History UsefulNotes / Dyslexia

2nd May '16 12:07:15 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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Real dyslexia also doesn't necessarily impair writing. While most dyslexics are bad at writing, it's just a side effect. Reading is basically practice on how to spell; thus, if you don't read much, you're not going to learn the various spellings of words very well. There are no physical impairments; many dyslexics, despite being very very bad at reading, have absolutely no problem writing very well. This is different from ''internet'' dyslexics; on message boards, "I'm dyslexic" is often code for "I'm going to make no effort whatsoever to post coherently and people will [[WhiteKnighting White Knight]] if you call me on it" and is popular with trolls.

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Real dyslexia also doesn't necessarily impair writing. While most dyslexics are bad at writing, it's just a side effect. Reading is basically practice on how to spell; thus, if you don't read much, you're not going to learn the various spellings of words very well. There are no physical impairments; many dyslexics, despite being very very bad at reading, have absolutely no problem writing very well. This is different from ''internet'' dyslexics; on message boards, "I'm dyslexic" is often code for "I'm going to make no effort whatsoever to post coherently and people will [[WhiteKnighting White Knight]] Knight if you call me on it" and is popular with trolls.
19th Oct '12 12:01:07 PM CaptEquinox
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Real dyslexia also doesn't necessarily impair writing. While most dyslexics are bad at writing, it's just a side effect. Reading is basically practice on how to spell; thus, if you don't read much, you're not going to learn the various spellings of words very well. There are no physical impairments; many dyslexics, despite being very very bad at reading, have absolutely no problem writing very well. This is different from ''internet'' dyslexics; on message boards, "I'm dyslexic" is usually code for "I'm going to make no effort whatsoever to post coherently and people will [[WhiteKnighting White Knight]] if you call me on it" and is popular with trolls.

to:

Real dyslexia also doesn't necessarily impair writing. While most dyslexics are bad at writing, it's just a side effect. Reading is basically practice on how to spell; thus, if you don't read much, you're not going to learn the various spellings of words very well. There are no physical impairments; many dyslexics, despite being very very bad at reading, have absolutely no problem writing very well. This is different from ''internet'' dyslexics; on message boards, "I'm dyslexic" is usually often code for "I'm going to make no effort whatsoever to post coherently and people will [[WhiteKnighting White Knight]] if you call me on it" and is popular with trolls.
trolls.




In real life, a lot of people who are simply too damned lazy to read will claim to be dyslexic in order to receive sympathy.
That is NOT always the case though, many people with dyslexia work hard to overcome their disability.

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\nIn real life, a lot * Some types of dyslexia are related to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotopic_sensitivity_syndrome Irlen Syndrome]], in which the brain doesn't properly pick up signals from the eyes, tries to readjust, and things can look scrambled or "floating around" as a result.

Never assume that
people (online or off) who claim to be dyslexic are simply just too damned lazy to read will claim or write properly and are trying to be dyslexic in order to receive sympathy.
That is NOT always the case though, many
garner sympathy. These conditions are extremely wide-ranging and a lot of people with dyslexia work hard still just don't know where or how to get help, or assume it's just a matter of "trying harder". Until relatively recently many of the above conditions were not recognized or thought to be relatively uncommon. People who had them (especially in "milder" forms) ''were'' written off as "just lazy". They go through life believing this and struggling on their own to overcome their disability. it.
1st Sep '12 2:22:12 PM Carnildo
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* Dyscalculia is a problem with math. This can range from some one who has a tendency to get mixed up when counting in their head to someone who can not comprehend any number past 3. There is a real case of a woman who, after a car accident, could not say the name of any number past 3. She could say "ate", but were she shown the word "eight", she could try to sound it out, but that was it.

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* Dyscalculia is a problem with math. This can range from some one who has a tendency to get mixed up when counting in their head to someone who can not comprehend any number past 3. There is a real case of a woman who, after a car accident, could not say the name of any number past 3. She could say "ate", but were she shown the word "eight", she could try to sound it out, but that was it. Motor dysgraphia can be mistaken for dyscalculia in schools: someone who's very slow at answering written math questions may simply be slow because of difficulty writing down the answers.




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* Strong visual/spatial reasoning skills can be mistaken for dyslexia: 'd', 'b', 'p', and 'q' are the same shape in different orientations. The easiest way to identify this is if someone has little difficulty reading upside-down or mirror writing, but can't consistently name those four letters of the alphabet.
27th Jul '12 11:44:13 AM captainmarkle
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* Dyspraxia is caused by incorrect development of the area of the brain that controls coordination, and results in varying degrees of poor hand eye coordination, sequence memorisation, distance judgment, handwriting, basic maths skills and confusion between left and right. It makes learning to drive a trial...

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* Dyspraxia is caused by incorrect development of the area of the brain that controls coordination, and results in varying degrees of poor hand eye coordination, sequence memorisation, distance judgment, handwriting, basic maths skills and confusion between left and right. It means that puzzles can be a lot more difficult, sport becomes a lot harder and it also makes learning to drive a trial...
29th Feb '12 10:49:47 PM trytoguess
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On a side note, dyslexia is not as prevalent in some other countries. The Korean, Spanish, and Italian writing systems have a much more regular correspondence between sound and spelling than French or English. This makes phonics much easier to learn and sight words less critical, and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexia#Effect_of_language_orthography studies have found less dyslexia]] among speakers of languages with such a regular spelling. In fact, most speakers of those languages don't even feel the need to talk about "spelling" or "dyslexia". On the other side of the planet, the JapaneseLanguage has two writing systems: the phonetic "kana" based on a symbol for each syllable (''mora'') (e.g. "[[KatamariDamacy ka-ta-ma-ri]]" is four characters), and the logographic "kanji," each of which has multiple pronounciations and/or meanings. Kanji are borrowed from Chinese and designed to represent Chinese words semi-phonetically, but in Japanese are often used to represent native Japanese words based on meaning alone. Kana, however, are so easy that when a young English speaking kid moved to Japan as a teenager, within months he was better at reading Japanese than English. Of course, the massive overdiagnosis of dyslexia in English-speaking countries doesn't help this bias (in the UK, students can get extra exam time if they're dyslexic: ''one in four'' applies, and although not all of them get it, many doctors no longer even ask for evidence).

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On a side note, dyslexia is not as prevalent in some other countries. The Korean, Spanish, and Italian writing systems have a much more regular correspondence between sound and spelling than French or English. This makes phonics much easier to learn and sight words less critical, and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexia#Effect_of_language_orthography studies have found less dyslexia]] among speakers of languages with such a regular spelling. In fact, most speakers of those languages don't even feel the need to talk about "spelling" or "dyslexia". On the other side of the planet, the JapaneseLanguage has two writing systems: the phonetic "kana" based on a symbol for each syllable (''mora'') (e.g. "[[KatamariDamacy ka-ta-ma-ri]]" is four characters), and the logographic "kanji," each of which has multiple pronounciations and/or meanings. Kanji are borrowed from Chinese and designed to represent Chinese words semi-phonetically, but in Japanese are often used to represent native Japanese words based on meaning alone. Kana, however, are so easy that when a young English speaking kid moved to Japan as a teenager, within months he was better at reading Japanese than English. Of course, the massive overdiagnosis of dyslexia in English-speaking countries doesn't help this bias (in the UK, students can get extra exam time if they're dyslexic: ''one in four'' applies, and although not all of them get it, many doctors no longer even ask for evidence).
6th Jan '12 12:57:59 AM unitedfruit
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* Dyscalculia is a problem with math. This can range from some one who has a tendency to get mixed up when counting in their head to some one who can not comprehend any number past 3. There is a real case of a woman who, after a car accident could not say the name of any number past 3, she could say ate, but show her the word eight, she could try to sound it out but that was it.

to:

* Dyscalculia is a problem with math. This can range from some one who has a tendency to get mixed up when counting in their head to some one someone who can not comprehend any number past 3. There is a real case of a woman who, after a car accident accident, could not say the name of any number past 3, she 3. She could say ate, "ate", but show her were she shown the word eight, "eight", she could try to sound it out out, but that was it.
15th Mar '11 6:50:17 PM vindurverndari
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That is NOT always the case though,many people with dyslexia work hard to overcome their disability.

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That is NOT always the case though,many though, many people with dyslexia work hard to overcome their disability.
25th Dec '10 6:15:15 AM utahann
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Added DiffLines:

That is NOT always the case though,many people with dyslexia work hard to overcome their disability.
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