History UsefulNotes / Epilepsy

29th Jan '18 6:01:13 PM Tightwire
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Use of alcohol, cocaine/amphetamines/related drugs, or PCP (or alternately GoingColdTurkey from alcohol or from the benzodiazipines such as Xanax or Klonopin or Valium) can precipitate a seizure even in someone without epilepsy, make medications less effective in diagnosed epileptics, and/or lead to a "worse" form of seizure (e.g. a normally "petit mal" person has a temporal lobe seizure or ConvulsiveSeizures.)

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Use of alcohol, cocaine/amphetamines/related drugs, or PCP (or alternately GoingColdTurkey from alcohol or from the benzodiazipines such as Xanax or Klonopin or Valium) can precipitate a seizure even in someone without epilepsy, make medications less effective in diagnosed epileptics, and/or lead to a "worse" form of seizure (e.g. a normally "petit mal" person has a temporal lobe seizure or ConvulsiveSeizures.)
) Stress is exaggerated as a factor but young children whose brains are still developing have been known to have their first seizures after life-changing events like an unexpected death in the family or a parent's divorce.



* Keep calm and reassure other people who may be nearby.
* Don't hold the person down or try to stop his movements.
* Time the seizure with your watch or phone.
* Clear the area around the person of anything which may hurt them or fall on them.
* Loosen ties or anything around the neck that may make breathing difficult.
* Put something flat and soft, like a folded jacket, blanket, or towel, under the head.
* Turn him or her gently onto one side. This will help keep the airway clear. Do not try to force the mouth open with any hard implement or with fingers.
* Don't attempt artificial respiration except in the unlikely event that a person does not start breathing again after the seizure has stopped.
* Stay with the person until the seizure ends naturally.
* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and will probably be tired and confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted repeatedly asking, "Are you sure?"
* If a person injures themselves during a seizure, they probably won't even be aware of it at this point. Epileptics have been known to try and walk with broken bones; if they are injured, try to keep them from worsening any injuries.
** On the converse side of things, now is a great time to snap any broken nails back into place.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home. Since they are not fully aware of their surroundings, it is wise to ask repeatedly.

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* Don't worry about what you can do to ''stop'' the seizure. There are more effective ways to keep them safe.
* Keep calm and reassure other people who may be nearby.
from panicing or performing WorstAid, of course.
* Keep the area clear. If you can move people and objects away, do so. It's actually far easier than moving a convulsing body.
* Don't hold the person pin them down or try to stop his movements.
* Time the seizure with your watch or phone.
* Clear the area around the person of anything which may hurt them or fall on them.
* Loosen ties or anything around the neck that may make breathing difficult.
* Put something flat and soft, like a folded jacket, blanket, or towel, under the head.
* Turn him or her gently onto one side. This will help keep the airway clear. Do not try to force the mouth open with any hard implement or with fingers.
otherwise restrict their movements.
* Time the seizure with a watch or phone - if it lasts over five minutes or if it's their first seizure, you should call an ambulance and they'll want to know how long it's been going on for.
* Loosen any tight clothing that may make breathing difficult.
* Cushion their head with something soft - a cushion, a blanket, your jacket - but don't try to restrict their head or neck.
* If you can do it easily (don't force it!) turn them onto their side to try and keep their airway clear.
* Don't put anything in their mouth and don't let anybody else put anything in their mouth, no matter how clever they think they are.
* Don't attempt artificial respiration except in the unlikely event that a person does not start breathing again after the seizure has stopped.
* Stay with the person until
stopped. Even then, only do it if you know CPR; don't try to be a hero.

!!Usually
the seizure ends naturally.
* When the person regains consciousness, they
will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and will probably be tired and confused. They may even try to continue end natrually with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted repeatedly asking, "Are you sure?"
* If a person injures themselves during a seizure, they probably won't even be aware of it at this point. Epileptics have been known to try and walk with broken bones; if they are injured, try to keep them from worsening any injuries.
** On the converse side of things, now is a great time to snap any broken nails back into place.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend,
no intervention. The epileptic can wake up within seconds, or relative, to help the person get home. Since they are not fully aware of their surroundings, it is wise to ask repeatedly.remain unconscious for a few minutes. After that...




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* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and will probably be tired and confused. Explain to them that they've had a seizure.
** This isn't always easy. Some epileptics may try to continue with what they were doing before the seizure started, although they will still be confused. Others have been quoted repeatedly asking "Are you sure?" Remember that they have zero awareness from the very moment their brain entered the seizure to the moment they awoke, and just keep explaining until they get it.
* If they have injured themselves, they might not even notice. This ranges from mere bruises, to cuts from fingernails digging in, to trying to walk on broken bones. Try and keep them from worsening their injuries while you phone an ambulance.
** On the converse side of things, now is a great time to snap any broken nails back into place.
* It's a really bad idea for them to go off alone so soon after a seizure. Offer to call them a taxi, a friend, or relative.
** Most epileptics carry some contact details. If they can't give you a number or destination or if they tell you this is their first seizure, or if they are injured, offer to call an ambulance. Again, you may have to ask repeatedly.



* The person is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet/card or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).

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* The person This is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet/card or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).
person's first seizure.
29th Jan '18 5:06:47 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, and the results tend to include more seizures, indescribable neural pains and full-body-paralysis for hours longer than the seizure would have lasted.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes While it is almost impossible to fatally overdose on the medication used to treat epilepsy (no, really), not only will the medication take several hours for the to kick in, but side effects of extra dose to register in the brain anyway, and the results tend to include doses range from more seizures, seizures to indescribable neural pains pain to full-body paralysis, and full-body-paralysis for hours longer than ultimately last until the seizure would have lasted.
medication wears off, which can be up to 12 hours.
31st May '17 3:44:31 PM Tightwire
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* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted asking, "Are you sure?"

to:

* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be tired and confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted repeatedly asking, "Are you sure?"
31st May '17 3:32:56 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, and last for hours longer than the seizure itself would.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, and the results are always frightening tend to include more seizures, indescribable neural pains and usually indescribably painful, and last full-body-paralysis for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
would have lasted.
31st May '17 3:22:55 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting for hours longer than the seizure itself would.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting and last for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
31st May '17 3:21:06 PM Tightwire
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Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid.

to:

Stopping a seizure state in progress is something that can ''only'' be done in a hospital, and due to the risk of death doing so involves (the only way to do it involves high dose benzodiazipines - meaning that even if you've stopped the seizure, the person's central nervous system is highly depressed) it is almost only done in cases where the seizures themselves carry a risk of being fatal (e.g. ''status epilepticus''). Anticonvulsant and/or cannabinoid treatment can prevent/reduce seizures if initiated, tolerated, and properly maintained, but takes anywhere from 48 hours to two weeks to take full effect, so the idea that one can just give someone an extra dose of "their meds" to stop a seizure in progress is WorstAid.
WorstAid. It takes several hours for the extra dose to register in the brain anyway, the results are always frightening and usually indescribably painful, lasting for hours longer than the seizure itself would.
14th May '17 2:59:09 PM Tightwire
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* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly.

to:

* When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may have to do so repeatedly.repeatedly since epileptics have been quoted asking, "Are you sure?"
30th Jan '17 2:20:24 AM Tightwire
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Anyone who has a brain may have a seizure. Animals can have seizures. In most cases the exact cause is unknown, although most people can detect one coming on.

to:

Anyone who has a brain may have a seizure. Animals can have seizures. In most cases the exact cause is unknown, and although most people can learn to detect one coming on.the signs of onset, some never seem to pinpoint the signals.
30th Jan '17 2:17:40 AM Tightwire
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As can be seen with trope names such as EpilepticFlashingLights and EpilepticTrees, the Hollywood depiction of epilepsy tends for the dramatic: Flashing lights cause loss of consciousness and seizures with intense muscle convulsions.

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As can be seen with trope names such as EpilepticFlashingLights and EpilepticTrees, the Hollywood depiction of epilepsy tends for the dramatic: dramatic - and innaccurate: Flashing lights cause immediate loss of consciousness and seizures with intense muscle convulsions.
7th Jul '16 9:12:24 AM Tightwire
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* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure. When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, so although they may seem alert, they are likely unaware of what's going on.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home.

to:

* Be friendly and reassuring as consciousness returns. Do not yell at the person, but tell them they had a seizure. When the person regains consciousness, they will be in a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postictal_state postictal]] state, so although and despite being conscious will probably be confused. They may even try to continue with whatever they were doing before the seizure. Tell them they've had a seizure - you may seem alert, have to do so repeatedly.
* If a person injures themselves during a seizure, they probably won't even be aware of it at this point. Epileptics have been known to try and walk with broken bones; if
they are likely unaware injured, try to keep them from worsening any injuries.
** On the converse side
of what's going on.
things, now is a great time to snap any broken nails back into place.
* Offer to call a taxi, friend, or relative, to help the person get home. Since they are not fully aware of their surroundings, it is wise to ask repeatedly.



* The person is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).

to:

* The person is not known to have epilepsy (e.g. does not have epilepsy listed on a medical ID necklace/bracelet necklace/bracelet/card or In Case of Emergency (ICE) information on their cell phone).
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