History UsefulNotes / Kenjutsu

25th Jan '16 9:47:45 AM Xandemaru
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* ''Nōdachi[=/=]Ōdachi'': The Japanese equivalent of a BFS, with blades reaching 45 feet in length. They fell out of favor after 1615 due to being impractical for use in confined indoors combat and the Shogunate prohibiting the use of swords above a set length.
to:
* ''Nōdachi[=/=]Ōdachi'': The Japanese equivalent of a BFS, with blades reaching 45 4 to 5 feet in length. They fell out of favor after 1615 due to being impractical for use in confined indoors combat and the Shogunate prohibiting the use of swords above a set length.
5th Dec '15 10:15:48 AM Coincleaner
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* ''Katana'': The most associated with the samurai class and Japanese sword arts. It was three feet or so long, with approximately a quarter of that as the hilt.
to:
* ''Katana'': The weapon most associated with the samurai class and Japanese sword arts. It was three feet or so long, with approximately a quarter of that as the hilt.
5th Dec '15 9:52:42 AM Coincleaner
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* ''Iaito'': This is a cheaper mock-up of a katana, blunt-edged and made (usually) of an aluminium-zinc alloy or stainless steel. It's used by beginning students of iaijutsu who have "outgrown" the use of a bokken. It allows a beginner to practice without the risk of harming themselves or dulling the edge of a real sword. * ''Shinai'': Mock sword made from four strips of flexible bamboo around a hollow core, used in Kendo to facilitate contact practice. Some traditional kenjutsu schools also use shinai, although of a notably different structure than the ones used for Kendo.
to:
* ''Iaito'': ''Iaitō'': This is a cheaper mock-up of a katana, blunt-edged and made (usually) of an aluminium-zinc alloy or stainless steel. It's used by beginning students of iaijutsu who have "outgrown" the use of a bokken. It allows a beginner to practice without the risk of harming themselves or dulling the edge of a real sword. * ''Shinai'': Mock sword made from four strips of flexible bamboo around a hollow core, used in Kendo to facilitate contact practice. Some traditional kenjutsu schools also use shinai, although of a notably different structure than from the ones used for Kendo.

One of the earliest schools to solely focus on iaijutsu techniques. Eishin-ryu has techniques performed from ''seiza'', ''tatehiza'' and from standing position. One notable aspect of Eishin-ryu when compared to other arts is its focus on environmental considerations, such as attacking from beneath an overhanging ledge or when passing under a gate. The majority of Eishin-ryu techniques are intended for eliminating a single opponent, but there are techniques for dealing with multiple opponents.
to:
One of the earliest schools to solely focus on iaijutsu techniques. Eishin-ryu has techniques performed from ''seiza'', ''tatehiza'' and from standing position. One notable aspect of Eishin-ryu when compared to other arts is its focus on environmental considerations, such as attacking from beneath an overhanging ledge or when passing under a gate. The majority of Eishin-ryu its techniques are intended for eliminating a single opponent, but there are techniques for dealing with multiple opponents.
2nd Dec '15 9:45:22 PM Coincleaner
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* ''Nōdachi[=/=]Ōdachi'': A blade resembling a katana but longer, with blades reaching 45 feet in length. They fell out of favor after 1615 due to being impractical for use in confined indoors combat and the Shogunate prohibiting the use of swords above a set length. * ''Katana'': The sword that most people immediately think of. It was three feet or so long, with approximately a quarter of that as the hilt.
to:
* ''Nōdachi[=/=]Ōdachi'': A blade resembling The Japanese equivalent of a katana but longer, BFS, with blades reaching 45 feet in length. They fell out of favor after 1615 due to being impractical for use in confined indoors combat and the Shogunate prohibiting the use of swords above a set length. * ''Katana'': The most associated with the samurai class and Japanese sword that most people immediately think of.arts. It was three feet or so long, with approximately a quarter of that as the hilt.

* ''Iaito'': This is a cheaper mock-up of a katana, with a dulled edge, made (usually) of an aluminium-zinc alloy or stainless steel. It's used by beginning students of iaijutsu who have "outgrown" the use of a bokken. It allows a beginner to practice without worrying if they'll harm their sword or themselves somehow. * ''Shinai'': Mock sword made from four strips of flexible bamboo around a hollow core, used in Kendo to facilitate contact practice. Some traditional ryu also use shinai, although of a notably different structure than the ones used for Kendo.
to:
* ''Iaito'': This is a cheaper mock-up of a katana, with a dulled edge, blunt-edged and made (usually) of an aluminium-zinc alloy or stainless steel. It's used by beginning students of iaijutsu who have "outgrown" the use of a bokken. It allows a beginner to practice without worrying if they'll harm their sword or the risk of harming themselves somehow. or dulling the edge of a real sword. * ''Shinai'': Mock sword made from four strips of flexible bamboo around a hollow core, used in Kendo to facilitate contact practice. Some traditional ryu kenjutsu schools also use shinai, although of a notably different structure than the ones used for Kendo.

* Even practice weapons such as the bokken or shinai are treated as though they have a live edge. '''Clothing'''
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* Even wooden practice weapons such as the bokken or shinai are treated as though they have a live edge. '''Clothing''' '''Clothing/Uniform'''

Despite its curved, single-edge construction, the katana was not limited to slicing; its structure made it possible to withstand chopping movements as well. For that reason, the most efficient way to cut would be to blend the two motions, so that the arc of the sword-tip is wider than the arc of the hands; like this, the sword would enter a target obliquely, then come out straight perpendicular to its own trajectory. Of course, since katana were scarcely heavier than 1kg, relying on the sword's weight was not sufficient to cut that way; the practitioner had to utilise his entire body (left hand giving as much or more power than the right, proper footwork, torso linear and angular momentum) to cut with power and precision. It was overwhelmingly common to hold the sword with both hands; however, a handful of schools also taught techniques with a sword in each hand (one katana, one wakizashi), or (even rarer) a katana in one hand and its sheath in the other.
to:
Despite its curved, single-edge construction, the katana was not limited to slicing; its structure made it possible to withstand chopping movements as well. For that reason, the most efficient way to cut would be to blend the two motions, so that the arc of the sword-tip is wider than the arc of the hands; like this, the sword would enter a target obliquely, then come out straight perpendicular to its own trajectory. Of course, since katana were scarcely heavier than 1kg, relying on the sword's weight was not sufficient to cut that way; the practitioner had to utilise his entire body (left hand giving as much or more power than the right, proper footwork, torso linear and angular momentum) to cut with power and precision. It was overwhelmingly common to hold Holding the sword with both hands; hands was the common practice; however, a handful of schools also taught techniques with a sword in each hand (one katana, one wakizashi), or (even rarer) a katana in one hand and its sheath in the other.

Like many feudal societies, the Japanese believed that left-handedness was a sign of evil or deception; therefore, sword techniques were taught exclusively as right-handed. This is reflected in the grip; the katana is usually gripped both-handed, with the left hand near the pommel and the right near the hand-guard. This holds true whether the sword is placed by the right side of the body or the left.
to:
Like many feudal societies, the Japanese believed that left-handedness was a sign of evil or deception; therefore, sword techniques were taught exclusively as right-handed. This is reflected in the grip; the katana is usually gripped both-handed, with the left hand near the pommel pommel/buttcap and the right near the hand-guard. This holds true whether the sword is placed by the right side of the body or the left.

Some schools taught techniques to avoid an attack, others taught techniques to flowingly move the enemy's sword off the centreline as part of one's regular attack. Generally, however, it was considered far more preferable to just attack before the enemy has a chance to react. Secondary to that is to ruin the opponent's technique and then attack, and tertiary is to let the opponent perform that technique and then make one's attack in response. This philosophy is very similar to the one found in German sword-fighting schools, and probably arose from similar combat experiences.
to:
Some schools taught techniques to avoid an attack, others taught techniques to flowingly move the enemy's sword off the centreline as part of one's regular attack. Generally, however, it was considered far more preferable to just attack before the enemy has a chance to react. does. Secondary to that is to ruin the opponent's technique technique, and then attack, and tertiary attack. Tertiary is to let the opponent perform that technique and then make one's attack in response. This philosophy is very similar to the one found in German sword-fighting schools, and probably arose from similar combat experiences.

One of the oldest and most famous kenjutsu schools in Japan. Named after the shintoist Katori shrine, where it's practiced, this school was (and, to some extent, still is) very secretive. Prospective students used to need to swear a blood oath of secrecy before even stepping foot inside the dojo; this practice is still upheld in the Katori shrine, but many teachers in other places readily teach a sizeable part of the curriculum to curious students without requiring an oath. Some of the techniques are only taught to the most trusted students there are, and (of course) always require a blood oath.
to:
One of the oldest and most famous kenjutsu schools in Japan. Named after the shintoist Shintoist Katori shrine, where it's practiced, this school was (and, to some extent, still is) very secretive. Prospective students used to need to swear a blood oath of secrecy before even stepping foot inside the dojo; this practice is still upheld in the Katori shrine, but many teachers in other places readily teach a sizeable part of the curriculum to curious students without requiring an oath. Some of the techniques are only taught to the most trusted students there are, and (of course) always require a blood oath.

One of the earliest schools to solely focus on iaijutsu techniques. Eishin-ryu has techniques performed from ''seiza'', ''tatehiza'' and from standing position. One notable aspect of Eishin-ryu when compared to other arts is its focus on environmental considerations, such as attacking from beneath an overhanging ledge or when passing under a gate. The majority of Eishin-ryu ''waza'' are intended for eliminating a single opponent, but there are techniques for dealing with multiple opponents.
to:
One of the earliest schools to solely focus on iaijutsu techniques. Eishin-ryu has techniques performed from ''seiza'', ''tatehiza'' and from standing position. One notable aspect of Eishin-ryu when compared to other arts is its focus on environmental considerations, such as attacking from beneath an overhanging ledge or when passing under a gate. The majority of Eishin-ryu ''waza'' techniques are intended for eliminating a single opponent, but there are techniques for dealing with multiple opponents.
28th Jun '14 6:04:51 AM eedwardgrey3
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* ''Waki'': Rear stance, philosophically associated with the element of Metal, because the other elements called "not it" and metal wasn't there. The left foot is positioned forward, and the sword is brought to the back and points backwards. As it could hide the sword behind the user's body, it was commonly called the "hidden guard" in many ryu. Ostensibly an awkward stance, can actually perform various attacks rather smoothly.
to:
* ''Waki'': Rear stance, philosophically associated with the element of Metal, because the other elements called "not it" and metal wasn't there. The left foot is positioned forward, and the sword is brought to the back and points backwards. As it could hide the sword behind the user's body, it was commonly called the "hidden guard" in many ryu. This may also help to conceal the length of the sword or a broken blade to surprise the opponent. Ostensibly an awkward stance, can actually perform various attacks rather smoothly.
10th Mar '14 11:14:19 PM Arawn999
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Added DiffLines:
* ''Nōdachi[=/=]Ōdachi'': A blade resembling a katana but longer, with blades reaching 45 feet in length. They fell out of favor after 1615 due to being impractical for use in confined indoors combat and the Shogunate prohibiting the use of swords above a set length.
1st Aug '13 3:12:48 AM SeptimusHeap
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Hottip cleanup
The first thing that a would-be initiate notices when observing a practice for the first time is the amount of ritual involved: bowing to the ''kamiza''[[hottip:*:head of the dojo where the presiding spirit is said to reside according to tradition]], to the sword, to training partners, when crossing swords etc. This is a holdover from when the arts were widely practiced by samurai; Japanese culture places extreme emphasis on etiquette. More pragmatically, etiquette involving the sword is there for safety purposes; someone drawing a sword in iai practice without observing standard protocol could be mistaken as intent on attacking someone. Here are a few common points, by no means a complete list:
to:
The first thing that a would-be initiate notices when observing a practice for the first time is the amount of ritual involved: bowing to the ''kamiza''[[hottip:*:head ''kamiza''[[note]]head of the dojo where the presiding spirit is said to reside according to tradition]], tradition[[/note]], to the sword, to training partners, when crossing swords etc. This is a holdover from when the arts were widely practiced by samurai; Japanese culture places extreme emphasis on etiquette. More pragmatically, etiquette involving the sword is there for safety purposes; someone drawing a sword in iai practice without observing standard protocol could be mistaken as intent on attacking someone. Here are a few common points, by no means a complete list:

* The blade and/or the handle are oriented towards specific directions when placing the sword on the floor (e.g. for torei[[hottip:*:(bowing to the sword)]]) or giving it to someone else. Exact details vary.
to:
* The blade and/or the handle are oriented towards specific directions when placing the sword on the floor (e.g. for torei[[hottip:*:(bowing torei[[note]](bowing to the sword)]]) sword)[[/note]]) or giving it to someone else. Exact details vary.
16th Jul '13 1:06:17 AM Arawn444
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Correcting a grammar mistake and eliminating redundant repetition.
A school that owes its fame to its founder: the most famous Japanese swordsman, Miyamoto Musashi. Officially formulated during Musashi's later years, it mainly concerns itself with the sword (katana, wakizashi or simultaneous wielding of the two), with some bojutsu and wrestling techniques included. Niten Ichi Ryu is most famous for its dual-sword curriculum, with a katana in one hand and a wakizashi in the other. However, it's worth noting that it's neither the only nor the first school to teach dual-sword techniques. Also, the main purpose of dual-wielding practice was to make the katana easier to wield one-handed. Musashi advocated the use of a katana in each hand.
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A school that owes its fame to its founder: the most famous Japanese swordsman, Miyamoto Musashi.MiyamotoMusashi. Officially formulated during Musashi's later years, it mainly concerns itself with the sword (katana, wakizashi or simultaneous wielding of the two), with some bojutsu and wrestling techniques included. Niten Ichi Ryu is most famous for its dual-sword curriculum, with a katana in one hand and a wakizashi in the other. However, it's worth noting that it's neither the only nor the first school to teach dual-sword techniques. Also, the main purpose of dual-wielding practice was to make the katana easier to wield one-handed. Musashi advocated the use of a katana in each hand.

-> ''Temperament:'' Calm and composed, influenced my Musashi's Buddhist practice.
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-> ''Temperament:'' Calm and composed, influenced my by Musashi's Buddhist practice.
11th Feb '13 11:08:23 AM TropeEater
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''Kenjutsu'' is the historical conglomerate of Japanese sword arts, sometimes referred to as JSA. [[KatanasAreJustBetter The way most fictional media tells it,]] students of the Japanese sword can achieve [[ImplausibleFencingPowers insane levels of skill and do things that outright defy physics and logic.]] Like all types of propaganda, the anecdotes about users of the katana have some basis in fact, with the amount of truth varying from source to source. Kenjutsu schools often have a well-preserved lineage, unlike, unfortunately, its [[{{UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship}} European counterparts]]. Because of this, we know a lot more about how the samurai used their weaponry in battle than we do about how knights and men-at-arms of Europe used theirs, despite the misconceptions surrounding Japanese weaponry and the growing body of knowledge of European swordplay.
to:
''Kenjutsu'' is the historical conglomerate of Japanese sword arts, sometimes referred to as JSA. [[KatanasAreJustBetter The way most fictional media tells it,]] students [[CharlesAtlasSuperPower a skilled student of the Japanese sword sword]] can achieve [[ImplausibleFencingPowers insane levels of skill and do things that outright defy physics and logic.]] logic,]] sometimes even bordering on SupernaturalMartialArts. Like all types of propaganda, the anecdotes about users of the katana have some basis in fact, with the amount of truth varying from source to source. Kenjutsu schools often have a well-preserved lineage, unlike, unfortunately, its [[{{UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship}} European counterparts]]. Because of this, we know a lot more about how the samurai used their weaponry in battle than we do about how knights and men-at-arms of Europe used theirs, despite the misconceptions surrounding Japanese weaponry and the growing body of knowledge of European swordplay.
16th Jun '12 10:08:13 AM Master_Prichter
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Despite its curved, single-edge construction, the katana was not limited to slicing; its structure made it possible to withstand chopping movements as well. For that reason, the most efficient way to cut would be to blend the two motions, so that the arc of the sword-tip is wider than the arc of the hands; like this, the sword would enter a target obliquely, then come out straight perpendicular to its own trajectory. Of course, since katana were scarcely heavier than 1kg, relying on the sword's weight was not sufficient to cut that way; the practitioner had to utilise his entire body (left hand giving as much or more power than the right, proper footwork, quick torso rotation) to cut with power and precision. It was overwhelmingly common to hold the sword with both hands; however, a handful of schools also taught techniques with a sword in each hand (one katana, one wakizashi), or (even rarer) a katana in one hand and its sheath in the other.
to:
Despite its curved, single-edge construction, the katana was not limited to slicing; its structure made it possible to withstand chopping movements as well. For that reason, the most efficient way to cut would be to blend the two motions, so that the arc of the sword-tip is wider than the arc of the hands; like this, the sword would enter a target obliquely, then come out straight perpendicular to its own trajectory. Of course, since katana were scarcely heavier than 1kg, relying on the sword's weight was not sufficient to cut that way; the practitioner had to utilise his entire body (left hand giving as much or more power than the right, proper footwork, quick torso rotation) linear and angular momentum) to cut with power and precision. It was overwhelmingly common to hold the sword with both hands; however, a handful of schools also taught techniques with a sword in each hand (one katana, one wakizashi), or (even rarer) a katana in one hand and its sheath in the other.
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