History UsefulNotes / IceHockey

10th Apr '18 7:36:57 AM Leafsdude
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* ''Series/DueSouth'' features the season 1 episode ''"The Blue Line"'' where Fraser has to protect a childhood friend who is a superstar hockey player after he receives death threats.
* The season 2 finale of ''Series/Flashpoint'' involves a suicidal [[TheWarOnTerror Afghanistan War vet]] suffering from PTSD and guilt after his best friends are KIA. As a teenager, he was a upstart hockey player, as were the friends, resulting in him choosing the local major league hockey rink that is scheduled for demolition[[note]]The famed Maple Leaf Gardens, [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed though it is renamed]].[[/note]] for his last stand.
8th Apr '18 9:50:19 PM KYCubbie
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* Hockey is unashamedly a full-contact sport, and rough-housing with the intent of claiming possession of the puck, called "checking," is legal (however, checking is illegal in women's hockey, and very strictly monitored in children's leagues.) Checking opposing players who do not have the puck, however, will usually lead to an interference penalty. Likewise, checking someone into the walls of the arena means a penalty for boarding and the leagues are also cracking down on checks specifically targeting the head because of the career-ending injuries resulting from that. Obstructing the goaltender is also illegal, which will lead to an interference penalty and, if a goal was scored on the play, may cause the referee to wave off the goal.

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* Hockey is unashamedly a full-contact sport, and rough-housing with the intent of claiming possession of the puck, called "checking," "checking", is legal (however, checking is illegal legal. (Note that in women's hockey, play, checking using any part of the body is illegal, though stick checks are legal, and checking of all types is very strictly monitored in children's leagues.) Checking opposing players who do not have the puck, however, will usually lead to an interference penalty. Likewise, checking someone into the walls of the arena means a penalty for boarding and the leagues are also cracking down on checks specifically targeting the head because of the career-ending injuries resulting from that. Obstructing the goaltender is also illegal, which will lead to an interference penalty and, if a goal was scored on the play, may cause the referee to wave off the goal.
4th Feb '18 1:25:07 PM nombretomado
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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for {{Nintendo}} in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.

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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for {{Nintendo}} {{Creator/Nintendo}} in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.
29th Jan '18 7:15:43 PM KYCubbie
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** As briefly mentioned above, [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] and NHL playoff hockey games typically have less fighting in them. The reasons for this are a lot simpler than you'd think: [[FridgeBrilliance For all of the assumptions and rationalizations for fighting, a team would rather win the game than risk losing the game because of, or despite, fighting.]] Pointing this out to a very passionate hockey fan is [[BerserkButton not advised]]. Though if two teams hate one another enough or the competition is intense enough, fights are still likely to break out, particularly after the result of a game has become clear -- some of the largest bench-clearing brawls have been in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, resulting in literally hundreds of penalty minutes being handed out, with even goalies getting in on the action (keep in mind they are normally on opposite ends of the rink.) That being said, there are some players who simply don't fight; attacking these players can end in a team's BerserkButton being pushed [[note]]The famous Creator/WayneGretzky was perhaps the most famous such player: His passion was hockey, not fighting, and he would studiously avoid getting into a fight so much that despite his peerless playing ability, he was never confronted even ''once'' in his career. If he was treated a little too roughly, though, his teammates were always happy to duke it out on his behalf.[[/note]]

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** As briefly mentioned above, [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Olympic]] UsefulNotes/{{Olympic|Games}} and NHL playoff hockey games typically have less fighting in them. The reasons for this are a lot simpler than you'd think: [[FridgeBrilliance For all of the assumptions and rationalizations for fighting, a team would rather win the game than risk losing the game because of, or despite, fighting.]] Pointing this out to a very passionate hockey fan is [[BerserkButton not advised]]. Though if two teams hate one another enough or the competition is intense enough, fights are still likely to break out, particularly after the result of a game has become clear -- some of the largest bench-clearing brawls have been in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, resulting in literally hundreds of penalty minutes being handed out, with even goalies getting in on the action (keep in mind they are normally on opposite ends of the rink.) That being said, there are some players who simply don't fight; attacking these players can end in a team's BerserkButton being pushed [[note]]The famous Creator/WayneGretzky was perhaps the most famous such player: His passion was hockey, not fighting, and he would studiously avoid getting into a fight so much that despite his peerless playing ability, he was never confronted even ''once'' in his career. If he was treated a little too roughly, though, his teammates were always happy to duke it out on his behalf.[[/note]]



The UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague (one of the oldest still-running leagues in sports) is currently the largest hockey league in the world, which as of 2016 consists of 30 teams across North America (7 from Canada, 23 from the United States), with a 31st team (the first major-league team in UsefulNotes/LasVegas) set to begin play in the 2017-18 season. There are also many important leagues in Europe, such as UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}'s ''Deutsche Eishockey Liga'', the [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] Hockey League (formerly known as ''Elitserien'') and Russia's [[strike: Superleague]] ''Kontinental Hockey League'', but they usually sit in the NHL's humongous shadow. The dream of many, but not all, European players is to join the NHL, and if an NHL player is sent to a European league [[ReassignedToAntarctica it's considered a demotion]].

The NHL was formed in 1917 with five teams [[note]]Toronto Arenas, Ottawa Senators, Montréal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Quebec Bulldogs[[/note]]. Three of these teams -- and four of the seven expansion teams to come in the '20s -- dissipated and by 1942, there were officially six NHL teams (commonly referred to as [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The Original Six]] [[note]]Presumably in contrast to the Expansion Six, who entered together in 1967; it's otherwise something of a misnomer, since the only teams in that group who were part of the ''original'' NHL were the Montréal Canadiens and the Toronto Maple Leafs (who were called the Arenas at the time)[[/note]]: The Toronto Maple Leafs, Montréal Canadiens, Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Blackhawks, New York Rangers and Boston Bruins. Following the 1966-67 season, the league expanded to twelve teams and over several decades reached the thirty-team mark that stands today.

The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In [[FanNickname the Cup]]'s early days (starting from the Cup's creation until 1912) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Eventually, two leagues, the precursor National Hockey Association (NHA) [[note]]Owners of the original NHL teams were all in the NHA, except for the Toronto Arenas owner. The NHL itself was created as a legal means to remove the NHA's Toronto owner, who was loathed by the rest of the owners, from the league[[/note]] and the Pacific Coast Hockey League (PCHL), [[note]]created and run by "the godfather of hockey", Lester Patrick, who created many significant rules such as forward passing, the blue and red lines, identifying numbers and the idea of "playoffs" as well as designing and funding the first indoor hockey arena[[/note]] took ownership of the Cup with the winner of each league playing for the Cup every year. The NHL began to form into a superior league, however, and the PCHL, which by then was known as the Western Hockey League, or WHL, suffered financially from lack of quality players and eventually folded, making the NHL the de facto owner of the Cup. This became de jure in 1947 when the NHL legally purchased the Cup. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, Metropolitan and Atlantic Divisions) with the top three teams in each division and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The division leader with the most points plays the lower wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven series, with teams competing exclusively in their respective divisions before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.

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The UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague (one of the oldest still-running leagues in sports) is currently the largest hockey league in the world, which as of 2016 the current 201718 season consists of 30 31 teams across North America (7 from Canada, 23 24 from the United States), with a 31st team (the first major-league team in UsefulNotes/LasVegas) set to begin play in the 2017-18 season.most recent expansion being to UsefulNotes/LasVegas for 201718. There are also many important leagues in Europe, such as UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}'s ''Deutsche Eishockey Liga'', the [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] Hockey League (formerly known as ''Elitserien'') and Russia's [[strike: Superleague]] ''Kontinental Hockey League'', but they usually sit in the NHL's humongous shadow. The dream of many, but not all, European players is to join the NHL, and if an NHL player is sent to a European league [[ReassignedToAntarctica it's considered a demotion]].

The NHL was formed in 1917 with five teams [[note]]Toronto Arenas, Ottawa Senators, Montréal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Quebec Bulldogs[[/note]]. Three of these teams -- and four of the seven expansion teams to come in the '20s -- dissipated and by 1942, there were officially six NHL teams (commonly referred to as [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The Original Six]] [[note]]Presumably in contrast to the Expansion Six, who entered together in 1967; it's otherwise something of a misnomer, since the only teams in that group who were part of the ''original'' NHL were the Montréal Canadiens and the Toronto Maple Leafs (who were called the Arenas at the time)[[/note]]: The Toronto Maple Leafs, Montréal Canadiens, Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Blackhawks, New York Rangers and Boston Bruins. Following the 1966-67 196667 season, the league expanded to twelve 12 teams and over several decades reached the thirty-team 31-team mark that stands today.

The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In [[FanNickname the Cup]]'s early days (starting from the Cup's creation until 1912) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Eventually, two leagues, the precursor National Hockey Association (NHA) [[note]]Owners of the original NHL teams were all in the NHA, except for the Toronto Arenas owner. The NHL itself was created as a legal means to remove the NHA's Toronto owner, who was loathed by the rest of the owners, from the league[[/note]] and the Pacific Coast Hockey League (PCHL), [[note]]created and run by "the godfather of hockey", Lester Patrick, who created many significant rules such as forward passing, the blue and red lines, identifying numbers and the idea of "playoffs" as well as designing and funding the first indoor hockey arena[[/note]] took ownership of the Cup with the winner of each league playing for the Cup every year. The NHL began to form into a superior league, however, and the PCHL, which by then was known as the Western Hockey League, or WHL, suffered financially from lack of quality players and eventually folded, making the NHL the de facto owner of the Cup. This became de jure in 1947 when the NHL legally purchased the Cup. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team 16-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, Metropolitan and Atlantic Divisions) with the top three teams in each division and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The division leader with the most points plays the lower wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven series, with teams competing exclusively in their respective divisions before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) teams), and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.



* '''Defencemen''' are usually slower, tougher players whose job is to stop the opponent from scoring. If you hear someone yelling for the D to get back to the net, that'd be them. Some also act as a second wave of offense (usually unofficially labeled [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "offensive defencemen"]]), and score a lot more often than in other sports. [[note]]This wasn't always the case. From the beginnings of modern hockey until the 1970s, there was at most a couple defensemen around the league every generation who would score even semi-regularly, such as Eddie Shore and Doug Harvey. Then Bobby Orr showed up and not only produced well above even the most offensive defensemen prior but even matched the highest scoring forwards of his day, being the only defenseman to ever win the Art Ross Trophy for most points in a season, doing so twice. Since then, every team in the league has constantly had at least a pair of defensemen who acquire points at rates comparable to an average forward[[/note]]
* The '''goaltender''', or "goalie," defends his goal and is the last line of defense preventing the puck from going into the net. The goalie is the only member of the team who has special equipment; his legs have large pads, he has a catching glove in his strong hand and a rectangular "blocker" on his off-hand [[note]]Most goalies have their stick and the blocker on the right hand, and the catching glove on the left. Notable "full right" goaltenders (which have the catching glove on the right) are Rick [=DiPietro=] and Tomas Vokoun. Also, there's a few historical exceptions, such as [[http://www.hhof.com/htmlSpotlight/spot_oneononep196402.shtml Bill Durnan]], who was ambidextrous, and [[http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/columns/story?id=1989377 Dan Blackburn]], who suffered a serious nerve injury to his catching hand rendering it useless, who used two of the same hand equipment[[/note]]. He also wears a specially hardened face mask. He is the only player that ''cannot be hit'' on the ice: Hitting him is an interference penalty [[note]]This is because, for the size and strength of their equipment, they're still designed to take the impact of a small rubber disc, not a 200+ pound human being[[/note]]. Nevertheless, the idea of the other team trying to interfere with the goalie and get away with it (the refs can't catch everything) is often what sparks roughhousing, at least in the NHL, as the other players will skate up to protect their man (though a few goalies don't mind getting rough themselves -- see Ron Hextall and Patrick Roy[[note]] (Pronounced "Rwah" {he is French Canadian}, not "Roy" like in, say, ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros''. Also, in Roy case, his rough tendencies unfortunately extend beyond the rink.)[[/note]])

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* '''Defencemen''' are usually slower, tougher players whose job is to stop the opponent from scoring. If you hear someone yelling for the D to get back to the net, that'd be them. Some also act as a second wave of offense (usually unofficially labeled [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "offensive defencemen"]]), and score a lot more often than in other sports. [[note]]This wasn't always the case. From the beginnings of modern hockey until the 1970s, there was at most a couple defensemen around the league every generation who would score even semi-regularly, such as Eddie Shore and Doug Harvey. Then Bobby Orr showed up and not only produced well above even the most offensive defensemen prior but even matched the highest scoring forwards of his day, being the only defenseman to ever win the Art Ross Trophy for most points in a season, doing so twice. Since then, every team in the league has constantly had at least a pair of defensemen who acquire points at rates comparable to an average forward[[/note]]
forward.[[/note]]
* The '''goaltender''', or "goalie," "goalie", defends his goal and is the last line of defense preventing the puck from going into the net. The goalie is the only member of the team who has special equipment; his legs have large pads, he has a catching glove in his strong hand and a rectangular "blocker" on his off-hand [[note]]Most goalies have their stick and the blocker on the right hand, and the catching glove on the left. Notable "full right" goaltenders (which have the catching glove on the right) are Rick [=DiPietro=] and Tomas Tomá Vokoun. Also, there's a few historical exceptions, such as [[http://www.hhof.com/htmlSpotlight/spot_oneononep196402.shtml Bill Durnan]], who was ambidextrous, and [[http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/columns/story?id=1989377 Dan Blackburn]], who suffered a serious nerve injury to his catching hand rendering it useless, who used two of the same hand equipment[[/note]]. He also wears a specially hardened face mask. He is the only player that ''cannot be hit'' on the ice: Hitting him is an interference penalty [[note]]This is because, for the size and strength of their equipment, they're still designed to take the impact of a small rubber disc, not a 200+ pound human being[[/note]]. Nevertheless, the idea of the other team trying to interfere with the goalie and get away with it (the refs can't catch everything) is often what sparks roughhousing, at least in the NHL, as the other players will skate up to protect their man (though a few goalies don't mind getting rough themselves -- see Ron Hextall and Patrick Roy[[note]] (Pronounced "Rwah" {he is French Canadian}, not "Roy" like in, say, ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros''. Also, in Roy case, his rough tendencies unfortunately extend beyond the rink.)[[/note]])



* When play is about to resume, the puck is brought into play through a "faceoff," where the linesman (or referee after goals and at the start of a period) drops the puck onto the ice and the opposing centres fight for possession of the puck. The clock stops when the referee blows his whistle and restarts when the puck hits the ice. A faceoff occurs at centre ice at the start of each period (and after a goal is scored) and subsequent faceoffs happen at various positions depending on where and why the play was stopped, who was responsible, etc.

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* When play is about to resume, the puck is brought into play through a "faceoff," "faceoff", where the linesman (or referee after goals and at the start of a period) drops the puck onto the ice and the opposing centres fight for possession of the puck. The clock stops when the referee blows his whistle and restarts when the puck hits the ice. A faceoff occurs at centre ice at the start of each period (and after a goal is scored) and subsequent faceoffs happen at various positions depending on where and why the play was stopped, who was responsible, etc.



* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods with regular 10-15 minute intermissions in between) until somebody scores.

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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty 60 minutes, there is a five minute 5-minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players skaters per side, side (plus the goalies), and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, skater, making it 4-on-3.[[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute 20-minute periods with regular 10-15 minute intermissions in between) until somebody scores.



** Another form for pulling the goalie also exists: the goaltender skates to the bench and is substituted with an additional player (usually a forward) to give their team an offensive advantage. This is [[GodzillaThreshold extremely risky]], however, as it leaves their net completely open, and usually it is only done during the final minutes of the third period when a team is desperate and losing by a goal or two, or when there is a delayed penalty on the opposing team, in which case the opposing team cannot touch the puck without stopping play. For instance, it's not unknown for some player of the opposing team to be able to score a goal clear from the opposite side of the rink, a shot that can be up to 61 metres (200 ft) away[[note]]of course, because of the icing-rule, this can be a bit of a gamble in close games. If the player misses the goal, he may cause an icing-call, resulting in an advantageous faceoff for the opposing team[[/note]].
* Because hockey is such a physically taxing game, substitutions are done frequently (every minute or so) and often in the middle of play, which are called "line changes." Teams are still required to have no more than six players on the ice at a time, however, and a sloppy line change could result in a penalty for having too many men on the ice. Goaltenders, however, are expected to stay on the ice at all times unless they are injured or the coach decides to substitute them due to a bad performance.
* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their infraction. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur unless the penalty is for more than 2 minutes or there was more then one penalty[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men (called a two man advantage). If a third player is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].

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** Another form for pulling the goalie also exists: the goaltender skates to the bench and is substituted with an additional player (usually a forward) to give their team an offensive advantage. This is [[GodzillaThreshold extremely risky]], however, as it leaves their net completely open, and usually it is only done during the final minutes of the third period when a team is desperate and losing by a goal or two, or when there is a delayed penalty on the opposing team, in which case the opposing team cannot touch the puck without stopping play. For instance, it's not unknown for some player of the opposing team to be able to score a goal clear from the opposite side of the rink, a shot that can be up to 61 metres (200 ft) away[[note]]of course, because of the icing-rule, icing rule, this can be a bit of a gamble in close games. If the player misses the goal, he may cause an icing-call, icing call, resulting in an advantageous faceoff for the opposing team[[/note]].
* Because hockey is such a physically taxing game, substitutions are done frequently (every minute or so) and often in the middle of play, which are called "line changes." changes". Teams are still required to have no more than six players on the ice at a time, however, and a sloppy line change could result in a penalty for having too many men on the ice. Goaltenders, however, are expected to stay on the ice at all times unless they are injured or the coach decides to substitute them due to a bad performance.
* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their infraction. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur unless the penalty is for more than 2 minutes or there was more then one penalty[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not cannot be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute 4-minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men skaters (called a two man two-man advantage). If a third player is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].



** Numerous other Music/TheTragicallyHip songs also reference hockey, explicitly or implicitly, such as ''The Lonely End Of The Rink'', an ode to hockey goalies, and ''Fifty Mission Cap'' which discusses the story of Bill Barilko.

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** Numerous other Music/TheTragicallyHip songs from The Hip also reference hockey, explicitly or implicitly, such as ''The Lonely End Of The Rink'', an ode to hockey goalies, and ''Fifty Mission Cap'' which discusses the story of Bill Barilko.
4th Dec '17 5:08:02 PM nombretomado
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* CraigFerguson had a simple plan for ending the War on Terror: [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks send in the Canadians,]] [[CanadianEqualsHockeyFan give 'em all hockey sticks,]] [[BloodKnight and tell 'em the Taliban have the puck]].

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* CraigFerguson Creator/CraigFerguson had a simple plan for ending the War on Terror: [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks send in the Canadians,]] [[CanadianEqualsHockeyFan give 'em all hockey sticks,]] [[BloodKnight and tell 'em the Taliban have the puck]].
27th Oct '17 11:25:00 PM LinkToTheFuture
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The UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague (one of the oldest still-running leagues in sports) is currently the largest hockey league in the world, which as of 2016 consists of 30 teams across North America (7 from Canada, 23 from the United States), with a 31st team (the first major-league team in UsefulNotes/LasVegas) set to begin play in the 2017-18 season. There are also many important leagues in Europe, such as UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}'s ''Deutsche Eishockey Liga'', the [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] Hockey League (formerly known as ''Elitserien'') and Russia's [[strike: Superleague]] ''Kontinental Hockey League'', but they usually sit in the NHL's humongous shadow. The dream of many, but not all, European players is to join the NHL, and if an NHL player is sent to a European league [[UnfortunateImplications it's considered a demotion]].

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The UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague (one of the oldest still-running leagues in sports) is currently the largest hockey league in the world, which as of 2016 consists of 30 teams across North America (7 from Canada, 23 from the United States), with a 31st team (the first major-league team in UsefulNotes/LasVegas) set to begin play in the 2017-18 season. There are also many important leagues in Europe, such as UsefulNotes/{{Germany}}'s ''Deutsche Eishockey Liga'', the [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} Swedish]] Hockey League (formerly known as ''Elitserien'') and Russia's [[strike: Superleague]] ''Kontinental Hockey League'', but they usually sit in the NHL's humongous shadow. The dream of many, but not all, European players is to join the NHL, and if an NHL player is sent to a European league [[UnfortunateImplications [[ReassignedToAntarctica it's considered a demotion]].
9th Oct '17 9:29:38 PM GrammarNavi
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* Hockey is a nationally engaging sport. Much like UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball and [[TheBeautifulGame soccer]], though, it also attracts those stereotypical college students who drink beer and riot after games. Even so, full-on riots are rare, and usually there are just loud parties that break out on (city name)'s main streets. There are some notable hockey-provoked riots (see the "Richard riot" in the SeriousBusiness article) but they prove to be the exception rather than the norm. The typical hockey-watching crowd in Canada are mostly families huddled around the television or a guy inviting his buddies over to watch the game (with or without alcohol.)

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* Hockey is a nationally engaging sport. Much like UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball and [[TheBeautifulGame [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]], though, it also attracts those stereotypical college students who drink beer and riot after games. Even so, full-on riots are rare, and usually there are just loud parties that break out on (city name)'s main streets. There are some notable hockey-provoked riots (see the "Richard riot" in the SeriousBusiness article) but they prove to be the exception rather than the norm. The typical hockey-watching crowd in Canada are mostly families huddled around the television or a guy inviting his buddies over to watch the game (with or without alcohol.)
9th Oct '17 5:59:30 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/NHLHockey'' and the sequels by [[ElectronicArts EA Sports]]: Originally released for DOS and Windows from 1993 through 2008 and for console platforms from 1992 through 2016 and beyond. The beginnings saw the franchise split for the two, with ''NHLPA Hockey'' being released in late 1992 for consoles with only NHLPA licensing, while ''NHL Hockey'' was released for DOS in late 1993 with full NHL and NHLPA license [[note]]NHL16, the most recent release, features support for most major leagues, including the American Hockey League, the three amateur Canadian Hockey Leagues and international leagues such as the Swiss National League A and the German Deutsche Eishockey League[[/note]]. By 1995, however, both games were fully licensed and were very similar visually, including the titles which featured the year after release [[note]]''NHL 96'' for the 1995 release, ''NHL 97'' for the 1996 release and so on)[[/note]]. Eventually the console version was prioritized, with PC versions ported from them, until the PC versions ended with ''NHL 09''.
* ''Face Off!'': The original PC DOS hockey game, released in 1989 by Mindspan Technologies and GameStar. Like many sports games of the period, it didn't have any official licenses, but it did feature easy-to-use editing of teams and players, so manually altering the game to fit real life rosters was possible. Many gimmicks and settings introduced, such as rule selection, play creation and a breakaway cam, were later implemented by [[ElectronicArts EA's]] series to varying success.

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* ''VideoGame/NHLHockey'' and the sequels by [[ElectronicArts [[Creator/ElectronicArts EA Sports]]: Originally released for DOS and Windows from 1993 through 2008 and for console platforms from 1992 through 2016 and beyond. The beginnings saw the franchise split for the two, with ''NHLPA Hockey'' being released in late 1992 for consoles with only NHLPA licensing, while ''NHL Hockey'' was released for DOS in late 1993 with full NHL and NHLPA license [[note]]NHL16, the most recent release, features support for most major leagues, including the American Hockey League, the three amateur Canadian Hockey Leagues and international leagues such as the Swiss National League A and the German Deutsche Eishockey League[[/note]]. By 1995, however, both games were fully licensed and were very similar visually, including the titles which featured the year after release [[note]]''NHL 96'' for the 1995 release, ''NHL 97'' for the 1996 release and so on)[[/note]]. Eventually the console version was prioritized, with PC versions ported from them, until the PC versions ended with ''NHL 09''.
* ''Face Off!'': The original PC DOS hockey game, released in 1989 by Mindspan Technologies and GameStar. Like many sports games of the period, it didn't have any official licenses, but it did feature easy-to-use editing of teams and players, so manually altering the game to fit real life rosters was possible. Many gimmicks and settings introduced, such as rule selection, play creation and a breakaway cam, were later implemented by [[ElectronicArts [[Creator/ElectronicArts EA's]] series to varying success.
16th Sep '17 5:56:23 PM nombretomado
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* Series/TheSimpsons episode "Lisa On Ice".

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* Series/TheSimpsons ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "Lisa On Ice".
28th Aug '17 12:03:50 AM BattleMaster
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* Music/WarrenZevon: Hit Somebody (The Hockey Song)- a Canadian farm boy gets recruited as a "goon" (Enforcer) for the Saskatoon Flames.

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* Music/WarrenZevon: Hit Somebody (The Hockey Song)- a Canadian farm boy gets recruited as a "goon" (Enforcer) for the Saskatoon Flames.Flames and spends his career beating people up when he wishes he could be scoring goals.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.IceHockey