Haste: Normally, creatures must wait a turn upon being summoned before using a tap effect or attacking. Haste allows creature to do either on their first turn. This has lead to some first turn victories. Mostly in red; green and black can have it as well.
** Another honorable mention: Super Haste. This ability, found on [[JokeCharacter Joke Card]] "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74324 Rocket Powered Turbo Slug]]", let the creature attack the turn ''before'' you played it. (Although it was originally a joke, the mechanic was recycled completely seriously in the TimeTravel-heavy ''Time Spiral'' block, albeit not for creatures.)

to:

* Haste: Normally, creatures must wait a turn upon being summoned before using a tap effect or attacking. Haste allows creature to do either on their first turn. This has lead to some first turn first-turn victories. Mostly in red; green and black can have it as well.
** Another honorable mention: Super Haste. This ability, found on [[JokeCharacter Joke Card]] "[[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=74324 Rocket Powered Turbo Slug]]", let the creature attack the turn ''before'' you played it. (Although Although it was originally a joke, the mechanic was recycled completely seriously in the TimeTravel-heavy ''Time Spiral'' block, albeit not for creatures.)



* Landwalk: A creature with landwalk becomes unblockable if opposing player controls a land they are affiliated with. For example, Islandwalk allows that creature to directly attack a player who controls an Island. All colors but white get landwalk commonly.

to:

* Landwalk: A creature with landwalk becomes unblockable if opposing player controls a land they are affiliated with. For example, Islandwalk allows that creature to directly attack a player who controls an Island. All colors It hasn't shown up regularly in a while, but used to appear in all colors, though white get landwalk commonly.got it rarely.



** It's already been announced that Persist and Undying will never be in the same block. Current design philosophy is to avoid having mechanics involving +1/+1 counters and mechanics involving -1/-1 counters together, as this helps avoid MindScrew. [[note]]In reverse order, Innistrad has +1/+1 counters, Scars of Mirrodin uses -1/-1 counters, Zendikar uses +1/+1 counters, Shards of Alara uses +1/+1 counters, Shadowmoor uses -1/-1 counters, and Lorwyn uses +1/+1 counters[[/note]]

to:

** It's already been announced that Persist and Undying will never be in the same block. Current design philosophy is to avoid having putting mechanics involving +1/+1 counters and together with mechanics involving -1/-1 counters together, as this helps avoid MindScrew. [[note]]In reverse order, Innistrad has +1/+1 counters, Scars of Mirrodin uses -1/-1 counters, Zendikar uses +1/+1 counters, Shards of Alara uses +1/+1 counters, Shadowmoor uses -1/-1 counters, and Lorwyn uses +1/+1 counters[[/note]]MindScrew.



* Rampage X: A retired ability, and for a good reason; rampage ups the creatures offense by X for each creature blocking it IN EXCESS of the first - this means it only fires if 2 or more creatures block this creature. It's confusing, so now they just opt to have a creature say "gets +X for each creature blocking it". Still, it lasted for almost 4 years.

to:

* Rampage X: A retired ability, and for a good reason; rampage ups the creatures offense by X for each creature blocking it IN EXCESS of the first - this means it only fires if 2 or more creatures block this creature. It's confusing, so now they just opt to have a creature say "gets +X for each creature blocking it".it" and start the creature off smaller than normal. Still, it lasted for almost 4 years.



* Unblockable: [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The creature can't be blocked]]. This pertains only to the action in the declare blockers step; spell effects can be used to cause a creature to become blocked, and they work just fine on an unblockable creature.
** This keyword has been phased out in favour of simply stating "This creature can't be blocked."

to:

* Unblockable: [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The creature can't be blocked]]. This pertains only to the action in the declare blockers step; spell effects can be used to cause a creature to become blocked, and they work just fine on an unblockable creature.
**
creature. This keyword has been phased out un-keyworded in favour of simply stating "This creature can't be blocked."
23rd Sep '17 9:59:15 PM andycyca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Every card tends to be unique in itself, but every set introduces new game mechanics that alter the natural order of battle, usually an ability unique to a certain set of cards. Some of these effects eventually transfer over into later sets and become a commonly-used effect, sometimes to the point where it gets a shorthand to explain a more complicated power. Listing all possible card effects would take up more space than is really necessary (there's [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Category:Keywords 57 of 'em]]), but here's some of the more common effects that have been used in more than one set:

to:

Every card tends to be unique in itself, but every set introduces new game mechanics that alter the natural order of battle, usually an ability unique to a certain set of cards. Some of these effects eventually transfer over into later sets and become a commonly-used effect, sometimes to the point where it gets a shorthand to explain a more complicated power. Listing all possible card effects would take up more space than is really necessary (there's [[http://wiki.mtgsalvation.com/article/Category:Keywords 57 [[https://mtg.gamepedia.com/Keyword_ability over 120 of 'em]]), but here's some of the more common effects that have been used in more than one set:
22nd Sep '17 3:13:47 PM xylophone
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Planeswalkers have analogous but separate planeswalker types, which are typically their given names; for example "Chandra Nalaar" and "Chandra Ablaze" both have the subtype "Chandra". Originally, only one planeswalker with the same subtype can be in play at any one time because they represent different versions of a single character, similar to the Legend rule that existed from Kamigawa through Magic 2014. With the Magic 2014 rules changes, now each player can control one planeswalker with the same planeswalker subtype; if any player controls more than one, he/she chooses one and sends the others to the graveyard. This rule change mirrors the change to the "Legend Rule" described below.

to:

* Planeswalkers have analogous but separate planeswalker types, which are typically their given names; for example "Chandra Nalaar" and "Chandra Ablaze" both have the subtype "Chandra". Originally, only Only one planeswalker with the same subtype name can be in play at any one time because they represent different versions of a single character, time, similar to the Legend rule that existed from Kamigawa through Magic 2014. With the Magic 2014 rules changes, now each player can control one planeswalker with the same planeswalker subtype; if any player controls more than one, he/she chooses one and sends the others to the graveyard. This rule change mirrors the change to the "Legend Rule" described below.rule.



** The standard Booster Pack size is 15, with 11 commons, 3 uncommons, and a rare. Starting at some point in Magic's second decade, one or more commons was replaced with a basic land. There is about a 1-in-4 chance of getting a "mythic rare" instead of a standard rare.

to:

** The standard Booster Pack size is 15, with 11 commons, 3 uncommons, and a rare. Starting at some point in Magic's second decade, one or more commons was replaced with a basic land. There is about a 1-in-4 1-in-10 chance of getting a "mythic rare" instead of a standard rare.



*** Legal Sets: The most current "block," the prior "block," the current "core set," and, for about 3 months every year until the next block is released, the prior "core set." A "block" is generally three consecutive sets released within one year with a shared setting, style and storyline, and a core set is a set released annually with a more generic storyline, meant more for beginners. Earlier versions of currently legal cards (the newer ones denoted as "reprints") and any Promo versions of currently-legal cards are also legal, as long as they are either white or black bordered and have a proper MagicTheGathering back.
*** As of 2015, the change from 3 set blocks to 2 set blocks, along with the abandonment of core sets, means that Standard now comprises of the current block, the one before it, and the one before ''that''.

to:

*** Legal Sets: The most current "block," the prior "block," the current "core set," and, for about 3 months every year until the next block is released, the prior "core set." A "block" is generally three consecutive Generally all expansions and core sets released within one year with a shared setting, style and storyline, and a core set is a set released annually with a more generic storyline, meant more for beginners. Earlier versions from the past couple of currently legal cards (the newer ones denoted as "reprints") years. Sets rotate out of Standard in "blocks" of 2 sets. and any Promo versions of currently-legal cards are also legal, as long as they are either white or black bordered and have a proper MagicTheGathering back.
*** As of 2015, the change from 3 set blocks to 2 set blocks, along with the abandonment of core sets, means that Standard now comprises of the current block, the one before it, and the one before ''that''. As of 2018, blocks will be replaced by core sets and standalone sets.



*** Card Copy Limit: 1 copy of each card other than Basic Lands. No card may be of any color other than the colors of the General, may not contain any colored mana symbols not present on the General, and no lands (including basics) may be included that produce colored mana other than the colors of the General (for example - a Red and White General allows only cards that are Red, and/or White, and/or Colorless in nature, and/or include Red, White, or Colorless activated abilities or produce Red, White, or Colorless mana; you may have creatures that are purely Red, purely White, Colorless, or both Red and White together, but any creature that is Red, White, and Black is illegal, as are any cards - including Lands - which contain any colored mana symbols other than those found in your General's mana cost). Lands or abilities of permanents which say "Add one mana of any color to your mana pool," or variants thereof, are allowed, but can only provide mana of the same color(s) as your General (special note should be given to cards which say the physical word, instead of show the mana symbol - for example, if you have a card in a blue-only deck which says, word for word, "add 3 green mana to your mana pool" and it hasn't been errated to say "add GGG to your mana pool," it is allowed, but the provided mana will immediately become colorless).

to:

*** Card Copy Limit: 1 copy of each card other than Basic Lands. No card may be of any color other than the colors of the General, Commander, may not contain any colored mana symbols not present on the General, Commander (excepting reminder text), and no lands (including basics) may be included that produce colored mana other than the colors of the General (for example - a Red and White General allows only cards that are Red, and/or White, and/or Colorless in nature, and/or include Red, White, or Colorless activated abilities or produce Red, White, or Colorless mana; you may have creatures that are purely Red, purely White, Colorless, or both Red and White together, but any creature that is Red, White, and Black is illegal, as are any cards - including Lands - which contain any colored mana symbols other than those found in your General's mana cost). Lands or abilities of permanents which say "Add one mana of any color to your mana pool," or variants thereof, are allowed, but can only provide mana of the same color(s) as your General (special note should be given to cards which say the physical word, instead of show the mana symbol - for example, if you have a card in a blue-only deck which says, word for word, "add 3 green mana to your mana pool" and it hasn't been errated to say "add GGG to your mana pool," it is allowed, but the provided mana will immediately become colorless).
2nd Jul '17 11:34:56 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Instants''' and '''Sorceries''' are the ''non''-"permanent" spells, in that they provide one-time, on-the-spot effects and go immediately to the discard pile when they've done their task. The primary difference between the two is when they are allowed be played: sorceries can only be cast during your Main Phase, while instants can be used at basically any time, including during the combat phase ''and'' during your opponent's turn. This has enormous tactical value. A Sorcery that makes your creature stronger has basically one use: buff your creature and hope your opponent is dumb enough to put a RedShirt in the way. (Note: [[GenreSavvy they probably aren't.]]) An ''Instant'' that has the same effect can be used to lure your opponent into a false sense of security--"Whatever, my MauveShirt can handle it"--''or'' can be used at a later time to save your creature from GreatBallsOfFire or something by giving it extra HitPoints. For this reason, Instants are often weaker or more expensive than Sorceries of comparable effect.\\

to:

* '''Instants''' and '''Sorceries''' are the ''non''-"permanent" spells, in that they provide one-time, on-the-spot effects and go immediately to the discard pile when they've done their task. The primary difference between the two is when they are allowed be played: sorceries can only be cast during your Main Phase, while instants can be used at basically any time, including during the combat phase ''and'' during your opponent's turn. This has enormous tactical value. A Sorcery that makes your creature stronger has basically one use: buff your creature and hope your opponent is dumb enough to put a RedShirt in the way. (Note: [[GenreSavvy they probably aren't.]]) ) An ''Instant'' that has the same effect can be used to lure your opponent into a false sense of security--"Whatever, my MauveShirt can handle it"--''or'' can be used at a later time to save your creature from GreatBallsOfFire or something by giving it extra HitPoints. For this reason, Instants are often weaker or more expensive than Sorceries of comparable effect.\\
This list shows the last 10 events of 220. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.MagicTheGathering