History UsefulNotes / HeavyMetal

9th Jan '16 7:16:15 AM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
** Power metal is also known for the amount of ease that it can be fused with other genres. For this reason, there are umbrella terms like progpower metal for bands that are one part progressive metal and one part power metal such as {{Kamelot}} and SymphonyX and thrash-power metal for bands that mix thrash metal and power metal such as IcedEarth and [[ThreeInchesOfBlood 3 Inches of Blood]].
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** Power metal is also known for the amount of ease that it can be fused with other genres. For this reason, there are umbrella terms like progpower metal for bands that are one part progressive metal and one part power metal such as {{Kamelot}} Music/{{Kamelot}} and SymphonyX Music/SymphonyX and thrash-power metal for bands that mix thrash metal and power metal such as IcedEarth and [[ThreeInchesOfBlood 3 Inches of Blood]].
3rd Jan '16 8:40:14 PM Papercut1
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* NuMetal is a genre that many metalheads despise that is seen as a combination of various different styles, including grunge, hip-hop, funk rock, hardcore and groove metal. The guitars are usually downtuned, the riffage isn't particularly complex, and the lyrics are often quite [[{{Wangst}} angsty]]. The normally hip-hop based turntables are often (but not always) used. Rapping is occasionally used. The genre is ''extremely'' controversial; [[BerserkButton mentioning it near a metalhead is rather risky]]. We'll leave it at that...
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* NuMetal is a genre that many metalheads despise that is seen as a combination of various different styles, including grunge, hip-hop, funk rock, hardcore and groove metal. The guitars are usually downtuned, the riffage isn't particularly complex, and the lyrics are often quite [[{{Wangst}} angsty]]. The normally hip-hop based turntables are often (but not always) used. Rapping is occasionally used. The genre was at it's peak in the late [[TheNineties '90s]] and early [[TurnOfTheMillennium '00s]], where it was easily the most profitable metal genre out there. Bands that fall into this genre (at least at some point) are Music/{{Korn}}, Music/{{Slipknot}}, Music/{{Deftones}}, Music/LimpBizkit, and Music/LinkinPark. It [[DeaderThanDisco died out]] in the mid-'00s and most bands associated with it either changed their sound or faded into general obscurity. However, it's beginning to see a [[PopularityPolynomial resurgence]] in the '10s as more and more bands integrate nu metal into their music, with successful results (though not nearly as successful as its prime). The genre is ''extremely'' controversial; [[BerserkButton mentioning it near a metalhead is rather risky]]. We'll leave it at that...
3rd Jan '16 7:48:54 PM Papercut1
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* NuMetal is a genre that many metalheads despise that is seen as a combination of various different styles, including grunge, hip-hop, funk rock, hardcore and groove metal. The guitars are usually downtuned, the riffage isn't particularly complex, and the lyrics are often quite [[{{Wangst}} angsty]]. Rapping is occasionally used. The genre is ''extremely'' controversial; [[BerserkButton mentioning it near a metalhead is rather risky]]. We'll leave it at that... ** AlternativeMetal is the genre from which NuMetal originated. A rather diverse genre, which, as the title would imply, combines Metal riffs and darkness with AlternativeRock songwriting and musical touches. As mentioned, the genre is rather diverse- the aforementioned NuMetal, FunkMetal and IndustrialMetal are all arguably subgenres of it, and it overlaps quite a bit with {{Grunge}} and PostGrunge, especially on the heavier end. While not as divisive as NuMetal, it's still polarizing with more purist Metal audiences- Metalarchives, for example, doesn't allow most artists who fall under this umbrella on their site. * {{Metalcore}}, while immensely divisive among many metalheads, does occasionally fall under the heavy metal umbrella, having two flavors: "first-wave" or "traditional" metalcore, which is a fusion of hardcore and various genres of metal (frequently sludge) and which commonly features [[UncommonTime odd time signatures]], astoundingly ferocious shouted/screamed vocals, and frequent experimental elements; as far as metal fans go, this variety is generally well-liked. The other one is "melodic" or "pop" metalcore, which fuses MelodicDeathMetal with modern breakdown-oriented hardcore music. Its most iconic features are chugging "breakdowns" (where the tempo and musical complexity are reduced for a period and the band rides only one or two chords), disjointed song structures, and hoarse, shouted vocals alternated with clean poppy vocals that tend to be far tamer in range and intensity than usual metal singing. Important bands in the former category include Starkweather, Converge, and Shai Hulud, while the latter category includes Music/{{Trivium}}, Music/AvengedSevenfold, and KillswitchEngage. It has a derivative called "deathcore" that adds influences from down-tempo "slam" death metal and grindcore. Music/JobForACowboy's debut EP is probably the definitive deathcore record. Recently many metalcore bands have begun taking in influences from thrash metal (probably [[FollowTheLeader in imitation of Trivium]]), but most dedicated thrashers are [[{{Hatedom}} not impressed]].
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* NuMetal is a genre that many metalheads despise that is seen as a combination of various different styles, including grunge, hip-hop, funk rock, hardcore and groove metal. The guitars are usually downtuned, the riffage isn't particularly complex, and the lyrics are often quite [[{{Wangst}} angsty]]. The normally hip-hop based turntables are often (but not always) used. Rapping is occasionally used. The genre is ''extremely'' controversial; [[BerserkButton mentioning it near a metalhead is rather risky]]. We'll leave it at that... ** * AlternativeMetal is the genre from which NuMetal originated. A rather diverse genre, which, as the title would imply, combines Metal riffs and darkness with AlternativeRock songwriting and musical touches. As mentioned, the genre is rather diverse- the aforementioned NuMetal, FunkMetal and IndustrialMetal are all arguably subgenres of it, and it overlaps quite a bit with {{Grunge}} and PostGrunge, especially on the heavier end. While not as divisive as NuMetal, it's still polarizing with more purist Metal audiences- Metalarchives, for example, doesn't allow most artists who fall under this umbrella on their site. * {{Metalcore}}, while immensely divisive among many metalheads, does occasionally fall under the heavy metal umbrella, having two flavors: flavors: ** "first-wave" or "traditional" metalcore, which is a fusion of hardcore and various genres of metal (frequently sludge) and which commonly features [[UncommonTime odd time signatures]], astoundingly ferocious shouted/screamed vocals, and frequent experimental elements; as far as metal fans go, this variety is generally well-liked. Important bands in this category include Starkweather, Converge, and Shai Hulud. ** The other one is "melodic" or "pop" metalcore, which fuses MelodicDeathMetal with modern breakdown-oriented hardcore music. Its most iconic features are chugging "breakdowns" (where the tempo and musical complexity are reduced for a period and the band rides only one or two chords), disjointed song structures, and hoarse, shouted vocals alternated with clean poppy vocals that tend to be far tamer in range and intensity than usual metal singing. Important Later bands also take PopPunk and {{Emo}} influences. Bands that fall in the former this category include Starkweather, Converge, and Shai Hulud, while the latter category includes Music/{{Trivium}}, Music/AvengedSevenfold, Music/ShadowsFall, Music/AsILayDying, and KillswitchEngage. KillswitchEngage. ** It has a derivative called "deathcore" "{{deathcore}}" that adds influences from down-tempo "slam" death metal and grindcore.grindcore. Later bands also take some influence from {{nu metal}}, but not the extent of nu-metalcore (listed below). Notable bands include Music/SuicideSilence, Music/UponABurningBody, Music/JobForACowboy, and Music/Whitechapel. Music/JobForACowboy's debut EP is probably the definitive deathcore record. ** Recently many metalcore bands have begun taking in influences from thrash metal (probably [[FollowTheLeader in imitation of Trivium]]), but most dedicated thrashers are [[{{Hatedom}} not impressed]].impressed]]. ** The '10s have brought a new variation called "entombedcore", which fuses traditional metalcore (now known as metallic hardcore) with Swedish death metal and crust punk, to create an angry, dirty, and abrasive sound. However, rarely do entombedcore band identify as metalcore, due to the negative stigma of the genre. It's become fairly popular as of late. Important bands include Trap Them, Nails, Xibalba, and All Pigs Must Die. ** There's another sub-genre created in the '10s that's unofficially referred to as "nu-metalcore", which, as the title suggests, is a hybrid between metalcore and {{nu metal}}. Specifically it combines the former's use of breakdowns, SopranoAndGravel dynamics, HarshVocals, and {{Metal Scream}}s with the latter's angsty lyrics, rapped vocals, downtuned guitars, and electronic manipulation. Some bands also use turntables, but not all. The reception has been [[BrokenBase mixed]], as you could imagine being a fusion of two controversial metal genres. Bands include Music/{{Issues}}, Of Mice & Men, Emmure, and My Ticket Home.
28th Dec '15 3:58:07 AM Morgenthaler
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** It introduced the extremely popular D-tuned guitar tone, which is one cause of its fuzzy n' sludgy, tar-esque guitar work. Born with the punk acts of the early '80s and codified by Grunge bands such as Music/TheMelvins and {{Mudhoney}}, it was adopted in spades by NuMetal and PostGrunge, for better or for worse, which led to the chord ultimately becoming a staple of modern rock.
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** It introduced the extremely popular D-tuned guitar tone, which is one cause of its fuzzy n' sludgy, tar-esque guitar work. Born with the punk acts of the early '80s and codified by Grunge bands such as Music/TheMelvins and {{Mudhoney}}, Music/{{Mudhoney}}, it was adopted in spades by NuMetal and PostGrunge, for better or for worse, which led to the chord ultimately becoming a staple of modern rock.
26th Dec '15 12:34:42 AM supergod
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In the 2010s, there are two new genres of note. {{Deathcore}}, a mixture of Death Metal and Hardcore (which has a rather large {{Hatedom}}), and {{Djent}}, a polyrythmic style of GrooveMetal (which has an even larger hatedom -- see [[{{Djent}} its page]] for details).
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In the 2010s, there are two new genres of note. {{Deathcore}}, a mixture of Death Metal and Hardcore Metalcore (which has a rather large {{Hatedom}}), and {{Djent}}, a polyrythmic style of GrooveMetal (which has an even larger hatedom -- see [[{{Djent}} its page]] for details).
25th Dec '15 9:59:59 AM Confession0791
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updating page
The period between 1985-1990 is widely considered the golden age of heavy metal and was the zenith of the genre's popularity and influence and filled with many of the genre's most esteemed classics, but even in these heady years, there manifested the forces that would soon send metal spiraling downward. As the Eighties progressed, the formerly quite distinct divide between American and European metal blurred and the various strains of metal began to hybridize. In continental Europe, the "vanilla" heavy metal had taken a different path from that in the US, becoming more and more refined and intellectual in nature as a contrast against the raw fury of extreme metal, which was by now starting to congeal into a cohesive scene that would one day be known as black metal. While this "power metal" had analogues in American bands like Music/{{Queensryche}} and Music/{{Manowar}}, it was far more popular in Europe, where bands like Iron Maiden (not a power metal band itself, but the first significant "thinking man's" metal band and the most important progenitor of power metal) Music/{{Helloween}}, Music/YngwieMalmsteen's Rising Force, and others were wowing metal fans with high-flying instrumental theatrics and escapist, [[HeavyMithril fantasy-oriented]] lyrics. Power metal and progressive rock, which was now losing the bad reputation it had acquired in the 1970s, spawned a host of new "white-collar" American power metal bands like Queensryche, Fates Warning, and Crimson Glory.
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The period between 1985-1990 1983-1991 is widely considered the golden age of heavy metal and was the zenith of the genre's popularity and influence and filled with many of the genre's most esteemed classics, but even in these heady years, there manifested the forces that would soon send metal spiraling downward. As the Eighties progressed, the formerly quite distinct divide between American and European metal blurred and the various strains of metal began to hybridize. In continental Europe, the "vanilla" heavy metal had taken a different path from that in the US, becoming more and more refined and intellectual in nature as a contrast against the raw fury of extreme metal, which was by now starting to congeal into a cohesive scene that would one day be known as black metal. While this "power metal" had analogues in American bands like Music/{{Queensryche}} and Music/{{Manowar}}, it was far more popular in Europe, where bands like Iron Maiden (not a power metal band itself, but the first significant "thinking man's" metal band and the most important progenitor of power metal) Music/{{Helloween}}, Music/YngwieMalmsteen's Rising Force, and others were wowing metal fans with high-flying instrumental theatrics and escapist, [[HeavyMithril fantasy-oriented]] lyrics. Power metal and progressive rock, which was now losing the bad reputation it had acquired in the 1970s, spawned a host of new "white-collar" American power metal bands like Queensryche, Fates Warning, and Crimson Glory.

The period between 1992 to 1998 was the [[DorkAge Dark Age of Heavy Metal]]. During this time, anything that was once glorified by metal was now vilified, and the theatrical, technical, and excessive natures of metal became a reason for headshaking and scorn as Alternative's ThreeChordsAndTheTruth ideology became mainstream. Stacking the odds against metal further was the stratospheric success of hair metal in the '80s. This brand of metal was advertised extensively thanks to MTV, and thus, in the popular mind, metal rested squarely from the silliness of Cinderalla, Poison, and Bon Jovi to the 'brutality' of Metallica and Slayer, leaving the experimental, traditional, and underground bands and genres to rot and branding the term "heavy metal" with goofy connotations of big hair, macho posturing, overt sexism, pigheadedness, an obsession with destruction, and unrealistic opulence.
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The period between 1992 to 1998 1997 was the [[DorkAge Dark Age of Heavy Metal]]. During this time, anything that was once glorified by metal was now vilified, and the theatrical, technical, and excessive natures of metal became a reason for headshaking and scorn as Alternative's ThreeChordsAndTheTruth ideology became mainstream. Stacking the odds against metal further was the stratospheric success of hair metal in the '80s. This brand of metal was advertised extensively thanks to MTV, and thus, in the popular mind, metal rested squarely from the silliness of Cinderalla, Poison, and Bon Jovi to the 'brutality' of Metallica and Slayer, leaving the experimental, traditional, and underground bands and genres to rot and branding the term "heavy metal" with goofy connotations of big hair, macho posturing, overt sexism, pigheadedness, an obsession with destruction, and unrealistic opulence.

The tide begin to turn for heavy metal as TheNineties gave way to the TurnOfTheMillennium. The resurgence of heavy metal had a start of sorts with "NuMetal" (or [[HeavyMetalUmlaut Nü Metal]]), which is extremely controversial, to the point where (much like hair metal) arguments about its metal status even occur on this page. NuMetal took all the disparate developments from the Dark Age of Metal and mixed them together, producing a nearly avant-garde mixture of AlternativeMetal, IndustrialMetal, ThrashMetal, {{Goth}}, GrooveMetal, {{Grunge}}, HardcorePunk, HipHop, PostPunk, SludgeMetal, and PostHardcore (though far from all bands would rely on each and every aspect). Nu Metal was, at the very least, unique for its time and its "chug" riffs, psuedo-death growls, extensive breakdowns, inclusion of rap music, and [[{{wangst}} angst-ridden]] themes of inner demons and personal struggles was popular among teens and tweens from 1998 to around 2001, but never caught on with the actual heavy metal community and was slapped with the derisive label "mallcore" by its detractors. Despite this, nü-metal achieved a level of commercial fame that simply hadn't been matched by other metal subgenres, with some bands even outselling '80s pop metal acts, registering it as the most successful 'metal' has ever been. During this time, even long-runner bands such as Slayer and Metallica tried out the genre to commercial, if not exactly critical, success. Following the early success of Music/{{Sepultura}} and Coal Chamber, and the meteoric rise of Music/{{Korn}} and Music/LimpBizkit, a wave of Nu Metal bands erupted, and bands such as Music/{{Slipknot}}, Music/SystemOfADown, Music/{{Deftones}}, Music/LinkinPark and many others became the biggest 'metal' bands in years, and although some bands also don't consider themselves metal, nu metal remains a gateway for many much as glam had been a decade prior.
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The tide begin to turn for heavy metal as TheNineties gave way to the TurnOfTheMillennium. The resurgence of heavy metal had a start of sorts with "NuMetal" (or [[HeavyMetalUmlaut Nü Metal]]), which is extremely controversial, to the point where (much like hair metal) arguments about its metal status even occur on this page. NuMetal took all the disparate developments from the Dark Age of Metal and mixed them together, producing a nearly avant-garde mixture of AlternativeMetal, IndustrialMetal, ThrashMetal, {{Goth}}, GrooveMetal, {{Grunge}}, HardcorePunk, HipHop, PostPunk, SludgeMetal, and PostHardcore (though far from all bands would rely on each and every aspect). Nu Metal was, at the very least, unique for its time and its "chug" riffs, psuedo-death growls, extensive breakdowns, inclusion of rap music, and [[{{wangst}} angst-ridden]] themes of inner demons and personal struggles was popular among teens and tweens from 1998 1997 to around 2001, 2002, but never caught on with the actual heavy metal community and was slapped with the derisive label "mallcore" by its detractors. Despite this, nü-metal achieved a level of commercial fame that simply hadn't been matched by other metal subgenres, with some bands even outselling '80s pop metal acts, registering it as the most successful 'metal' has ever been. During this time, even long-runner bands such as Slayer and Metallica tried out the genre to commercial, if not exactly critical, success. Following the early success of Music/{{Sepultura}} and Coal Chamber, and the meteoric rise of Music/{{Korn}} and Music/LimpBizkit, a wave of Nu Metal bands erupted, and bands such as Music/{{Slipknot}}, Music/SystemOfADown, Music/{{Deftones}}, Music/LinkinPark and many others became the biggest 'metal' bands in years, and although some bands also don't consider themselves metal, nu metal remains a gateway for many much as glam had been a decade prior.

Since then, we've seen a series of ups and downs in popularity but today, in 2015, heavy metal continues to change with the times. With the popularity of the Internet, metal fans have largely eschewed music television— which has become too obsessed with electronic pop, rap, indie, and dubstep— and instead focus their interests as a community and welcome those who find their way into this culture. Meanwhile, the mainstream has also embraced metal in most of its forms, with many prominent names being known metalheads while metal super stars also top headlines. Trends in metal change- from alternative metal to metalcore to deathcore to djent to the recent wave of occult metal, metal fans continue to expand their horizons while awaiting the 'new Metallica's arrival.
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While NuMetal fell ''hard'' in 2003, a more traditional form of metal with more focus on technicality and melody arose. Dubbed "The New Wave of American Heavy Metal", {{Metalcore}} bands such as Shadows Fall, Lamb of God[[note]]although more GrooveMetal than metalcore[[/note]], Trivium, Chimaira, and Killswitch Engaged became the metal of choice for the mainstream metalhead. Some of these bands such as Avenged Sevenfold and Bullet For My Valentine were much more radio-friendly and emo-influenced, and were derided by traditional metalheads as "mallcore"; while the heavier and more technically proficient bands such as the aforementioned Shadows Fall and Chimaira were all too often lumped in with the latter. This scene fell off in popularity in the early 2010s. In the 2010s, there are two new genres of note. {{Deathcore}}, a mixture of Death Metal and Hardcore (which has a rather large {{Hatedom}}), and {{Djent}}, a polyrythmic style of GrooveMetal (which has an even larger hatedom -- see [[{{Djent}} its page]] for details). Since then, we've seen a series of ups and downs in popularity but today, in 2015, heavy metal continues to change with the times. With the popularity of the Internet, metal fans have largely eschewed music television— television and radio -- which has become too obsessed with electronic pop, rap, indie, and dubstep— dubstep -- and instead focus their interests as a community and welcome those who find their way into this culture. Meanwhile, the mainstream has also embraced metal in most of its forms, with many prominent names being known metalheads while metal super stars also top headlines. Trends in metal change- change -- from alternative metal to metalcore to deathcore to djent to the recent wave of occult metal, metal fans continue to expand their horizons while awaiting the 'new Metallica's arrival.
24th Sep '15 5:39:36 PM sharkcrap11
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How has Alt-Metal not been mentioned yet here...
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** AlternativeMetal is the genre from which NuMetal originated. A rather diverse genre, which, as the title would imply, combines Metal riffs and darkness with AlternativeRock songwriting and musical touches. As mentioned, the genre is rather diverse- the aforementioned NuMetal, FunkMetal and IndustrialMetal are all arguably subgenres of it, and it overlaps quite a bit with {{Grunge}} and PostGrunge, especially on the heavier end. While not as divisive as NuMetal, it's still polarizing with more purist Metal audiences- Metalarchives, for example, doesn't allow most artists who fall under this umbrella on their site.
29th Aug '15 7:04:04 AM Adept
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* Also related to symphonic metal and power metal is ProgressiveMetal, which combines the power and aggression of metal with the instrumental technicality and odd song construction of prog-rock. Some of the bands, like Shadow Gallery, also take on classical influences, while others such as Music/LiquidTensionExperiment have a jazz-fusion influence. The genre tends to be focused on EpicRocking and instrumental technicality. Some well-known bands in this genre include Music/DreamTheater, Music/FatesWarning, Music/{{Queensryche}}, SymphonyX, Music/PainOfSalvation, {{Ayreon}} and the aforementioned bands. There are also quite a few progressive death metal bands around, including {{Opeth}}, Music/{{Atheist}}, and Music/{{Cynic}}.
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* Also related to symphonic metal and power metal is ProgressiveMetal, which combines the power and aggression of metal with the instrumental technicality and odd song construction of prog-rock. Some of the bands, like Shadow Gallery, also take on classical influences, while others such as Music/LiquidTensionExperiment have a jazz-fusion influence. The genre tends to be focused on EpicRocking and instrumental technicality. Some well-known bands in this genre include Music/DreamTheater, Music/FatesWarning, Music/{{Queensryche}}, SymphonyX, Music/SymphonyX, Music/PainOfSalvation, {{Ayreon}} Music/{{Ayreon}} and the aforementioned bands. There are also quite a few progressive death metal bands around, including {{Opeth}}, Music/{{Opeth}}, Music/{{Atheist}}, and Music/{{Cynic}}.
30th Jun '15 4:19:43 AM kelandwood
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The source of the name "heavy metal" is, like most things to do with metal, hotly debated. Those who prefer a more "high culture" or "respectable" inspiration point to characters called "the Heavy Metal Kid" and "Heavy Metal People" in works by Creator/WilliamSBurroughs. Lowerbrow types often point to the line "heavy metal thunder" as a metaphor for the sound of motorbike engines in the proto-metal hit [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UWRypqz5-o "Born To Be Wild"]] by Music/{{Steppenwolf}}. More generally, the word "heavy" had been used for a long time among hippies to mean "serious" or "depressing", and some people point as well to the group of often-toxic chemical elements known as "heavy metals" in chemistry. Some claim that "heavy metal" is merely a natural progression of heaviness from "hard rock" and "heavy rock" (i.e. suggesting an even harder brand of music) so the term was inevitable. When it was first used and when it gained mainstream use is debated, but few deny that it was a well-established term in music by at least 1975, though it was referred to or was used interchangeably with 'heavy rock' and a multitude of heavy bands from Music/{{Rush}}, Music/UriahHeep to Buffalo, Music/{{Rainbow}} to Music/{{ACDC}} were all labeled heavy metal even if most didn't consider themselves such, tried to avoid the label, or weren't metal to begin with— even Music/{{Aerosmith}} was called an "American heavy metal-rock band!" This has led to a bit of confusion, with few of the bands being mentioned in the same breath as metal these days.

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The source of the name "heavy metal" is, like most things to do with metal, hotly debated. Those who prefer a more "high culture" or "respectable" inspiration point to characters called "the Heavy Metal Kid" and "Heavy Metal People" in works by Creator/WilliamSBurroughs. Lowerbrow types often point to the line "heavy metal thunder" as a metaphor for the sound of motorbike engines in the proto-metal hit [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UWRypqz5-o "Born To Be Wild"]] by Music/{{Steppenwolf}}. More generally, the word "heavy" had been used for a long time among hippies to mean "serious" or "depressing", and some people point as well to the group of often-toxic chemical elements known as "heavy metals" in chemistry. Some claim that "heavy metal" is merely a natural progression of heaviness from "hard rock" and "heavy rock" (i.e. suggesting an even harder brand of music) so the term was inevitable. When it was first used and when it gained mainstream use is debated, but few deny that it was a well-established term in music by at least 1975, though it was referred to or was used interchangeably with 'heavy rock' and a multitude of heavy bands from Music/{{Rush}}, Music/UriahHeep to Buffalo, Music/{{Rainbow}} to Music/{{ACDC}} were all labeled heavy metal even if most didn't consider themselves such, tried to avoid the label, or weren't metal to begin with— even Music/{{Aerosmith}} was called an "American heavy metal-rock band!" This has led to a bit of confusion, with few of the bands being mentioned in the same breath as metal these days.
27th Jun '15 7:50:36 AM kelandwood
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If Black Sabbath was the TropeMakers of heavy metal, then the classifiably contentious Music/DeepPurple could potentially be considered the {{trope codifier}}s, being held-back by a keyboard-driven, catchier sound with a more old-fashioned, mid-boosted guitar tone but nevertheless influencing an entire generation of metal musicians to come. Providing a faster, smarter variation on Black Sabbath's crushing riffwork, mixing razor sharp riffs, agile leads, and one of the earliest examples of the dramatic, high-pitched vocals and searing "MetalScream" that became almost synonymous with metal in the mid-to-late 1980s. Fast-paced burners like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRt3PIDER94 "Highway Star"]] stripped away Black Sabbath's doomy blues baggage, providing a sound that was nothing short of revolutionary, later on being taken to the nth degree by the first self-conscious metal band, also often considered the {{trope codifier}}s Music/JudasPriest. Abandoning the more classic hard rock sound of their debut, they picked up where Sabbath left off on their sophomore album, ''Sad Wings of Destiny'', with similarly plodding and bass-heavy guitar riffs. They would further innovate a punchier, gallop like sound on tracks such as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_mpt8xyZVI "Dissident Aggressor"]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z44z-knCLf8 "Stained Class"]] and a "rev your engines go" approach on [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02V2XWbpf1s "Exciter"]] that looked into the future speed metal and thrash metal movements of the 1980s. On the opposite side of the world, a German Kraut-rock known as the Music/{{Scorpions}} released their first, largely un-debated metal album in 1976's "Virgin Killer". Having previously approached the genre on their proceeding release In Trance (or depending on who you ask switching to it), they adopted a highly theatrical vocal approach and grandiose use of twin guitars which would later be taken up by the equally melodic and far more successful Iron Maiden. Unfortunately, the genre's sound turned out to be too revolutionary for the conservative '70s rock scene and heavy metal enjoyed limited mainstream success at this time, with almost all of the mid '70s metal bands remaining small, unsigned, and having been forgotten (and in some cases vindicated) by history while leaving the progressive/glam/heavy rock bands of the day to merely experiment with heavy metal but never adopting the sound in full.
to:
If Black Sabbath was the TropeMakers of heavy metal, then the classifiably contentious Music/DeepPurple could potentially be considered the {{trope codifier}}s, being held-back by a keyboard-driven, catchier sound with a more old-fashioned, mid-boosted guitar tone but nevertheless influencing an entire generation of metal musicians to come. Providing a faster, smarter variation on Black Sabbath's crushing riffwork, mixing razor sharp riffs, agile leads, and one of the earliest examples of the dramatic, high-pitched vocals and searing "MetalScream" that became almost synonymous with metal in the mid-to-late 1980s. Fast-paced burners like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRt3PIDER94 "Highway Star"]] stripped away Black Sabbath's doomy blues baggage, providing a sound that was nothing short of revolutionary, later on being taken to the nth degree by the first self-conscious metal band, also often considered the {{trope codifier}}s Music/JudasPriest. Abandoning the more classic hard rock sound of their debut, they picked up where Sabbath left off on their sophomore album, ''Sad Wings of Destiny'', with similarly plodding and bass-heavy guitar riffs. They would further innovate a punchier, gallop like sound on tracks such as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_mpt8xyZVI "Dissident Aggressor"]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z44z-knCLf8 "Stained Class"]] and a "rev your engines go" approach on [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02V2XWbpf1s "Exciter"]] that looked into the future speed metal and thrash metal movements of the 1980s. On the opposite side of the world, a German Kraut-rock known as the Music/{{Scorpions}} released their first, largely un-debated metal album in 1976's "Virgin Killer". Having previously approached the genre on their proceeding release In Trance (or depending on who you ask switching to it), they adopted a highly theatrical vocal approach and grandiose use of twin guitars which would later be taken up by the equally melodic and far more successful Iron Maiden. Unfortunately, the genre's sound turned out to be too revolutionary for the conservative '70s rock scene and heavy metal enjoyed limited mainstream success at this time, with almost all of the mid '70s metal bands remaining small, unsigned, and having been forgotten (and in some cases vindicated) by history while leaving the progressive/glam/heavy rock bands of the day to merely experiment with heavy metal but never adopting the sound in full.
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