History UsefulNotes / JapaneseHonorifics

26th Apr '16 2:12:30 PM Willbyr
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** In NightmareOfNunnally, Nunnally initially uses "-san" on Alice (as she does for most older people of no special status) when meeting her in a flashback, but uses "-chan" on her in the present after they become friends.

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** In NightmareOfNunnally, ''[[Manga/CodeGeassNightmareOfNunnally Nightmare of Nunnally]]'', Nunnally initially uses "-san" on Alice (as she does for most older people of no special status) when meeting her in a flashback, but uses "-chan" on her in the present after they become friends.
9th Apr '16 7:45:13 PM Vilui
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:''-niisan/-neesan'': Literally refers to one's older brother or sister, respectively, but can also be used to refer to a relative within your generation that is older than you (i.e. an older cousin) ''or'' a slightly older close friend that you consider to be ''like'' a brother or sister, similar to ''-senpai''. [[note]] As the Japanese "e" is pronounced similarly to the French "é", the pronunciation of these two apparently-similar honorifics is quite different.[[/note]] To directly address your brother or sister, add ''O-'' to the beginning (it denotes respect), but if you don't feel particularly respectful, feel free to omit it. Siblings trying to be cute will sometimes refer to their older counterparts as ''Onii-chan'' or ''Onee-chan''. An alternate way of being very casual, typically seen more in fiction than reality, is to drop the ''san'' and address the subject as "<name>-''nii''" or "<name>-''nee''".

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:''-niisan/-neesan'': Literally refers to one's older brother or sister, respectively, but can also be used to refer to a relative within your generation that is older than you (i.e.(e.g. an older cousin) ''or'' a slightly older close friend that you consider to be ''like'' a brother or sister, similar to ''-senpai''. [[note]] As the Japanese "e" is pronounced similarly to the French "é", the pronunciation of these two apparently-similar honorifics is quite different.[[/note]] To directly address your brother or sister, add ''O-'' to the beginning (it denotes respect), but if you don't feel particularly respectful, feel free to omit it. Siblings trying to be cute will sometimes refer to their older counterparts as ''Onii-chan'' or ''Onee-chan''. An alternate way of being very casual, typically seen more in fiction than reality, is to drop the ''san'' and address the subject as "<name>-''nii''" or "<name>-''nee''".
26th Jan '16 2:28:49 PM nighttrainfm
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* In ''Series/KamenRiderFourze'', protagonist Gentaro refers to all his friends with ''yobisute'', partly to reflect his image as a ''[[JapaneseDelinquents yanki]]'', partly because he's all about ThePowerOfFriendship, and maybe partly due to the copious American influence on the show. He even does it with people he ''wants'' to befriend, as seen in episode 8 where he calls [[JerkJock Shun Daimonji]] just "Shun", in spite of the fact that Daimonji is actively antagonizing him. In the previous episode, he does this with the detention teacher and is forced to study while doing a handstand as punishment.

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* In ''Franchise/KamenRider'':
**
''Series/KamenRiderFourze'', protagonist Gentaro refers to all his friends with ''yobisute'', partly to reflect his image as a ''[[JapaneseDelinquents yanki]]'', partly because he's all about ThePowerOfFriendship, and maybe partly due to the copious American influence on the show. He even does it with people he ''wants'' to befriend, as seen in episode 8 where he calls [[JerkJock Shun Daimonji]] just "Shun", in spite of the fact that Daimonji is actively antagonizing him. In the previous episode, he does this with the detention teacher and is forced to study while doing a handstand as punishment.


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* In ''Series/BakuryuuSentaiAbaranger'', Ryouga makes a point of calling Doctor Nakadai Mikoto 'Nakadai-sensei'. This demonstrates Ryouga's extreme friendliness and politeness: while Mikoto did save his life in hospital, he's also a sadistic asshole who spends a good chunk of the series trying to kill Ryouga.
22nd Jan '16 8:37:22 PM Adept
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** In the Disappearance movie and ''TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'', the version of Yuki involved is surprisingly respectful toward others, referring to even her best friend Ryoko as "[[LastNameBasis Asakura]]-san" (dubbed as "Miss Asakura").

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** In the Disappearance movie and ''TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'', ''Manga/TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'', the version of Yuki involved is surprisingly respectful toward others, referring to even her best friend Ryoko as "[[LastNameBasis Asakura]]-san" (dubbed as "Miss Asakura").



* In ''NagasareteAirantou'', Kagami (a 27-year old woman with a very girly mind) insists the teenage Ikuto call her Kagami-chan, actually attacking him when he refers to her as Kagami-san. This is to contrast her with her far more mature eleven-year-old daughter.

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* In ''NagasareteAirantou'', ''Manga/NagasareteAirantou'', Kagami (a 27-year old woman with a very girly mind) insists the teenage Ikuto call her Kagami-chan, actually attacking him when he refers to her as Kagami-san. This is to contrast her with her far more mature eleven-year-old daughter.
11th Jan '16 6:11:52 PM rjd1922
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Using no honorific at all (called ''yobisute'') is also an honorific -- it's a "null honorific", and it means the speaker is addressing the person to whom he is speaking in an intimate and familiar manner usually restricted to family, spouses or one's closest friends. Usually, this is only done when FirstNameBasis permission is granted by the subject. Using no honorific without such permission is a grave insult; this is a subtlety lost on many foreign visitors, who may offend people with no idea that they're doing so (although nowadays this is generally not the case for most foreigners since most Japanese understand that many languages do not use honorifics, and many foreigners, particularly business travelers. brush up on Japanese etiquette before visiting.). Addressing someone in ''yobisute'' for the first time frequently marks an important point in a RomanceArc or friendship.

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Using no honorific at all (called ''yobisute'') is also an honorific -- it's a "null honorific", and it means the speaker is addressing the person to whom he is speaking in an intimate and familiar manner usually restricted to family, spouses or one's closest friends. Usually, this is only done when FirstNameBasis permission is granted by the subject. Using no honorific without such permission is a grave insult; this is a subtlety lost on many foreign visitors, who may offend people with no idea that they're doing so (although nowadays this is generally not the case for most foreigners since most Japanese understand that many languages do not use honorifics, and many foreigners, particularly business travelers. travelers, brush up on Japanese etiquette before visiting.).visiting). Addressing someone in ''yobisute'' for the first time frequently marks an important point in a RomanceArc or friendship.
31st Dec '15 11:16:28 AM Doug86
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* In ''KarakuridoujiUltimo'' Kumegawa Hiroshi threatens to take out his doji because Shiina Machi not using an honorific when speaking to him, though this later turns out to be BelligerentSexualTension

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* In ''KarakuridoujiUltimo'' ''Manga/KarakuridoujiUltimo'' Kumegawa Hiroshi threatens to take out his doji because Shiina Machi not using an honorific when speaking to him, though this later turns out to be BelligerentSexualTension
21st Dec '15 5:45:55 PM Prfnoff
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* Alex calls ''Nikita'' "''Sensei''" in the revamped version of the show starring Maggie Q as Nikita.

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* Alex calls ''Nikita'' ''Series/{{Nikita}}'' "''Sensei''" in the revamped version of the show starring Maggie Q as Nikita.



** ''KamenRiderKiva'' actually has a literal "walking tank of a dude named Dai-chan" incident. He had lost his memory, was really big, so "dai" (as in great) was as good a nickname for him as any, and "chan" fits a GentleGiant. It's kinda like calling him "Mr. Big" in a friendly way. Of course, once he regains his memory (he's actually an AxCrazy BloodKnight villain they hadn't seen in his civilian guise yet, though the viewer knew who he was) any friendly name was off the table. When Rook of the Checkmate Four shows up, you worry less about what to call him and more about survival.

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** ''KamenRiderKiva'' ''Series/KamenRiderKiva'' actually has a literal "walking tank of a dude named Dai-chan" incident. He had lost his memory, was really big, so "dai" (as in great) was as good a nickname for him as any, and "chan" fits a GentleGiant. It's kinda like calling him "Mr. Big" in a friendly way. Of course, once he regains his memory (he's actually an AxCrazy BloodKnight villain they hadn't seen in his civilian guise yet, though the viewer knew who he was) any friendly name was off the table. When Rook of the Checkmate Four shows up, you worry less about what to call him and more about survival.



* In ''RedSteel'', the player character is often called "Scott-san", and Tony Tanaka calls Sato "Sato-sama".

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* In ''RedSteel'', ''VideoGame/RedSteel'', the player character is often called "Scott-san", and Tony Tanaka calls Sato "Sato-sama".
19th Dec '15 5:56:21 PM nombretomado
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* The English version of ''{{Shenmue}}'' features the cast using honorifics.

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* The English version of ''{{Shenmue}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Shenmue}}'' features the cast using honorifics.
12th Dec '15 5:15:13 PM Hvedekorn
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** Sogeking tends to use "Kun" for everyone, including himself (that is, Ussop when he isn't being Sogeking).

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** Sogeking tends to use "Kun" for everyone, including himself (that is, Ussop Usopp when he isn't being Sogeking).
12th Dec '15 5:11:01 PM Hvedekorn
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Added DiffLines:

** Asuka has the most polite use of honorifics in the series, using "-sama" for Yamazaki and "-san" for everybody else.
** Himekawa very indiscriminately uses "-san" for all boys (except her childhood friend Yuri, to whom she uses "-kun") and "-chan" for all girls, not always paying regard to the context.
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