History UsefulNotes / India

21st Mar '18 8:45:47 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/TheOffice'' (US) has the episode "Diwali," wherein Kelly invites the gang to a celebration of the Indian holiday.

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* ''Series/TheOffice'' (US) ''Series/TheOfficeUS'' has the episode "Diwali," wherein Kelly invites the gang to a celebration of the Indian holiday.
6th Jan '18 5:27:31 AM BawdyDam
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* The Vedic Age: Indo-Aryan tribes moved into the Indus valley, and then, all of northern India. They brought the Sanskrit language, which is comparable to Latin in Europe in terms of the influence it had on India. It also is a distant relative of most European languages such as English, French, Russian etc.

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* The Vedic Age: Indo-Aryan tribes moved into the Indus valley, and then, all of northern India. They brought the Sanskrit language, which is comparable to Latin in Europe in terms of the influence it had on India.Asia. It also is a distant relative of most European languages such as English, French, Russian etc.
21st Dec '17 7:43:47 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* UsefulNotes/TheRaj - The Colonial Rule, Popularization of the "Savage" India through British Media, The JWB Massacre, The World Wars, Bhagath Singh, UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi

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* UsefulNotes/TheRaj - The Colonial Rule, Popularization of the [[SimSimSalabim "Savage" India India]] through British Media, The JWB Massacre, The World Wars, Bhagath Singh, UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi
15th Dec '17 11:52:20 AM Njein
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On August 15, 1947, India became an independent nation, which despite its partitions, constituted the 7th largest nation in the world. The Herculean task of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_integration_of_India gargantuan task of uniting the 560+ princely states]] fell to Home Minister Vallabhai Patel, his Constitutional Advisor V.P. Menon, and (more controversially) the Britain-appointed Viceroy Louis Mountbatten. While the parts of the subcontinent under direct British rule immediately became part of the Union of India (as it was called before it became a republic in 1950), the Princely States themselves had the option of joining India, Pakistan, or remaining independent. Majority-Muslim states on the border with Pakistan tended to join Pakistan without controversy, while most others chose to join India. However, several princely states refused to follow the obvious patterns, the most notable of which are Kashmir, Junagadh, and Hyderabad, all instances where the ruling elite was a different religion from the majority of the population in the state. Kashmir, where the ruler was Hindu and the people Muslim, is quite possibly one of the biggest political quagmires in the world today, besides the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict, [[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar the division of Korea]], [[UsefulNotes/Afghanistan invasions of Afghanistan]], and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles. The other two major instances involved a Muslim ruler over a majority-Hindu state: Junagadh's Muslim prince decided to join Pakistan despite not bordering it at all, leading India to essentially lay siege to the territory, and eventually the prince bailed out to Pakistan. Hyderabad's Muslim ruler decided he didn't much care to be part of either India ''or'' Pakistan, and Hyderabad had to be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Polo forcefully integrated]].

to:

On August 15, 1947, India became an independent nation, which despite its partitions, constituted the 7th largest nation in the world. The Herculean task of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_integration_of_India gargantuan task of uniting the 560+ princely states]] fell to Home Minister Vallabhai Patel, his Constitutional Advisor V.P. Menon, and (more controversially) the Britain-appointed Viceroy Louis Mountbatten. While the parts of the subcontinent under direct British rule immediately became part of the Union of India (as it was called before it became a republic in 1950), the Princely States themselves had the option of joining India, Pakistan, or remaining independent. Majority-Muslim states on the border with Pakistan tended to join Pakistan without controversy, while most others chose to join India. However, several princely states refused to follow the obvious patterns, the most notable of which are Kashmir, Junagadh, and Hyderabad, all instances where the ruling elite was a different religion from the majority of the population in the state. Kashmir, where the ruler was Hindu and the people Muslim, is quite possibly one of the biggest political quagmires cans of worms in the world today, besides the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict, [[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar the division of Korea]], [[UsefulNotes/Afghanistan invasions of [[UsefulNotes/{{Afghanistan}} Afghanistan]], and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles. The other two major instances involved a Muslim ruler over a majority-Hindu state: Junagadh's Muslim prince decided to join Pakistan despite not bordering it at all, leading India to essentially lay siege to the territory, and eventually the prince bailed out to Pakistan. Hyderabad's Muslim ruler decided he didn't much care to be part of either India ''or'' Pakistan, and Hyderabad had to be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Polo forcefully integrated]].
15th Dec '17 11:25:41 AM Njein
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On August 15, 1947, India became an independent nation, which despite its partitions, constituted the 7th largest nation in the world. The Herculean task of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_integration_of_India uniting the princely states]] fell to Home Minister Vallabhai Patel, his Constitutional Advisor V.P. Menon, and (more controversially) the Britain-appointed Viceroy Louis Mountbatten. While the parts of the subcontinent under direct British rule immediately became part of the Union of India (as it was called before it became a republic in 1950), the Princely States themselves had the option of joining India, joining Pakistan, or remaining independent. Majority-Muslim states on the border with Pakistan tended to join Pakistan without controversy, while most others chose to join India. However, several princely states refused to follow the obvious patterns, the most notable of which are Kashmir, Junagadh, and Hyderabad, all instances where the ruling elite was a different religion from the majority of the population in the state. Kashmir, where the ruler was Hindu and the people Muslim, is quite possibly the biggest political can of worms in the world today besides the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles. The other two major instances involved a Muslim ruler over a majority-Hindu state: Junagadh's Muslim prince decided to join Pakistan despite not bordering it at all, leading India to essentially lay siege to the territory, and eventually the prince fled. Hyderabad's Muslim ruler decided he didn't much care to be part of India ''or'' Pakistan, and Hyderabad had to be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Polo integrated by force of arms]].

A lot of the problems that nobody got around to rectifying before independence are still there now, most notably a high rate of illiteracy in the more rural areas, which both the government and private organizations are fighting to change, the uneven spread of urbanization and since TheNineties, massive income inequality, UrbanSegregation and the rise of communal violence and political corruption. On the positive side, sixty years of quick, accelerated development later, India today is the world's largest democracy, maintaining the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Military second largest military in the world]], a nuclear superpower, and the only nation that has U.N permission to trade in nuclear fuel without having signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty. For a country that has only had six decades of actual modern development, it says a lot about how fast the nation is moving forward, especially when Americans today are concerned that Indians are surpassing them in the IT sector. Poverty is ''extremely'' widespread still, with 41% of the nation falling below the poverty line (and an equal percentage of malnourished children), and the nation containing a third of the world's poor. It is trying to deal with these problems, but it remains a slow climb.

to:

On August 15, 1947, India became an independent nation, which despite its partitions, constituted the 7th largest nation in the world. The Herculean task of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_integration_of_India gargantuan task of uniting the 560+ princely states]] fell to Home Minister Vallabhai Patel, his Constitutional Advisor V.P. Menon, and (more controversially) the Britain-appointed Viceroy Louis Mountbatten. While the parts of the subcontinent under direct British rule immediately became part of the Union of India (as it was called before it became a republic in 1950), the Princely States themselves had the option of joining India, joining Pakistan, or remaining independent. Majority-Muslim states on the border with Pakistan tended to join Pakistan without controversy, while most others chose to join India. However, several princely states refused to follow the obvious patterns, the most notable of which are Kashmir, Junagadh, and Hyderabad, all instances where the ruling elite was a different religion from the majority of the population in the state. Kashmir, where the ruler was Hindu and the people Muslim, is quite possibly one of the biggest political can of worms quagmires in the world today today, besides the UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict UsefulNotes/ArabIsraeliConflict, [[UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar the division of Korea]], [[UsefulNotes/Afghanistan invasions of Afghanistan]], and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles. The other two major instances involved a Muslim ruler over a majority-Hindu state: Junagadh's Muslim prince decided to join Pakistan despite not bordering it at all, leading India to essentially lay siege to the territory, and eventually the prince fled. bailed out to Pakistan. Hyderabad's Muslim ruler decided he didn't much care to be part of either India ''or'' Pakistan, and Hyderabad had to be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Polo integrated by force of arms]].

forcefully integrated]].

A lot of the problems that nobody got around cared to rectifying fix before independence are still there now, most notably a high rate of illiteracy in the more rural areas, which both the government and private organizations are fighting to change, ethno-religious tensions, the uneven spread of urbanization and since TheNineties, massive income inequality, UrbanSegregation and the rise of communal violence violence, and rampant political corruption. On the positive side, sixty years of quick, accelerated development later, India today is the world's largest democracy, maintaining the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Military second largest military in the world]], a nuclear superpower, and the only nation that has U.N permission to trade in nuclear fuel without having signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty. For a country that has only had six decades of actual modern development, it says a lot about how fast the nation is moving forward, especially when Americans today are concerned that Indians are surpassing them in the IT sector. Poverty is ''extremely'' widespread still, with 41% of the nation falling below the poverty line (and an equal percentage of malnourished children), and the nation containing a third of the world's poor. It is trying to deal with these problems, but it remains a slow climb.
3rd Nov '17 9:33:26 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* UsefulNotes/{{Bollywood}} - The Hindi Film Industry, nicknamed after its U.S counterpart.
* UsefulNotes/TheOtherwoods - Because not all Indian movies are Bollywood.
* Main/FilmiMusic - Ever wonder why Indian movies have so many songs and musical numbers?

to:

* IndianMedia
**
UsefulNotes/{{Bollywood}} - The Hindi Film Industry, nicknamed after its U.S counterpart.
* ** UsefulNotes/TheOtherwoods - Because not all Indian movies are Bollywood.
* ** Main/FilmiMusic - Ever wonder why Indian movies have so many songs and musical numbers?
11th Oct '17 5:43:17 PM manofwarb
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* Indian Laws - The Police, The Court System, And other organizations.

to:

* Indian Laws UsefulNotes/IndianLaws - The Police, The Court System, And other organizations.
16th Jul '17 10:16:19 AM nombretomado
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India's independence struggle caught global attention after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Several Indian freedom fighters had supported calls for Indian soldiers to enlist in the hopes for Dominion Status and autonomy. Despite the great numbers of Indian soldiers who died for the Crown, the British didn't uphold their side of the bargain. Then after the war, the events of the Jalianwalla Bagh massacre happened, where British General Dyer ordered a contingent to fire on protestors in a crowded area. The resulting violence, brutal crackdown, martial law in Amritsar and grotesque acts of torture earned condemnation across India and the world (even by arch-imperialist UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill in Parliament). Around this time, a lawyer returning from South Africa, named UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi (though still called Mohandas Karamchand at the time) was making his voice heard in India. To protest this massacre, he called for the Non-Cooperation Movement, a large scale boycott of Indian goods that electrified public opinion and earned Gandhi worldwide attention. Later events such as the Civil Disobedience movemement and the iconic Salt March, and several other agitations exposed the absurdity and arbitrary nature of English rule behind the propaganda of the Empire.

Despite his immense importance however, Britain's withdrawal from India was not solely, or mainly, a result of Gandhi's protests, rather a result of a number of diverse factors. This includes: WW2's significant impact on Britain's army and economy, anti-British riots beginning to break out around the country, growing dissent among the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Army_during_World_War_II#Aftermath Indian Army during WW2]], who were becoming increasing antagonistic towards the Allies (unsurprising, since they were now caught in a situation where they were fighting ''against'' an oppressive regime ''for'' an oppressive regime -- nearly 100,000 Indian soldiers eventually defected over to the INA; [[LaResistance the pro-Japanese, anti-British Resistance]] movement, and some [=POWs=] were actually recruited voluntarily by the Japanese; both these forces inevitably went on to fight the Allies in Southeast Asia) plus, having just witnessed the results of a totalitarian government, the world was much less willing to buy the idea of British rule being for "India's own good". Even then, the independence attained in 1947 was as much triumph as it was tragedy.

The policies of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, alongside internal party disputes within the Congress, led to a polarization between the two parties of the Indian National Congress and the Muslim League. The leader of the Muslim League, and founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah was originally a member of the Congress party. He had once voiced support for Hindu-Muslim unity, and was a committed nationalist. Yet, factional disputes within the Congress, percieved closeness to Hindu religious leaders and fears of a Hindu nationalism rather than a secular one, made him sympathetic to the a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-nation_theory two-nation theory]], a demand for a separate nation for India's sizable Muslim minority carved out of provinces in the Raj that had sizable Muslim majorities and Hindu-Sikh minorities. This idea of nationalism was inspired by Kemalism, Zionism and Arab nationalism, i.e. it revolved around social identity of Muslims as citizens, rather than building a theocratic state, and Jinnah fully expected a Pakistan that would be democratic and eventually co-exist alongside India. This notion of a separate Muslim nation was opposed by the Congress' leadership who were committed to a secular state and believed that its leadership was representative of all Indians, the majority Hindus and its minorities. It is a fact that despite the purpose of Pakistan as a nation for the Muslim minority, a vast number of Muslims did not wish to live in a separate Muslim nation and identified with Indian nationalism. Indeed, in the 21st Century, India ranks among the top three Muslim populations in the world, with 172 million residing in India and calling it home (greater than the total populations of Russia and Japan). It's only in proportion to the 900+ million Hindu population that Muslims constitute a "minority" in India.

to:

India's independence struggle caught global attention after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Several Indian freedom fighters had supported calls for Indian soldiers to enlist in the hopes for Dominion Status and autonomy. Despite the great numbers of Indian soldiers who died for the Crown, the British didn't uphold their side of the bargain. Then after the war, the events of the Jalianwalla Bagh massacre happened, where British General Dyer ordered a contingent to fire on protestors protesters in a crowded area. The resulting violence, brutal crackdown, martial law in Amritsar and grotesque acts of torture earned condemnation across India and the world (even by arch-imperialist UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill in Parliament). Around this time, a lawyer returning from South Africa, named UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi (though still called Mohandas Karamchand at the time) was making his voice heard in India. To protest this massacre, he called for the Non-Cooperation Movement, a large scale boycott of Indian goods that electrified public opinion and earned Gandhi worldwide attention. Later events such as the Civil Disobedience movemement movement and the iconic Salt March, and several other agitations exposed the absurdity and arbitrary nature of English rule behind the propaganda of the Empire.

Despite his immense importance however, Britain's withdrawal from India was not solely, or mainly, a result of Gandhi's protests, rather a result of a number of diverse factors. This includes: WW2's [=WW2=]'s significant impact on Britain's army and economy, anti-British riots beginning to break out around the country, growing dissent among the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Army_during_World_War_II#Aftermath Indian Army during WW2]], who were becoming increasing antagonistic towards the Allies (unsurprising, since they were now caught in a situation where they were fighting ''against'' an oppressive regime ''for'' an oppressive regime -- nearly 100,000 Indian soldiers eventually defected over to the INA; [[LaResistance the pro-Japanese, anti-British Resistance]] movement, and some [=POWs=] were actually recruited voluntarily by the Japanese; both these forces inevitably went on to fight the Allies in Southeast Asia) plus, having just witnessed the results of a totalitarian government, the world was much less willing to buy the idea of British rule being for "India's own good". Even then, the independence attained in 1947 was as much triumph as it was tragedy.

The policies of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, alongside internal party disputes within the Congress, led to a polarization between the two parties of the Indian National Congress and the Muslim League. The leader of the Muslim League, and founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah was originally a member of the Congress party. He had once voiced support for Hindu-Muslim unity, and was a committed nationalist. Yet, factional disputes within the Congress, percieved perceived closeness to Hindu religious leaders and fears of a Hindu nationalism rather than a secular one, made him sympathetic to the a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-nation_theory two-nation theory]], a demand for a separate nation for India's sizable Muslim minority carved out of provinces in the Raj that had sizable Muslim majorities and Hindu-Sikh minorities. This idea of nationalism was inspired by Kemalism, Zionism and Arab nationalism, i.e. it revolved around social identity of Muslims as citizens, rather than building a theocratic state, and Jinnah fully expected a Pakistan that would be democratic and eventually co-exist alongside India. This notion of a separate Muslim nation was opposed by the Congress' leadership who were committed to a secular state and believed that its leadership was representative of all Indians, the majority Hindus and its minorities. It is a fact that despite the purpose of Pakistan as a nation for the Muslim minority, a vast number of Muslims did not wish to live in a separate Muslim nation and identified with Indian nationalism. Indeed, in the 21st Century, India ranks among the top three Muslim populations in the world, with 172 million residing in India and calling it home (greater than the total populations of Russia and Japan). It's only in proportion to the 900+ million Hindu population that Muslims constitute a "minority" in India.
14th Jun '17 7:06:11 AM Lymantria
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* Main/TheOtherwoods - Because not all Indian movies are Bollywood.

to:

* Main/TheOtherwoods UsefulNotes/TheOtherwoods - Because not all Indian movies are Bollywood.
21st May '17 11:58:09 PM Scabbard
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* Creator/RoaldDahl's ''Literature/TheWonderfulStoryOfHenrySugar'' has several stories. The title story is about a man who learns [[spoiler: who to see without using his eyes]] from a man from India...

to:

* Creator/RoaldDahl's ''Literature/TheWonderfulStoryOfHenrySugar'' has several stories. The title story is about a man who learns [[spoiler: who [[spoiler:how to see without using his eyes]] from a man from India...
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.India