History UsefulNotes / DigitalDistribution

26th Feb '15 5:53:37 PM RisefromYourGrave
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles and their 8th generation successors, the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}}, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/XboxOne, and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/WiiU, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles and their 8th generation successors, the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}}, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/XboxOne, and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/WiiU, have a built in built-in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's PlayStationNetwork's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, XboxLive's Games Store (formerly Marketplace), and Wii Shop Channel (and its successor the Nintendo [=eShop=]) respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.



* The client and server software, and the physical servers supporting them, are expensive and prone to faults, making them unavailable to independent producers (although some companies are happy to publish third party and independantly produced content with their services which inverts this somewhat).

to:

* The client and server software, and the physical servers supporting them, are expensive and prone to faults, making them unavailable to independent producers (although some companies are happy to publish third party third-party and independantly produced independently-produced content with their services which inverts this somewhat).



'''The Razor Blade Model''' - A model which rarely works for non-VideoGame media. The name for this comes from the popular analogy of a shaving company giving away their razors and making money selling disposable blades and shaving cream. The principle is the same: Rather than selling the software itself, the publisher makes money by having the user pay to ''use'' the software. Examples include subscription based models (as used with many {{MMORPG}}s such as ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''), which have the user pay a flat rate to keep playing, and "microtransaction" based [[AllegedlyFreeGame Free-To-Play]] models (as used with ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHeroes'') where the user may purchase additional content (such as extra maps or weapons).

to:

'''The Razor Blade Model''' - A model which rarely works for non-VideoGame media. The name for this comes from the popular analogy of a shaving company giving away their razors and making money selling disposable blades and shaving cream. The principle is the same: Rather than selling the software itself, the publisher makes money by having the user pay to ''use'' the software. Examples include subscription based subscription-based models (as used with many {{MMORPG}}s such as ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''), which have the user pay a flat rate to keep playing, and "microtransaction" based [[AllegedlyFreeGame Free-To-Play]] models (as used with ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHeroes'') where the user may purchase additional content (such as extra maps or weapons).
9th Jan '15 6:12:15 PM GlennMagusHarvey
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19th Sep '14 9:43:19 AM Bisected8
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}}, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, consoles and their 8th generation successors, the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}}, 3}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}}, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, 360}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/XboxOne, and UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/WiiU, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.
19th Sep '14 9:14:44 AM rexpensive
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.
7th Sep '14 5:54:16 PM DracMonster
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.
26th Jan '14 9:57:57 PM EarlOfSandvich
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'''The Razor Blade Model''' - A model which rarely works for non-VideoGame media. The name for this comes from the popular analogy of a shaving company giving away their razors and making money selling disposable blades and shaving cream. The principle is the same: Rather than selling the software itself, the publisher makes money by having the user pay to ''use'' the software. Examples include subscription based models (as used with many {{MMORPG}}s such as ''WorldOfWarcraft''), which have the user pay a flat rate to keep playing, and "microtransaction" based [[AllegedlyFreeGame Free-To-Play]] models (as used with ''BattlefieldHeroes'') where the user may purchase additional content (such as extra maps or weapons).

to:

'''The Razor Blade Model''' - A model which rarely works for non-VideoGame media. The name for this comes from the popular analogy of a shaving company giving away their razors and making money selling disposable blades and shaving cream. The principle is the same: Rather than selling the software itself, the publisher makes money by having the user pay to ''use'' the software. Examples include subscription based models (as used with many {{MMORPG}}s such as ''WorldOfWarcraft''), ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''), which have the user pay a flat rate to keep playing, and "microtransaction" based [[AllegedlyFreeGame Free-To-Play]] models (as used with ''BattlefieldHeroes'') ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHeroes'') where the user may purchase additional content (such as extra maps or weapons).
25th Sep '13 7:30:49 AM MissMokushiroku
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* There is no copy protection (or at least no strong copy protection) of any sort, so you'd better hope that the consumers are honest.

to:

* There is no copy protection CopyProtection (or at least no strong copy protection) of any sort, so you'd better hope that the consumers are honest.



This is how traditional broadcasting works, and is generally used with broadcast-style one-way content like online streaming of TV shows, movies and music. The VideoGame industry has not gotten into it as much, beyond ProductPlacement as an additional income stream.

to:

This is how traditional broadcasting works, and is generally used with broadcast-style one-way content like online streaming of TV shows, movies and music. The VideoGame industry has not gotten into it as much, beyond ProductPlacement as an additional income stream.
stream; however, this method of distribution is catching on with {{iOS}}/smartphone games, which often have separate "free" and "paid" versions, or otherwise allow the user to pay to remove the ads.
24th Feb '13 11:22:02 PM 2101OdysseyFour
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGames like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGames IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.
24th Feb '13 11:21:42 PM 2101OdysseyFour
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'''The Honesty Model''' - This is the simplest of the models. Just set up a website and some sort of payment system, have the consumers download the product (possibly with some copy protection, if you can afford it), and then send you the money (or simply request donations, rather than a fixed fee). ''VideoGame/WorldOfGoo'' was a commercial success using this method. The HumbleBundle, with a user-specified amount going to charity organizations as well as indie developers, is another successful take on the model.

to:

'''The Honesty Model''' - This is the simplest of the models. Just set up a website and some sort of payment system, have the consumers download the product (possibly with some copy protection, if you can afford it), and then send you the money (or simply request donations, rather than a fixed fee). ''VideoGame/WorldOfGoo'' was a commercial success successfully released using this method. The HumbleBundle, with a user-specified amount going to charity organizations as well as indie developers, is another successful take on the model.
24th Feb '13 11:20:51 PM 2101OdysseyFour
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'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.

to:

'''Client/Server Model''' - The consumer is given a piece of software (the "client") which interfaces with the vendor's server. The client allows the user to purchase and download the media, and verifies that the user's copy is legitimate. All three of the 7th generation consoles, the {{PlayStation 3}}, {{Xbox 360}}, and {{Wii}}, have a built in client, and a server: The Playstation Network's Store, Xbox Live Marketplace, and Wii Shop Channel respectively. The most popular service for computer users is {{Steam}} (owned by Creator/{{Valve|Software}}, the creators of ''VideoGame/{{Half-Life}}''), and larger publishers also have their own services (such as EA). These specialize in games. Some IndieGames like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'' have had found success under this model. There are also services such as the BBC iPlayer which use a similar system to distribute TV shows, although in this case for free. Also becoming popular are things like the Amazon Kindle (eBooks), where a piece of hardware is mostly a client and has little else on it at first. If the user wishes to uninstall or delete the media, they are typically allowed to download it again at a later date.



'''The Honesty Model''' - This is the simplest of the models. Just set up a website and some sort of payment system, have the consumers download the product (possibly with some copy protection, if you can afford it), and then send you the money (or simply request donations, rather than a fixed fee). IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'', and ''VideoGame/WorldOfGoo'' have had found success using this method. The HumbleBundle, with a user-specified amount going to charity organizations as well as indie developers, is another successful take on the model.

to:

'''The Honesty Model''' - This is the simplest of the models. Just set up a website and some sort of payment system, have the consumers download the product (possibly with some copy protection, if you can afford it), and then send you the money (or simply request donations, rather than a fixed fee). IndieGame[=s=] like ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}'', and ''VideoGame/WorldOfGoo'' have had found was a commercial success using this method. The HumbleBundle, with a user-specified amount going to charity organizations as well as indie developers, is another successful take on the model.
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