History UsefulNotes / JapaneseHonorifics

9th Jun '17 2:02:09 PM ButterDispenser
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Two notable examples in ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'' and the sequel series ''Anime/DigimonZeroTwo'': Tentomon and Wormmon. Tentomon will always address Koshiro/Izzy as "Koshiro-han", and adds "-han" when talking about practically any of the other human characters. Meanwhile, Wormmon refers to Ken exclusively as "Ken-chan", ''even when he's the Digimon Emperor.''
7th Jun '17 7:17:58 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the WhateleyUniverse, Generator (deceased Japanese mother and trying to regain her lost culture) uses Chaka-''sempai'' for her martial arts tutor and ''onee-san'' and ''onee-sama'' for her best friend and roommate Billie whom she loves like a big sister. Billie, who is not Japanese but is an Anime fan (her own CodeName is "Tennyo") humors her and appreciates the honor.

to:

* In the WhateleyUniverse, Literature/WhateleyUniverse, Generator (deceased Japanese mother and trying to regain her lost culture) uses Chaka-''sempai'' for her martial arts tutor and ''onee-san'' and ''onee-sama'' for her best friend and roommate Billie whom she loves like a big sister. Billie, who is not Japanese but is an Anime fan (her own CodeName is "Tennyo") humors her and appreciates the honor.
5th Jun '17 9:22:29 AM Juneberries
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Ranma's respect for his elders [[ObaSan is pretty clear]], generally referring to his father as "oyaji" ("Pops"), Cologne as "ba-san" ("old ghoul"), and Happosai as "jii-san" and "ji-ji" (translated as "old man" or outright "old freak").
5th Jun '17 9:18:19 AM Juneberries
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Ranma's respect for his elders [[ObaSan is pretty clear]], generally referring to his father as "oyaji" ("Pops"), Cologne as "ba-san" ("old ghoul"), and Happosai as "jii-san" and "ji-ji" (translated as "old man" or outright "old freak").
13th May '17 4:31:53 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''"Honorific"''', in linguistic lingo, refers to the little prefixes, suffixes, or titles that are added to a name in most languages, like "Mr.", "Mrs.", "Dr.", "[[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Sir]]" and the like. Japanese, naturally, has them. One interesting feature, however, is that there are far more of them with far more nuances of meaning than there are in other languages. They can be either attached to the end of a name, or in some cases (such as "sensei", much like the English "Professor") as standalone substitutes for names.

to:

'''"Honorific"''', "Honorific", in linguistic lingo, refers to the little prefixes, suffixes, or titles that are added to a name in most languages, like "Mr.", "Mrs.", "Dr.", "[[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Sir]]" and the like. Japanese, naturally, has them. One interesting feature, however, is that there are far more of them with far more nuances of meaning than there are in other languages. They can be either attached to the end of a name, or in some cases (such as "sensei", much like the English "Professor") as standalone substitutes for names.



:''-dono'': Originally "lord," in the feudal sense, once denoting a higher level of respect than ''-sama''. However, while ''-dono'' denotes high status on the part of the person being addressed, it does not imply lower status on the part of the speaker, unlike ''-sama''. It thus serves as a face-saving way for high-ranking ''JidaiGeki'' characters to address others of high rank. Today, it's considered slightly less respectful than ''-sama'' due to the lack of self-humbling. However, it's rather archaic to use at all these days; in anime it's sometimes used as an anachronism to indicate the speaker's age (Cologne in ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', Washu in ''Anime/TenchiMuyo'', etc), or in feudal/historical settings. The only place it's still more or less widely used is the military, cf. "kisama".

to:

:''-dono'': Originally "lord," in the feudal sense, once denoting a higher level of respect than ''-sama''. However, while ''-dono'' denotes high status on the part of the person being addressed, it does not imply lower status on the part of the speaker, unlike ''-sama''. It thus serves as a face-saving way for high-ranking ''JidaiGeki'' characters to address others of high rank. Today, it's considered slightly less respectful than ''-sama'' due to the lack of self-humbling. However, it's rather archaic to use at all these days; in anime it's sometimes used as an anachronism to indicate the speaker's age (Cologne in ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', Washu in ''Anime/TenchiMuyo'', etc), etc.), or in feudal/historical settings. The only place it's still more or less widely used is the military, cf. "kisama".



:''-chan'': A general, informal term of endearment with overtones of intense cuteness, most frequently used for (and between) girls, but also applicable to pets, small children regardless of gender, friends, or lovers. Making it part of a nickname is even more so, and is done primarily for little kids, {{Kawaiiko}} teen girls, close friends (regardless of gender), or lovers (for whom it is especially intimate). Sometimes translated as 'little'; for example, "[[Anime/WitchHunterRobin Robin-chan]]" becoming "little Robin", sometimes translated as "-baby" (as in [[Manga/RanmaOneHalf Kunô-baby]]). Literally speaking, it's the diminutive -- a cultural equivalent to calling your friend "Jimmy" instead of just plain Jim. Technically speaking, it's what would properly be termed the ''affectionate'' diminutive. However, as the "Kunô-baby" example shows, it can also be used as a ''derisive'' diminutive, depending upon context and tone.

to:

:''-chan'': A general, informal term of endearment with overtones of intense cuteness, most frequently used for (and between) girls, but also applicable to pets, small children regardless of gender, friends, or lovers. Making it part of a nickname is even more so, and is done primarily for little kids, {{Kawaiiko}} teen girls, close friends (regardless of gender), or lovers (for whom it is especially intimate). Sometimes translated as 'little'; for example, "[[Anime/WitchHunterRobin Robin-chan]]" becoming "little Robin", sometimes translated as "-baby" (as in [[Manga/RanmaOneHalf Kunô-baby]]).Kunō-baby]]). Literally speaking, it's the diminutive -- a cultural equivalent to calling your friend "Jimmy" instead of just plain Jim. Technically speaking, it's what would properly be termed the ''affectionate'' diminutive. However, as the "Kunô-baby" "Kunō-baby" example shows, it can also be used as a ''derisive'' diminutive, depending upon context and tone.



* In ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', teenagers Ranma and Ukyo have pet names for each other using the truncated name + ''-chan'' structure ("Ranchan" and "Ucchan", the latter doubling as a pun on her Kansai dialect). These date back to their initial friendship at age six. At least one background character, upon hearing their use, commented that this was "little kid stuff". These are carried over largely without explanation in the English dub, though Ukyo's habitual "Ran-chan" is often translated as "Ranma-honey" instead. Likewise, Soun and Genma always refer to each other as "Saotome-kun" and "Tendo-kun", reflecting their status as old friends and fellow students of Happousai. In their case it's supposed to sound more adolescent than juvenile.
** Ranma repeatedly refuses to acknowledge the ultra-rich buffoon Tatewaki Kuno's insistence that Ranma show him the respect due an upperclassman by addressing him as "{{Sempai|Kohai}}". The dub translates this mostly literally as demanding to be called "Upperclassman Kuno."
*** Whenever Ranma does use ''-sempai'' he tends to either deliberately mispronounce Kuno's name so it sounds more like "no abilities" than "nine abilities", or (in the manga, naturally) use katakana to denote a mocking pronunciation of the term.
** Likewise, Nabiki invariably refers to Kuno as Kuno-chan (translated as "Kuno baby" in the English dub) as a way to mock his excessive formality. It's hard to combine a formal name with the diminutive "-chan" in a way that doesn't imply sarcasm, derision or even contempt.
** Ranma and Akane consistently address each other using ''yobisute'', and the lack of honorifics underlines both their status as the OfficialCouple and the ambiguous WillTheyOrWontThey nature of their relationship. The reason Kuno first gets mad at Ranma for addressing Akane so casually was because Ranma was using ''yobisute''.

to:

* In ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', teenagers ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'':
** Teenagers
Ranma and Ukyo Ukyō have pet names for each other using the truncated name + ''-chan'' structure ("Ranchan" and "Ucchan", the latter doubling as a pun on her Kansai dialect). These date back to their initial friendship at age six. At least one background character, upon hearing their use, commented that this was "little kid stuff". These are carried over largely without explanation in the English dub, though Ukyo's Ukyō's habitual "Ran-chan" is often translated as "Ranma-honey" instead. instead.
**
Likewise, Soun Sōun and Genma always refer to each other as "Saotome-kun" and "Tendo-kun", reflecting their status as old friends and fellow students of Happousai.Happōsai. In their case it's supposed to sound more adolescent than juvenile.
** Ranma repeatedly refuses to acknowledge the ultra-rich buffoon Tatewaki Kuno's Kunō's insistence that Ranma show him the respect due an upperclassman by addressing him as "{{Sempai|Kohai}}". The dub translates this mostly literally as demanding to be called "Upperclassman Kuno."
***
" Whenever Ranma does use ''-sempai'' ''-sempai'', he tends to either deliberately mispronounce Kuno's Kunō's name so it sounds more like "no abilities" than "nine abilities", or (in the manga, naturally) use katakana to denote a mocking pronunciation of the term.
** Likewise, Nabiki invariably refers to Kuno Kunō as Kuno-chan Kunō-chan (translated as "Kuno baby" "Kunō-baby" in the English dub) as a way to mock his excessive formality. It's hard to combine a formal name with the diminutive "-chan" in a way that doesn't imply sarcasm, derision or even contempt.
** Ranma and Akane consistently address each other using ''yobisute'', and the lack of honorifics underlines both their status as the OfficialCouple and the ambiguous WillTheyOrWontThey nature of their relationship. The reason Kuno Kunō first gets mad at Ranma for addressing Akane so casually was because Ranma was using ''yobisute''.



* In ''{{Manga/Saki}}''

to:

* In ''{{Manga/Saki}}''''Manga/{{Saki}}''



* One notable example in {{Bakemonogatari}} is a sequence in which Senjougahara asks Araragi to call her "Senjougahara-sama", and he replies by sarcastically calling her "Senjougahara-chan" and promptly gets poked in his eyes.

to:

* One notable example in {{Bakemonogatari}} ''LightNovel/{{Bakemonogatari}}'' is a sequence in which Senjougahara asks Araragi to call her "Senjougahara-sama", and he replies by sarcastically calling her "Senjougahara-chan" and promptly gets poked in his eyes.
7th May '17 7:26:36 PM BNSF1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Quite unusually, the English dub actually retains the honorifics.
29th Apr '17 4:12:39 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is a gameplay mechanic in some installments of the TokimekiMemorial series; choosing the wrong honorific when addressing a [[DatingSim potential love interest]] may have unfortunate consequences.

to:

* This is a gameplay mechanic in some installments of the TokimekiMemorial ''VisualNovel/TokimekiMemorial'' series; choosing the wrong honorific when addressing a [[DatingSim potential love interest]] may have unfortunate consequences.
25th Apr '17 12:56:52 AM LinTaylor
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Of course, when it comes to previous Kamen Riders, Gentaro ''always'' calls them "sempai" out of deep respect and admiration.


Added DiffLines:

* In the Chinpokomon episode of ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', the kids start speaking Japanese, which leads to a frustrated Mr. Garrison shouting "Goddammit children! I am '''not''' 'Garrison-san'! [[HandPuppet This]] is '''not''' 'Hat-san'!"
17th Apr '17 5:06:25 AM TakeHomeRena
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[http://bobcatmoran.livejournal.com/9914.html Here's an analysis]] of the honorifics and pronouns used in the original Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork''. The translation did manage to adapt some of them, such as the high formality of Yai's Navi and programs.

to:

** [[http://bobcatmoran.livejournal.com/9914.html [[https://bobcatmoran.dreamwidth.org/26255.html#cutid1 Here's an analysis]] of the honorifics and pronouns used in the original Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork''. The translation did manage to adapt some of them, such as the high formality of Yai's Navi and programs.
13th Mar '17 2:34:01 PM secretfan14
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The many different honorifics used in ''Manga/AiYoriAoshi'' are an important part of characterization. For instance, each member of Kaoru's UnwantedHarem addresses him differently. [[YamatoNadeshiko Aoi]] says "Kaoru-sama"; formal [[HaremNanny Miyabi]] says "Kaoru-dono" (rendered in English as "Sir Kaoru"); easygoing American [[HardDrinkingPartyGirl Tina]] says "Kaoru"; younger student [[{{Dojikko}} Taeko]] says "Hanabishi-sempai"; and rich girl [[TheOjou Mayu]] says "Hanabishi-sama". In fact, the respectful honorifics that Aoi and Miyabi use should really be a problem for their cover story -- clearly Kaoru is more than just a tenant to them.

to:

* The many different honorifics used in ''Manga/AiYoriAoshi'' are an important part of characterization. For instance, each member of Kaoru's UnwantedHarem addresses him differently. [[YamatoNadeshiko Aoi]] says "Kaoru-sama"; formal [[HaremNanny Miyabi]] says "Kaoru-dono" (rendered in English as "Sir Kaoru"); easygoing American [[HardDrinkingPartyGirl Tina]] says "Kaoru"; younger student [[{{Dojikko}} [[CuteClumsyGirl Taeko]] says "Hanabishi-sempai"; and rich girl [[TheOjou Mayu]] says "Hanabishi-sama". In fact, the respectful honorifics that Aoi and Miyabi use should really be a problem for their cover story -- clearly Kaoru is more than just a tenant to them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 277. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.JapaneseHonorifics