History UsefulNotes / KatanasOfTheRisingSun

20th Aug '17 1:42:07 AM EvilKid
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** And of course, there is always ''Yamato'', which was not only the last and biggest battleship but also enigmatic and strikingly handsome as exemplified by the iconic photograph of her running at full power surrounded in spray.

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** And of course, there is always ''Yamato'', ''Yamato'' (and ''Musashi'', her sister ship), which was not only the last and biggest battleship but also enigmatic and strikingly handsome as exemplified by the iconic photograph of her running at full power surrounded in spray.


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*** Supercarrier Shinano, same weight as Yamato and Musashi as Shinano was planned third ship of ''Yamato''-class converted to carrier. Lack pilots and maintenance crew means by the time she is commissioned makes her only good as mobile anti-AA platform.


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** Subverted with Type 93, as they're MadeOfExplodium GlassCannon.


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** In some place, Japanese had defensive bunkers so complex and strong which manage to negate some of US shelling either by tanks or by ships. Japanese in turn has inferior doctrine for their tanks and infantries, which make them lose in open battles.


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** Happens to Soviet again at Nomonhan Incident or Battles of Khalkhin Gol, Soviet wins and Japanese won't dare to disturb them again but at some costs. Considering the difference in equipment, the high command of Red Army was left wondering what is the reason the casualty on their side that high.
16th Jul '17 10:24:04 AM nombretomado
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** Nowadays, any WW2 ''shin-gunto'' swords are often immediately confiscated and destroyed if found. With all the atrocities committed involving them, it's not surprising. They're also banned in Japan, the US-written weapon laws allowed only "artistically significant" swords to be preserved. As such the majority of ''shin-gunto'' were melted down at the end of the war, and the majority of surviving examples are those that Allied (especially US) soldiers took home as war trophies.

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** Nowadays, any WW2 [=WW2=] ''shin-gunto'' swords are often immediately confiscated and destroyed if found. With all the atrocities committed involving them, it's not surprising. They're also banned in Japan, the US-written weapon laws allowed only "artistically significant" swords to be preserved. As such the majority of ''shin-gunto'' were melted down at the end of the war, and the majority of surviving examples are those that Allied (especially US) soldiers took home as war trophies.
7th Jul '17 8:46:28 AM MAI742
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* TanksForNothing: As can be seen above, Japanese armor was, frankly speaking, crap by the time the Sherman and T-34 started being mass produced. To be fair to them, they ''did'' know that and ''did'' try to improve (the Type 97 Chi-Ha Shinhoto being an example), but the realities of a war in the Pacific[[note]]Which was fought mainly by the IJN, which received a lion's share of the available resources, and the IJA, mainly responsible for the tank development, was largely sidelined.[[/note]] and the [[KlingonScientistsGetNoRespect general unglamorousness of the whole affair]] meant that the progress was slow and production sluggish, and when they finally were onto [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_3_Chi-Nu something that was worth thinking about]], their industry was already pretty much destroyed. So all the drizzle of the modern tanks that ''were'' made went straight to the Home Islands units, and the only remaining unit that did have the chance to see the tank warfare, the Kwantung Army, was essentially left with the [[SoLastSeason tanks it used in Khalkhin-Gol. In 1939.]] Which were [[DecadeDissonance already archaic]] ''[[UpToEleven even then]]''. Naturally, the Soviet offensive in August '45 [[CurbStompBattle barely ever noticed them]].

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* TanksForNothing: As can be seen above, Japanese armor was, frankly speaking, crap by the time the Sherman and T-34 started being mass produced. To be fair to them, they ''did'' know that and ''did'' try to improve (the Type 97 Chi-Ha Shinhoto being an example), but the realities of a war in the Pacific[[note]]Which was fought mainly by the IJN, which received a lion's share of the available resources, and the IJA, mainly responsible for the tank development, was largely sidelined.[[/note]] and the [[KlingonScientistsGetNoRespect general unglamorousness of the whole affair]] meant that the progress was slow and production sluggish, and when they finally were onto [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_3_Chi-Nu something that was worth thinking about]], their industry was already pretty much destroyed. So all the drizzle of the modern tanks that ''were'' made went straight to the Home Islands units, and the only remaining unit that did have the chance to see the tank warfare, the Kwantung Army, was essentially left with the [[SoLastSeason tanks it used in Khalkhin-Gol. In 1939.]] Which were [[DecadeDissonance already archaic]] ''[[UpToEleven even then]]''. Naturally, the Soviet offensive in August '45 [[CurbStompBattle barely ever noticed them]]. Indeed, they were so contemptuous of Japanese armor and AT capabilities that they replaced all the T-34/85s issued to the divisions assigned to the Khingan Mountain Range thrust (south-eastward from Mongolia to Beijing) with BT-7s given that they were roughly as invulnerable and had much better speed over extremely rough terrain.
7th Jul '17 8:41:57 AM MAI742
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* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had few or no AT weapons beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, and Sherman tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.

to:

* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had few or no AT weapons beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, Sherman, and Sherman T-34 tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. BT-5, BT-7, and Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.
7th Jul '17 8:37:54 AM MAI742
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** Even before World War II, there was Lt. Col. Eiichi Ioki, who put up heroic defense against the main Soviet offensive at the strategic Fui Heights for five days during the Battle of Khalkhin Gol against overwhelming odds and had the good sense and skill to extract his surrounded, outnumbered, starving, worn out, but still mostly alive troops when the situation became hopeless (which, itself, took a masterful maneuver). Naturally, he was forced to commit suicide after the battle.

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** Even before World War II, there was Lt. Col. Eiichi Ioki, who put up heroic defense against the main Soviet offensive at the strategic Fui Heights for five days during the Battle of Khalkhin Gol against overwhelming odds and had the good sense and skill to extract his surrounded, outnumbered, starving, worn out, but still mostly alive troops battalion (500 men) when the situation became hopeless (which, itself, took a masterful maneuver). Naturally, he was forced to commit suicide after the battle.battle and died in disgrace. General Michitarō Komatsubara ordered his division (20,000 men) to counterattack and got them annihilated, and naturally he was commended for his conduct.



** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia's allies (let alone the country itself). The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that could've been true... but unfortunately for them, they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by one of their best generals (Georgy Zhukov, who promoted and assisted such gifted commanders as Konstantin Rokossovsky in the planning of Operations including ''Bagration''). His thorough planning and the brilliance of his subordinates enabled to him to launch an encirclement operation which captured all but one battalion (500 men) of an entire Japanese security division (20,000 men). However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.

to:

** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia's allies (let alone the country itself). The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan Unfortunately for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that could've been true... but unfortunately for them, them they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by one of their best generals (Georgy Zhukov, Georgy Zhukov (passably competent at tactics, but an excellent strategist who promoted and assisted such gifted commanders as Konstantin Rokossovsky in the planning of Operations including ''Bagration'').''Bagration''). This wasn't helped by Stalin personally insisting that the entire far east's truck pool be put at Zhukov's disposal to give him all the supplies he needed to field the largest force possible, and that the first hundred production-model T-34s be delivered to the corps. His thorough planning and the brilliance of his subordinates enabled to him to launch an encirclement operation which captured all but one battalion (500 men) of an entire Japanese security division (20,000 men). However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.
7th Jul '17 8:30:48 AM MAI742
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** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia, as they basically achieved nothing there. The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that could've been true... but unfortunately for them, they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by one of their best generals (Georgy Zhukov, who promoted and assisted such gifted commanders as Konstantin Rokossovsky in the planning of Operations including ''Bagration''). His thorough planning and the brilliance of his subordinates enabled to him to launch an encirclement operation which captured all but one battalion (500 men) of an entire Japanese security division (20,000 men). However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.

to:

** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia, as they basically achieved nothing there.Russia's allies (let alone the country itself). The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that could've been true... but unfortunately for them, they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by one of their best generals (Georgy Zhukov, who promoted and assisted such gifted commanders as Konstantin Rokossovsky in the planning of Operations including ''Bagration''). His thorough planning and the brilliance of his subordinates enabled to him to launch an encirclement operation which captured all but one battalion (500 men) of an entire Japanese security division (20,000 men). However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.
7th Jul '17 8:29:01 AM MAI742
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** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia, as they basically achieved nothing there. The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that would've been true... but unfortunately for them, they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by their best general (Georgy Zhukov, the hero of the German-Soviet subset of World War 2, and architect of great Soviet victories such as Operation Bagration). His quick thinking and the morale of his troops enabled to him to utilize his firepower advantage and rout the Japanese from Khalkin Gol despite heavy casualties. However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.

to:

** Khalkin Gol, where Japan learned you never, under ''any'' circumstances try to invade Russia, as they basically achieved nothing there. The Japanese went in remembering the victory in the UsefulNotes/RussoJapaneseWar, but they managed to forget [[PyrrhicVictory how Pyrrhic it was]]. The Japanese plan for the battle was dependent on the idea that their light infantry skill and strategic planning would be enough to outflank and annihilate the more numerous and heavily armed but supposedly poorly motivated, trained, and led Russians. Had this battle happened in 1941, that would've could've been true... but unfortunately for them, they were facing probably the most lavishly equipped, trained, and supplied corps that the USSR had, led by one of their best general generals (Georgy Zhukov, the hero of the German-Soviet subset of World War 2, who promoted and architect of great Soviet victories assisted such gifted commanders as Operation Bagration). Konstantin Rokossovsky in the planning of Operations including ''Bagration''). His quick thinking thorough planning and the morale brilliance of his troops subordinates enabled to him to utilize his firepower advantage and rout the launch an encirclement operation which captured all but one battalion (500 men) of an entire Japanese from Khalkin Gol despite heavy casualties.security division (20,000 men). However, the prospect of a Japanese-Soviet War was raised again in June-July 1941, after the Soviets performed notoriously poorly against the Germans and their allies. When ''Operation Barbarossa'' failed at Smolensk in July-August, though, they dropped it for good.
7th Jul '17 8:21:27 AM MAI742
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** There's also the matter that while Japanese considered Chi-Ha a medium tank, by the world standards it was a ''light'' tank, and thus completely inadequate when faced off with anyone with better armor than the Chinese (after 1942, of course). Japan never deployed a true medium tank, not to mention a heavy one, in any significant numbers[[note]]the only possible candidate, Type 3 Chi-Nu, had a whooping build number of 144, and was a no match for the Allies' armor anyway[[/note]], and all such designs remained in prototype or field test stages at best.

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** There's also the matter that while Japanese considered Chi-Ha a medium tank, by the world standards it was a ''light'' tank, and thus completely inadequate when faced off with anyone with better armor AT weapons than the Chinese (after 1942, of course). Japan never deployed a true medium tank, not to mention a heavy one, in any significant numbers[[note]]the only possible candidate, Type 3 Chi-Nu, had a whooping build number of 144, and was a no match for the Allies' armor anyway[[/note]], and all such designs remained in prototype or field test stages at best.
7th Jul '17 8:18:54 AM MAI742
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* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had little or no AT weapons beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, and Sherman tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.

to:

* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had little few or no AT weapons beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, and Sherman tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.
7th Jul '17 8:18:38 AM MAI742
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* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had little or none beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, and Sherman tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.

to:

* TankGoodness: Mostly averted. Japanese tanks were, at the start of World War 2, decent vehicles for their time. Japan was at the front of tank development throughout the 1930s, and had the world's 5th largest tank force by 1940. Their Type 97 Chi-Ha tanks were an even match for virtually any other light of that era with their low-velocity 57mm gun and were rarely taken out by Chinese forces, since KMT forces rarely risked very little of their (scarce) artillery in direct-fire roles (bar critical battles such as the dozen fought Shanghai, Wuhan, and Changsha) and non-KMT forces had little or none no AT weapons beyond IEDs. By the time World War 2 started, the Chi-Ha was beginning to show its age and was upgraded with a new "Shinhoto" turret and a much stronger 47mm gun. Even then, the tracks were too fragile and armour too thin for it to withstand near- or partial-hits from medium and light artillery, let alone direct hits from mortar rounds and bazookas. In the rare instances (even rarer than in the European theatre) in which tank faced tank, the Chi-Ha's armour and armament usually placed it at a distinct disadvantage; Matilda, M3-Lee, and Sherman tanks were all but invulnerable from the front and could consistently disable or destroy Chi-Has with a hit from their own guns. Stuart light tanks were roughly equal in terms of (poor) armour and armament.
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