History UsefulNotes / IceHockey

6th Jul '16 12:10:28 PM Leafsdude
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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.

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* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] {{Nintendo}} in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.
6th Jul '16 12:08:43 PM Leafsdude
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Officials include:

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Officials include:There are also multiple positions for Officials:



* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
* A timekeeper who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

Higher level leagues often time have a separate video review officials as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.

to:

* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
recently. They wear the same uniform as referees, but without the orange armband.
* A timekeeper '''timekeeper''' who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

boxes.
*
Higher level leagues often time have a separate video '''video review officials officials''' as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.
review.
* Before video replay technology was implemented in most organized leagues, a '''goal judge''' would be employed to sit right behind the goal nets at either end of the rink and whose only job was to inform the referee whether the puck had completely crossed the line [[note]]The referee still was the only one empowered to decide whether the puck entered the net ''legally''[[/note]], usually by activating the red goal light switch that he controlled. They were generally not dressed in uniforms, so although they were employed well into the 1990s by most leagues, including the NHL, they aren't easy to spot in video footage.



[[AC:Music]]

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[[AC:Music]][[AC:{{Music}}]]



* Music/TheTragicallyHip song ''Fireworks'' starts with a reference to the Summit Series and includes the line "You said you didn't give a f*%k about hockey, I never heard someone say that before."

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* Music/TheTragicallyHip song ''Fireworks'' starts with a reference to the Summit Series and includes the line "You said you didn't give a f*%k fuck about hockey, I never heard someone say that before."


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[[AC:VideoGames]]
* ''VideoGame/NHLHockey'' and the sequels by [[ElectronicArts EA Sports]]: Originally released for DOS and Windows from 1993 through 2008 and for console platforms from 1992 through 2016 and beyond. The beginnings saw the franchise split for the two, with ''NHLPA Hockey'' being released in late 1992 for consoles with only NHLPA licensing, while ''NHL Hockey'' was released for DOS in late 1993 with full NHL and NHLPA license [[note]]NHL16, the most recent release, features support for most major leagues, including the American Hockey League, the three amateur Canadian Hockey Leagues and international leagues such as the Swiss National League A and the German Deutsche Eishockey League[[/note]]. By 1995, however, both games were fully licensed and were very similar visually, including the titles which featured the year after release [[note]]''NHL 96'' for the 1995 release, ''NHL 97'' for the 1996 release and so on)[[/note]]. Eventually the console version was prioritized, with PC versions ported from them, until the PC versions ended with ''NHL 09''.
* ''Face Off!'': The original PC DOS hockey game, released in 1989 by Mindspan Technologies and GameStar. Like many sports games of the period, it didn't have any official licenses, but it did feature easy-to-use editing of teams and players, so manually altering the game to fit real life rosters was possible. Many gimmicks and settings introduced, such as rule selection, play creation and a breakaway cam, were later implemented by [[ElectronicArts EA's]] series to varying success.
* ''Blades Of Steel'': Originating as an arcade game before being released for [[{{Nintendo}}]] in 1988. Has a cult status among both arcade players and hockey fans, especially for its innovative voice sampling.
4th Jul '16 1:49:46 PM Leafsdude
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** An exception is when a player is penalized for misconduct; the player is in the sin bin for 10 minutes but the team is allowed another player on the rink for the duration. Such a player will not return until the first whistle after the 10 minutes is over.[[note]]Although unlikely, this means that a player who got a 10 minute penalty at the start of a period could find himself in the box for the whole period, if there are no stoppages[[/note]]. The same goes with players who are in put in the box for the same length at the same time (known colloquially as "coincidental penalties), unless it's a pair of two minute penalties while both teams are playing with all players, in which case both teams play 4-on-4 until the penalties are done or another penalty is called, allowing the players to leave the box immediately.

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** An exception is when a player is penalized for misconduct; the player is in the sin bin for 10 minutes but the team is allowed another player on the rink for the duration. Such a player will not return until the first whistle after the 10 minutes is over.[[note]]Although over[[note]]Although unlikely, this means that a player who got a 10 minute penalty at the start of a period could find himself in the box for the whole period, if there are no stoppages[[/note]]. The same goes with players who are in put in the box for the same length at the same time (known colloquially as "coincidental penalties), unless it's a pair of two minute penalties while both teams are playing with all players, in which case both teams play 4-on-4 until the penalties are done or another penalty is called, allowing the players to leave the box immediately.



** Goalies scoring a goal is a very, very rare instance in modern hockey, as they are not allowed to cross the center line of the field and rarely even advance that far in an attempt to score[[note]]This rule was implemented after a goalie who attempted to play offense was knocked out by a check in the 1966-1967 season[[/note]]. In the modern NHL a total of only eleven goaltenders are credited with scoring a goal, with only two goalies (Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur) scoring more than once (Brodeur's goal total is now three). Of those fourteen total goals, seven were scored by actually shooting the puck into the empty net and seven by own goals by the opposing team on their own empty net.[[note]]However, one of Brodeur's goals is officially credited as being made against Dan Ellis, the opposing goalkeeper. Ellis was being pulled from the ice when the puck was deflected back towards the net by his own teammate after Brodeur defended against a shot on his own net. While Ellis tried to defend against it, he was too far away from the net at the time and was unable to stop the own goal.[[/note]]
* Hockey players wear possibly the most gear out of any sport: the threat of being hit by a fast-moving disc of hard vulcanized rubber is very real and very dangerous. In addition to skates, hockey players wear: shin pads, padded pants, a jock strap, thick padded gloves[[note]]that generally also have a lot of rigidity in the fingers as well, which is why they're removed for a proper fight: punching someone with a hockey glove is exceedingly dangerous and grounds for getting banned from the sport[[/note]], elbow pads, shoulder pads with chest protection, neck guards and helmets. The total weight of a player's gear can be upwards of 50 pounds, if not more. A recent rule change also means that new players ''must'' have a visor on their mask to protect their face.

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** Goalies scoring a goal is a very, very rare instance in modern hockey, as they are not allowed to cross the center line of the field rink and rarely even advance that far in an attempt to score[[note]]This rule was implemented after a goalie who attempted to play offense was knocked out by a check in the 1966-1967 season[[/note]]. In the modern NHL a total of only eleven goaltenders are credited with scoring a goal, with only two goalies (Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur) scoring more than once (Brodeur's goal total is now three). Of those fourteen total goals, seven were scored by actually shooting the puck into the empty net and seven by own goals by the opposing team on their own empty net.[[note]]However, one of Brodeur's goals is officially credited as being made against Dan Ellis, the opposing goalkeeper. Ellis was being pulled from the ice when the puck was deflected back towards the net by his own teammate after Brodeur defended against a shot on his own net. While Ellis tried to defend against it, he was too far away from the net at the time and was unable to stop the own goal.[[/note]]
* Hockey players wear possibly the most gear out of any sport: the threat of being hit by a fast-moving disc of hard vulcanized rubber is very real and very dangerous. In addition to skates, hockey players wear: shin pads, padded pants, a jock strap, thick padded gloves[[note]]that generally also have a lot of rigidity in the fingers as well, which is why they're removed for a proper fight: punching someone with a hockey glove is exceedingly dangerous and grounds for getting banned from the sport[[/note]], elbow pads, shoulder pads with chest protection, neck guards and helmets. The total weight of a player's gear can be upwards of 50 pounds, if not more. A recent rule change also means that new players ''must'' have a visor on their mask helmets to protect their face.


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* [[Series/TheSimpsons The Simpsons]] episode "Lisa On Ice".
28th Jun '16 4:09:12 AM Morgenthaler
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* Season 1 of CornerGas featured an episode with the Dog River hockey team losing to a rival team until Lacey steps in as coach.
* Rick Mercer of Series/TheRickMercerReport repeatedly attends hockey games or hangs out with hockey players in segments. This can range from interviewing guests at the Hockey Hall of Fame to chatting up NHL stars to attending a pond hockey tournament in small town Newfoundland to being invited to learn sledge hockey by the Canadian Paralympic team.

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* Season 1 of CornerGas ''Series/CornerGas'' featured an episode with the Dog River hockey team losing to a rival team until Lacey steps in as coach.
* Rick Mercer of Series/TheRickMercerReport ''Series/TheRickMercerReport'' repeatedly attends hockey games or hangs out with hockey players in segments. This can range from interviewing guests at the Hockey Hall of Fame to chatting up NHL stars to attending a pond hockey tournament in small town Newfoundland to being invited to learn sledge hockey by the Canadian Paralympic team.
5th Jun '16 9:00:47 PM foxesforsale
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* ''Check Please'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.

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* ''Check Please'': ''Webcomic/CheckPlease'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.
5th Jun '16 8:55:33 PM foxesforsale
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[[AC:{{Webcomic}}s]]
* ''Check Please'': A Georgian ex-figure-skater joins a university hockey team in freshman year, and has to learn to overcome his fear of checking, while also managing his team's social life, coming out of the closet, and his love of baking pie.
8th May '16 4:33:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.

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* Film/{{Goon}}: A sort of SpiritualSuccessor to SlapShot, Film/SlapShot, focusing on the gritty world of enforcers in pro hockey.
15th Apr '16 3:38:41 PM oknazevad
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** Rare is a hockey player who's never seen the movie... fewer than five times.



** Rare is a hockey player who's never seen the movie... fewer than five times.
15th Apr '16 3:37:26 PM oknazevad
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Counting officials, there are seven positions in hockey:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.

to:

Counting officials, there The are seven five positions in hockey:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
hockey:


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Officials include:
* The '''referee''' oversees the action, enforces the game rules and gives out penalties (punishments for infractions.) There are two referees in every NHL match (until recently there was only one.) He is typically marked by wearing the traditional striped shirt with orange armbands.
* Two '''linesmen''' enforce the offside rules and have the power to stop the play due to "icing" (both of which are explained below.) They are also responsible for breaking up scuffles and fights between players. As such, the size and fitness of linesmen has increased considerably recently.
* A timekeeper who controls the scoreboard clock(s), who sits off the ice between the two penalty boxes.

Higher level leagues often time have a separate video review officials as well, either in the rink, or, as in the case with the NHL, at a central location watching the video feeds from the arena. In either case, the referees use a phone located at the timekeeper's table to communicate with the video reviewer on issues regarding whether a puck fully crossed the goal line, possible timing issues, or other calls subject to replay. The NHL's operations centre is in Toronto (not at the league's business offices in New York), which is why announcers will talk about refs being on the phone to Toronto during a video review.
15th Apr '16 2:59:36 PM oknazevad
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* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/nite]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[nite]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].

to:

* During the regular season of the NHL, if the score remains tied after sixty minutes, there is a five minute "sudden-death" overtime period (similar to soccer's Golden Goal rule) with only three players per side, and if there are still no tie-breaking goals, there are three rounds of penalty shots (a la penalty kicks in soccer)[[note]]In the event of a penalty, the offending team sends the offender to the penalty box, replaces him with someone else from the bench, and the other team gets an extra player, making it 4-on-3.[[/nite]] [[/note]] During the playoffs, however, overtime is five-on-five and will continue indefinitely (split into further 20 minute periods) until somebody scores.
** Traditionally, in the standings, a win is worth 2 points, a tie is worth 1 point, and a loss is worth no points. Since the 200506 season, however, if the game proceeds to overtime, both teams get 1 point while overtime/shootouts are played for the second point that goes to the winner. Point totals are used to determine which teams make it to the playoffs, rather an a strict win-loss record. A team's record for the season is recorded as X-Y-Z, where X is wins, Y is losses, and Z is ties/"overtime losses".[[nite]]This [[note]]This means that games that go to overtime actually have more impact on the standings than ones that don't, a mathematical oddity that has been the subject of much criticism and discussion, with suggestions including going to a 3 for a regulation win, 2 for an OT win, 1 for an OT loss, 0 for a regulation loss system, or just saying to "heck with it", dropping the shootout and brining back proper ties after OT. [[/note]].
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