History UsefulNotes / JewishLifeEvents

7th Apr '18 3:42:50 PM danlansdowne
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If a boy and girl have the ceremony on the same day in the same service, the service is a "B'nei Mitzvah," but the boy still is a bar mitzvah and the girl a bat mitzvah. The invitation would just say "come celebrate [girl] and [boy]'s b'nai mitzvah!" or something like that.
If you don't know the gender, it's a b'nai mitzvah ("I have to go to one of my cousin's b'nai mitzvah"). If two girls are having theirs on the same day, it's a b'not mitzvah

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If a boy and girl have the ceremony on the same day in the same service, the service is a "B'nei Mitzvah," but the boy still is a bar mitzvah and the girl a bat mitzvah. The invitation would just say "come celebrate [girl] and [boy]'s b'nai mitzvah!" or something like that. \n "B'nei Mitzvah" has also been used in at least one instance where a teen was non-binary.
If you don't know the gender, it's a b'nai mitzvah ("I have to go to one of my cousin's b'nai mitzvah"). If two girls are having theirs on the same day, it's a b'not mitzvahmitzvah.
5th Mar '18 9:13:00 AM Glide08
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* ''Don't'' worry about getting there exactly on time. Very few Jewish weddings adhere to an exact schedule, regardless of what's printed on the invitation. You may find yourself with nothing to do for half an hour while they get their act together ''at best'' - And G-d forbid you if it's an Ethiopian (Beta Israel) wedding, where the waiting time is closer to [[UpToEleven three hours]]. (This is true of most Jewish ceremonies. Among American Jews, this is often referred to as "Jewish Standard Time".)

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* ''Don't'' worry about getting there exactly on time. Very few Jewish weddings adhere to an exact schedule, regardless of what's printed on the invitation. You may find yourself with nothing to do for half an hour while they get their act together ''at best'' - And G-d forbid help you if it's an Ethiopian (Beta Israel) wedding, where the waiting time is closer to [[UpToEleven three hours]]. (This is true of most Jewish ceremonies. Among American Jews, this is often referred to as "Jewish Standard Time".)
5th Mar '18 9:11:14 AM Glide08
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Often shortened to just "bris". Can also be pronounced Brit Milah among Israelis and Sephardim; "bris" is the Ashkenazi pronunciation. This is the "Covenant of [[GroinAttack Circumcision]]", and probably the most {{squick}}-worthy of Jewish rituals. It is only done for boys, when they are eight days old (it can be delayed if the baby is ill, e.g. jaundiced). An informal ceremony called a simchat bat may be done for baby girls on their eighth day of life instead. The idea of a bris comes from the Bible and was commanded to Abraham way back; it symbolizes the dedication of Jews to God's will (it's more of a "deal", in fact - we do what he says and he watches over us).

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Often shortened to just "bris". Can also be Is pronounced Brit Milah among Israelis and Sephardim; "bris" is the Ashkenazi pronunciation.pronunciation, and Israelis ''never'' use it. This is the "Covenant of [[GroinAttack Circumcision]]", and probably the most {{squick}}-worthy of Jewish rituals. It is only done for boys, when they are eight days old (it can be delayed if the baby is ill, e.g. jaundiced). An informal ceremony called a simchat bat may be done for baby girls on their eighth day of life instead. The idea of a bris comes from the Bible and was commanded to Abraham way back; it symbolizes the dedication of Jews to God's will (it's more of a "deal", in fact - we do what he says and he watches over us).



Pay attention to the invitation when invited to an Orthodox wedding. First, there will usually be a "Kabolas Ponim", or reception. After this comes the "Chupah", or wedding ceremony. Finally there is the meal and dancing. Weddings will usually begin between 5:00 and 7:00 PM.

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Pay attention to the invitation when invited to an Orthodox wedding. First, there will usually be a "Kabolas Ponim", Ponim" (Or "Kabalat Panim" in Sephardi prnounciation), or reception. After this comes the "Chupah", or wedding ceremony. Finally there is the meal and dancing. Weddings will usually begin between 5:00 and 7:00 PM.
PM, and at least in Israel, they're ''always'' held on weekdays, with Thursday being the most popular option.



* ''Don't'' worry about getting there exactly on time. Very few Jewish weddings adhere to an exact schedule, regardless of what's printed on the invitation. You may find yourself with nothing to do for half an hour while they get their act together. (This is true of most Jewish ceremonies. Among American Jews, this is often referred to as "Jewish Standard Time".)

to:

* ''Don't'' worry about getting there exactly on time. Very few Jewish weddings adhere to an exact schedule, regardless of what's printed on the invitation. You may find yourself with nothing to do for half an hour while they get their act together.together ''at best'' - And G-d forbid you if it's an Ethiopian (Beta Israel) wedding, where the waiting time is closer to [[UpToEleven three hours]]. (This is true of most Jewish ceremonies. Among American Jews, this is often referred to as "Jewish Standard Time".)



* ''Don't'' bother yourself with a gift registry for an Israeli wedding, 'cause it only has one entry - money, [[GreedyJew of course]]. In fact, the first thing you'll see is a box for you to put your envelope full of cash/cheque in.



* ''Don't'' assume you'll be eating anything immediately. Some weddings only have very little food to nibble on until the food actually gets served, which can sometimes be as late as 10:00 depending on the wedding. Most are better at this, though. In any case, it's good planning to have a snack before you leave.

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* ''Don't'' assume you'll be eating anything immediately. Some weddings only have very little food to nibble on until the food actually gets served, which can sometimes be as late as 10:00 depending on the wedding. Most are better at this, though.though, And the Kabalat Panim in Israeli weddings is full of cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. In any case, it's good planning to have a snack before you leave.




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** At Israeli non-orthodox weddings, usually only the groom would be expected to wear a suit, and even then, this doesn't cover ties. For everyone else, everything goes.



Sephardi and Mizrachi Jews, who mostly come from Muslim countries rather than Christian ones, for the most part never adopted the idea that seeing the bride before the wedding day is bad luck, although it is starting to become more widespread. As a result, on the day of the wedding, the bride and groom spend copious amounts of time taking pictures together before the wedding starts.

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Sephardi and Mizrachi Jews, who mostly come from Muslim countries rather than Christian ones, for the most part never adopted the idea that seeing the bride before the wedding day is bad luck, although it is starting to become more widespread. As a result, on the day of the wedding, the bride and groom spend copious amounts of time taking pictures together before the wedding starts. \n This also applies in Israel, even among Ashkenazis, thanks to Israel's Jewish population being Majority Sephardi/Mizrachi.



'''Kabolas Panim/Reception'''

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'''Kabolas Panim/Kabalat Panim/Reception'''


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In an Israeli Kabalat Panim, there's an open bar and food stations serving "appetizers", which usually stuff you enough to qualify as full-fledged meals.


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Israelis, as you might have figured out from the lack of a dress code, also don't bother with such quaint concepts like "dinner hour" and "assigned seating" - In fact, if you leave your seat, there's a fair chance that someone else will take it.
25th Feb '17 4:17:09 PM nombretomado
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-->--The Sons[[labelnote:*]]The Sons![[/labelnote]], ''Tradition'', ''FiddlerOnTheRoof''

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-->--The Sons[[labelnote:*]]The Sons![[/labelnote]], ''Tradition'', ''FiddlerOnTheRoof''
''Theatre/FiddlerOnTheRoof''
27th Nov '15 11:41:57 AM nombretomado
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As far as records show, this ceremony has never been performed in the back seat of a [[strike: Mercury Grand Marquis]] [[SaturdayNightLive Royal Deluxe II]].

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As far as records show, this ceremony has never been performed in the back seat of a [[strike: Mercury Grand Marquis]] [[SaturdayNightLive [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Royal Deluxe II]].
28th Oct '15 6:46:06 AM Soalai
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Added DiffLines:

[[AC:Weddings]]
16th Apr '15 7:05:55 AM Cidolfas
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[[AC:Wedding]]
->At an Orthodox wedding, the bride is pregnant.\\
At a Conservative wedding, the rabbi is pregnant.\\
At a Reform wedding, the groom is also pregnant.
-->--Old joke.
15th Apr '15 5:30:03 PM Juicehead_Baby
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->At an Orthodox wedding, the bride is pregnant.\\
At a Conservative wedding, the rabbi is pregnant.\\
At a Reform wedding, the groom is also pregnant.
-->--Old joke.
9th Jan '15 10:16:11 AM DannWoolf
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* At various points in history, grave robbing was fairly common. In order to prevent this, one is place a stone on any grave they pass. Enough people pass by a grave and there are a lot of rocks, hopefully, enough to deter would-be grave robbers.

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* At various points in history, grave robbing was fairly common. In order to prevent this, one is to place a stone on any grave they pass. Enough people pass by a grave and there are a lot of rocks, hopefully, enough to deter would-be grave robbers.
25th Oct '14 5:49:43 PM Cidolfas
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Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of non-Orthodox traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.

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Note that, in the Orthodox tradition, all of these positions are exclusively held by men. In the conservative movement, any of the positions may be held by a woman. In the Reform and Reconstructionist movements, the bris is not even considered a required practice, although it is still very widely done. There have been health issues raised about the procedure, especially since ''mohels'' are not always doctors, and the procedure has been recently modified amongst many (though far from all) Orthodox communities to allay these concerns. There is [[http://www.jewsagainstcircumcision.org/ a movement today]] among Jews of non-Orthodox traditions to stop circumcision and have [[http://www.jewishcircumcision.org/ritual.htm a dedication]] instead.



It’s also worth noting that some babies have been subjected to botched circumcision, especially since the ''mohel'' is very often not a medical professional, and every now and then they go into shock and die; this was acknowledged in the defining ''halakha'' book ''Shulkhan Arukh'', which states that a male baby born after two of his brothers died because of this procedure doesn’t have to go undergo it. In some cases, when the ''mohel'' is a stickler for tradition, the baby also undergoes ''metzitza bape'' (lit. ‘sucking by the mouth’), i.e. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin sucking the blood off the penis after cutting]], and some babies have contracted herpes and other diseases this way. This, along with the general {{Squick}}y nature of the ceremony and the advent of the internet, has lead to some Jews requesting an alternative (using a small tube to avoid direct contact, for instance), getting a medically trained mohel or just get a doctor to do it; rarely, they avoid the ceremony altogether, or, as Reformed Jews often do, opt for a simple naming ceremony named ''brit shalom'' (‘a covenant of peace’) or ''brit bli mila'' (‘a covenant without circumcision’).
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