History UsefulNotes / IceHockey

8th May '16 4:33:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.

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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, Film/SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.
15th Apr '16 3:38:41 PM oknazevad
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** Rare is a hockey player who's never seen the movie... fewer than five times.



** Rare is a hockey player who's never seen the movie... fewer than five times.
15th Apr '16 3:37:26 PM oknazevad
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Counting officials, there are seven positions in hockey:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.

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Counting officials, there The are seven five positions in hockey:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
hockey:


Added DiffLines:

Officials include:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
* A timekeeper who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

Higher level leagues often time have a separate video review officials as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.
15th Apr '16 2:59:36 PM oknazevad
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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/nite]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[nite]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].

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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/nite]] [[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[nite]]This [[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].
15th Apr '16 2:58:31 PM oknazevad
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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3[[/note]]. During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If the game proceeds to overtime, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both teams get 1 point) while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner.[[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion.[[/note]] League scores are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[/note]].

to:

* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3[[/note]]. 4-on-3.[[/nite]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, scores.
**Traditionally, in the standings,
a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both both teams get 1 point) point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner.[[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion.[[/note]] League scores winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[nite]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].
15th Apr '16 2:45:33 PM oknazevad
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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3[[/note]]. During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If the game proceeds to a shootout, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both teams get 1 point). League scores are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[/note]].

to:

* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3[[/note]]. During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If the game proceeds to a shootout, overtime, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both teams get 1 point). point) while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner.[[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion.[[/note]] League scores are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[/note]].
15th Apr '16 2:32:00 PM oknazevad
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The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In the Cup's early days (starting from 1915 until the Original Six era) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Once the league began to form, however, a playoff structure was planned out. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, [[OddNameOut Metropolitan]] and Atlantic Conferences) with the top three teams in each conference and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The conference leader with the most points plays the last wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven miniseries, with teams competing exclusively in their respective conferences before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and a the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.

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The NHL championship trophy is UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup, one of the oldest and most prestigious trophies in all of sports. In the Cup's early days (starting from 1915 until the Original Six era) any team could challenge the current champions to a showdown for the Cup, provided the opposing team could make the trip there of course. Once the league began to form, however, a playoff structure was planned out. A modern NHL regular season lasts 82 games, with a sixteen-team playoff season. In recent changes, the league has been divided into four divisions (Pacific, Central, [[OddNameOut Metropolitan]] Metropolitan and Atlantic Conferences) Divisions) with the top three teams in each conference division and the next top-2 "wild card" teams in the East (Metropolitan and Atlantic) and the West (Pacific and Central) Conferences combined qualifying for the playoffs. The conference division leader with the most points plays the last lower wild card seed, while the other leader plays the first wild card seed, while the 2nd and 3rd place teams play each other. Each round is a best-of-seven miniseries, series, with teams competing exclusively in their respective conferences divisions before meeting in the semi-finals and then for the Cup. The final two teams play one last best-of-seven round for the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is unique among the major pro sports leagues' trophies in that there's only ''one'' Stanley Cup [[note]]Well, technically there's three of them; the retired original Cup at the Hockey Hall of Fame, the "authenticated" presentation Cup that replaced it, and the official replica Cup that's displayed at the Hall of Fame when the "authenticated" Cup is unavailable.[[/note]], rather than a new trophy that's made each year and permanently awarded to the the league champion. Winning the Stanley Cup Playoff gives a team possession of the trophy for one year, and a the name of the winning team along with its owner, coaches and players [[note]]the latter of which have a set of game played limits, though teams can apply for exceptions; the most noteworthy is Denis Savard's addition to the 1993 Montreal Canadiens inscription after missing almost all the season due to injury[[/note]] are inscribed on the trophy. Originally, whenever the trophy ran out of room for team engravings, a new band was added to the bottom. But eventually this led to a truly enormous trophy and the NHL realized it would at some point get too big for a man lift. So now it's limited to 5 bands (each with room for 13 championship teams,) and whenever the bottom band is filled, the top band gets removed to the Hall of Fame and a new bottom band is added, maintaining the now-standard size of the Cup.
22nd Mar '16 12:29:23 PM PaladinPhoenix
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* Hockey players wear possibly the most gear out of any sport: the threat of being hit by a fast-moving disc of hard vulcanized rubber is very real and very dangerous. In addition to skates, hockey players wear: shin pads, padded pants, a jock strap, thick padded gloves[[note]]that generally also have a lot of rigidity in the fingers as well, which is why they're removed for a proper fight: punching someone with a hockey glove is exceedingly dangerous and grounds for getting banned from the sport[[/note]], elbow pads, shoulder pads with chest protection, neck guards and helmets. The total weight of a player's gear can be upwards of 50 pounds, if not more. A recent rule change also means that new players ''must'' have a visor on their mask to protect their face.
22nd Mar '16 12:22:20 PM PaladinPhoenix
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** When a team is rushing towards the opposing goal, the player in possession of the puck must be the first to cross the blue line; if one of his teammates is ahead of the blue line when the puck carrier crosses it, or if the carrier crosses the blue line before the puck does, the play is whistled dead as "offside".

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** When a team is rushing towards the opposing goal, the player in possession of the puck must be the first to cross the blue line; if one of his teammates is ahead of the blue line when the puck carrier crosses it, or if the carrier crosses the blue line before the puck does, the play is whistled dead as "offside".



** During a faceoff, a scramble for control of the puck ''before'' the puck is dropped is not allowed. Both players in the faceoff must wait until the puck hits the ice before they can try to take control of it. If one of the players jumps the gun, the faceoff is delayed, the player is pushed out of the faceoff, and (generally) one of the wings takes his place.
* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer). During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If the game proceeds to a shootout, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both teams get 1 point). League scores are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[/note]].

to:

** During a faceoff, a scramble for control of the puck ''before'' the puck is dropped is not allowed. Both players in the faceoff must wait until the puck hits the ice before they can try to take control of it. If one of the players jumps the gun, the faceoff is delayed, the offending player is pushed out of the faceoff, and (generally) (usually) one of the wings takes his place.
* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer).soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3[[/note]]. During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores [[note]]In league scoring, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. If the game proceeds to a shootout, for the purposes of league scoring, it's considered a tie (both teams get 1 point). League scores are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[/note]].



* Because hockey is such a physically taxing game, substitutions are done frequently (every minute or so) and often in the middle of play, which are called "line changes." Teams are still required to have no more than five forwards/defencemen on the ice at a time, however, and a sloppy line change could result in a penalty for having too many men on the ice. Goaltenders, however, are expected to stay on the ice at all times unless they are injured or the coach decides to substitute them due to a bad performance.
* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their offense. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men (called a two man advantage). If a third players is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; In some cases, the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].

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* Because hockey is such a physically taxing game, substitutions are done frequently (every minute or so) and often in the middle of play, which are called "line changes." Teams are still required to have no more than five forwards/defencemen six players on the ice at a time, however, and a sloppy line change could result in a penalty for having too many men on the ice. Goaltenders, however, are expected to stay on the ice at all times unless they are injured or the coach decides to substitute them due to a bad performance.
* When a player commits an infraction (provided the ref sees and identifies it), play is stopped once the offending player's team touches the puck[[note]]Unless it results in an injury or otherwise results in a normal stoppage of play (such as the puck exiting the playing surface or the net being moved from its normal position), a penalty will never ''immediately'' stop play. If it did, then the team that does not have possession of the puck would be encouraged to commit a minor infraction to stop the other team, especially if the other team has a decisive advantage like a breakaway. Therefore, when a penalty occurs, play continues until the offending team touches the puck, i.e. tries to take advantage of their offense.infraction. If the other team scores before the penalty is officially called, then the penalty does not occur[[/note]]. Said team is then forced to play short-handed while the penalized player sits in the penalty box, or [[FanNickname "sin bin"]], and can not be substituted. This gives the opposing team a "power play" for two minutes for a minor infraction or five minutes for a major[[note]]The difference between the two is generally a violation of rules for a minor, and an injury (or the intent to cause one) for a major, but not always. One exception is high sticking penalties: an injury, often "drawing blood", usually results in a 4 minute (two consecutive minors, or a "double minor") penalty[[/note]]. The penalized player returns to the ice when the other team scores a goal (on minor penalties only) or when the penalty's time runs out. However, if a player is deliberately injured by an offending player, that is a match penalty and the player is expelled for the rest of the game (and is fined an amount of money and/or suspended for a period of games afterwards) while his team plays shorthanded for 5-10 minutes depending on the severity of the injury. If two players are in the penalty box, their team is forced to play with only three men (called a two man advantage). If a third players is then sent to the box, the third penalty will not begin until the first has ended, as teams cannot play with fewer then three players (plus goalie) on the ice[[note]]If you've ever watched a game of hockey and been confused as to why the goalie keeps slapping his stick on the ice loudly, it's to alert his team that the powerplay is ended, and they're about to face off against a suddenly full-strength team. It is worth to note that, due to the positioning of the two penalty boxes (close to the middle red line, and outside of the offensive zones), it is possible that a penalized player might return to the game behind the opposing team's defensemen (particularly if they are on the offensive), which leaves him open for a clean breakaway against the opposing goalie if his team manages to get him the puck; In some cases, the goalie's slapping serves to warn his defensemen against this possibility[[/note]].
22nd Mar '16 12:10:16 PM PaladinPhoenix
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** Contrary to most portrayals, however, mano-a-mano showdowns are often used strategically. Coaches may send out "enforcers" (players who specialize in starting scraps) to provoke a fight if he feels his team's morale is low, believing that a good old-fashioned beatdown ''might'' cheer them up. Another example is the Edmonton Oilers during TheEighties taking advantage of the fighting penalty system at the time. The Oilers excelled at four-on-four play, and since fighting at the time forced both fighters into the penalty box with no substitutes, the Oilers would send out an enforcer like Marty [=McSorley=] to [[ThePlan start a fight with another player in order to force penalties and let their special teams go to work]], or even to tactically remove a specific opposing player from the game for a short amount of time. Enforcers are also used to act as a deterrent to being rough on the star player or goalies, anyone who hits them deals with the Enforcer.

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** Contrary to most portrayals, however, mano-a-mano showdowns are often used strategically. strategically: while a fight can happen due to mutual animosity between players, they're far more likely to happen for other reasons[[note]]This is usually when you'll see a "pointless face-off", where the ref drops the puck and everyone ignores it because two guys on the ice are about to throw down, and everyone knows it, including the refs[[/note]] Coaches may send out "enforcers" (players who specialize in starting scraps) to provoke a fight if he feels his team's morale is low, believing that a good old-fashioned beatdown ''might'' cheer them up. Another example is the Edmonton Oilers during TheEighties taking advantage of the fighting penalty system at the time. The Oilers excelled at four-on-four play, and since fighting at the time forced both fighters into the penalty box with no substitutes, the Oilers would send out an enforcer like Marty [=McSorley=] to [[ThePlan start a fight with another player in order to force penalties and let their special teams go to work]], or even to tactically remove a specific opposing player from the game for a short amount of time. Enforcers are also used to act as a deterrent to being rough on the star player or goalies, anyone who hits them deals with the Enforcer.
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