History UsefulNotes / JewishLifeEvents

27th Nov '15 11:41:57 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As far as records show, this ceremony has never been performed in the back seat of a [[strike: Mercury Grand Marquis]] [[SaturdayNightLive Royal Deluxe II]].

to:

As far as records show, this ceremony has never been performed in the back seat of a [[strike: Mercury Grand Marquis]] [[SaturdayNightLive [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Royal Deluxe II]].
28th Oct '15 6:46:06 AM Soalai
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[AC:Weddings]]
16th Apr '15 7:05:55 AM Cidolfas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:Wedding]]
->At an Orthodox wedding, the bride is pregnant.\\
At a Conservative wedding, the rabbi is pregnant.\\
At a Reform wedding, the groom is also pregnant.
-->--Old joke.
15th Apr '15 5:30:03 PM Juicehead_Baby
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

->At an Orthodox wedding, the bride is pregnant.\\
At a Conservative wedding, the rabbi is pregnant.\\
At a Reform wedding, the groom is also pregnant.
-->--Old joke.
9th Jan '15 10:16:11 AM DannWoolf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* At various points in history, grave robbing was fairly common. In order to prevent this, one is place a stone on any grave they pass. Enough people pass by a grave and there are a lot of rocks, hopefully, enough to deter would-be grave robbers.

to:

* At various points in history, grave robbing was fairly common. In order to prevent this, one is to place a stone on any grave they pass. Enough people pass by a grave and there are a lot of rocks, hopefully, enough to deter would-be grave robbers.
25th Oct '14 5:49:43 PM Cidolfas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of non-Orthodox traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.

to:

Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There have been health issues raised about the procedure, especially since ''mohels'' are not always doctors, and the procedure has been recently modified amongst many (though far from all) Orthodox communities to allay these concerns. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of non-Orthodox traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.



It’s also worth noting that some babies have been subjected to botched circumcision, especially since the ''mohel'' is very often not a medical professional, and every now and then they go into shock and die; this was acknowledged in the defining ''halakha'' book ''Shulkhan Arukh'', which states that a male baby born after two of his brothers died because of this procedure doesn’t have to go undergo it. In some cases, when the ''mohel'' is a stickler for tradition, the baby also undergoes ''metzitza bape'' (lit. ‘sucking by the mouth’), i.e. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sucking the blood off the penis after cutting]], and some babies have contracted herpes and other diseases this way. This, along with the general {{Squick}}y nature of the ceremony and the advent of the internet, has lead to some Jews requesting an alternative (using a small tube to avoid direct contact, for instance), getting a medically trained mohel or just get a doctor to do it; rarely, they avoid the ceremony altogether, or, as Reformed Jews often do, opt for a simple naming ceremony named ''brit shalom'' (‘a covenant of peace’) or ''brit bli mila'' (‘a covenant without circumcision’).
25th Oct '14 1:48:30 PM SvartiKotturinn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It’s also worth noting that some babies have been subjected to botched circumcision, especially since the ''mohel'' is very often not a medical professional, and every now and then they go into shock and die; this was acknowledged in the defining ''halakha'' book ''Shulkhan Arukh'', which states that a male baby born after two of his brothers died because of this procedure doesn’t have to go undergo it. In some cases, when the ''mohel'' is a stickler for tradition, the baby also undergoes ''metzitza bape'' (lit. ‘sucking by the mouth’), i.e. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sucking the blood off the penis after cutting]], and some babies have contracted herpes and other diseases this way. This, along with the general {{Squick}}y nature of the ceremony and the advent of the internet, has lead to some Jews avoiding the ceremony altogether, or, as Reformed Jews often do, opt for a simple naming ceremony named ''brit shalom'' (‘a covenant of peace’) or ''brit bli mila'' (‘a covenant without circumcision’).

to:

It’s also worth noting that some babies have been subjected to botched circumcision, especially since the ''mohel'' is very often not a medical professional, and every now and then they go into shock and die; this was acknowledged in the defining ''halakha'' book ''Shulkhan Arukh'', which states that a male baby born after two of his brothers died because of this procedure doesn’t have to go undergo it. In some cases, when the ''mohel'' is a stickler for tradition, the baby also undergoes ''metzitza bape'' (lit. ‘sucking by the mouth’), i.e. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sucking the blood off the penis after cutting]], and some babies have contracted herpes and other diseases this way. This, along with the general {{Squick}}y nature of the ceremony and the advent of the internet, has lead to some Jews avoiding requesting an alternative (using a small tube to avoid direct contact, for instance), getting a medically trained mohel or just get a doctor to do it; rarely, they avoid the ceremony altogether, or, as Reformed Jews often do, opt for a simple naming ceremony named ''brit shalom'' (‘a covenant of peace’) or ''brit bli mila'' (‘a covenant without circumcision’).
25th Oct '14 8:43:25 AM SvartiKotturinn
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

It’s also worth noting that some babies have been subjected to botched circumcision, especially since the ''mohel'' is very often not a medical professional, and every now and then they go into shock and die; this was acknowledged in the defining ''halakha'' book ''Shulkhan Arukh'', which states that a male baby born after two of his brothers died because of this procedure doesn’t have to go undergo it. In some cases, when the ''mohel'' is a stickler for tradition, the baby also undergoes ''metzitza bape'' (lit. ‘sucking by the mouth’), i.e. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sucking the blood off the penis after cutting]], and some babies have contracted herpes and other diseases this way. This, along with the general {{Squick}}y nature of the ceremony and the advent of the internet, has lead to some Jews avoiding the ceremony altogether, or, as Reformed Jews often do, opt for a simple naming ceremony named ''brit shalom'' (‘a covenant of peace’) or ''brit bli mila'' (‘a covenant without circumcision’).
15th Sep '14 7:37:03 AM Cidolfas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of all traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.

to:

Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of all non-Orthodox traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.
13th Sep '14 1:59:49 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done.

to:

Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done.
done. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of all traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.



Interestingly, there is no religious requirement for any sort of event marking this date; it's purely a social thing. [[YouKeepUsingThatWord A bar mitzvah was not originally something you "have"]] -- and, among religious Jews (particularly outside of the United States), it still isn't. Neglecting to celebrate your bar mitzva prevents you from coming of age just as much as neglecting to have an 18th birthday party prevents you from being eligible to vote - i.e., not at all.

Orthodox boys will begin putting on ''tefillin'' (phylacteries) and some will also begin wearing a ''tallit'' (prayer shawl) slightly before they become bar mitzvah, to get used to it. In more liberal (Conservative and Reform) tradition, the ''tallit'' is given on the day of the bar mitzvah, and ''tefillin'' is rarely worn at all by adults, let alone by 13 year old boys. (In many Conservative and most Reform congregations, girls will also wear ''tallit'' at their bat mitzvah.)

to:

Interestingly, there is no religious requirement for any sort of event marking this date; it's purely a social thing. [[YouKeepUsingThatWord A bar mitzvah was not originally something you "have"]] -- and, among religious Jews (particularly outside of the United States), it still isn't. Neglecting to celebrate your bar mitzva mitzvah prevents you from coming of age just as much as neglecting to have an 18th birthday party prevents you from being eligible to vote - i.e., not at all.

Orthodox boys will begin putting on ''tefillin'' ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tefillin tefillin]]'' (phylacteries) and some will also begin wearing a ''tallit'' ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallit tallit]]'' (prayer shawl) slightly before they become bar mitzvah, to get used to it. In more liberal (Conservative and Reform) tradition, the ''tallit'' is given on the day of the bar mitzvah, and ''tefillin'' is rarely worn at all by adults, let alone by 13 year old boys. (In many Conservative and most Reform congregations, girls will also wear ''tallit'' at their bat mitzvah.)



* ''Do'' try and bring a ''kippah'' (skullcap) if possible. Those paper-thin silk ones are pretty embarrassing, so try and get at least a knitted one. You may also want to bring a bobby pin to attach it. Those who are bald may want a larger kippah which will stay on witout a pin or clip. Note that only men are required to wear ''kippot'', and that at Orthodox services women are discouraged from doing so.

to:

* ''Do'' try and bring a ''kippah'' (skullcap) if possible. Those paper-thin silk ones are pretty embarrassing, so try and get at least a knitted one. You may also want to bring a bobby pin to attach it. Those who are bald may want a larger kippah which will stay on witout a pin or clip. Note that only men are required to wear ''kippot'', and that at Orthodox services women are discouraged from doing so.so, although an increasing number of Reform and Reconstructionist women wear them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 58. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.JewishLifeEvents