History UsefulNotes / FermiParadox

23rd May '16 3:22:00 PM Trogdor7620
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->''Two possibilities exist: either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.''
-->-- '''Arthur C. Clarke'''
30th Apr '16 4:04:05 PM Hadjorim
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The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there, and surely thousands at least in our own galaxy. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].

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The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there, and surely thousands at least in our own galaxy. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].time.


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The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence.
29th Apr '16 12:56:03 AM Schismatism
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* The paradox is lampooned in ''Webcomic/FreeFall'': an alien squid (Sqid, if you would) who just so happens to be very tasty to virtually any sort of Terran animal points out that humanity's resilience is, in large part, due to asteroids smacking into Earth and giving more time to evolve: those who got it on the first try have simpler cellular structures. So...
--> '''Sam:''' There is no Fermi Paradox! Every time the aliens make it to Earth, the cows get them!
13th Mar '16 3:45:55 PM FordPrefect
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Related to the paradox is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation Drake equation]], one attempt to quantify the elements required to actually discover other intelligent life forms out there, The Drake Equation has been criticized because most of its terms are unknown, leaving it to the discretion of individuals. Depending on the numbers you put in, the number of intelligent species per-galaxy as predicted by the Drake Equation can be anywhere from millions to less than one. In the end these terms can never ''be'' known for sure until after we resolve the Fermi Paradox one way or the other: either by finally contacting an alien civilization, or by exploring enough of the universe to say convincingly that they don't exist.

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Related to the paradox is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation Drake equation]], one attempt to quantify the elements required to actually discover other intelligent life forms out there, there. The Drake Equation has been criticized because most of its terms are unknown, leaving it to the discretion of individuals. Depending on the numbers you put in, the number of intelligent species per-galaxy as predicted by the Drake Equation can be anywhere from millions to less than one. In the end end, these terms can never ''be'' be known for sure until after we resolve the Fermi Paradox one way or the other: either by finally contacting an alien civilization, or by exploring enough of the universe to say convincingly that they don't exist.
20th Feb '16 11:28:21 PM Hadjorim
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Related to the paradox is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation Drake equation]], one attempt to quantify the elements required to actually discover other intelligent life forms out there -- unfortunately, most of its terms are unknown, and can never ''be'' known for sure until after we resolve the Fermi Paradox one way or the other: either by finally contacting an alien civilization, or by exploring enough of the universe to say convincingly that they don't exist.

to:

Related to the paradox is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation Drake equation]], one attempt to quantify the elements required to actually discover other intelligent life forms out there -- unfortunately, there, The Drake Equation has been criticized because most of its terms are unknown, and leaving it to the discretion of individuals. Depending on the numbers you put in, the number of intelligent species per-galaxy as predicted by the Drake Equation can be anywhere from millions to less than one. In the end these terms can never ''be'' known for sure until after we resolve the Fermi Paradox one way or the other: either by finally contacting an alien civilization, or by exploring enough of the universe to say convincingly that they don't exist.
20th Feb '16 11:17:43 PM Hadjorim
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The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there, and seriously thousands at least in our own galaxy. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].

to:

The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there, and seriously surely thousands at least in our own galaxy. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].
20th Feb '16 11:17:28 PM Hadjorim
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The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].

to:

The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there.there, and seriously thousands at least in our own galaxy. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].
20th Feb '16 11:06:53 PM Hadjorim
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The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]]. So ''where are all the aliens?''

to:

The Fermi Paradox is an observation/question by physicist Enrico Fermi: The universe is very old. Life (from a scientific viewpoint) seems to be relatively simple--simple enough that, given the unimaginable size of the universe, there should be millions of planets with life scattered out there. And even without Faster-than-Light Travel, an intelligent spacefaring species should be able to spread across the galaxy in a relatively short amount of time[[note]]The Fermi paradox has also been presented as one of the arguments against the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory Steady state theory]], that states the Universe has existed forever. With an infinite amount of time behind it -- no matter how rare truly advanced space-faring species were -- sooner or later, not one but many would appear and we'd see evidence of their existence [[/note]].

So ''where are all the aliens?''
where is everybody?
31st Jan '16 7:58:57 AM zarpaulus
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** He has mentioned that it was part of the inspiration for the ''Literature/{{Uplift}}'' series. Where every space-faring race is governed by a bureaucracy that tightly controls colonization rights and which declared Earth's sector off-limits millions of years ago.




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* The paradox is brought up in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' as a concept that has been largely disregarded in the thousand years since FirstContact, but, after hearing evidence that [[spoiler: galaxy-spanning civilizations have risen and fallen many times over millions of years]] the idea is revisited.
30th Jan '16 5:26:25 PM CrippleNinja
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Note that technically, Fermi was [[http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/the-fermi-paradox-is-not-fermi-s-and-it-is-not-a-paradox/ actually pessimistic about interstellar travel, and it isn't a paradox.]]
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