History UsefulNotes / DwightDEisenhower

27th May '17 9:48:35 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* He briefly appears at the start of the 1985 sci-fi comedy ''Film/MyScienceProject''.

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* He briefly appears at the start of the 1985 sci-fi comedy ''Film/MyScienceProject''.''Film/MyScienceProject'', telling the army to "get rid of" the alien craft they've found. (Meaning destroy it to prevent panic.)
9th May '17 7:40:35 PM Sylderon
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Eisenhower was made the Governor of the American Zone in Germany, where he helped bring in food and medicine for the German citizens. He served as Chief of Staff for President Harry S Truman and, later, as the first supreme commander of NATO during the beginning years of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. He was courted by both major parties in 1948, but declined to run. He was "drafted" by Republicans in 1952 and won the general election in a ten-point victory and Electoral College landslide. It was the first time a Republican nominee won since UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover in 1928.[[note]]In fact, the main reason why he finally decided to run for president as a Republican was because he felt that the country needed a change in leadership after 20 years of the Democrats winning the White House.[[/note]] Additionally, he won reelection in 1956 by an even larger margin. His campaign slogan was "I Like Ike", which was meant to be worn on buttons and bumper stickers to show support. The unpopular and sour-faced UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, then a commie-fighting Senator from California, was his running mate; Ike tried to make Nixon a Cabinet member during his second term, but Tricky Dicky insisted on staying on as the VP. Eisenhower was also president of [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Columbia University]] from 1948 to 1953, which gave him administrative experience for his years as the nation's president.

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Eisenhower was made the Governor of the American Zone in Germany, where he helped bring in food and medicine for the German citizens. He served as Chief of Staff for President Harry S Truman and, later, as the first supreme commander of NATO during the beginning years of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. He was courted by both major parties in 1948, but declined to run. He was "drafted" by Republicans in 1952 and won the general election in a ten-point victory and Electoral College landslide. It was the first time a Republican nominee won since UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover in 1928.[[note]]In fact, the main reason why he finally decided to run for president as a Republican was because he felt that the country needed a change in leadership after 20 years of the Democrats winning the White House.[[/note]] Additionally, he won reelection in 1956 by an even larger margin. His campaign slogan was "I Like Ike", which was meant to be worn on buttons and bumper stickers to show support. The unpopular and sour-faced UsefulNotes/RichardNixon, then a commie-fighting Senator from California, was his running mate; Ike tried to make Nixon a Cabinet member during his second term, but Tricky Dicky insisted on staying on as the VP. Eisenhower was also president of [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Columbia University]] from 1948 to 1953, which gave him administrative experience for his years as the nation's president.
president.[[note]]Ike joked that Columbia really meant to ask for his brother Milton, an accomplished academic who was President of Johns Hopkins University, but sent the letter to him by mistake and were too embarrassed to correct themselves[[/note]]
16th Apr '17 1:11:32 PM nombretomado
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Relations with the Soviet Union proved to be very testy during his eight years. During his first year in office, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin died. Eisenhower met with Soviet premiere Nikita Khrushchev a few times with the hopes of slowly ending the Cold War, but these conferences only produced a few results. The USSR's brutal crushing of the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 was one of the tenser moments of the Cold War, but Eisenhower kept his head and refused to risk causing a nuclear war. Following Nixon’s visit to the Soviet Union and Khrushchev’s visit to America, the chance for peace started to look better. However, on the eve of another summit in Paris, an American U-2 spy plane was shot down over USSR territory. Eisenhower begrudgingly admitted to an outraged Khrushchev that he ordered this flight as well as others, embarrassing the American government. Khrushchev left the summit in protest, Eisenhower had to cancel his planned trip to the USSR, and relations between the two countries returned to their previous state. Speaking of the Cold War, TheSpaceRace started when the Soviet Union launched the first man-made satellite into space in 1957. He responded by creating both UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} to lead the American space program and DARPA to expand scientific knowledge and technological progress. The Nuclear Navy also got its start during the 1950's - under the leadership of Hyman G. Rickover, it had a record of zero reactor accidents which continues to this day.

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Relations with the Soviet Union proved to be very testy during his eight years. During his first year in office, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin died. Eisenhower met with Soviet premiere Nikita Khrushchev a few times with the hopes of slowly ending the Cold War, but these conferences only produced a few results. The USSR's brutal crushing of the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 was one of the tenser moments of the Cold War, but Eisenhower kept his head and refused to risk causing a nuclear war. Following Nixon’s visit to the Soviet Union and Khrushchev’s visit to America, the chance for peace started to look better. However, on the eve of another summit in Paris, an American U-2 spy plane was shot down over USSR territory. Eisenhower begrudgingly admitted to an outraged Khrushchev that he ordered this flight as well as others, embarrassing the American government. Khrushchev left the summit in protest, Eisenhower had to cancel his planned trip to the USSR, and relations between the two countries returned to their previous state. Speaking of the Cold War, TheSpaceRace UsefulNotes/TheSpaceRace started when the Soviet Union launched the first man-made satellite into space in 1957. He responded by creating both UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} to lead the American space program and DARPA to expand scientific knowledge and technological progress. The Nuclear Navy also got its start during the 1950's - under the leadership of Hyman G. Rickover, it had a record of zero reactor accidents which continues to this day.
10th Apr '17 8:45:37 AM Taskmaster123
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Added DiffLines:

Efforts were underway to award him the Medal Of Honor after the war, due to his extraordinary leadership. He personally stopped this, as he believed the Medal of Honor should only be awarded for bravery in combat. There ''was'' precedent for awarding it for other reasons, as Lindbergh had been awarded it for his solo flight across the Atlantic. Not that Eisenhower attempted to avoid combat and his underlings often had to scramble to prevent him from going too close to the front. In addition, both Churchill and Roosevelt were very aware of how crucial his leadership was and made it clear to his staff and the other Allied generals that he simply could not be placed in a position where there was a possibility he might be killed or captured.
3rd Mar '17 7:26:08 AM TheWildWestPyro
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Despite regretting the Warren Court's liberalism, Eisenhower was firmly behind the Court on one issue--civil rights. As a general, he had always deeply respected the work that Black troops did (especially because Black soldiers generally did support work, which Eisenhower, who believed ''logistics'' to be the single most important thing in war, saw as being as at least as important as combat to the war effort), and this carried over to civilian life, as well. The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. In support of this, ruling, Eisenhower ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest, though unlike most federal measures, this one was at least ''intended'' to help them.

to:

Despite regretting the Warren Court's liberalism, Eisenhower was firmly behind the Court on one issue--civil rights. As a general, he had always deeply respected the work that Black black troops did (especially because Black black soldiers generally did support work, which Eisenhower, who believed ''logistics'' to be the single most important thing in war, saw as being as at least as important as combat to the war effort), and this carried over to civilian life, as well. The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. In support of this, ruling, Eisenhower ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest, though unlike most federal measures, this one was at least ''intended'' to help them.
13th Sep '16 7:16:24 PM YT45
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On the foreign policy front, Eisenhower’s “New Look” policy supported the containment and, eventually, the “rolling back” of communism throughout the world. To do this, he used a method of PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, massively increasing the number of nuclear weapons owned by the United States. Eisenhower didn’t seem to ever want to use these weapons, though; he repeatedly turned down any attempt by his advisors to use them against RedChina or other communist nations, and originated America's "No First Strike" policy which mandated that America's strategic nuclear arsenal could only be used in retaliation for the Soviets or Chinese using theirs first. Note that this never applied to ''tactical'' warheads deployed on an active battlefield, only strategic weapons targeted at population centers. Some historians have theorized that Ike actually built so many nukes in order to ''prevent'' World War III by the concept of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutually_assured_destruction mutually-assured destruction]] - if both sides had enough nuclear power to pretty much destroy all human life on Earth, they would do everything in their power to not go to war and, eventually, the UsefulNotes/ColdWar would end. If this is true, history has proven that he was right. Additionally, he openly promoted the use of atomic and nuclear power for peaceful purposes, such as energy, rather than the creation of weapons. However, Ike wasn't opposed to using ''conventional'' weapons for the same purpose. His administration established and operated under the "domino theory", which stated that if one country falls to communism, its neighbors would eventually fall too if significant anti-communist support was not given. One of the unfortunate effects of this was the beginning of American involvement in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar during his time in office, though he only sent a few hundred troops there and the next few administrations were the ones to expand it.

to:

On the foreign policy front, Eisenhower’s “New Look” policy supported the containment and, eventually, the “rolling back” of communism throughout the world. To do this, he used a method of PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, massively increasing the number of nuclear weapons owned by the United States. Eisenhower didn’t seem to ever want to use these weapons, though; he repeatedly turned down any attempt by his advisors to use them against RedChina or other communist nations, and originated America's "No First Strike" policy which mandated that America's strategic nuclear arsenal could only be used in retaliation for the Soviets or Chinese using theirs first. Note that this never applied to ''tactical'' warheads deployed on an active battlefield, only strategic weapons targeted at population centers. Some historians have theorized that Ike actually built so many nukes in order to ''prevent'' World War III by the concept of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutually_assured_destruction mutually-assured destruction]] - if both sides had enough nuclear power to pretty much destroy all human life on Earth, they would do everything in their power to not go to war and, eventually, the UsefulNotes/ColdWar would end. If this is true, history has proven that he was right. Additionally, he openly promoted the use of atomic and nuclear power for peaceful purposes, such as energy, rather than the creation of weapons. However, Ike wasn't opposed to using ''conventional'' weapons for the same purpose. His administration established and operated under the "domino theory", which stated that if one country falls to communism, its neighbors would eventually fall too if significant anti-communist support was not given. One of the unfortunate effects of this was the beginning escalation of American involvement in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar[[note]]American involvement in Vietnam began in 1942, when the OSS began supporting Ho Chi Minh's Viet Minh guerillas against the Japanese and Vichy collaborators in French Indochina. Things turned sour in 1946, when [[UngratefulBastard Ho]] officially cast his lot with the communists (though he hadn't done a great job of hiding his red leanings when he was [[EnemyMine asking for American guns and ammo]] to fight the Japanese), which prompted Truman to support the French reasserting their control in Southeast Asia (many historians think the whole thing could have been resolved without violence had General LeClerc not [[DroppedABridgeOnHim died in a sudden and suspicious car accident in Paris]] the day before he was supposed to fly to Hanoi). The general consensus today is that the US had no dog in this fight, but the proverbial die was cast. The OSS and its successor, the CIA, became increasingly more active in Indochina/Vietnam throughout the 40s and 50s. Eisenhower was just the first to officially deploy troops as "advisers." [[/note]] during his time in office, though he only sent a few hundred troops there and the next few administrations were the ones to expand it.
13th Sep '16 7:02:01 PM YT45
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On the foreign policy front, Eisenhower’s “New Look” policy supported the containment and, eventually, the “rolling back” of communism throughout the world. To do this, he used a method of PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, massively increasing the number of nuclear weapons owned by the United States. Eisenhower didn’t seem to ever want to use these weapons, though; he repeatedly turned down any attempt by his advisors to use them against RedChina or other communist nations. Some historians have theorized that Ike actually built so many nukes in order to ''prevent'' World War III by the concept of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutually_assured_destruction mutually-assured destruction]] - if both sides had enough nuclear power to pretty much destroy all human life on Earth, they would do everything in their power to not go to war and, eventually, the UsefulNotes/ColdWar would end. If this is true, history has proven that he was right. Additionally, he openly promoted the use of atomic and nuclear power for peaceful purposes, such as energy, rather than the creation of weapons. However, Ike wasn't opposed to using ''conventional'' weapons for the same purpose. His administration established and operated under the "domino theory", which stated that if one country falls to communism, its neighbors would eventually fall too if significant anti-communist support was not given. One of the unfortunate effects of this was the beginning of American involvement in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar during his time in office, though he only sent a few hundred troops there and the next few administrations were the ones to expand it.

to:

On the foreign policy front, Eisenhower’s “New Look” policy supported the containment and, eventually, the “rolling back” of communism throughout the world. To do this, he used a method of PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, massively increasing the number of nuclear weapons owned by the United States. Eisenhower didn’t seem to ever want to use these weapons, though; he repeatedly turned down any attempt by his advisors to use them against RedChina or other communist nations.nations, and originated America's "No First Strike" policy which mandated that America's strategic nuclear arsenal could only be used in retaliation for the Soviets or Chinese using theirs first. Note that this never applied to ''tactical'' warheads deployed on an active battlefield, only strategic weapons targeted at population centers. Some historians have theorized that Ike actually built so many nukes in order to ''prevent'' World War III by the concept of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutually_assured_destruction mutually-assured destruction]] - if both sides had enough nuclear power to pretty much destroy all human life on Earth, they would do everything in their power to not go to war and, eventually, the UsefulNotes/ColdWar would end. If this is true, history has proven that he was right. Additionally, he openly promoted the use of atomic and nuclear power for peaceful purposes, such as energy, rather than the creation of weapons. However, Ike wasn't opposed to using ''conventional'' weapons for the same purpose. His administration established and operated under the "domino theory", which stated that if one country falls to communism, its neighbors would eventually fall too if significant anti-communist support was not given. One of the unfortunate effects of this was the beginning of American involvement in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar during his time in office, though he only sent a few hundred troops there and the next few administrations were the ones to expand it.
13th Sep '16 6:52:48 PM YT45
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Despite regretting the Warren Court's liberalism, Eisenhower was firmly behind the Court on one issue--civil rights. As a general, he had always deeply respected the work that Black troops did (especially because Black soldiers generally did support work, which Eisenhower, who believed ''logistics'' to be the single most important thing in war, saw as being as at least as important as combat to the war effort), and this carried over to civilian life, as well. The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. In support of this, ruling, Eisenhower ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest.

to:

Despite regretting the Warren Court's liberalism, Eisenhower was firmly behind the Court on one issue--civil rights. As a general, he had always deeply respected the work that Black troops did (especially because Black soldiers generally did support work, which Eisenhower, who believed ''logistics'' to be the single most important thing in war, saw as being as at least as important as combat to the war effort), and this carried over to civilian life, as well. The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. In support of this, ruling, Eisenhower ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest.
slightest, though unlike most federal measures, this one was at least ''intended'' to help them.
13th Sep '16 6:44:40 PM YT45
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Eisenhower saw a number of promotions throughout UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, eventually reaching the ranks of General of the Army (five-stars) and Supreme Allied Commander in Europe. He was one of the most gifted leaders on the Allied side, and was responsible for some of the most important American victories in the European and North African theaters. He was the commander of both Operation Torch (the Allied landings on North Africa) and Operation Husky (the invasion of Sicily). President UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt then chose him to plan the Allied invasion of northern Europe. Codenamed Operation Overlord, but best known as D-Day, the Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy (part of northern France) were a very risky move (he actually had a speech [[ItsAllMyFault assuming full responsibility]] ready in case it failed) that, luckily, paid off. His record on strategic choices during the drive across France is mixed, but two things rarely in dispute are that he never passed the buck to others when things went wrong, and that he was a master at coalition warfare, keeping the British, Americans, Canadians, French, Poles, and others focused on fighting the Germans rather than on their disagreements with each other. Eisenhower continued to supervise the western front for the remainder of the war and was present at the German surrender. He was also one of the first Allied leaders to see the concentration camps in Germany, and he ordered both the military and news crews to document everything they saw knowing some would deny it really happened. He famously wrote "We are told the American soldier does not know what he is fighting for. Now, at least, he will know what he is fighting against."

to:

Eisenhower saw a number of promotions throughout UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, eventually reaching the ranks of General of the Army (five-stars) and Supreme Allied Commander in Europe. He was one of the most gifted leaders on the Allied side, and was responsible for some of the most important American victories in the European and North African theaters. He was the commander of both Operation Torch (the Allied landings on North Africa) and Operation Husky (the invasion of Sicily). President UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt then chose him to plan the Allied invasion of northern Europe. Codenamed Operation Overlord, but best known as D-Day, D-Day[[note]] In military parlance, [[YouKeepUsingThatWord "D-Day"]] is the day the operation is set to commence, with "H-Hour" being the specific time at which the order will be given. There were literally ''hundreds'' of D-Days throughout the war (and Korea, and Vietnam), many of them having nothing to do with amphibious landings. For some reason, pop culture quickly came to associate the term specifically with Operation Overlord (the actual name of the Normandy invasion), and for this reason Allied planners deviated from the norm by identifying the days on which the main phases of [[HopelessWar Operation Downfall (the planned invasion of Japan)]] would commence as X-, Y-, and Z-Days.[[/note]], the Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy (part of northern France) were a very risky move (he actually had a speech [[ItsAllMyFault assuming full responsibility]] ready in case it failed) that, luckily, paid off. His record on strategic choices during the drive across France is mixed, but two things rarely in dispute are that he never passed the buck to others when things went wrong, and that he was a master at coalition warfare, keeping the British, Americans, Canadians, French, Poles, and others focused on fighting the Germans rather than on their disagreements with each other. Eisenhower continued to supervise the western front for the remainder of the war and was present at the German surrender. He was also one of the first Allied leaders to see the concentration camps in Germany, and he ordered both the military and news crews to document everything they saw knowing some would deny it really happened. He famously wrote "We are told the American soldier does not know what he is fighting for. Now, at least, he will know what he is fighting against."
3rd Sep '16 10:14:55 PM karstovich2
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The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. Supporting their ruling, he ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest.

to:

Despite regretting the Warren Court's liberalism, Eisenhower was firmly behind the Court on one issue--civil rights. As a general, he had always deeply respected the work that Black troops did (especially because Black soldiers generally did support work, which Eisenhower, who believed ''logistics'' to be the single most important thing in war, saw as being as at least as important as combat to the war effort), and this carried over to civilian life, as well. The unanimous Supreme Court ruling in ''Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka'' (1954) outlawed school segregation and seriously kicked off the CivilRightsMovement. Supporting their In support of this, ruling, he Eisenhower ordered the desegregation of DC schools (per ''Bolling v. Sharpe'') and would later send down the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the inclusion of black students in the high school at Little Rock, Arkansas after Governor Orval Faubus called up the Arkansas National Guard to block desegregation. He also proposed two Civil Rights Acts to Congress in 1957 and 1960, which were the first passed since Reconstruction ended in 1877, created the Commission on Civil Rights, and completed Truman’s process of desegregating the military. Eisenhower has often been criticized for not doing enough to support the Civil Rights Movement; he did ''personally'' support it, but he believed that the President could only help them to a limited extent and that changing things suddenly would lead to some people taking violent action to try and stop it. Other notable moments of the Civil Rights Movement during his time include the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the murder of black youth Emmett Till, African American student Autherine Lucy's admittance to the University of Alabama via court order, and the start of the sit-in movements. In 1958, Eisenhower met with notable African American leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr. He also supported the very unfortunate policy of "termination," where Native Americans were forced to move off of reservations and into cities in order to assimilate into white culture. Like nearly all things the federal government has done to Native Americans, this did not help them in the slightest.
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