History UsefulNotes / Epilepsy

31st May '17 3:44:31 PM Tightwire
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* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted asking, "Are you sure?"

to:

* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be tired and confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted repeatedly asking, "Are you sure?"
31st May '17 3:32:56 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, and last for hours longer than the seizure itself would.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, and the results are always frightening tend to include more seizures, indescribable neural pains and usually indescribably painful, and last full-body-paralysis for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
would have lasted.
31st May '17 3:22:55 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting for hours longer than the seizure itself would.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting and last for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
31st May '17 3:21:06 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid.
WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
14th May '17 2:59:09 PM Tightwire
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* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly.

to:

* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly.repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted asking, "Are you sure?"
30th Jan '17 2:20:24 AM Tightwire
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Anyone who has a brain may have a seizure. Animals can have seizures. In most cases the exact cause is unknown, although most people can detect one coming on.

to:

Anyone who has a brain may have a seizure. Animals can have seizures. In most cases the exact cause is unknown, and although most people can learn to detect one coming on.the signs of onset, some never seem to pinpoint the signals.
30th Jan '17 2:17:40 AM Tightwire
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As can be seen with trope names such as EpilepticFlashingLights and EpilepticTrees, the Hollywood depiction of epilepsy tends for the dramatic: Flashing lights cause loss of consciousness and seizures with intense muscle convulsions.

to:

As can be seen with trope names such as EpilepticFlashingLights and EpilepticTrees, the Hollywood depiction of epilepsy tends for the dramatic: dramatic - and innaccurate: Flashing lights cause immediate loss of consciousness and seizures with intense muscle convulsions.
7th Jul '16 9:12:24 AM Tightwire
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* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure. When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, so although they may seem alert, they are likely unaware of what's going on.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home.

to:

* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure. When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, so although and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may seem alert, have to do so repeatedly.
* If a person injures themselves during a seizure, they probably won't even be aware of it at this point. Epileptics have been known to try and walk with broken bones; if
they are likely unaware injured, try to keep them from worsening any injuries.
** On the converse side
of what's going on.
things, now is a great time to snap any broken nails back into place.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home. Since they are not fully aware of their surroundings, it is wise to ask repeatedly.



* The person is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).

to:

* The person is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet necklace/bracelet/card or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).
7th Jul '16 8:41:48 AM Tightwire
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In reality, epilepsy is much more variable. For starters, only a minority of those with epilepsy have seizures triggered by flashing lights or any other environmental input. Usually seizures occur at random purely due to internal workings of the brain, simple as that.

to:

In reality, epilepsy is much more variable. For starters, only a minority of those with epilepsy have seizures triggered by flashing lights or any other environmental input.input, and it is known as Photosensitive Epilepsy. Usually seizures occur at random purely due to internal workings of the brain, simple as that.
31st May '16 4:43:58 AM wrestlingdog909
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One in 26 Americans have epilepsy, so you almost certainly know someone with this disorder whether you know it or not. ''[[ParanoiaFuel You]]'' may even have it ''without knowing it'' until your first seizure event. This is one of the reasons that the inaccurate portrayal of ConvulsiveSeizures and inaccurate [[WorstAid seizure first aid]] is so dangerous. More people die in the United States from epilepsy than breast cancer.

First aid for epilepsy is not too difficult. The goal is to keep the person safe until the seizure stops naturally by itself. Holding someone down or restraining a person who is having a seizure is dangerous and can lead to combative behaviors. It is known for them to get parts of their body trapped in furniture while becoming so tense that they cannot be moved, in which case, you will simply have to wait. Someone having a seizure cannot swallow their tongue, although they may bite it. Never, ever put any foreign object in their mouth, since they may choke, break their teeth, and in the case of your fingers, it has been known for them to bite down ''to the bone.''

to:

One in 26 Americans have epilepsy, so you almost certainly know someone with this disorder whether you know it or not. ''[[ParanoiaFuel You]]'' may even have it ''without knowing it'' until your first seizure event. This is one of the reasons that the inaccurate portrayal of ConvulsiveSeizures and inaccurate [[WorstAid seizure first aid]] is so dangerous. More people die in the United States from epilepsy than breast cancer. \n\n Additionally, even people who don't have epilepsy can have seizures for all sorts of reasons- the most common being head injury, high fever, brain infections like meningitis, drug abuse, electric shock, eclampsia, or abnormal levels of glucose of sodium or glucose. 90% of people with seizure disorders live in the developing world.

First aid for epilepsy is not too difficult. The goal is to keep the person safe until the seizure stops naturally by itself. Holding someone down or restraining a person who is having a seizure is dangerous and can lead to combative behaviors. It is known for them to get parts of their body trapped in furniture while becoming so tense that they cannot be moved, in which case, you will simply have to wait. Someone having a seizure cannot swallow their tongue, although they may bite it. Never, ever put any foreign object in their mouth, since they may choke, break their teeth, and in the case of your fingers, it has been known for them to bite down ''to the bone.''
'' Some people with epilepsy have medications that can be taken in the aftermath of a seizure to prevent further incidents (like Ativan) or devices like a [[http://www.epilepsy.com/learn/treating-seizures-and-epilepsy/devices/vagus-nerve-stimulation-vns vagus nerve simulator]].



* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home.

to:

* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure. When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, so although they may seem alert, they are likely unaware of what's going on.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home.

* Offer Check to call see if a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home.
is wearing any kind of medical alert information (bracelet) to see if there are specific instructions.
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