History UsefulNotes / IrishPoliticalSystem

30th Nov '15 10:05:50 AM FF32
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* It also states that ''"all powers of government derive, under God, from the people"'', another one for RichardDawkins to get at.
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* It also states that ''"all powers of government derive, under God, from the people"'', another one for RichardDawkins UsefulNotes/RichardDawkins to get at.
12th Nov '15 5:34:12 AM karstovich2
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The Constitution of Ireland (''Bunreacht na hÉireann'') is composed of a Preamble and fifty Articles. It can only be changed by referendum (a vote of all adult citizens), and it has been changed twenty-four times since its adoption in 1937. Oddities and controversies in the constitution include:
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The Constitution of Ireland (''Bunreacht na hÉireann'') is composed of a Preamble and fifty Articles. It can only be changed by referendum (a vote of all adult citizens), and it has been changed twenty-four thirty-three times since its adoption in 1937. Oddities and controversies in the constitution include:

* LGBT activists protest that Article 41.3.1˚ states that ''"The State pledges itself to guard with special care the institution of marriage, on which the Family is founded"'', which impinges the rights of same-sex unions. It also affects men's rights, such as ''State (Nicolaou) v. An Bord Uchtála'' which judged that an unmarried father could not prevent his child's mother from placing their child for adoption, as they were not a 'Family'.
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* LGBT activists protest that Article 41.3.1˚ states that ''"The State pledges itself to guard with special care the institution of marriage, on which the Family is founded"'', which impinges the rights of same-sex unions.unions; this issue is now moot after the passage of the Thirty-Fourth Amendment formally establishing that both same-sex and opposite-sex couples have a right to marry (don't ask how there have been thirty-three amendments and this one is the thirty-fourth). It also affects men's rights, such as ''State (Nicolaou) v. An Bord Uchtála'' which judged that an unmarried father could not prevent his child's mother from placing their child for adoption, as they were not a 'Family'.
30th Oct '15 11:49:57 AM Josef5678
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* '''Fianna Fáil''' ("fee-anna fawl"; "Warriors of Ireland") (19 [=TDs=], 14 Sen, 3 [=MEPs=], 406 local) is a right-wing populist republican party which has ruled the country for most of its existence; it was most recently in power from June 1997 to March 2011. Historically drawn from Sinn Féin members opposed to the Anglo-Irish Treaty which established the Irish Free State, who were nevertheless pragmatic enough to realize they'd been beaten in the Civil War and would have to get their Republic through elections and internal reform of the Free State (this was Éamon de Valera's strategy, and FF is his party). In modern times FF has become synonymous with the corrupt élite who had an all-too-close relationship with property developers and senior bankers, fuelling the implosion of the Irish property bubble and the near-collapse of the State. [[IncrediblyLamePun Jokes about "fail"]] are understandably rather common (if memory serves, even ''TheEconomist'' has gotten in on the action). Their loss to Fine Gael in the 2011 election was not only the biggest in party history, but the worst ever in Irish politics and among the worst in Europe - they lost ''fifty-seven'' seats, beating the previous record of just fifteen.
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* '''Fianna Fáil''' ("fee-anna fawl"; "Warriors of Ireland") (19 [=TDs=], 14 Sen, 3 [=MEPs=], 406 local) is a right-wing populist republican party which has ruled the country for most of its existence; it was most recently in power from June 1997 to March 2011. Historically drawn from Sinn Féin members opposed to the Anglo-Irish Treaty which established the Irish Free State, who were nevertheless pragmatic enough to realize they'd been beaten in the Civil War and would have to get their Republic through elections and internal reform of the Free State (this was Éamon de Valera's strategy, and FF is his party). In modern times FF has become synonymous with the corrupt élite who had an all-too-close relationship with property developers and senior bankers, fuelling the implosion of the Irish property bubble and the near-collapse of the State. [[IncrediblyLamePun Jokes about "fail"]] are understandably rather common (if memory serves, even ''TheEconomist'' ''Magazine/TheEconomist'' has gotten in on the action). Their loss to Fine Gael in the 2011 election was not only the biggest in party history, but the worst ever in Irish politics and among the worst in Europe - they lost ''fifty-seven'' seats, beating the previous record of just fifteen.
2nd Oct '15 7:50:38 AM moloch
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There are county councils representing the 26 traditional counties, except that County Dublin is divided into Fingal County, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County and South Dublin County; County Tipperary is split into South and North; and the cities of Dublin, Galway, Limerick, Cork and Waterford are administrated separately to their counties.
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There are county councils representing the 26 traditional counties, except that County Dublin is divided into Fingal County, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County and South Dublin County; County Tipperary is was split into South and North; North Ridings until 2014; and the cities of Dublin, Galway, Limerick, Cork and Waterford are administrated separately to their counties.
2nd Oct '15 7:12:33 AM moloch
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Cearbhall[[labelnote:''Pronunciation'']] Cya-ROOL. In English, it'd be ''Cyril Daly''[[/labelnote]] Ó Dálaigh (1911--1978) took over after Childers died. He was in office for less than two years, since he did not get on well with the Fine Gael/Labour coalition and in particular Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave.
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Cearbhall[[labelnote:''Pronunciation'']] Cya-ROOL. In English, Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh [[labelnote:''Pronunciation'']] Cya-ROOL O Dawlig. For reference, in English translation, it'd be ''Cyril Daly''[[/labelnote]] Daly'', but that was never his legal name and as such, should never be substituted for "Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh Dálaigh".[[/labelnote]] (1911--1978) took over after Childers died. He was in office for less than two years, since he did not get on well with the Fine Gael/Labour coalition and in particular Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave. \n The only president to resign the position.
2nd Oct '15 7:06:27 AM moloch
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Cearball Ó Dálaigh (1911--1978) took over after Childers died. He was in office for less than two years, since he did not get on well with the Fine Gael/Labour coalition and in particular Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave.
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Cearball Cearbhall[[labelnote:''Pronunciation'']] Cya-ROOL. In English, it'd be ''Cyril Daly''[[/labelnote]] Ó Dálaigh (1911--1978) took over after Childers died. He was in office for less than two years, since he did not get on well with the Fine Gael/Labour coalition and in particular Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave.
2nd Oct '15 5:57:06 AM moloch
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* The Irish language is the 'first official language', even though few speak it (''is teanga deacair í a fhoghlaim, agus ní mhúintear maith í sa scoil freisin''), while English is a 'second language', despite being the mother tongue of 95 plus percent of citizens.
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* The Irish language is the 'first official language', even though few speak it (''is (''deirtear gur teanga deacair í a fhoghlaim, agus ní mhúintear maith í sa scoil freisin''), while English is a 'second language', despite being the mother tongue of 95 plus percent of citizens.
14th Sep '15 6:51:34 AM PaddyMurphy
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added note about the translation of Sinn Féin
* '''Sinn Féin''' ("shin fane"; "Ourselves") ([=RoI=]: 14 [=TDs=], 3 Sen, 127 local; in [=NI=]: 5 [=MPs=], 29 [=MLAs=], 1 MEP, 138 local) is a left-wing republican party with "close ties" to the Provisional IRA. They were historically the party that split off from the "original" Sinn Féin in 1970 when it changed its name to the Workers' Party (for which see below) and decided to participate in [=RoI=] electoral politics; they nevertheless began taking seats in the Republic (and later, the NI Assembly) starting in the early 1980s. With the reversal of the Greens' policy on the EU, Sinn Féin is now the only Eurosceptic political party in the country with representation in the Dáil. Had a remarkably good time of the 2011 elections, picking up nine seats and becoming the fourth-largest party in the Dáil.
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* '''Sinn Féin''' ("shin fane"; "Ourselves") "Ourselves"[[note]]Sometimes translated—inaccurately, if more poetically—as "ourselves alone." This is a translation you will see in some older works.[[/note]]) ([=RoI=]: 14 [=TDs=], 3 Sen, 127 local; in [=NI=]: 5 [=MPs=], 29 [=MLAs=], 1 MEP, 138 local) is a left-wing republican party with "close ties" to the Provisional IRA. They were historically the party that split off from the "original" Sinn Féin in 1970 when it changed its name to the Workers' Party (for which see below) and decided to participate in [=RoI=] electoral politics; they nevertheless began taking seats in the Republic (and later, the NI Assembly) starting in the early 1980s. With the reversal of the Greens' policy on the EU, Sinn Féin is now the only Eurosceptic political party in the country with representation in the Dáil. Had a remarkably good time of the 2011 elections, picking up nine seats and becoming the fourth-largest party in the Dáil.
15th May '15 7:54:31 AM Boreas74
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Sp
* '''Labour Party''' (''Páirtí an Lucht Oibre'') (33 [=TDs=], 11 Sen, 2 [=MEPs=], 230 local) is a left-of-centre social democrat party. Affiliated with several trade unions, including Ireland's biggest union SIPTU. Founded in 1912, during the 1990's in absorbed several smaller socialist and social democrat parties including the Independent Socialist Party, the Democratic Socialist Party, and finally Democratic Left in 1999. Historically firm allies of Fine Gael--every Fine Gael government thus far has included Labour as either the sole or the largest junior coalition partner--despite their (theoretically) vast ideological differences; Fine Gael's social orientation tempers disagreements somewhat.
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* '''Labour Party''' (''Páirtí an Lucht Oibre'') (33 [=TDs=], 11 Sen, 2 [=MEPs=], 230 local) is a left-of-centre social democrat party. Affiliated with several trade unions, including Ireland's biggest union SIPTU. Founded in 1912, during the 1990's in it absorbed several smaller socialist and social democrat parties including the Independent Socialist Party, the Democratic Socialist Party, and finally Democratic Left in 1999. Historically firm allies of Fine Gael--every Fine Gael government thus far has included Labour as either the sole or the largest junior coalition partner--despite their (theoretically) vast ideological differences; Fine Gael's social orientation tempers disagreements somewhat.
15th May '15 7:53:18 AM Boreas74
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Two other parties were absorbed by Labour in the 90's the ISP in Sligo/Leitrim and the DSP in Limerick.
* '''Labour Party''' (''Páirtí an Lucht Oibre'') (33 [=TDs=], 11 Sen, 2 [=MEPs=], 230 local) is a left-of-centre social democrat party. Affiliated with several trade unions, including Ireland's biggest union SIPTU. Founded in 1912, absorbed Democratic Left in 1999. Historically firm allies of Fine Gael--every Fine Gael government thus far has included Labour as either the sole or the largest junior coalition partner--despite their (theoretically) vast ideological differences; Fine Gael's social orientation tempers disagreements somewhat.
to:
* '''Labour Party''' (''Páirtí an Lucht Oibre'') (33 [=TDs=], 11 Sen, 2 [=MEPs=], 230 local) is a left-of-centre social democrat party. Affiliated with several trade unions, including Ireland's biggest union SIPTU. Founded in 1912, during the 1990's in absorbed several smaller socialist and social democrat parties including the Independent Socialist Party, the Democratic Socialist Party, and finally Democratic Left in 1999. Historically firm allies of Fine Gael--every Fine Gael government thus far has included Labour as either the sole or the largest junior coalition partner--despite their (theoretically) vast ideological differences; Fine Gael's social orientation tempers disagreements somewhat.
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