History UsefulNotes / GunSafety

1st Oct '17 4:01:04 PM ADrago
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** More generally, don't copy things you see in films or on TV just because they [[RuleOfCool look cool]]. TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs, after all.

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** More generally, don't copy things you see in films or on TV just because they [[RuleOfCool look cool]]. TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs, JustForFun/TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs, after all.
21st Sep '17 11:48:36 AM Caps-luna
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** However its important to note that while there are AcceptableTargets in fiction the concept doesn't apply to violence in the real world. While hating Neo-Nazis and other hate groups is encouraged in society, going on a shooting spree against these people is not defensible and you as a gun broker should take steps to prevent this from happening. While its expected (and generally a positive sign) to hear anti-racist speech, be careful of people who make jokes like "man if only I had a bullet for every Nazi in the world," or seem unusually focused on racism or other injustices in society. These people may be working themselves up into becoming a vigilante or worse. And lastly remember that anyone can be a racist against another group even they are themselves a minority. If you hear a potential costumer make prejudiced comments against any group of people you should at the very least press them about the issue to find out if its a deep seated grudge or not and take appropriate action.

to:

** *** However its important to note that while there are AcceptableTargets in fiction the concept doesn't apply to violence in the real world. While hating Neo-Nazis and other hate groups is encouraged in society, going on a shooting spree against these people is not defensible and you as a gun broker should take steps to prevent this from happening. While its expected (and generally a positive sign) to hear anti-racist speech, be careful of people who make jokes like "man if only I had a bullet for every Nazi in the world," or seem unusually focused on racism or other injustices in society. These people may be working themselves up into becoming a vigilante or worse. And lastly remember that anyone can be a racist against another group even they are themselves a minority. If you hear a potential costumer make prejudiced comments against any group of people you should at the very least press them about the issue to find out if its a deep seated grudge or not and take appropriate action.
21st Sep '17 11:48:07 AM Caps-luna
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to:

** However its important to note that while there are AcceptableTargets in fiction the concept doesn't apply to violence in the real world. While hating Neo-Nazis and other hate groups is encouraged in society, going on a shooting spree against these people is not defensible and you as a gun broker should take steps to prevent this from happening. While its expected (and generally a positive sign) to hear anti-racist speech, be careful of people who make jokes like "man if only I had a bullet for every Nazi in the world," or seem unusually focused on racism or other injustices in society. These people may be working themselves up into becoming a vigilante or worse. And lastly remember that anyone can be a racist against another group even they are themselves a minority. If you hear a potential costumer make prejudiced comments against any group of people you should at the very least press them about the issue to find out if its a deep seated grudge or not and take appropriate action.
15th Sep '17 3:43:23 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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Added DiffLines:

** On that note, '''never''' give an inexperienced shooter a weapon too powerful for them to control as a prank, as is commonly seen in online videos. Not only is this a major dick move, but it also is ''not funny'', it is ''not cute'', and it has gotten people ''killed''.
29th Jun '17 6:03:37 AM Tightwire
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** Even if you ''don't'' have a weapon, never reach into your clothes unless directed or under your car seat around police - there have been too many unpleasant incidents of jumpy copps making rash assumptions. It shouldn't be like that, but it is - guns can grant the holder with a false sense of security and power - and it's something that could just as easily happen if ''you're'' the one with the gun.

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** Even if you ''don't'' have a weapon, never reach into your clothes unless directed or under your car seat around police - there have been too many unpleasant incidents of jumpy copps cops making rash assumptions.assumptions. Maybe they ''are'' being an asshole, but you're still the one in hospital - or worse. It shouldn't be like that, but it is - guns can grant the holder with a false sense of security and power - and it's something that could just as easily happen if ''you're'' the one with the gun.
30th May '17 5:35:19 PM nombretomado
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* If you have no experience with guns, do not touch one unless properly supervised. Accept no substitute for proper instruction. TVTropes does not count as proper instruction. (And remember: proper instruction is not a substitute to keeping a cool head and being careful.)

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* If you have no experience with guns, do not touch one unless properly supervised. Accept no substitute for proper instruction. TVTropes Wiki/TVTropes does not count as proper instruction. (And remember: proper instruction is not a substitute to keeping a cool head and being careful.)
25th Apr '17 9:27:44 PM DaNuke
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* One of the preferred techniques among gun dealers to ensure the safety of their business, thanks to its simplicity and relative accuracy, is to read the customer's mind through their body language, attitude, actions, situation, their words and what they reveal about their personal profile. Pay close attention, and some attitudes in particular will stand out as red flags that indicate that the customer is up to ''something'' that is definitely not good; in these cases, refusing to sell guns or ammo could prevent a crime or save someone's life. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:

to:

* One of the preferred techniques among gun dealers to ensure the safety of their business, thanks to its simplicity and relative accuracy, is to have a little talk with the customer in order to read the customer's their mind through their body language, attitude, actions, situation, their personal context, words and what they reveal about their personal profile.profile. Unless the customer is cool-headed or good enough at lying to fake non-verbal language, chances are the customer will reveal at least a little bit of their true intentions. Pay close attention, and some attitudes in particular will stand out as red flags that indicate that the customer is up to ''something'' that is definitely not good; in these cases, refusing to sell guns or ammo could prevent a crime or save someone's life. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:
25th Apr '17 10:53:57 AM DaNuke
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** Presenting any money other than US dollars, such as foreign currency or cryptocurrencies (bitcoins, litecoins, ethereums...), or insisting on paying with cash if the shop enforces credit card purchases (some shops do it to add another layer of paper trail), means your purchaser does not want to be tracked. While this behavior has become increasingly prevalent among otherwise perfectly honest people following Edward Snowden's big reveals, there is still a possiblity that you're dealing with a criminal who wants to slip off the radar.

to:

** Presenting any money other than US dollars, legal tender, such as foreign currency or cryptocurrencies (bitcoins, litecoins, ethereums...), or insisting on paying with cash if the shop enforces credit card purchases (some shops do it to add another layer of paper trail), means your purchaser does not want to be tracked. While this behavior has become increasingly prevalent among otherwise perfectly honest people following Edward Snowden's big reveals, there is still a possiblity that you're dealing with a criminal who wants to slip off the radar.
25th Apr '17 10:48:56 AM DaNuke
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* If you sell/trade/repair guns, ''you'' may be the last line of defense against a homicide or suicide. Take the time to [[http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/means-matter/gun-shop-project/ learn the signs of someone who is a danger to themselves or others as a result of a mental health or life crisis]], educate yourself in the [[http://psychopathyawareness.wordpress.com/2011/10/03/the-list-of-psychopathy-symptoms/ warning signs of a sociopath]], and ''take the time to talk.'' It also goes without saying that, as a shopkeeper or gun business owner, one of your duties is to prevent straw purchasing -- when someone purchases a gun on behalf of someone who is not legally allowed to own it -- because even though legally the purchaser is the one guilty for allowing someone who shouldn't possess guns to possess one (according to the American free enterprise principle, the shopkeeper was just running his business), it is possible for the shopkeeper to run into serious legal trouble if the police manages to trace back a fraudulent transaction to their store.[[note]]Straw purchasing has been credited by some reports [[https://everytownresearch.org/reports/inside-straw-purchasing-criminals-get-guns-illegally/#foot_note_69 like this one]] to be literally one of the main driving forces of many gun smuggling mafias, high school shootings including Columbine and even Mexico's entire cartel violence problem, and yet quite a few shop owners have been found to sell guns with very few questions asked and waiving any worries by reciting the mantra "money is money, business is business".[[/note]] While you probably aren't a mental health professional and aren't expected to be, educating yourself won't hurt anyone and may ''definitely'' save lives. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:
* As noted in the links and above, if someone seems emotionally distraught (crying, rage), showing symptoms of a mental illness (the rapid, pressured, fast speech that is a hallmark symptom of bipolar mania, the anxiety and eye contact avoidance of a suicidal person, appearing to be hearing voices, acting in a paranoid manner), or obviously under the influence of alcohol or drugs (''especially'' stimulant drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine), they ''do not'' need a gun.
* Anyone who "just wants a gun, any gun" should be assumed to possibly be having bad intentions. Hunters, sport shooters/marksmanship/target shooters, gun fanboys, and even most people looking for self-defense weapons usually know ''exactly'' what type of weapon they need/want and have researched it in advance, whereas people who are suicidal or homicidal often don't care, because any gun can kill. Of course, a more savvy suicidal person or killer might use one of these as a glib excuse - in which case, be aware if the gun matches the alleged need. If it doesn't, that's even more of a red flag than "oh just give me anything." This is mostly limited to countries with unregulated gun trade like the USA, as in European jurisdictions any gun license released is specific to the category of weapon - as in rifles or shotguns for the hunter, handgun for self-defense, specific types of rifle or pistol for the target shooter and so on.
* Related, someone who doesn't truthfully say what they are going to do with the gun upfront - or especially who doesn't even say so ''if actually asked.'' If the answer to "what do you need this for" is silence, subject change, BlatantLies, or a glib, quick excuse that doesn't seem to make sense, watch out.
* If your customer seems to know next to nothing about guns, chances are they're a straw purchaser. If, in addition, they want one specific gun and nothing else, chances are they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's order.
* Multiple guns in one purchase/trade is a warning sign, especially if they are very different kinds. It might be plausible that a hunter or sport/target shooter is buying, say, three slightly different long guns (in case of jams or breakage, to try something different, for different stages in the event), and similarly a new concealed-carry holder might buy two handguns, one for home and one for car/body carry. Someone seeking to acquire an AR-15 semiautomatic, two handguns, and a sniper rifle, on the other hand, should be taken with major suspicion -- there's a high chance they're either stocking up for a major crime, or that they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's purchase order.
* NoKillLikeOverkill is also a very major warning sign. Usually this can be spotted with ammunition - know how much an average shooter needs, and start asking questions if someone is buying ''far'' more. This is a red flag for both paranoia and mass casualty shooters. This also ties into the gun itself - if someone is seeking, say, an AR-15 for "home defense," you can and should consider trying to steer them toward a handgun or a pump-action shotgun instead - and see their reaction when you try. If they acquiesce, they may have just been thinking unrealistically, but you should still monitor them closely. If they try to sidestep the issue, come up with an excuse, or suddenly grow defensive or even outright rude or hostile (e.g., if your attempts to gently redirect them are met with a reply of "I don't recall asking for your fucking opinion" or something along those lines), you have an absolutely massive red flag on your hands and should act accordingly.
* Purchasing too little, however, is also a red flag -- it implies the purchaser is about to commit suicide. Why purchasing the whole suite of safe, holder, carrying case, maintenance kit, accessories and a fair supply of ammo when you're going to die without using them?
* Mentioning major personal setbacks such as divorce, job loss, bankruptcy or academic failure might as well just be an up-front "I'm going to kill myself".
* Unsolicited comments disparaging specific minority groups, that sound suspiciously like the rhetoric of [[ThoseWackyNazis known]] [[UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan extremist]] [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic groups]], or that have an aggressively militaristic anti-government bent should also serve as a warning sign. Given the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment very heated nature of the gun control debate in the US]], anyone who works at a business that sells firearms will most certainly hear anti-government sentiment from customers on a fairly frequent basis. As such, you should instead listen to the tone of the sentiment. Are they lamenting a loss of freedom and expressing fears of a police state, or do they sound as if they're preparing for a war or have an overly bellicose demeanor? If it's the latter, definitely listen closer to their speech to see if what they're saying matches up with the rhetoric of extremist groups. For those in the US, sovereign citizens are probably the most commonly encountered extremist group; listen for things like explicit or thinly-concealed anti-Semitic and/or Masonic sentiment, anti-banking or Federal Reserve comments (something along the lines of "Wall Street is going to be the death of this country" is nothing to worry about; on the other hand, something like "fucking Jews are using our corporate shells as collateral" should make your spider-sense tingle), comments about the government being illegitimate or fraudulent (rather than just corrupt or power-drunk; sovereigns genuinely believe that the US government is a sham), and an overwhelmingly arrogant or contempt-filled attitude (as they believe that they are enlightened by their knowledge of a massive, labyrinthine conspiracy that most Americans are simply too stupid and gullible to understand or believe), and look for things like odd license plates (if their vehicles are visible), oddly-punctuated names, or strange addresses; lastly, if they try to pay with currency that you have never seen before and that does not match any known legal tender, that's almost assuredly a sign that you're dealing with them, ''especially'' if it has something like "Republic of Texas" or "Little Shell Pembina Band" emblazoned upon it (in case you're wondering, this currency is not recognized and should not be accepted under any circumstances).[[note]]While [[http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2010/fall/tips-for-law-enforcement this list]] is intended to aid law enforcement in spotting them, a lot of the items on it are just as applicable to gun store employees[[/note]] Sovereign citizens have also taken to cryptocurrencies such as the Bitcoin to make their transactions, due to them not being backed by any nation-state and due recently also to the painstaking efforts by companies as large and recognized as IBM to legitimize them, meaning that in principle, accepting them shouldn't hurt -- but as usual when doing business with guns, err on the side of caution, refuse them, and ask for US dollars. While the average sovereign citizen will never engage in violence and will mostly just be a colossal pain in the ass for law enforcement, the court system, government employees, and the odd landlord or property owner who is unlucky enough to have gotten into a squabble with one, there are enough high-profile cases of sovereign citizens engaging in violence that you should be on the lookout for them. Second to sovereign citizens are Neo-Nazis or various other white supremacist groups - [[http://www.adl.org/combating-hate/hate-on-display/summary-view.html?hate_symbol_category=neo-nazi-symbols this symbolism]] combined with a hatred of minorities (''especially'' Jews or African-Americans) is a major red flag there.

to:

* If Selling, trading and repairing guns is more than just a business: it's a big responsibility. You're literally selling or working with killing machines and make them available to the general public, and this puts you sell/trade/repair guns, ''you'' may be in a position where you should also put some effort from your part to ensure that your business won't result in gun deaths and an onslaught of gun haters clamoring for the last line end of defense against a homicide or suicide.your business. Take the time to [[http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/means-matter/gun-shop-project/ learn the signs of someone who is a danger to themselves or others as a result of a mental health or life crisis]], educate yourself in the [[http://psychopathyawareness.wordpress.com/2011/10/03/the-list-of-psychopathy-symptoms/ warning signs of a sociopath]], and ''take the time to talk.'' It also goes without saying that, as a shopkeeper or gun business owner, one of your duties is to prevent straw purchasing -- when someone purchases a gun on behalf of someone who is not legally allowed to own it -- because even though legally American gun laws are so easygoing you probably won't have any liability for having sold a gun to someone who used it on a crime (in the event of a straw purchase, the purchaser is the one guilty for allowing someone who shouldn't possess guns to possess one (according to the American free enterprise principle, the shopkeeper was just running his business), it is possible for the shopkeeper to one), that doesn't means you won't run into serious legal trouble if the police manages to trace back a fraudulent transaction to their store.[[note]]Straw purchasing is also the source of many evils in the world: it has been credited by some reports [[https://everytownresearch.org/reports/inside-straw-purchasing-criminals-get-guns-illegally/#foot_note_69 like this one]] to be literally one of the main driving forces of many gun smuggling mafias, all kinds of bad situations, from small ones like individual crimes, to important ones like high school shootings including Columbine and even gun smuggling mafias, to situations as huge and dire as Mexico's entire cartel violence problem, problem... and yet yet, quite a few shop owners have been found to sell guns with very few questions asked and waiving any worries by reciting the mantra "money is money, business is business".[[/note]] While you probably aren't a mental health professional [[/note]]
* One of the preferred techniques among gun dealers to ensure the safety of their business, thanks to its simplicity
and aren't expected relative accuracy, is to be, educating yourself won't hurt anyone read the customer's mind through their body language, attitude, actions, situation, their words and may ''definitely'' what they reveal about their personal profile. Pay close attention, and some attitudes in particular will stand out as red flags that indicate that the customer is up to ''something'' that is definitely not good; in these cases, refusing to sell guns or ammo could prevent a crime or save lives.someone's life. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:
* ** As noted in the links and above, if someone seems emotionally distraught (crying, rage), showing symptoms of a mental illness (the rapid, pressured, fast speech that is a hallmark symptom of bipolar mania, the anxiety and eye contact avoidance of a suicidal person, appearing to be hearing voices, acting in a paranoid manner), or obviously under the influence of alcohol or drugs (''especially'' stimulant drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine), they ''do not'' need a gun.
* ** Anyone who "just wants a gun, any gun" should be assumed to possibly be having bad intentions. Hunters, sport shooters/marksmanship/target shooters, gun fanboys, and even most people looking for self-defense weapons usually know ''exactly'' what type of weapon they need/want and have researched it in advance, whereas people who are suicidal or homicidal often don't care, because any gun can kill. Of course, a more savvy suicidal person or killer might use one of these as a glib excuse - in which case, be aware if the gun matches the alleged need. If it doesn't, that's even more of a red flag than "oh just give me anything." This is mostly limited to countries with unregulated gun trade like the USA, as in European jurisdictions any gun license released is specific to the category of weapon - as in rifles or shotguns for the hunter, handgun for self-defense, specific types of rifle or pistol for the target shooter and so on.
* ** Related, someone who doesn't truthfully say what they are going to do with the gun upfront - or especially who doesn't even say so ''if actually asked.'' If the answer to "what do you need this for" is silence, subject change, BlatantLies, or a glib, quick excuse that doesn't seem to make sense, watch out.
* ** If your customer seems to know next to nothing about guns, chances are they're a straw purchaser. If, in addition, they want one specific gun and nothing else, chances are they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's order.
* ** Multiple guns in one purchase/trade is a warning sign, especially if they are very different kinds. It might be plausible that a hunter or sport/target shooter is buying, say, three slightly different long guns (in case of jams or breakage, to try something different, for different stages in the event), and similarly a new concealed-carry holder might buy two handguns, one for home and one for car/body carry. Someone seeking to acquire an AR-15 semiautomatic, two handguns, and a sniper rifle, on the other hand, should be taken with major suspicion -- there's a high chance they're either stocking up for a major crime, or that they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's purchase order.
* ** NoKillLikeOverkill is also a very major warning sign. Usually this can be spotted with ammunition - know how much an average shooter needs, and start asking questions if someone is buying ''far'' more. This is a red flag for both paranoia and paranoia, mass casualty shooters.shooters and gun smugglers. This also ties into the gun itself - if someone is seeking, say, an AR-15 for "home defense," you can and should consider trying to steer them toward a handgun or a pump-action shotgun instead - and see their reaction when you try. If they acquiesce, they may have just been thinking unrealistically, but you should still monitor them closely. If they try to sidestep the issue, come up with an excuse, or suddenly grow defensive or even outright rude or hostile (e.g., if your attempts to gently redirect them are met with a reply of "I don't recall asking for your fucking opinion" or something along those lines), you have an absolutely massive red flag on your hands and should act accordingly.
* ** Purchasing too little, however, is also a red flag -- it implies the purchaser is about to commit suicide. Why purchasing the whole suite of safe, holder, carrying case, maintenance kit, accessories and a fair supply of ammo when you're going to die without using them?
* ** Mentioning major personal setbacks such as divorce, job loss, bankruptcy or academic failure might as well just be an up-front "I'm going to kill myself".
* ** Presenting any money other than US dollars, such as foreign currency or cryptocurrencies (bitcoins, litecoins, ethereums...), or insisting on paying with cash if the shop enforces credit card purchases (some shops do it to add another layer of paper trail), means your purchaser does not want to be tracked. While this behavior has become increasingly prevalent among otherwise perfectly honest people following Edward Snowden's big reveals, there is still a possiblity that you're dealing with a criminal who wants to slip off the radar.
**
Unsolicited comments disparaging specific minority groups, that sound suspiciously like the rhetoric of [[ThoseWackyNazis known]] [[UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan extremist]] [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic groups]], or that have an aggressively militaristic anti-government bent should also serve as a warning sign. Given the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment very heated nature of the gun control debate in the US]], anyone who works at a business that sells firearms will most certainly hear anti-government sentiment from customers on a fairly frequent basis. As such, you should instead listen to the tone of the sentiment. Are they lamenting a loss of freedom and expressing fears of a police state, or do they sound as if they're preparing for a war or have an overly bellicose demeanor? If it's the latter, definitely listen closer to their speech to see if what they're saying matches up with the rhetoric of extremist groups. For those in the US, sovereign citizens are probably the most commonly encountered extremist group; listen for things like explicit or thinly-concealed anti-Semitic and/or Masonic sentiment, anti-banking or Federal Reserve comments (something along the lines of "Wall Street is going to be the death of this country" is nothing to worry about; on the other hand, something like "fucking Jews are using our corporate shells as collateral" should make your spider-sense tingle), comments about the government being illegitimate or fraudulent (rather than just corrupt or power-drunk; sovereigns genuinely believe that the US government is a sham), and an overwhelmingly arrogant or contempt-filled attitude (as they believe that they are enlightened by their knowledge of a massive, labyrinthine conspiracy that most Americans are simply too stupid and gullible to understand or believe), and look for things like odd license plates (if their vehicles are visible), oddly-punctuated names, or strange addresses; lastly, if they try to pay with currency that you have never seen before and that does not match any known legal tender, that's almost assuredly a sign that you're dealing with them, ''especially'' if it has something like "Republic of Texas" or "Little Shell Pembina Band" emblazoned upon it (in case you're wondering, this currency is not recognized and should not be accepted under any circumstances).[[note]]While [[http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2010/fall/tips-for-law-enforcement this list]] is intended to aid law enforcement in spotting them, a lot of the items on it are just as applicable to gun store employees[[/note]] Sovereign citizens have also taken to cryptocurrencies such as the Bitcoin to make their transactions, due to them not being backed by any nation-state and due recently also to the painstaking efforts by companies as large and recognized as IBM to legitimize them, meaning that in principle, accepting them shouldn't hurt -- but as usual when doing business with guns, err on the side of caution, refuse them, and ask for US dollars. While the average sovereign citizen will never engage in violence and will mostly just be a colossal pain in the ass for law enforcement, the court system, government employees, and the odd landlord or property owner who is unlucky enough to have gotten into a squabble with one, there are enough high-profile cases of sovereign citizens engaging in violence that you should be on the lookout for them. Second to sovereign citizens are Neo-Nazis or various other white supremacist groups - [[http://www.adl.org/combating-hate/hate-on-display/summary-view.html?hate_symbol_category=neo-nazi-symbols this symbolism]] combined with a hatred of minorities (''especially'' Jews or African-Americans) is a major red flag there.
24th Apr '17 7:17:29 PM DaNuke
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* Finally, if you sell/trade/repair guns or are in a situation where someone asks to borrow a weapon (something you should not normally allow them to do), ''you'' may be the last line of defense against a homicide or suicide. Take the time to [[http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/means-matter/gun-shop-project/ learn the signs of someone who is a danger to themselves or others as a result of a mental health or life crisis]], educate yourself in the [[http://psychopathyawareness.wordpress.com/2011/10/03/the-list-of-psychopathy-symptoms/ warning signs of a sociopath]], and ''take the time to talk.'' It also goes without saying that, as a shopkeeper or gun business owner, one of your duties is to prevent straw purchasing -- when someone purchases a gun on behalf of someone who is not legally allowed to own it -- because even though legally the purchaser is the one guilty for allowing someone who shouldn't possess guns to possess one (according to the American free enterprise principle, the shopkeeper was just running his business), it is possible for the shopkeeper to run into serious legal trouble if the police manages to trace back a fraudulent transaction to their store.[[note]]Straw purchasing has been credited by some reports [[https://everytownresearch.org/reports/inside-straw-purchasing-criminals-get-guns-illegally/#foot_note_69 like this one]] to be literally one of the main driving forces of many gun smuggling mafias, high school shootings including Columbine and even Mexico's entire cartel violence problem, and yet quite a few shop owners have been found to sell guns with very few questions asked and waiving any worries by reciting the mantra "money is money, business is business".[[/note]] While you probably aren't a mental health professional and aren't expected to be, educating yourself won't hurt anyone and may ''definitely'' save lives. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:
** As noted in the links and above, if someone seems emotionally distraught (crying, rage), showing symptoms of a mental illness (the rapid, pressured, fast speech that is a hallmark symptom of bipolar mania, the anxiety and eye contact avoidance of a suicidal person, appearing to be hearing voices, acting in a paranoid manner), or obviously under the influence of alcohol or drugs (''especially'' stimulant drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine), they ''do not'' need a gun.
** Anyone who "just wants a gun, any gun" should be assumed to possibly be having bad intentions. Hunters, sport shooters/marksmanship/target shooters, gun fanboys, and even most people looking for self-defense weapons usually know ''exactly'' what type of weapon they need/want and have researched it in advance, whereas people who are suicidal or homicidal often don't care, because any gun can kill. Of course, a more savvy suicidal person or killer might use one of these as a glib excuse - in which case, be aware if the gun matches the alleged need. If it doesn't, that's even more of a red flag than "oh just give me anything." This is mostly limited to countries with unregulated gun trade like the USA, as in European jurisdictions any gun license released is specific to the category of weapon - as in rifles or shotguns for the hunter, handgun for self-defense, specific types of rifle or pistol for the target shooter and so on.
** Related, someone who doesn't truthfully say what they are going to do with the gun upfront - or especially who doesn't even say so ''if actually asked.'' If the answer to "what do you need this for" is silence, subject change, BlatantLies, or a glib, quick excuse that doesn't seem to make sense, watch out.
** If your customer seems to know next to nothing about guns, chances are they're a straw purchaser. If, in addition, they want one specific gun and nothing else, chances are they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's order.
** Multiple guns in one purchase/trade is a warning sign, especially if they are very different kinds. It might be plausible that a hunter or sport/target shooter is buying, say, three slightly different long guns (in case of jams or breakage, to try something different, for different stages in the event), and similarly a new concealed-carry holder might buy two handguns, one for home and one for car/body carry. Someone seeking to acquire an AR-15 semiautomatic, two handguns, and a sniper rifle, on the other hand, should be taken with major suspicion -- there's a high chance they're either stocking up for a major crime, or that they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's purchase order.
** NoKillLikeOverkill is also a very major warning sign. Usually this can be spotted with ammunition - know how much an average shooter needs, and start asking questions if someone is buying ''far'' more. This is a red flag for both paranoia and mass casualty shooters. This also ties into the gun itself - if someone is seeking, say, an AR-15 for "home defense," you can and should consider trying to steer them toward a handgun or a pump-action shotgun instead - and see their reaction when you try. If they acquiesce, they may have just been thinking unrealistically, but you should still monitor them closely. If they try to sidestep the issue, come up with an excuse, or suddenly grow defensive or even outright rude or hostile (e.g., if your attempts to gently redirect them are met with a reply of "I don't recall asking for your fucking opinion" or something along those lines), you have an absolutely massive red flag on your hands and should act accordingly.
** Purchasing too little, however, is also a red flag -- it implies the purchaser is about to commit suicide. Why purchasing the whole suite of safe, holder, carrying case, maintenance kit, accessories and a fair supply of ammo when you're going to die without using them?
** Mentioning major personal setbacks such as divorce, job loss, bankruptcy or academic failure might as well just be an up-front "I'm going to kill myself".
** Unsolicited comments disparaging specific minority groups, that sound suspiciously like the rhetoric of [[ThoseWackyNazis known]] [[UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan extremist]] [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic groups]], or that have an aggressively militaristic anti-government bent should also serve as a warning sign. Given the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment very heated nature of the gun control debate in the US]], anyone who works at a business that sells firearms will most certainly hear anti-government sentiment from customers on a fairly frequent basis. As such, you should instead listen to the tone of the sentiment. Are they lamenting a loss of freedom and expressing fears of a police state, or do they sound as if they're preparing for a war or have an overly bellicose demeanor? If it's the latter, definitely listen closer to their speech to see if what they're saying matches up with the rhetoric of extremist groups. For those in the US, sovereign citizens are probably the most commonly encountered extremist group; listen for things like explicit or thinly-concealed anti-Semitic and/or Masonic sentiment, anti-banking or Federal Reserve comments (something along the lines of "Wall Street is going to be the death of this country" is nothing to worry about; on the other hand, something like "fucking Jews are using our corporate shells as collateral" should make your spider-sense tingle), comments about the government being illegitimate or fraudulent (rather than just corrupt or power-drunk; sovereigns genuinely believe that the US government is a sham), and an overwhelmingly arrogant or contempt-filled attitude (as they believe that they are enlightened by their knowledge of a massive, labyrinthine conspiracy that most Americans are simply too stupid and gullible to understand or believe), and look for things like odd license plates (if their vehicles are visible), oddly-punctuated names, or strange addresses; lastly, if they try to pay with currency that you have never seen before and that does not match any known legal tender, that's almost assuredly a sign that you're dealing with them, ''especially'' if it has something like "Republic of Texas" or "Little Shell Pembina Band" emblazoned upon it (in case you're wondering, this currency is not recognized and should not be accepted under any circumstances).[[note]]While [[http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2010/fall/tips-for-law-enforcement this list]] is intended to aid law enforcement in spotting them, a lot of the items on it are just as applicable to gun store employees[[/note]] Sovereign citizens have also taken to cryptocurrencies such as the Bitcoin to make their transactions, due to them not being backed by any nation-state and due recently also to the painstaking efforts by companies as large and recognized as IBM to legitimize them, meaning that in principle, accepting them shouldn't hurt -- but as usual when doing business with guns, err on the side of caution, refuse them, and ask for US dollars. While the average sovereign citizen will never engage in violence and will mostly just be a colossal pain in the ass for law enforcement, the court system, government employees, and the odd landlord or property owner who is unlucky enough to have gotten into a squabble with one, there are enough high-profile cases of sovereign citizens engaging in violence that you should be on the lookout for them. Second to sovereign citizens are Neo-Nazis or various other white supremacist groups - [[http://www.adl.org/combating-hate/hate-on-display/summary-view.html?hate_symbol_category=neo-nazi-symbols this symbolism]] combined with a hatred of minorities (''especially'' Jews or African-Americans) is a major red flag there.

to:


! Trading With Guns
* Finally, if If you sell/trade/repair guns or are in a situation where someone asks to borrow a weapon (something you should not normally allow them to do), guns, ''you'' may be the last line of defense against a homicide or suicide. Take the time to [[http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/means-matter/gun-shop-project/ learn the signs of someone who is a danger to themselves or others as a result of a mental health or life crisis]], educate yourself in the [[http://psychopathyawareness.wordpress.com/2011/10/03/the-list-of-psychopathy-symptoms/ warning signs of a sociopath]], and ''take the time to talk.'' It also goes without saying that, as a shopkeeper or gun business owner, one of your duties is to prevent straw purchasing -- when someone purchases a gun on behalf of someone who is not legally allowed to own it -- because even though legally the purchaser is the one guilty for allowing someone who shouldn't possess guns to possess one (according to the American free enterprise principle, the shopkeeper was just running his business), it is possible for the shopkeeper to run into serious legal trouble if the police manages to trace back a fraudulent transaction to their store.[[note]]Straw purchasing has been credited by some reports [[https://everytownresearch.org/reports/inside-straw-purchasing-criminals-get-guns-illegally/#foot_note_69 like this one]] to be literally one of the main driving forces of many gun smuggling mafias, high school shootings including Columbine and even Mexico's entire cartel violence problem, and yet quite a few shop owners have been found to sell guns with very few questions asked and waiving any worries by reciting the mantra "money is money, business is business".[[/note]] While you probably aren't a mental health professional and aren't expected to be, educating yourself won't hurt anyone and may ''definitely'' save lives. Some ''highly specific'' red flags are as follows:
** * As noted in the links and above, if someone seems emotionally distraught (crying, rage), showing symptoms of a mental illness (the rapid, pressured, fast speech that is a hallmark symptom of bipolar mania, the anxiety and eye contact avoidance of a suicidal person, appearing to be hearing voices, acting in a paranoid manner), or obviously under the influence of alcohol or drugs (''especially'' stimulant drugs such as cocaine or methamphetamine), they ''do not'' need a gun.
** * Anyone who "just wants a gun, any gun" should be assumed to possibly be having bad intentions. Hunters, sport shooters/marksmanship/target shooters, gun fanboys, and even most people looking for self-defense weapons usually know ''exactly'' what type of weapon they need/want and have researched it in advance, whereas people who are suicidal or homicidal often don't care, because any gun can kill. Of course, a more savvy suicidal person or killer might use one of these as a glib excuse - in which case, be aware if the gun matches the alleged need. If it doesn't, that's even more of a red flag than "oh just give me anything." This is mostly limited to countries with unregulated gun trade like the USA, as in European jurisdictions any gun license released is specific to the category of weapon - as in rifles or shotguns for the hunter, handgun for self-defense, specific types of rifle or pistol for the target shooter and so on.
** * Related, someone who doesn't truthfully say what they are going to do with the gun upfront - or especially who doesn't even say so ''if actually asked.'' If the answer to "what do you need this for" is silence, subject change, BlatantLies, or a glib, quick excuse that doesn't seem to make sense, watch out.
** * If your customer seems to know next to nothing about guns, chances are they're a straw purchaser. If, in addition, they want one specific gun and nothing else, chances are they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's order.
** * Multiple guns in one purchase/trade is a warning sign, especially if they are very different kinds. It might be plausible that a hunter or sport/target shooter is buying, say, three slightly different long guns (in case of jams or breakage, to try something different, for different stages in the event), and similarly a new concealed-carry holder might buy two handguns, one for home and one for car/body carry. Someone seeking to acquire an AR-15 semiautomatic, two handguns, and a sniper rifle, on the other hand, should be taken with major suspicion -- there's a high chance they're either stocking up for a major crime, or that they're fulfilling a gun smuggler's purchase order.
** * NoKillLikeOverkill is also a very major warning sign. Usually this can be spotted with ammunition - know how much an average shooter needs, and start asking questions if someone is buying ''far'' more. This is a red flag for both paranoia and mass casualty shooters. This also ties into the gun itself - if someone is seeking, say, an AR-15 for "home defense," you can and should consider trying to steer them toward a handgun or a pump-action shotgun instead - and see their reaction when you try. If they acquiesce, they may have just been thinking unrealistically, but you should still monitor them closely. If they try to sidestep the issue, come up with an excuse, or suddenly grow defensive or even outright rude or hostile (e.g., if your attempts to gently redirect them are met with a reply of "I don't recall asking for your fucking opinion" or something along those lines), you have an absolutely massive red flag on your hands and should act accordingly.
** * Purchasing too little, however, is also a red flag -- it implies the purchaser is about to commit suicide. Why purchasing the whole suite of safe, holder, carrying case, maintenance kit, accessories and a fair supply of ammo when you're going to die without using them?
** * Mentioning major personal setbacks such as divorce, job loss, bankruptcy or academic failure might as well just be an up-front "I'm going to kill myself".
** * Unsolicited comments disparaging specific minority groups, that sound suspiciously like the rhetoric of [[ThoseWackyNazis known]] [[UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan extremist]] [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic groups]], or that have an aggressively militaristic anti-government bent should also serve as a warning sign. Given the [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment very heated nature of the gun control debate in the US]], anyone who works at a business that sells firearms will most certainly hear anti-government sentiment from customers on a fairly frequent basis. As such, you should instead listen to the tone of the sentiment. Are they lamenting a loss of freedom and expressing fears of a police state, or do they sound as if they're preparing for a war or have an overly bellicose demeanor? If it's the latter, definitely listen closer to their speech to see if what they're saying matches up with the rhetoric of extremist groups. For those in the US, sovereign citizens are probably the most commonly encountered extremist group; listen for things like explicit or thinly-concealed anti-Semitic and/or Masonic sentiment, anti-banking or Federal Reserve comments (something along the lines of "Wall Street is going to be the death of this country" is nothing to worry about; on the other hand, something like "fucking Jews are using our corporate shells as collateral" should make your spider-sense tingle), comments about the government being illegitimate or fraudulent (rather than just corrupt or power-drunk; sovereigns genuinely believe that the US government is a sham), and an overwhelmingly arrogant or contempt-filled attitude (as they believe that they are enlightened by their knowledge of a massive, labyrinthine conspiracy that most Americans are simply too stupid and gullible to understand or believe), and look for things like odd license plates (if their vehicles are visible), oddly-punctuated names, or strange addresses; lastly, if they try to pay with currency that you have never seen before and that does not match any known legal tender, that's almost assuredly a sign that you're dealing with them, ''especially'' if it has something like "Republic of Texas" or "Little Shell Pembina Band" emblazoned upon it (in case you're wondering, this currency is not recognized and should not be accepted under any circumstances).[[note]]While [[http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2010/fall/tips-for-law-enforcement this list]] is intended to aid law enforcement in spotting them, a lot of the items on it are just as applicable to gun store employees[[/note]] Sovereign citizens have also taken to cryptocurrencies such as the Bitcoin to make their transactions, due to them not being backed by any nation-state and due recently also to the painstaking efforts by companies as large and recognized as IBM to legitimize them, meaning that in principle, accepting them shouldn't hurt -- but as usual when doing business with guns, err on the side of caution, refuse them, and ask for US dollars. While the average sovereign citizen will never engage in violence and will mostly just be a colossal pain in the ass for law enforcement, the court system, government employees, and the odd landlord or property owner who is unlucky enough to have gotten into a squabble with one, there are enough high-profile cases of sovereign citizens engaging in violence that you should be on the lookout for them. Second to sovereign citizens are Neo-Nazis or various other white supremacist groups - [[http://www.adl.org/combating-hate/hate-on-display/summary-view.html?hate_symbol_category=neo-nazi-symbols this symbolism]] combined with a hatred of minorities (''especially'' Jews or African-Americans) is a major red flag there.
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