History UsefulNotes / HairColorInJapan

19th May '16 9:43:30 AM Morgenthaler
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** BlondesAreEvil
** BlondGuysAreEvil
9th Apr '16 7:19:48 PM sorako
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Blonde hair on a male character may imply that he is a {{trickster}}. Alternately, it may symbolize that this character is a focus of chaos, and trouble follows him wherever he goes, such as Vash the Stampede from ''Manga/{{Trigun}}'', or Soichiro Nagi from ''Manga/TenjouTenge''; a live-action example is the movie version of ''Film/BattleRoyale'''s Kazuo Kiriyama. It is also not uncommon for anime males with ''long'' blonde hair to be portrayed as Casanova-types. (Examples: Kurz from ''LightNovel/FullMetalPanic'', Allen Schezar from ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'', Kyle from ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'' among others...)

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Blonde hair on a male character may imply that he is a {{trickster}}. Alternately, it may symbolize that this character is a focus of chaos, and trouble follows him wherever he goes, such as Vash the Stampede from ''Manga/{{Trigun}}'', or Soichiro Nagi from ''Manga/TenjouTenge''; ''Manga/TenjhoTenge''; a live-action example is the movie version of ''Film/BattleRoyale'''s Kazuo Kiriyama. It is also not uncommon for anime males with ''long'' blonde hair to be portrayed as Casanova-types. (Examples: Kurz from ''LightNovel/FullMetalPanic'', Allen Schezar from ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'', Kyle from ''VideoGame/SuikodenV'' among others...)
9th Apr '16 7:18:35 PM sorako
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In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, including the main characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) can be more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').

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In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, including the main characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} [[AloofDarkHairedGirl other]] [[{{TheOjou}} [[{{Ojou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) can be more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').
''Manga/MidoriDays'').
28th Dec '15 3:14:57 AM BobJones2nd
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In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, including the main characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) are more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').

to:

In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, including the main characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) are can be more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').
28th Dec '15 3:13:15 AM BobJones2nd
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In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) are more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').

to:

In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, including the main characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) are more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').
28th Dec '15 3:11:31 AM BobJones2nd
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In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').

to:

In general, though, brown, black or (rarely) naturalistic auburn hair tends to indicate an OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or some other "grounded", "normal" (Japanese) person. Brown hair, in particular, tend to be the most widely used color for ordinary Japanese characters, because a black haired female can indicate [[{{TallDarkandBishoujo}} other]] [[{{TheOjou}} qualities]]. Black hair (or dark blue and purple) are more common among male protagonists, to make them more relatable to the audience. In some anime, green hair can serve as an additional "standard" hair color (for instance, Midori in ''Manga/MidoriNoHibi'').
19th Nov '14 5:41:14 AM narm00
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Red hair often corresponds either to spirit possession and/or enchantment (as in Manga/{{Ranma|OneHalf}}'s red-headed "curse form"), or to the more Western "hot head" stereotype (such as Asuka from ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' or Lina Inverse from ''LightNovel/Slayers'').

White hair tends to indicate dignity and skill (or simply obvious age), unless the character in question is a {{bishonen}}, in which case he is [[WhiteHairBlackHeart almost always a villain]]. If the character is a white-haired, dark-skinned woman, then dignity, skill or power is often implied, but the character is often also emotionally driven and portrayed as a "force of nature". Urd from ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'', Sanae from ''Anime/HanaukyoMaidTai'', Sara from ''Anime/HandMaidMay'' are good examples. Storm of the ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' is a good Western example.

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Red hair often corresponds either to spirit possession and/or enchantment (as in Manga/{{Ranma|OneHalf}}'s red-headed "curse form"), or to the more Western "hot head" stereotype (such as Asuka from ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' or Lina Inverse from ''LightNovel/Slayers'').''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'').

White hair tends to indicate dignity and skill (or simply obvious age), unless the character in question is a {{bishonen}}, in which case he is [[WhiteHairBlackHeart almost always a villain]]. If the character is a white-haired, dark-skinned woman, then dignity, skill or power is often implied, but the character is often also emotionally driven and portrayed as a "force of nature". Urd from ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'', Sanae from ''Anime/HanaukyoMaidTai'', and Sara from ''Anime/HandMaidMay'' are good examples. Storm of the ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' is a good Western example.
1st Jul '14 1:16:35 PM MacronNotes
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[[caption-width-right:250:In {{real life}}, Japanese people usually have black hair. However, as people like [[RoseHairedGirl Kohaku]] here show us, this isn't the case in most anime, manga, and video games.]]

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[[caption-width-right:250:In {{real life}}, Japanese people usually have black hair. However, as people like [[RoseHairedGirl Kohaku]] Kohaku here show us, this isn't the case in most anime, manga, and video games.]]



** RoseHairedGirl

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** RoseHairedGirlRoseHairedSweetie
28th May '14 12:27:28 PM SpaceDrake
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The bizarre hair colors seen in modern anime have their origins in the black-and-white manga source material. In a nation where virtually everyone has black hair, characters in manga (who often had [[OnlySixFaces very similar facial features]] as well) could be difficult to distinguish from one another. One solution was to give them different hair styles, or to use variant shading (or no shading at all) on their hair. When the mangas were translated to color animation, the odd shadings were often translated as bright colors.

In most cases, these unnatural colors are understood to be normal, natural shades by the other characters. That is to say, the color carries none of the social connotations it would in the real world, and other characters rarely if ever react to it as unusual in any way. This may indicate that the color used is more a visual shortcut than a real color - e.g., perhaps the cast of ''Ranma'' does in fact have black hair, but, just as their eyes are drawn nothing like real eyes, their hair gets drawn nothing like their "real" hair.

to:

The bizarre hair colors seen in modern anime have their origins in the black-and-white manga source material. In a nation where virtually everyone has black hair, characters in manga (who often had [[OnlySixFaces very similar facial features]] as well) could be difficult to distinguish from one another. One solution was to give them different hair styles, or to use variant shading (or no shading at all) on their hair. When the mangas were translated to color animation, the odd shadings were often sometimes translated as bright colors.

colors. This trope/concept ''particularly'' exploded, however, with the advent of computer video games in the 1980s - due to palette restrictions, giving characters "natural" hair colors, black especially, that read well on-screen was often enormously difficult. Bright hair colors in the red, blue, purple and green ranges, however, often translated very well to the screen and often made it easier to track characters visually on screen. And given the cross-promotion and cross-inspiration between anime and video games, even in the 80s, the concept transferred very quickly.

In most cases, these unnatural colors are understood to be normal, natural shades by the other characters. That is to say, the color carries none of the social connotations it would in the real world, and other characters rarely if ever react to it as unusual in any way. This may indicate that the color used is more a visual shortcut than a real color - e.g., perhaps the cast of ''Ranma'' does in fact have black hair, but, just as their eyes are drawn nothing like real eyes, their hair gets drawn nothing like their "real" hair.
hair. Dark blue hair, in particular, is often understood to be a "stylized" black, used in instances where actual black hair simply would not read well visually.
19th May '14 9:07:14 PM Aiguille
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Beginning in 2000 or so, {{Magical Girl}}s' transformed alter egos tend to have different shades of their hair colours. ''Manga/TokyoMewMew'' is one of the most notable examples but not the earliest, although originally in the manga, the characters kept their hair colours; only once the anime began and gave them different shades did they manga follow suit. (The mangaka also did this with the transformation phrases, previously not present, as well as the altered weapons.) One of, if not the earliest hair color changes was actually ''Manga/KamikazeKaitouJeanne''. ''Franchise/SailorMoon'', on the other hand, played it backwards. Covers and colored pages of [[Manga/SailorMoon the manga]] often showed the Senshi with hair that matched their transformations, but TheNinties [[Anime/SailorMoon anime]] gave them more natural hair, Usagi and Minako's blondness notwithstanding.

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Beginning in 2000 or so, {{Magical Girl}}s' transformed alter egos tend to have different shades of their hair colours. ''Manga/TokyoMewMew'' is one of the most notable examples but not the earliest, although originally in the manga, the characters kept their hair colours; only once the anime began and gave them different shades did they manga follow suit. (The mangaka also did this with the transformation phrases, previously not present, as well as the altered weapons.) One of, if not the earliest hair color changes was actually ''Manga/KamikazeKaitouJeanne''. ''Franchise/SailorMoon'', on the other hand, played it backwards. Covers and colored pages of [[Manga/SailorMoon the manga]] often showed the Senshi with hair that matched their transformations, but TheNinties TheNineties [[Anime/SailorMoon anime]] gave them more natural hair, Usagi and Minako's blondness notwithstanding.
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