History UsefulNotes / FightingGame

17th Jan '18 9:15:15 AM Patrickthekid
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* Empty Jump - In some situations, it may be advantageous to jump towards an opponent, but not use an attack while in the air, expecting the opponent to react to an attack that never occurs. Doing so is usually referred to as an empty jump. In Smash games, it is called a 'Tomahawk' and often leads to a grab.

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* Empty Jump - In some situations, it may be advantageous to jump towards an opponent, but not use an attack while in the air, expecting the opponent to react to an attack that never occurs. Doing so is usually referred to as an empty jump. In Smash games, it doing an empty jump to grab an opponent is called a 'Tomahawk' and often leads to a grab.'Tomahawk'.
17th Jan '18 9:13:39 AM Patrickthekid
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* Empty Jump - In some situations, it may be advantageous to jump towards an opponent, but not use an attack while in the air, expecting the opponent to react to an attack that never occurs. Doing so is usually referred to as an empty jump.

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* Empty Jump - In some situations, it may be advantageous to jump towards an opponent, but not use an attack while in the air, expecting the opponent to react to an attack that never occurs. Doing so is usually referred to as an empty jump. In Smash games, it is called a 'Tomahawk' and often leads to a grab.
1st Jan '18 3:14:30 PM Bravetriforcer
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* Bread n' Butter (BnB) - a standard, simple combo that forms the core of your gameplay. The one that you use a lot (usually by practicing first) when you aren't thinking of doing longer combos.
* Buffer - inputting a move while your character is busy doing something else (doing another attack, or being downed, or dashing, or blocking, etc).

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* Bread n' Butter (BnB) - a A standard, simple combo that forms the core of your gameplay. character's gameplay or is otherwise very simple and effective. The one that combo you use a lot (usually by should be practicing first) when you aren't thinking of doing or building muscle memory for first, before looking at longer combos.
* Buffer - inputting Inputting a move while your character is busy doing something else (doing another attack, or being downed, or dashing, or blocking, etc). etc). Key to performing a Reversal.



* [[LagCancel Cancel]] - Cutting one action's animation short by inputting another action.
** Attack cancel - The most common type of cancel, and so is just referred to as a "cancelling." Typically, the hierarchy goes "normal moves > command normals (when available) > special moves > super moves". In games that allow cancelling normals into another, they also have their own hierarchy, typically from weaker ones to stronger ones. Some games (notably ''The King of Fighters'') have a special way to let the players cancel a special move into another, usually by spending meter or entering a special state.
** Guard cancel - Canceling a blocking animation into an attack or evasive maneuver. May be so useful in some games that a meter cost is attached to performing it. Often called an Alpha Counter after the term for it in VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha. Compare with Counterattack, below.
** Jump cancel - [[IThoughtItMeant Is not canceling a jump into something else,]] but canceling an attack with a jump, allowing one to transition from comboing an opponent with ground attacks to air attacks. Usually done after a LauncherMove.
** Dash cancel - Again, [[IThoughtItMeant is not canceling a dash into something else,]] but canceling an attack with a dash, allowing one to close in to opponents for easier followups (or, sometimes, to dash backwards and retreat to a safer position).
** Tag cancel - In certain team-based fighting games, another character can tag in while the point character on their team is performing their own move. Usually carries a strict limit on what moves can be canceled into or out of (such as allowing super moves only). Various games have different official terminologies for this, such as [[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Tag Assault]], [[VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken Cross Cancel]], [[VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2 Delayed Hyper]] [[VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3 Combo/DHC]], etc.

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* [[LagCancel Cancel]] - Cutting one action's an animation short by inputting another action.
** Attack cancel Cancel - The most common type of cancel, and so is just referred to as a "cancelling." Typically, the hierarchy goes "normal moves > command normals (when available) > special moves > super moves". In games that allow cancelling normals into another, they also have their own hierarchy, typically from weaker ones to stronger ones. Some games (notably ''The King of Fighters'') have a special way to let the players cancel a special move into another, usually by spending meter or entering a special state.
** Guard cancel Cancel - Canceling a blocking animation into an attack or evasive maneuver. May be so useful in some games that a meter cost is attached to performing it. Often called an Alpha Counter after the term for it in VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha. Compare with Counterattack, below.
** Jump cancel Cancel - [[IThoughtItMeant Is not canceling a jump into something else,]] but canceling an attack with a jump, allowing one to transition from comboing an opponent with ground attacks to air attacks. Usually done after a LauncherMove.
** Dash cancel Cancel - Again, [[IThoughtItMeant is not canceling a dash into something else,]] but canceling an attack with a dash, allowing one to close in to opponents for easier followups (or, sometimes, to dash backwards and retreat to a safer position).
** Tag cancel Cancel - In certain team-based fighting games, another character can tag in while the point character on their team is performing their own move. Usually carries a strict limit on what moves can be canceled into or out of (such as allowing super moves only). Various games have different official terminologies for this, such as [[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Tag Assault]], [[VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken Cross Cancel]], [[VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2 Delayed Hyper]] [[VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3 Combo/DHC]], etc.



** Whiff cancel - Most attack cancels require that the first attack hit the opponent in some way before the cancel is allowed to occur. However, some games allow moves to cancel into others even if they whiff. This type of cancel may be restricted to specific moves, specific timings, or move types depending on the game. Also called "kara cancel" ("kara" means "empty" in Japan).
* ComboBreaker - a mechanic that stops combos. Usually limited with a cost, or coming with high cooldown. The Burst above is one kind of Combo Breaker; there are multiple ways a combo can be broken (actively).

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** Whiff cancel Cancel - Most attack cancels require that the first attack hit the opponent in some way before the cancel is allowed to occur. However, some games allow moves to cancel into others even if they whiff. This type of cancel may be restricted to specific moves, specific timings, or move types depending on the game. Also called "kara cancel" ("kara" means "empty" in Japan).
* ComboBreaker - a A mechanic that stops combos. Usually limited with by a cost, cost or coming with a very high cooldown. The Burst above is one kind of Combo Breaker; there are multiple ways a combo can actively be broken (actively). by the victim. The name is most prominently associating with the KillerInstinct franchise, which made its name with its streamlined Combo system and the announcer calling out [[MemeticMutation C-c-c-c-combo Breaker]] when someone breaks a combo.
30th Dec '17 1:03:28 AM Bravetriforcer
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* AA - AntiAir; techniques that are used to intercept the airborne enemy when you're standing on the ground.
* Air Dash - a dash move that's performed in the air. Depending on the game, all characters (with some exceptions) may be able to do this, or only select characters can. Usually limited to either air dash forward and backward, some characters may also have air dash to 8 directions.
* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne. Certain games may allow a second, more advanced kind of blocking that's usually better (usually negating chip damage) but either harder to perform or coming with a cost, such as the Just Defend below, ''Videogame/StreetFighter's'' Parry or ''Videogame/GuiltyGear's'' Faultless Defense.
** Blockstun - When attacked, you are stuck blocking for a period of time.
** Blockstring - A "combo" where the blockstun of the previous move lasts long enough for the next move to connect, preventing the opponent from responding. Pseudo-blockstrings look like true blockstrings, but can be escaped by attacking during the correct time, usually using a [[{{Shoryuken}} DP]] to take advantage of the invincible start up.
** Guard Crush - where a character's blocking is "crushed", making the character open to another attack. Usually only occurs when one blocks too many attacks at a time, or when a character use a certain specialized attack, but not all games have this mechanic. Differs from unblockable attacks, which straight up ignore the blocking and deal direct damage and hitstun to the defending character.
* [[ScratchDamage Chip Damage]] - The largely reduced damage that a character takes from attacks while blocking. In some games, normal attacks do not cause chip damage. Some games also prevent chip damage from defeating an opponent in most or all cases.
* [[{{Combos}} Combo]] - Short for "Combination Attack" (not to be confused with actual CombinationAttack, which some fighting games have), this is a series of normal attacks performed back-to-back, usually capped off with a special move and/or super attack. The defining feature of a combo is that the the player being attacked is prevented from returning to a neutral state during its performance until it ends.

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* AA - AntiAir; techniques that are used to intercept the an airborne enemy when you're standing on the ground.
* Air Dash - a A dash move that's performed in the air. Depending on the game, all characters (with some exceptions) may be able to do this, or only select characters can. Usually limited to either air dash forward and backward, some characters may also have be able to air dash to 8 in eight directions.
* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each "low." Each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne. Certain games may allow a second, more advanced kind of blocking that's usually better (usually (such as by negating chip damage) but either harder to perform or coming with a cost, such as cost. Examples include the Just Defend below, (seen below), ''Videogame/StreetFighter's'' Parry or ''Videogame/GuiltyGear's'' Faultless Defense.
** Blockstun - When attacked, you block an attack you are stuck blocking for a period of time.
time, unable to use any other attacks or techniques.
** Blockstring - A "combo" where the blockstun of the previous move lasts long enough for the next move to connect, preventing the opponent from responding. Pseudo-blockstrings look like true blockstrings, but can be escaped by attacking during the correct time, usually using a [[{{Shoryuken}} DP]] to take by taking advantage of the invincible start up.
start-up of [[{{Shoryuken}} DP (Dragon Punch)]] attacks.
** Guard Crush - where Where a character's blocking is "crushed", making the character open to another attack. Usually only occurs when one blocks too many attacks at a time, or when a character use uses a certain specialized attack, but not all games have this mechanic.attack. Differs from unblockable attacks, which straight up ignore the blocking and deal direct damage and hitstun to the defending character.
* [[ScratchDamage Chip Damage]] - The largely reduced heavily-reduced damage that a character takes from attacks while blocking. In some games, normal attacks do not cause chip damage. Some games also prevent chip damage from defeating an opponent being fatal in most or all cases.
* [[{{Combos}} Combo]] - Short for "Combination Attack" (not to be confused with actual CombinationAttack, [[CombinationAttack Combination Attacks]], which some fighting games have), this also have). This is a series of normal attacks performed back-to-back, usually capped off with a special move and/or super attack. Super Attack. The defining feature of a combo is that the the player being attacked is prevented from returning largely unable to a neutral state during its performance until it ends.do anything while being comboed. Bursts or other combo-breaker mechanics notwithstanding.



** [[LagCancel Chain combo]] - A combo where a move's animation may be interrupted with another move. Usually the attack must connect first (whether cleanly or blocked) in order for the interruption to be possible; some games however may allow cancelling out of missed attacks, depending on the attack used.
* Command Dash - a special move that is basically a dash, specific to a particular character. Usually differs from standard dash move everyone has, having extra properties such as being able to be canceled from other specials or being able to pass through opponents and their attacks.
* Dizzy - a state where the character is dazed, unable to do anything until either it goes off by itself or until the opponent hits them. Usually happens after enough number of hits without hitting back; some other games may have the dizzy state occur by other means, if there's a dizzy state at all.

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** [[LagCancel Chain combo]] - A combo where a move's animation may be interrupted with another move. Usually the attack must connect first (whether cleanly or blocked) in order for the interruption to be possible; some games however may allow cancelling out of missed attacks, attacks as well, depending on the attack used.used.
* Command Dash - A special move that is basically a dash, specific to a particular character. Tends to have special properties separate from the universal dash, such as being able to be canceled from other special attacks or being able to pass through opponents and their attacks.

* Command Dash - a special move that is basically a dash, specific to a particular character. Usually differs from standard dash move everyone has, having extra properties such as being able to be canceled from other specials or being able to pass through opponents and their attacks.
* Dizzy - a A state where the character is dazed, unable to do anything until either it goes wears off by itself or until (Much more likely) the opponent hits them. Usually happens after enough number of hits without hitting back; some Being attacked too many times in a short timespan is the most common way to become dizzy; other games may have the dizzy state occur by other means, if there's more specific requirements, or even not have a dizzy state mechanic at all.all. The game may also allow for the dazed player to reduce their timer by ButtonMashing.



* Hitbox - invisible boxes (or sometimes circles) that serves as the the character's "body" for gameplay purposes. For fighting games in particular, "hitbox" specifically refers to the boxes that will do a hit if it collides with the enemy's body (which typically only appears in the move's "active frames"; see Frame, below), while the boxes of the body itself is called a "hurtbox". Usually, hitboxes and hurtboxes overlap (when the attack is not a projectile), in that attacking an enemy with their hitbox active will make them (and, depending on the case, you as well) take a "hit". See Stuff and Trade for details, below.
* Hitstun - When an opponent is hit, they are "stunned" for a while, allowing for combos. Certain moves apply special kinds of hitstun, making it easier to continue combos.

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* Hitbox - invisible Invisible boxes (or sometimes circles) that serves serve as the the character's "body" for gameplay purposes. For fighting games in particular, "hitbox" specifically refers to the boxes that will do a hit if it collides with the enemy's body (which typically only appears in the move's "active frames"; see Frame, below), while the boxes of for the body itself is are called a the "hurtbox". Usually, hitboxes and hurtboxes overlap (when the attack is not a projectile), in that attacking an enemy with their hitbox active will make them (and, depending on the case, you as well) take a "hit". See Stuff and Trade below for details, below.
details.
* Hitstun - When an opponent is hit, they are "stunned" for a while, allowing for combos. Amount of hitstun varies, with "heavier" attacks tending toward more hitstun than "lighter" attacks. Certain moves apply special kinds of hitstun, making it easier to continue combos.



* Meter - commonly refers to the ManaMeter the game uses. May come in stocks and/or multiple levels.
** Meter gain - refers to how much the meter gets filled when something happens, usually by attacking, defending against attacks, or getting hit. Different attacks (i.e a normal move vs a special move) may have different meter gain, and an attack being hit or blocked may also affect the meter gain amount.
* MirrorMatch - refers to matches where both sides use the same character.

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* Meter - commonly refers A universal term referring to the ManaMeter the that almost every fighting game uses. May come in has. Can be presented either as segemented stocks and/or multiple levels.
on a single bar, or a bar that increases in level with a number keeping track of how much meter you have.
** Meter gain - refers to how much the meter gets filled when something happens, usually by such as attacking, defending against attacks, or getting hit. Different attacks (i.e a normal move vs a special move) may have different amounts of meter gain, and an attack being hit or blocked may also affect the meter gain amount.
amounts.
* MirrorMatch - refers Refers to matches where both sides use the same character.character(s).



** Command Normal - AKA a Unique Move or in Japanese, ''Tokushu Waza'' (特殊技, lit. Unique Art) An attack performed by pressing an attack button in conjunction with a particular direction. Depending on the game, they might have properties that basic normal attacks don't have, such as being able to be comboed into from normal attacks or acting as overheads.
* Poke - usually from a neutral situation, where one attacks the opponent with relatively safe moves at relatively safe range. Used either to open combos, or hit-confirm certain attacks (see below), or start blockstrings, or engage in footsies (see below). Related to the "raw X" term (also below); typically, performing unsafe moves raw for poking isn't recommended.
* Projectile - a long range attack where the character shoots out a projectile of some kind. As popularized by Videogame/StreetFighter's Ryu and Ken, it might sometimes be called a "fireball" (refers to their Hadouken). Might be reflectable in some games, and might be able to be thrown up at different angles or different speeds.
** Beam - a slightly different attack from a projectile, where the attack reaches the other side of the screen almost instantly. Unlike projectiles, beams typically aren't reflectable.

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** Command Normal - AKA a Unique Move or or, in Japanese, ''Tokushu Waza'' (特殊技, lit. Unique Art) Art). An attack performed by pressing an attack button in conjunction with a particular direction.direction. Distinct from Special Attacks because you only need to hold a direction to make the attack happen, rather than a complete motion such as a quartercircle. Depending on the game, they might have properties that basic normal attacks don't have, such as being able to be comboed into from normal attacks or acting as overheads.
* Poke - usually from a neutral situation, where one attacks Normals that can be, assuming you are at the opponent with relatively safe moves at relatively safe range. correct range, be tossed out without much worry of retaliation. Used either to open combos, or hit-confirm certain attacks (see below), or start blockstrings, or engage in footsies (see below). Related to the "raw X" term (also below); typically, performing below). Performing unsafe moves (IE poor frame data or being unsafe on block) raw for poking as pokes isn't recommended.
* Projectile - a long range An attack where the character shoots out fires [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTine a projectile projectile]] of some kind. As popularized by Videogame/StreetFighter's Ryu and Ken, it might sometimes be called a "fireball" (refers to their Hadouken).( Hadouken) is also a common generic term for projectiles. Might be reflectable in some games, and might be able to be thrown up at different angles or different speeds.
** Beam - a slightly different attack from Related to a projectile, but where the attack reaches the other side of the screen almost instantly. Unlike projectiles, beams typically aren't reflectable.



** Safe on Block - A move which recovers faster than the opponent recovers from its blockstun.

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** Safe on Block - A move which recovers faster than the opponent recovers from its blockstun.



* [[SwitchOutMove Snapback]] - In tag fighters, a move that forces the opponent to tag their current character out. Useful when an opponent tries to "save" a severely-injured character by tagging out, but always costs meter.
* Spam - to [[SpamAttack repeat a move over and over again]], whether it hits or not. Tends to be a bad form.

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* [[SwitchOutMove Snapback]] - In tag tag-team fighters, a move that forces the opponent to tag their current character out. Useful when an opponent tries to "save" a severely-injured character by tagging out, but this attack always costs meter.
* Spam - to [[SpamAttack Spam]] - To repeat a move over and over again]], again, whether it hits or not. Tends to be a bad form. form, but when performed with more forethought than "I will shoot another projectile after I fire this one" it is a valid tactic.



** Charge Move - A special move whose command input involves holding ("charging") either a direction on the joystick or button(s) for a brief period of time. This kind of move is most popular in 2D fighters, although it is occasionally seen in 3D fighters (where it more commonly appears as a button press and release, rather than a joystick charge).
** EX Special Move - Certain games have moves that are more powerful than regular special moves in some way (usually by doing more damage than the normal variety of the move or having the best properties of the various versions of the move combined), but less powerful than a Super. This can take the form of upgraded or exclusive special moves depending on the game. Typically requires meter, though normally less than required to perform a super.

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** Charge Move - A special move whose command input involves holding ("charging") either a direction on the joystick or button(s) for a brief period of time. This kind of move is most popular common in 2D fighters, although it is occasionally seen in 3D fighters (where it more commonly appears as a button press and release, rather than a joystick charge).
** EX Special Move - Certain games have moves that are more powerful than regular special moves in some way (usually way. Usually by doing more damage than the normal variety of the move or having the best properties of the various versions of the move combined), combined, but still less powerful than a Super. Super Move. This can take the form of upgraded or exclusive special moves depending on the game.game and character. Typically requires meter, though normally less than required to perform a super.



** Level ''x'' Super Move - In games with segmented {{Mana Meter}}s, some super moves may require more than one segment in order to be used. X refers to how many segments are required in order to use the super.
** EX Super Move - Similar to EX specials, some games allow the use of enhanced super moves in exchange for using more meter or satisfying another requirement (such as having the usual amount of meter and [[DesperationAttack a low amount of life left]] at the same time). These EX supers usually have similar benefits to EX specials, such as combining the best traits of other versions of the super or simply being the most powerful version available. This differs from the Level ''x'' Super in that (depending on the game) one doesn't need to spend more meter than usual or satisfy the EX-specific requirements in order to use the super, though they will not gain any potential benefits they would have by doing so.
* Sweep - a low attack that knocks the enemy off their feet. Usually goes by crouching HK (heavy kick/roundhouse) for its command.

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** Level ''x'' Super Move - In games with segmented {{Mana Meter}}s, some super moves may require more than one segment in order to be used. X refers to how many segments are required in order to use the super.
Super.
** EX Super Move - Similar to EX specials, Specials, some games allow the use of enhanced super moves in exchange for using more meter or satisfying another requirement (such as having the usual amount of meter and [[DesperationAttack a low amount of life left]] at the same time). These EX supers Supers usually have similar benefits to EX specials, such as combining the best traits of other versions of the super or simply being the most powerful version available. This differs from the Level ''x'' Super in that (depending on the game) one doesn't need to spend more meter than usual or satisfy the EX-specific requirements in order to use the super, though they will not gain any potential benefits they would have by doing so.
* Sweep - a A low attack that knocks the enemy off their feet. Usually goes by uses crouching HK (heavy kick/roundhouse) for its command.



* Taunt - a move where the character taunts the opponent, often with a dedicated TauntButton. Usually does nothing, sometimes [[PracticalTaunt serves practical use]] such as filling your meter or being a weak attack in itself, depending on the game (or the character).
* [[GrappleMove Throw]] - An attack dealt by first grabbing the opponent rather than simply striking them, ignoring their block. Depending on the game, there may be a dedicated throw button, or throws may be performed by pressing two particular attack buttons in conjunction. May be escapable, see Throw Tech below.

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* Taunt - a A move where the character taunts the opponent, often with a dedicated TauntButton. Usually does nothing, sometimes [[PracticalTaunt serves practical use]] such as filling your meter or being a weak attack in itself, depending on the game (or the character).
* [[GrappleMove Throw]] - An attack dealt by first grabbing the opponent rather than simply striking them, ignoring their block. Depending on the game, there may be a dedicated throw button, or throws may be performed by pressing two particular attack buttons in conjunction. May be escapable, see Throw Tech below.



** Grappler - a character with a significant amount of command throws in their movelist. Tend to be a MightyGlacier.

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** Grappler - a A character with a significant amount of command throws in their movelist. Tend to be a MightyGlacier.



* Whiff - Completely missing the opponent during an attack. Depending on the attack used, it may result in a player being vulnerable to other attacks.

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* Whiff - Completely missing the opponent during with an attack. Depending on the attack used, it may result in a player being vulnerable to other attacks.
26th Dec '17 7:46:19 AM FRizer
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* Just Frame - A pre-set follow-up special move or string that can only be executed by inputting the next command with strict timing. Alternatively, moves that always work, but have special animations or properties if the follow-ups are executed within certain frames of animation or if the command for the initial attack is input in a very specific way, usually extremely quickly.

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* Just Frame - A pre-set follow-up special move or string that can only be executed by inputting the next command with strict timing. Alternatively, moves that always work, but have special animations or properties if the follow-ups are executed within certain frames of animation or if the command for the initial attack is input in a very specific way, usually extremely quickly. [[JustFrameBonus Tends to give bonuses]] than if you don't perform it precisely.
20th Dec '17 12:05:21 AM FRizer
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* Maining / Subbing - "Maining a character" means you focus on a certain character in the game to master the character and bring the best out of him/her. "Subbing a character" means you give a secondary focus on another character, usually just for fun but sometimes in case picking your "main" isn't a good option.



* Mexican Uppercut - The crouching heavy punch as usable by some [[{{Shotoclone}} Shotoclones]] as a makeshift substitute for a proper Shoryuken if the player's execution isn't at the level needed to perform them reliably. Originated in Southern California.

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* Mexican Uppercut - The crouching heavy punch as usable by some [[{{Shotoclone}} Shotoclones]] {{Shotoclone}}s as a makeshift substitute for a proper Shoryuken if the player's execution isn't at the level needed to perform them reliably. Originated in Southern California.
8th Dec '17 12:54:25 AM Vulcan422
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* Motohiro Okubo - Bandai Namco staff who worked under Harada in developing ''Tekken 7'' and director of ''Soulcalibur VI''.
20th Nov '17 7:48:56 AM FRizer
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* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne. Certain games may allow a second kind of blocking that's usually better (usually negating chip damage) but with a cost.

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* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne. Certain games may allow a second second, more advanced kind of blocking that's usually better (usually negating chip damage) but either harder to perform or coming with a cost.cost, such as the Just Defend below, ''Videogame/StreetFighter's'' Parry or ''Videogame/GuiltyGear's'' Faultless Defense.



** Guard Crush - where a character's blocking is "crushed", making the character open to another attack. Usually only occurs when one blocks too many attacks at a time, or when a character use a certain specialized attack, but not all games have this mechanic. Differs from unblockable attacks, which straight up ignore the blocking and deal direct damage and hitstun to the defending character.



* Meter - commonly refers to the ManaMeter the game uses.

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* Meter - commonly refers to the ManaMeter the game uses. May come in stocks and/or multiple levels.
** Meter gain - refers to how much the meter gets filled when something happens, usually by attacking, defending against attacks, or getting hit. Different attacks (i.e a normal move vs a special move) may have different meter gain, and an attack being hit or blocked may also affect the meter gain amount.
* MirrorMatch - refers to matches where both sides use the same character.



* Poke - usually from a neutral situation, where one attacks the opponent with relatively safe moves at relatively safe range. Used either to open combos, or hit-confirm certain attacks (see below), or start blockstrings, or footsies (see below).

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* Poke - usually from a neutral situation, where one attacks the opponent with relatively safe moves at relatively safe range. Used either to open combos, or hit-confirm certain attacks (see below), or start blockstrings, or engage in footsies (see below).below). Related to the "raw X" term (also below); typically, performing unsafe moves raw for poking isn't recommended.



** EX Super Move - Similar to EX specials, some games allow the use of enhanced super moves in exchange for using more meter or satisfying another requirement (such as having the usual amount of meter and a low amount of life left at the same time). These EX supers usually have similar benefits to EX specials, such as combining the best traits of other versions of the super or simply being the most powerful version available. This differs from the Level ''x'' Super in that (depending on the game) one doesn't need to spend more meter than usual or satisfy the EX-specific requirements in order to use the super, though they will not gain any potential benefits they would have by doing so.

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** EX Super Move - Similar to EX specials, some games allow the use of enhanced super moves in exchange for using more meter or satisfying another requirement (such as having the usual amount of meter and [[DesperationAttack a low amount of life left left]] at the same time). These EX supers usually have similar benefits to EX specials, such as combining the best traits of other versions of the super or simply being the most powerful version available. This differs from the Level ''x'' Super in that (depending on the game) one doesn't need to spend more meter than usual or satisfy the EX-specific requirements in order to use the super, though they will not gain any potential benefits they would have by doing so.



* Tag - In team-based fighters, tagging means switching the character you're playing with another on your team mid-fight. Usually requires you to be at a "neutral" situation, but some games are more lenient about it.
* Taunt - a move where the character taunts the opponent, often with a dedicated TauntButton. Usually does nothing, sometimes [[PracticalTaunt serves practical use]] such as filling your meter or being a weak attack in itself, depending on the game (or the character).



* Abare - In the West, this means playing aggressively, trying to land pokes/attacks at the smallest opportunity such as in between blockstrings. In Japan, this means desperately performing attacks (tends to involve ButtonMashing) to cover oneself as self-defense. The word itself means means "rampaging" in Japan.



** Attack cancel - The most common type of cancel, and so is just referred to as a "cancelling." Typically, the hierarchy goes "normal moves > command normals (when available) > special moves > super moves". In games that allow cancelling normals into another, they also have their own hierarchy, typically from weaker ones to stronger ones.

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** Attack cancel - The most common type of cancel, and so is just referred to as a "cancelling." Typically, the hierarchy goes "normal moves > command normals (when available) > special moves > super moves". In games that allow cancelling normals into another, they also have their own hierarchy, typically from weaker ones to stronger ones. Some games (notably ''The King of Fighters'') have a special way to let the players cancel a special move into another, usually by spending meter or entering a special state.



** Whiff cancel - Most attack cancels require that the first attack hit the opponent in some way before the cancel is allowed to occur. However, some games allow moves to cancel into others even if they whiff. This type of cancel may be restricted to specific moves or move types depending on the game. Also called "kara cancel" ("kara" means "empty" in Japan).

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** Whiff cancel - Most attack cancels require that the first attack hit the opponent in some way before the cancel is allowed to occur. However, some games allow moves to cancel into others even if they whiff. This type of cancel may be restricted to specific moves moves, specific timings, or move types depending on the game. Also called "kara cancel" ("kara" means "empty" in Japan).
* ComboBreaker - a mechanic that stops combos. Usually limited with a cost, or coming with high cooldown. The Burst above is one kind of Combo Breaker; there are multiple ways a combo can be broken (actively).



* Damage Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base damage. Some games count a single multi-hit attack as one move for the purpose of scaling. Also called Proration.

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* Damage Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base damage. Some games count a single multi-hit attack as one move for the purpose of scaling. Sometimes, some other factors may scale the damage, such as repeating a certain move over and over, or hitting the opponent with a certain move. Also called Proration.



* Hit Confirm - Using a normal or special to ''confirm'' that an unsafe special or super move can ''hit'' the opponent before committing any meter to using one and/or risking yourself to be hit afterwards if the move misses or is blocked. If the opening attack connects, then you can safely cancel into the special move or super. Related to the concept of cancels, above.

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* Hit Confirm - Using a normal or special to ''confirm'' that an unsafe special or super move can ''hit'' the opponent before committing any meter to using one and/or risking yourself to be hit afterwards if the move misses or is blocked. If the opening attack connects, then you can safely cancel into the special move or super. Related to the concept of poking and cancels, above.



* Hop - in certain games, a jump at lower elevation than normal. Usually done by inputting the upward motion in as little frames as possible.

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* Hop - in certain games, a jump at lower elevation than normal. Usually done by inputting the upward motion in as little frames as possible. Useful for quicker upward evasion, quicker aerial/overhead attacks, etc.



* Meaty - A preemptive strike against an opponent who is still getting up off the floor. The idea is to have the opponent's hitbox overlap with that of your attack the moment they regain control. Your opponent's only options become to either block or use a reversal. May also be used to describe hitting an opponent late in the active portion of a move in order to increase the number of frames between the time when you have recovered from your attack and the the time when your opponent recovers from the hit.

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* Meaty - A preemptive strike against an opponent who is still getting up off the floor. The idea is to have the opponent's hitbox overlap with that of your attack the moment they regain control. Your opponent's only options become to either block or use a reversal. May also be used to describe hitting an opponent late in the active portion of a move in order to increase the number of frames between the time when you have recovered from your attack and the the time when your opponent recovers from the hit. Sometimes, when an attack is described as "meaty", it means that it has a lot of active frames, which helps in performing meaty.
* Mind games - refers to the psychology involved for winning battles; a large part of {{Metagame}} comprises of this. This term covers baiting, conditioning, footsies, mix ups, outright changing your attack patterns, and many more.



** 50/50 mix up - situations where the offending character looks like they will either do an overhead or a low without being easily read; the chance of each happening is 50/50 in this case. Tends to refer to attack that looks like it'll hit low instead hitting overhead, or vice versa.



* OTG - An acronym that stands for either "Off the Ground" or "On the Ground", depending on the game and use. In either case, it refers to an attack that can hit an opponent even while they're knocked down. This kind of move is more common in 3D fighting games. (In 2D fighting games a knockdown usually gives a character MercyInvincibility until they get up.) The distinction between "Off the Ground" is that it typically bounces the opponent back into the air for an extended combo while "On the Ground" requires the opponent to remain down.
* Overhead - An attack that can curve or drop over a crouching opponent's head, going around their guard. As such, they need to be blocked from a standing position. In most games, all jumping attacks function as overheads, though proper positioning may be required. In 2D fighting games it's referred to as an Overhead or High attack. In 3D fighting games it's more likely to be referred to as a Mid attack.

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* OTG - An acronym that stands for either "Off the Ground" or "On the Ground", depending on the game and use. In either case, it refers to an attack that can hit an opponent even while they're knocked down. This kind of move is more common in 3D fighting games. (In 2D fighting games a knockdown usually gives a character MercyInvincibility until they get up.) The distinction between "Off the Ground" is that it typically bounces the opponent back into the air for an extended combo while "On the Ground" (aka "Pursuit", taken from ''Videogame/{{Darkstalkers}}'') requires the opponent to remain down.
* Overhead - An attack that can curve or drop over a crouching opponent's head, going around their guard. As such, they need to be blocked from a standing position. In most games, all jumping attacks function as overheads, though proper positioning may be required. In 2D fighting games it's referred to as an Overhead or High attack. In 3D fighting games it's more likely to be referred to as a Mid attack. Contrast a "low" attack that must be blocked by crouching.



* Priority - determines which attack will hit out of 2 characters who are attacking simultaneously with their certain moves. This is a combination of multiple factors, such as the amount of active frames (i.e the attack's speed), the attack's range, whether or not it's invincible, etc.

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* Priority - determines which attack will hit out of 2 characters who are attacking simultaneously with their certain moves. This is a combination of multiple factors, such as the amount of active frames (i.e the attack's duration), the amount of startup frames (the attack's speed), the attack's range, whether or not it's invincible, invincible (for how many frames), etc.



* Rage gauge - A special gauge that fills by getting hit. When it's filled to full (or sometimes a certain percentage), a character may be able to either [[CriticalStatusBuff enter a powerful state]], or [[DesperationAttack perform an unique attack that consumes the gauge]], or both. May exist by different names in different games.



** Trade - when your attack and the opponent's attack clash. This can either result in both characters getting hit and damaged, or (in certain games) a special kind of "blocking" occurs, i.e the attacks are thought to be hitting a blocking opponent in this case. They may or may not be able to immediately cancel the traded attack into another move after that. Some certain games will also do something special whenever a "trade" occurs.

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** Trade - when your attack and the opponent's attack clash.clash, i.e "trading attacks between 2 people". This can either result in both characters getting hit and damaged, or (in certain games) a special kind of "blocking" occurs, i.e the attacks are thought to be hitting a blocking opponent in this case. They may or may not be able to immediately cancel the traded attack into another move after that. Some certain games will also do something special whenever a "trade" occurs.



* Unblockable - When an opponent is forced to block both high and low or left and right at the same time (which cannot be done), they are in an ''unblockable'' situation, guaranteeing you a hit (and usually a combo). Common in games with assists, as one character can hit high, while the other hits low. Certain games prevent this, requiring you to only block one.

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* Unblockable - When an opponent is forced to block both high and low or left and right at the same time (which cannot be done), they are in an ''unblockable'' situation, guaranteeing you a hit (and usually a combo). Common in games with assists, as one character can hit high, while the other hits low.low - or, sometimes, the assist hits from the front while you hit from behind, confusing the opponent's blocking attempt. Certain games prevent this, requiring you to only block one. Often called "unblockable setup".



* Four button fighters - fighting games with 4 attack button set ups. Used by ''Videogame/TheKingOfFighters'', ''Videogame/GuiltyGear'', etc.



* Install - a [[SuperMode powered-up state]] that the player character can access, which may increase their damage output, speed, etc. Popularized by [[Videogame/GuiltyGear Sol Badguy's Dragon Install]].

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* Install - a [[SuperMode powered-up state]] that the player character can access, which may increase their damage output, speed, etc. Popularized by [[Videogame/GuiltyGear Sol Badguy's Dragon Install]].Install]], although this type of move has been around for longer.


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* PuppetFighter - a character who controls another entity to fight alongside them. The other entity isn't the real fighter - the opponent may be able to hit them to take them out (if taking them out is possible), but a puppet fighter only loses if they themselves got KO'd. Tend to be DifficultButAwesome.


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* Six button fighters - fighting games with 6 attack buttons. Popularized with ''Street Fighter''.
* SNKBoss (Syndrome) - boss characters that are "unfair" in certain ways, such as having high speed, high endurance, high priority on their moves, being able to read the player's controller inputs, or when the game's system are giving them more advantage (such as infinite meter).
20th Nov '17 3:26:20 AM FRizer
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* [[GrappleMove Throw]] - An attack dealt by first grabbing the opponent rather than simply striking them, ignoring their block. Depending on the game, there may be a dedicated throw button, or throws may be performed by pressing two particular attack buttons in conjunction.
** Throw Tech - The defense against throws, typically by inputting the same input as the throw quickly after the opponent's throw connects.

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* [[GrappleMove Throw]] - An attack dealt by first grabbing the opponent rather than simply striking them, ignoring their block. Depending on the game, there may be a dedicated throw button, or throws may be performed by pressing two particular attack buttons in conjunction.
**
conjunction. May be escapable, see Throw Tech - The defense against throws, typically by inputting the same input as the throw quickly after the opponent's throw connects.below.



* Delay - mostly comes up in combo parlance, delay means, well, giving a delay between the previous attack and the next attack in a combo. This is usually done to ensure that the next attack hits.



* Ukemi/Tech - In many fighting games, if you are knocked down, you can avoid being rendered prone by hitting a button at the moment of impact. The character will catch themselves, roll immediately to their feet, or otherwise avoid falling down. The term "ukemi" (受身, literally "receiving body" or "passive falling") comes from juudou. Some attacks have as a special quality that they force the knockdown on you; in other words, they disable ukemi. (See "Hard Knockdown"; knockdowns that can be rolled/teched out of is called a "soft knockdown".)

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* Ukemi/Tech [[KnockbackEvasion Ukemi/Tech]] - In many fighting games, if you are knocked down, you can avoid being rendered prone by hitting a button at the moment of impact. The character will catch themselves, roll immediately to their feet, or otherwise avoid falling down. The term "ukemi" (受身, literally "receiving body" or "passive falling") comes from juudou. Some attacks have as a special quality that they force the knockdown on you; in other words, they disable ukemi. (See "Hard Knockdown"; knockdowns that can be rolled/teched out of is called a "soft knockdown".))
** Air Tech - Some fighting games allow an aerial version of teching, to escape juggles. This, again, depends on whether the attack that hits you can be teched out or not. Some games may also have automatic air tech, either when they're hit by certain (usually weak) attacks or when their hitstun has decayed enough.



* {{Scrub}} - Someone who easily sees certain things in the game as "cheap/broken", especially if the person has low skill in playing the game. Mostly thrown as an insult, sometimes without using it right.



* Unga - a fighter who's characterized as having high raw damage and (usually) ease of use; also called "Ungaboys". The name is derived from how playing the character is like playing a caveman (who says "unga" and similar things).
* Yomi - The ability to know what your opponent is going to do, either [[BatmanGambit by conditioning your opponent to think the way you want them to]] or by learning how they already think.

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* Unga - a fighter who's characterized as having high raw damage damage, (usually) powerful mixup tools and (usually) ease of use; use, which helps them overwhelm opponents; also called "Ungaboys". The name is derived from how playing the character is like playing a caveman or gorilla (who says "unga" and similar things).
things). "Unga" is also used as an adjective for things relating to them.
* Yomi - The ability to know what your opponent is going to do, either [[BatmanGambit by conditioning your opponent to think the way you want them to]] or by learning how they already think. See also Read, above.
19th Nov '17 8:40:09 AM FRizer
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* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne.

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* Block - AKA Guard. A defensive state that reduces the damage taken from incoming attacks, [[DefendCommand assumed either by holding a directional input away from the opponent or via a dedicated block button]], depending on the game. Blocks usually come in more than one variety, such as "high" and "low," each of which protects against and is vulnerable to different moves, and some games even allow blocking while airborne. Certain games may allow a second kind of blocking that's usually better (usually negating chip damage) but with a cost.



* Poke - usually from a neutral situation, where one attacks the opponent with relatively safe moves at relatively safe range. Used either to open combos, or hit-confirm certain attacks (see below), or start blockstrings, or footsies (see below).



* Sweep - a low attack that knocks the enemy off their feet. Usually goes by crouching HK (heavy kick/roundhouse) for its command.



** Grappler - a character with a significant amount of command throws in their movelist. Tend to be a MightyGlacier.



* Damage Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base damage. Some games count a single multi-hit attack as one move for the purpose of scaling.

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* Damage Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base damage. Some games count a single multi-hit attack as one move for the purpose of scaling. Also called Proration.



* Hard Knockdown - A knockdown that can't be Teched/Ukemi'ed (see below). This is advantageous to the attacker for several reasons, such as knowing the exact moment that the opponent will get up from a fall so that they can time their followups. In some games, opponents can also be attacked while on the ground (see "OTG") for more damage or extended combos.

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* Hard Knockdown (aka Untechable Knockdown) - A knockdown that can't be Teched/Ukemi'ed (see below). This is advantageous to the attacker for several reasons, such as knowing the exact moment that the opponent will get up from a fall so that they can time their followups. In some games, opponents can also be attacked while on the ground (see "OTG") for more damage or extended combos.



* Hitstun Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base hitstun. This makes combos harder to continue as they get longer.

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* Hitstun Scaling - As a combo continues, each successive attack receives a decreasing multiplier to its base hitstun. This makes combos harder to continue as they get longer. Also called Hitstun Deterioration or Hitstun Decay.
* Hop - in certain games, a jump at lower elevation than normal. Usually done by inputting the upward motion in as little frames as possible.



* Macro - Pre-programmable command on a controller that lets the user perform complex button sequences by one button press. Usually banned in tournaments.



* (High/Low) Mix up - In games where attacks can be "high" or "overhead" (must be standing to block) or "low" (must be crouching to block), attacking in a blockstring while regularly switching (or not) the kind of attack can throw off your opponent enough to land a hit. This also includes faking going for a hit before grabbing (in games where you cannot grab an opponent in block stun) or faking a grab to go for a hit. It's also not uncommon to refer to cross-ups as mix-ups, though it's technically incorrect.

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* (High/Low) Mix up - In games where attacks can be "high" or "overhead" (must be standing to block) or "low" (must be crouching to block), attacking in a blockstring while regularly switching (or not) the kind of attack can throw off your opponent enough to land a hit. This also includes faking going for a hit before grabbing (in games where you cannot grab an opponent in block stun) stun; see Tick Throw below) or faking a grab to go for a hit. It's also not uncommon to refer to cross-ups as mix-ups, though it's technically incorrect.



** Plus X Frames: When this move connects as a hit or block, the opponent has X frames of hitstun/blockstun left after you finish recovering from your move. If a move is plus X frames on hit, a Link combo can be done with a follow-up move whose start-up is less than X frames. Moves with plus frames on block can be used consecutively to create a Blockstring.
** Minus X Frames: When this move connects as a hit or block, you have X frames of recovery left after your opponent's hitstun/blockstun ends. If a move is minus X frames, it can be punished by a move whose start up is less than X frames.

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** Plus X Frames: Frames (Frame Advantage): When this move connects as a hit or block, the opponent has X frames of hitstun/blockstun left after you finish recovering from your move. If a move is plus X frames on hit, a Link combo can be done with a follow-up move whose start-up is less than X frames. Moves with plus frames on block can be used consecutively to create a Blockstring.
** Minus X Frames: Frames (Frame Disadvantage): When this move connects as a hit or block, you have X frames of recovery left after your opponent's hitstun/blockstun ends. If a move is minus X frames, it can be punished by a move whose start up is less than X frames.



* Priority - determines which attack will hit out of 2 characters who are attacking simultaneously with their certain moves. This is a combination of multiple factors, such as the amount of active frames (i.e the attack's speed), the attack's range, whether or not it's invincible, etc.



* Raw (X) - performing a move without cancelling it from another attack beforehand; i.e doing it from a "neutral" situation. Contrast the Hit Confirm above.



* Safe jump - a jump-in attack done around the time the opponent wakes up from being knocked down. Usually timed so that the knocked down opponent can do nothing but try to block. See also Meaty above.



** Trade - when your attack and the opponent's attack clash. This can either result in both characters getting hit and damaged, or (in certain games) a special kind of "blocking" occurs, i.e the attacks are thought to be hitting a blocking opponent in this case. They may or may not be able to immediately cancel the clashed attack into another move after that. Some certain games will also do something special whenever a "trade" occurs.

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** Trade - when your attack and the opponent's attack clash. This can either result in both characters getting hit and damaged, or (in certain games) a special kind of "blocking" occurs, i.e the attacks are thought to be hitting a blocking opponent in this case. They may or may not be able to immediately cancel the clashed traded attack into another move after that. Some certain games will also do something special whenever a "trade" occurs.



* Tiger Knee/TK - The act of doing a slightly extended quarter-circle motion, similar to Sagat's original motion for Tiger Knee, rather than a standard quarter-circle motion. The way most fighting games will read the input is that the character will do a tiny jump just before doing the move. Used to do air-only moves or air-versions of moves as close to the ground as possible.

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* Super jump - a certain kind of jump where you go up higher than normal. Usually done by holding down (crouching) before the jump.
* Tiger Knee/TK - The act of doing a slightly extended quarter-circle motion, similar to Sagat's original motion for Tiger Knee, rather than a standard quarter-circle motion.motion[[note]]Quarter circle forward, plus up-forward, before the attack button[[/note]]. The way most fighting games will read the input is that the character will do a tiny jump just before doing the move. Used to do air-only moves or air-versions of moves as close to the ground as possible.



* Triangle Jump, Triangle Dash - The act of jumping and then Air Dashing either down-forward or down-back. This is only doable by characters that have an 8-way Air Dash.
* Turtling - A strategy where the player is primarily defensive, blocking/evading attacks coming at them and waiting for an opportunity for an attack, usually by punishes. MightyGlacier characters tend to play like this, as their large pool of health helps. Another strategy apart from Rushdown and Zoning, which creates a trifecta of TacticalRockPaperScissors (Turtling > rushdown > zoning > turtling).

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* Triangle Jump, Triangle Dash - The act of jumping and then Air Dashing either down-forward or down-back. This is only doable by characters that have an 8-way Air Dash.
Dash.[[note]]Note that in Japan, "sankaku tobi" (means exactly "triangle jump") refers to the act of {{Wall Jump}}ing.[[/note]]
* Turtling - A strategy where the player is primarily defensive, blocking/evading attacks coming at them and waiting for an opportunity for an attack, usually by punishes. MightyGlacier characters tend to play like this, as their large pool of health helps. "Charge" characters also rely on turtling by the nature of their charge moves (usually by holding back/down, which makes them block). Another strategy apart from Rushdown and Zoning, which creates a trifecta of TacticalRockPaperScissors (Turtling > rushdown > zoning > turtling).



* [[{{Shoryuken}} Dragon Punch]] (DP) - Any special attack in 2D fighting games consisting of an upward rising assault from the input forward, down, down forward, and attack; they are mostly used as anti-air attacks. Has also been used in later games for charge-based Anti-Airs, such as Decapre's Psycho Sting, although this is technically a misnomer. Named for original localized name of Ryu and Ken's Shoryuken.

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* [[{{Shoryuken}} Dragon Punch]] (DP) - Any special attack in 2D fighting games consisting of an upward rising assault from the input forward, down, down forward, and attack; they are mostly used as anti-air attacks. Has also been used in later games for charge-based Anti-Airs, such as Decapre's Psycho Sting, although this is technically a misnomer. Named for original localized name of Ryu and Ken's Shoryuken. Sometimes called "SRK".



* Matchup - (subjectively) theoretical measurement on how a certain character would fare against another certain character. More realistic numbers are usually 6-4, 7-3, or 5-5 (which is considered even).
** Ten-Oh (10-0) Matchup - The claim that a battle is so heavily favored for one side that the odds are 10-0 in their favor; in other words, that there's no chance of losing. This is almost always hyperbole, however (as very few fights are ''completely'' unwinnable). Often, this is jokingly used after-the-fact, where a player is getting trounced so thoroughly that their loss is a foregone conclusion.



* One Character Victory (OCV) - in a team-based game, this occurs when one player manages to beat the other character's team with just one person at point without losing any of their team members.
** Reverse OCV - When your team is down to one character left while the opponent still has their complete amount, yet you then [[BackFromTheBrink manage to beat all of them and come out victorious.]]



* Shotos or {{Shotoclone}}s - Characters who have a projectile attack and an anti air attack (rush-forward attack optional). Taken from ''Street Fighter's'' Ryu and Ken, who are said to train in "Shotokan Karate" (a case of mis-publication back in the days).



* Ten-Oh (10-0) Matchup: The claim that a battle is so heavily favored for one side that the odds are 10-0 in their favor; in other words, that there's no chance of losing. This is almost always hyperbole, however (as very few fights are ''completely'' unwinnable). More realistic numbers are usually 6-4, 7-3, or 5-5 (which is considered even). Often, this is jokingly used after-the-fact, where a player is getting trounced so thoroughly that their loss is a foregone conclusion.

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* Ten-Oh (10-0) Matchup: The claim Tatsu - refers to {{Hurricane Kick}}s, aka Tatsumaki Senpuukyaku, an attack that a battle is so heavily favored for one side that the odds are 10-0 in their favor; in other words, that there's no chance of losing. This is almost always hyperbole, however (as very few fights are ''completely'' unwinnable). More realistic numbers are usually 6-4, 7-3, or 5-5 (which is considered even). Often, this is jokingly used after-the-fact, where a player is getting trounced so thoroughly that their loss is a foregone conclusion.multiple ''Street Fighter'' characters have.
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