History UsefulNotes / IceHockey

30th Aug '16 7:01:10 AM Leafsdude
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*** As long as the puck carrier is in control of the puck, the puck carrier cannot be ruled offside. His teammates, however, can. It's also possible to go offside and then negate the whistle, as long as you retreat back across the blue line ''before'' the puck is played[[note]]In other words, you can't enter the opposing team's endzone {cross their blue line} before the puck. Or rather, you ''can'', but you ''must'' be out of the offensive zone before the puck is played by the offensive team inside it. If you're not, you're offside. If you leave before the puck is played, no harm, no foul.[[/note]]. One notable exception is shooting the puck towards the net during a delayed offside [[note]]a delayed offside occurs when a team has possession of the puck outside of their offensive zone while a player in inside it. It's usually signaled by the linesman by putting one arm in the air[[/note]], which results in an automatic whistle, even if every player is onside before the puck reaches the goalie (or enters the net).

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*** As long as the puck carrier is in control of the puck, the puck carrier cannot be ruled offside. His teammates, however, can. It's also possible to go offside and then negate the whistle, as long as you retreat back across the blue line ''before'' the puck is played[[note]]In other words, you can't enter the opposing team's endzone {cross their blue line} before the puck. Or rather, you ''can'', but you ''must'' be out of the offensive zone before the puck is played by the offensive team inside it. If you're not, you're offside. If you leave before the puck is played, no harm, no foul.[[/note]]. One notable exception is shooting the puck towards the net during a delayed offside [[note]]a delayed offside occurs when a team has possession of the puck outside of their offensive zone while a player in is inside it. It's usually signaled by the linesman by putting one arm in the air[[/note]], which results in an automatic whistle, even if every player is onside before the puck reaches the goalie (or enters the net).



** If the goaltender draws a penalty (rare, but it can happen), a teammate who was on the ice at the time has to serve the penalty for him. This also happens if a team is caught with too many men on the ice during a sloppy line change, as well as for a player who is injured or otherwise unable to serve his penalty, or any penalty to a non-player, such as a coach or even, rarely, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero the fans]]. Coaches often select players strategically in these cases, putting their most offensive players in the penalty box since they rarely kill penalties and are better suited for a breakaway pass when the penalty ends.

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** If the goaltender draws takes a penalty (rare, but it can happen), a teammate who was on the ice at the time has to serve the penalty for him. This also happens if a team is caught with too many men on the ice during a sloppy line change, as well as for a player who is injured or otherwise unable to serve his penalty, or any penalty to a non-player, such as a coach or even, rarely, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero the fans]]. Coaches often select players strategically in these cases, putting their most offensive players in the penalty box since they rarely kill penalties and are better suited for a breakaway pass when the penalty ends.
25th Aug '16 12:23:10 PM Leafsdude
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The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In the Cup's early days (starting from 1915 until the Original Six era) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Once the league began to form, however, a playoff structure was planned out. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, Metropolitan and Atlantic Divisions) with the top three teams in each division and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The division leader with the most points plays the lower wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven series, with teams competing exclusively in their respective divisions before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and a the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.

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The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In [[FanNickname the Cup's Cup]]'s early days (starting from 1915 the Cup's creation until the Original Six era) 1912) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Once Eventually, two leagues, the precursor National Hockey Association (NHA) [[note]]Owners of the original NHL teams were all in the NHA, except for the Toronto Arenas owner. The NHL itself was created as a legal means to remove the NHA's Toronto owner, who was [[{{understatement}} disliked]] by the rest of the owners, from the league[[/note]] and the Pacific Coast Hockey League (PCHL), [[note]]created and run by "the godfather of hockey", Lester Patrick, who created many significant rules such as forward passing, the blue and red lines, identifying numbers and the idea of "playoffs" as well as designing and funding the first indoor hockey arena[[/note]] took ownership of the Cup with the winner of each league playing for the Cup every year. The NHL began to form, form into a superior league, however, a playoff structure and the PCHL, which by then was planned out.known as the Western Hockey League, or WHL, suffered financially from lack of quality players and eventually folded, making the NHL the de facto owner of the Cup. This became de jure in 1947 when the NHL legally purchased the Cup. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, Metropolitan and Atlantic Divisions) with the top three teams in each division and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The division leader with the most points plays the lower wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven series, with teams competing exclusively in their respective divisions before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and a the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.



* The '''centre''' is a hard position to explain. A good comparison is to the midfield position in soccer; they are forwards, but are expected to come back and help defend your side, usually covering the opposing player in front of the net. Also responsible, in most cases, for taking "faceoffs" (described below), a specialized skill. May be the team leader and is often the captain.

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* The '''centre''' is a hard position to explain. A good comparison is to the midfield position in soccer; they are forwards, but are expected to come back and help defend your side, usually covering the opposing player in front of the net. Also responsible, in most cases, for taking "faceoffs" (described below), a specialized skill. May be the team leader and is often the captain. [[note]]Like in other sports, the captain is the official "leader" of the team, being the go-to-guy for media interviews and the expected emotional sparkplug both in the dressing room and on the playing surface. They are also among the only players (along with associate captains) that can discuss rule interpretations with officials. This is why goaltenders are barred from officially being named captain, as it would require the goalie to constantly chase down officials after the play all over the rink[[/note]]



* '''Defencemen''' are usually slower, tougher players whose job is to stop the opponent from scoring. If you hear someone yelling for the D to get back to the net, that'd be them. Some also act as a second wave of offense (usually unofficially labeled [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "offensive defencemen"]]), and score a lot more often than in other sports.

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* '''Defencemen''' are usually slower, tougher players whose job is to stop the opponent from scoring. If you hear someone yelling for the D to get back to the net, that'd be them. Some also act as a second wave of offense (usually unofficially labeled [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "offensive defencemen"]]), and score a lot more often than in other sports. [[note]]This wasn't always the case. From the beginnings of modern hockey until the 1970s, there was at most a couple defensemen around the league every generation who would score even semi-regularly, such as Eddie Shore and Doug Harvey. Then Bobby Orr showed up and not only produced well above even the most offensive defensemen prior but even matched the highest scoring forwards of his day, being the only defenseman to ever win the Art Ross Trophy for most points in a season, doing so twice. Since then, every team in the league has constantly had at least a pair of defensemen who acquire points at rates comparable to an average forward[[/note]]



** Icing is when a player shoots the puck from behind centre ice and past the opposing team's net, and a player from the opposing team touches it. In that case, play is stopped and there is a faceoff inside the offending team's blue line. In the NHL, the offending team is not allowed to substitute their players before play resumes. In international ice hockey usually "no-touch icing" is used whereas the play is whistled dead as soon as the puck crossed two red lines. [[note]]In case you're wondering, icing calls are intended to prevent "dumping the puck". Clearing the puck out of your endzone is not easy, and if you were able to simply knock it into the other endzone, it would defeat the purpose of defense. In order to clear the puck out of your endzone, you must control it until at least the centre line before you can dump it. The intent is to make the game more strategic instead of a scramble.[[/note]] There is however no icing for the defending team when they are penalty killing, which means they have one or two players less due to an infraction.
* When play is about to resume, the puck is brought into play through a "faceoff," where the linesman (or referee after goals and at the start of a period) drops the puck onto the ice and the opposing centres fight for possession of the puck. The clock stops when the referee blows his whistle and restarts when the puck hits the ice. A faceoff occurs at centre ice at the start of each period (and after a goal is scored) and subsequent faceoffs happen at various positions depending on why the play was stopped, who was responsible, etc.

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** Icing is when a player shoots the puck from behind centre ice and past the opposing team's net, and a player from the opposing team touches it. In that case, play is stopped and there is a faceoff inside the offending team's blue line. In the NHL, the offending team is not allowed to substitute their players before play resumes. In international ice hockey usually "no-touch icing" is used whereas the play is whistled dead as soon as the puck has crossed two red lines. [[note]]In case you're wondering, icing calls are intended to prevent "dumping the puck". Clearing the puck out of your endzone is not easy, and if you were able to simply knock it into the other endzone, it would defeat the purpose of defense. In order to clear the puck out of your endzone, you must control it until at least the centre line before you can dump it. The intent is to make the game more strategic instead of a scramble.[[/note]] There is however no icing for the defending team when they are penalty killing, which means they have one or two players less due to an infraction.
* When play is about to resume, the puck is brought into play through a "faceoff," where the linesman (or referee after goals and at the start of a period) drops the puck onto the ice and the opposing centres fight for possession of the puck. The clock stops when the referee blows his whistle and restarts when the puck hits the ice. A faceoff occurs at centre ice at the start of each period (and after a goal is scored) and subsequent faceoffs happen at various positions depending on where and why the play was stopped, who was responsible, etc.



* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].
* Each team has 20 players[[note]]Most teams actually have a few more, as many as 50, but only 20 can sit on the bench and play, and in the NHL, only 23 healthy players can be on the immediate roster[[/note]], six of which can be on the ice at any given time (usually three forwards, two defensemen and a goalkeeper). Coaches will usually have "lines" (special trios of forwards and pairs of defensemen) who work well together; sometimes coaches will shuffle their lines in the middle of the game to see which combination works best. In a regular hockey game usually 19 players (four lines of forwards, three pairs of defensemen and one goalie) will see play with the reserve goalie sitting on the bench in case of injury. The starting goalie may also be "pulled" when his play is not up to par.

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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) periods with regular 10-15 minute intermissions in between) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 1998-99 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the a second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining bringing back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].
OT[[/note]].
* Each team has 20 players[[note]]Most teams actually have a few more, as many as 50, but only 20 can sit on the bench and play, and in the NHL, only 23 healthy players can be on the immediate roster[[/note]], six of which can be on the ice at any given time (usually three forwards, two defensemen and a goalkeeper). Coaches will usually have "lines" (special trios of forwards and pairs of defensemen) and/or "units" (groups of 5 players) who work well together; sometimes coaches will shuffle their lines in the middle of the game to see which combination works best. In a regular hockey game usually 19 players (four lines of forwards, three pairs of defensemen and one goalie) will see play with the reserve goalie sitting on the bench in case of injury. The starting goalie may also be "pulled" when his play is not up to par.



* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their infraction. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men (called a two man advantage). If a third players is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; In some cases, the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].

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* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their infraction. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur[[/note]].occur unless the penalty is for more than 2 minutes or there was more then one penalty[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men (called a two man advantage). If a third players player is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; In some cases, the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].



*** There are also [[{{Pun}} a handful]] of other ways for a penalty shot to be awarded, such as a non-goalie covering the puck with his hand within the crease or intentionally knocking the net out of position during a scoring opertunity. Unlike the breakaway example, where the player fouled must take the shot, in these cases, any player on the ice can take the shot.

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*** There are also [[{{Pun}} a handful]] of other ways for a penalty shot to be awarded, such as a non-goalie covering the puck with his hand within the crease or intentionally knocking the net out of position during a scoring opertunity.opportunity. Unlike the breakaway example, where the player fouled must take the shot, in these cases, any player on the ice can take the shot.



** The goaltender will leave play for an extra attacker in the case of a "delayed" penalty, indicated when an official raises his hand but doesn't blow the whistle (indicating an infraction drawn by the defending team). In this situation, the penalty is not called until the defending team touches the puck; the goalie won't be facing any shots, so the extra attacker can press the offence. Also, if a team needs to tie the game or face losing near the end of the game, the coach will "pull the goalie" by taking the goalie off for another skater, to hopefully score the tying goal. It leaves the net open so the other team can score a goal very easily, but there's usually no difference for the losing team if they lose by one goal or two.

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** The goaltender will leave play for an extra attacker in the case of a "delayed" penalty, indicated when an official raises his hand but doesn't blow the whistle (indicating an infraction drawn by the defending team). In this situation, the penalty is not called until the defending team touches the puck; the goalie won't be facing any shots, so the extra attacker can press the offence.offense. Also, if a team needs to tie the game or face losing near the end of the game, the coach will "pull the goalie" by taking the goalie off for another skater, to hopefully score the tying goal. It leaves the net open so the other team can score a goal very easily, but there's usually no difference for the losing team if they lose by one goal or two.




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** Numerous other Music/TheTragicallyHip songs also reference hockey, explicitly or implicitly, such as ''The Lonely End Of The Rink'', an ode to hockey goalies, and ''Fifty Mission Cap'' which discusses the story of Bill Barilko.
* Tom Cochrane and Red Rider's song ''The Big League''.



* [[Series/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]] episode "Lisa On Ice".

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* [[Series/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]] Series/TheSimpsons episode "Lisa On Ice".
21st Aug '16 3:41:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* CraigFerguson had a simple plan for ending the War on Terror: [[CanucksWithChinooks send in the Canadians,]] [[CanadianEqualsHockeyFan give 'em all hockey sticks,]] [[BloodKnight and tell 'em the Taliban have the puck]].

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* CraigFerguson had a simple plan for ending the War on Terror: [[CanucksWithChinooks [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks send in the Canadians,]] [[CanadianEqualsHockeyFan give 'em all hockey sticks,]] [[BloodKnight and tell 'em the Taliban have the puck]].
6th Jul '16 12:10:28 PM Leafsdude
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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.

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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] {{Nintendo}} in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.
6th Jul '16 12:08:43 PM Leafsdude
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Officials include:

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Officials include:There are also multiple positions for Officials:



* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
* A timekeeper who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

Higher level leagues often time have a separate video review officials as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.

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* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
recently. They wear the same uniform as referees, but without the orange armband.
* A timekeeper '''timekeeper''' who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

boxes.
*
Higher level leagues often time have a separate video '''video review officials officials''' as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.
review.
* Before video replay technology was implemented in most organized leagues, a '''goal judge''' would be employed to sit right behind the goal nets at either end of the rink and whose only job was to inform the referee whether the puck had completely crossed the line [[note]]The referee still was the only one empowered to decide whether the puck entered the net ''legally''[[/note]], usually by activating the red goal light switch that he controlled. They were generally not dressed in uniforms, so although they were employed well into the 1990s by most leagues, including the NHL, they aren't easy to spot in video footage.



[[AC:Music]]

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[[AC:Music]][[AC:{{Music}}]]



* Music/TheTragicallyHip song ''Fireworks'' starts with a reference to the Summit Series and includes the line "You said you didn't give a f*%k about hockey, I never heard someone say that before."

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* Music/TheTragicallyHip song ''Fireworks'' starts with a reference to the Summit Series and includes the line "You said you didn't give a f*%k fuck about hockey, I never heard someone say that before."


Added DiffLines:

[[AC:VideoGames]]
* ''VideoGame/NHLHockey'' and the sequels by [[ElectronicArts EA Sports]]: Originally released for DOS and Windows from 1993 through 2008 and for console platforms from 1992 through 2016 and beyond. The beginnings saw the franchise split for the two, with ''NHLPA Hockey'' being released in late 1992 for consoles with only NHLPA licensing, while ''NHL Hockey'' was released for DOS in late 1993 with full NHL and NHLPA license [[note]]NHL16, the most recent release, features support for most major leagues, including the American Hockey League, the three amateur Canadian Hockey Leagues and international leagues such as the Swiss National League A and the German Deutsche Eishockey League[[/note]]. By 1995, however, both games were fully licensed and were very similar visually, including the titles which featured the year after release [[note]]''NHL 96'' for the 1995 release, ''NHL 97'' for the 1996 release and so on)[[/note]]. Eventually the console version was prioritized, with PC versions ported from them, until the PC versions ended with ''NHL 09''.
* ''Face Off!'': The original PC DOS hockey game, released in 1989 by Mindspan Technologies and GameStar. Like many sports games of the period, it didn't have any official licenses, but it did feature easy-to-use editing of teams and players, so manually altering the game to fit real life rosters was possible. Many gimmicks and settings introduced, such as rule selection, play creation and a breakaway cam, were later implemented by [[ElectronicArts EA's]] series to varying success.
* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.
4th Jul '16 1:49:46 PM Leafsdude
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** An exception is when a player is penalized for misconduct; the player is in the sin bin for 10 minutes but the team is allowed another player on the rink for the duration. Such a player will not return until the first whistle after the 10 minutes is over.[[note]]Although unlikely, this means that a player who got a 10 minute penalty at the start of a period could find himself in the box for the whole period, if there are no stoppages[[/note]]. The same goes with players who are in put in the box for the same length at the same time (known colloquially as "coincidental penalties), unless it's a pair of two minute penalties while both teams are playing with all players, in which case both teams play 4-on-4 until the penalties are done or another penalty is called, allowing the players to leave the box immediately.

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** An exception is when a player is penalized for misconduct; the player is in the sin bin for 10 minutes but the team is allowed another player on the rink for the duration. Such a player will not return until the first whistle after the 10 minutes is over.[[note]]Although over[[note]]Although unlikely, this means that a player who got a 10 minute penalty at the start of a period could find himself in the box for the whole period, if there are no stoppages[[/note]]. The same goes with players who are in put in the box for the same length at the same time (known colloquially as "coincidental penalties), unless it's a pair of two minute penalties while both teams are playing with all players, in which case both teams play 4-on-4 until the penalties are done or another penalty is called, allowing the players to leave the box immediately.



** Goalies scoring a goal is a very, very rare instance in modern hockey, as they are not allowed to cross the center line of the field and rarely even advance that far in an attempt to score[[note]]This rule was implemented after a goalie who attempted to play offense was knocked out by a check in the 1966-1967 season[[/note]]. In the modern NHL a total of only eleven goaltenders are credited with scoring a goal, with only two goalies (Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur) scoring more than once (Brodeur's goal total is now three). Of those fourteen total goals, seven were scored by actually shooting the puck into the empty net and seven by own goals by the opposing team on their own empty net.[[note]]However, one of Brodeur's goals is officially credited as being made against Dan Ellis, the opposing goalkeeper. Ellis was being pulled from the ice when the puck was deflected back towards the net by his own teammate after Brodeur defended against a shot on his own net. While Ellis tried to defend against it, he was too far away from the net at the time and was unable to stop the own goal.[[/note]]
* Hockey players wear possibly the most gear out of any sport: the threat of being hit by a fast-moving disc of hard vulcanized rubber is very real and very dangerous. In addition to skates, hockey players wear: shin pads, padded pants, a jock strap, thick padded gloves[[note]]that generally also have a lot of rigidity in the fingers as well, which is why they're removed for a proper fight: punching someone with a hockey glove is exceedingly dangerous and grounds for getting banned from the sport[[/note]], elbow pads, shoulder pads with chest protection, neck guards and helmets. The total weight of a player's gear can be upwards of 50 pounds, if not more. A recent rule change also means that new players ''must'' have a visor on their mask to protect their face.

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** Goalies scoring a goal is a very, very rare instance in modern hockey, as they are not allowed to cross the center line of the field rink and rarely even advance that far in an attempt to score[[note]]This rule was implemented after a goalie who attempted to play offense was knocked out by a check in the 1966-1967 season[[/note]]. In the modern NHL a total of only eleven goaltenders are credited with scoring a goal, with only two goalies (Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur) scoring more than once (Brodeur's goal total is now three). Of those fourteen total goals, seven were scored by actually shooting the puck into the empty net and seven by own goals by the opposing team on their own empty net.[[note]]However, one of Brodeur's goals is officially credited as being made against Dan Ellis, the opposing goalkeeper. Ellis was being pulled from the ice when the puck was deflected back towards the net by his own teammate after Brodeur defended against a shot on his own net. While Ellis tried to defend against it, he was too far away from the net at the time and was unable to stop the own goal.[[/note]]
* Hockey players wear possibly the most gear out of any sport: the threat of being hit by a fast-moving disc of hard vulcanized rubber is very real and very dangerous. In addition to skates, hockey players wear: shin pads, padded pants, a jock strap, thick padded gloves[[note]]that generally also have a lot of rigidity in the fingers as well, which is why they're removed for a proper fight: punching someone with a hockey glove is exceedingly dangerous and grounds for getting banned from the sport[[/note]], elbow pads, shoulder pads with chest protection, neck guards and helmets. The total weight of a player's gear can be upwards of 50 pounds, if not more. A recent rule change also means that new players ''must'' have a visor on their mask helmets to protect their face.


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* [[Series/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]] episode "Lisa On Ice".
28th Jun '16 4:09:12 AM Morgenthaler
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* Season 1 of CornerGas featured an episode with the Dog River hockey team losing to a rival team until Lacey steps in as coach.
* Rick Mercer of Series/TheRickMercerReport repeatedly attends hockey games or hangs out with hockey players in segments. This can range from interviewing guests at the Hockey Hall of Fame to chatting up NHL stars to attending a pond hockey tournament in small town Newfoundland to being invited to learn sledge hockey by the Canadian Paralympic team.

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* Season 1 of CornerGas ''Series/CornerGas'' featured an episode with the Dog River hockey team losing to a rival team until Lacey steps in as coach.
* Rick Mercer of Series/TheRickMercerReport ''Series/TheRickMercerReport'' repeatedly attends hockey games or hangs out with hockey players in segments. This can range from interviewing guests at the Hockey Hall of Fame to chatting up NHL stars to attending a pond hockey tournament in small town Newfoundland to being invited to learn sledge hockey by the Canadian Paralympic team.
5th Jun '16 9:00:47 PM foxesforsale
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* ''Check Please'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.

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* ''Check Please'': ''Webcomic/CheckPlease'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.
5th Jun '16 8:55:33 PM foxesforsale
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[[AC:{{Webcomic}}s]]
* ''Check Please'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.
8th May '16 4:33:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.

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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, Film/SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.
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