History UsefulNotes / Deism

28th Jun '16 6:47:12 PM Adept
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* Used by ArthurCClarke as the prevailing religion in the last installment of his ''TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' novels. Sort of. Everyone in ''3001'' believes "as little as possible", and the big split is between Theists, who believe "in at least one god", and Deists, who believe "in at most one god".

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* Used by ArthurCClarke Creator/ArthurCClarke as the prevailing religion in the last installment of his ''TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' ''Literature/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' novels. Sort of. Everyone in ''3001'' believes "as little as possible", and the big split is between Theists, who believe "in at least one god", and Deists, who believe "in at most one god".



** Also used in the [[RendezvousWithRama Rama Series]], although again it's not really present until the last installment, ''Rama Revealed'' (and a little bit in ''The Garden of Rama''). The creatures who built Rama did so as part of a project to collect life from all over the universe, to learn about God's plan for it, and are committed Deists.

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** Also used in the [[RendezvousWithRama [[Literature/RendezvousWithRama Rama Series]], although again it's not really present until the last installment, ''Rama Revealed'' (and a little bit in ''The Garden of Rama''). The creatures who built Rama did so as part of a project to collect life from all over the universe, to learn about God's plan for it, and are committed Deists.
1st Feb '16 11:25:59 AM FF32
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* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.

to:

* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin Creator/BenjaminFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.
14th Jun '15 2:20:19 PM Morgenthaler
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* The god of StarMaker could be this, though that one is so callous to the suffering going on in the Universe as to seem downright malevolent.

to:

* The god of StarMaker ''Literature/StarMaker'' could be this, though that one is so callous to the suffering going on in the Universe as to seem downright malevolent.
28th Dec '14 12:06:29 AM JulianLapostat
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Ironically, during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment, the most anti-clerical and critical views of organized religion and Christianity came from authors of a deist perspective. While atheist authors did exist, for the most part their arguments of ReligionIsWrong did not catch a wide audience or be treated as anything more than a "shock" or "scandal" among the educated elite, they were seen even by non-believers as pranksters rather than someone posing a real challenge to the Church. Deist authors by arguing for a natural religion based on then-scientific knowledge, by being "for" something provided a more coherent argument at the time to live a non-Christian, secular life. During the French Revolution, deists had wide support from liberal aristocrats and middle and lower-middle class people as well as working class agitators, while atheist radicals were quite famous for attacking and destroying Church property and even threatening pro-revolutionary priests such as Henri Gregoire (who wanted a liberal Catholic Church, clamped down on anti-semitism and campaigned for abolitionism) during the dechristianizing campaign. Robespierre, a famous Deist, managed to clamp down on excesses of dechristianization, by stating that "atheism is aristocratic" seeing it as a viewpoint that essentially states [[WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons that common people are idiotic for having religious sentiment]]. He used Deism to erode the role of the Church and clampdown on dechristianizing excess, by wedding it to revolutionary doctrine to create a new nationalist Cult of the Supreme Being which bore fruit in the most popular, elaborate and widely attended Revolutionary Festival of the era. Nationalism during the Revolution often had a quasi-religious fervor where people saw democracy and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment as new doctrines for a non-denominational Church.

to:

Ironically, during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment, the most anti-clerical and critical views of organized religion and Christianity came from authors of a deist perspective. While atheist authors did exist, for the most part their arguments of ReligionIsWrong did not catch a wide audience or be treated as anything more than a "shock" or "scandal" among the educated elite, they were seen even by non-believers as pranksters rather than someone posing a real challenge to the Church. Deist authors by arguing for a natural religion based on then-scientific knowledge, by being "for" something provided a more coherent argument at the time to live a non-Christian, secular life. During the French Revolution, deists had wide support from liberal aristocrats and middle and lower-middle class people as well as working class agitators, while atheist radicals were quite famous for attacking and destroying Church property and even threatening pro-revolutionary priests such as Henri Gregoire (who wanted a liberal Catholic Church, clamped down on anti-semitism and campaigned for abolitionism) during the dechristianizing campaign. Robespierre, a famous Deist, managed to clamp down on excesses of dechristianization, by stating that "atheism is aristocratic" seeing it as a viewpoint that essentially states [[WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons that common people are idiotic for having religious sentiment]]. He used Deism to erode the role of the Church and clampdown on dechristianizing excess, by wedding it to revolutionary doctrine to create a new nationalist Cult of the Supreme Being which bore fruit in the most popular, elaborate and widely attended Revolutionary Festival of the era. Nationalism during the Revolution often had a quasi-religious fervor where people saw democracy and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment as new doctrines for a non-denominational Church. Though, the French ultimately erred in using state power to decide religious matters. The American Founders, having more time, distance and a less hostile partisan climate than in France, used Deist ideas of a Distant God guiding human endeavors in Science and Politics to create a comprehensive, precisely written separation of Church and State in the First Amendment that kept the State as non-intervening and non-hostile to religious belief. They were helped by the fact that the Catholic Church wasn't omnipresent as it was in France (it was the largest landowner pre-Revolution) and many of the Protestant sects had a strong liberal dissenting tradition since they were persecuted by the Anglican Church in England.
27th Dec '14 11:48:06 PM JulianLapostat
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Some like Creator/{{Voltaire}} was highly critical of Church superstitions and his writings in ''Candide, Zadig, The Ingenu'' enjoyed a wider audience than the author of the atheist pamphlet, "The Three Imposters". Likewise, it was Creator/ThomasPaine who wrote the widely read and popular ''The Age of Reason'', which provided Biblical criticism from a Deist perspective that was widely read by most readers. While Deists such as Voltaire was critical of atheism as well [[note]]it was in response to "The Three Imposters" that Voltaire stated "If God does not exist, it is necessary to invent him[[/note]], a lot of his arguments and ideas, as well as that of Paine's inspired later atheist writers and authors, who took the advantages of later scientific developments such as Darwin's evolutionary theory as well as Marxist critique to provide a more comprehensive and thorough secular worldview.

to:

Some like Creator/{{Voltaire}} was highly critical of Church superstitions and his writings in ''Candide, Zadig, The Ingenu'' enjoyed a wider audience than the author of the atheist pamphlet, "The Three Imposters". Likewise, it was Creator/ThomasPaine who wrote the widely read and popular ''The Age of Reason'', which provided Biblical criticism from a Deist perspective that was widely read by most readers. While Deists such as Voltaire was critical of atheism as well [[note]]it was in response to "The Three Imposters" that Voltaire stated "If God does not exist, it is necessary to invent him[[/note]], a lot of his arguments and ideas, as well as that of Paine's inspired later atheist writers and authors, who took the advantages of later scientific developments such as Darwin's evolutionary theory as well as leftist, anarchist and Marxist critique (who managed to make atheism accessible and viable to the common man by describing it as a means of control that acknowledges discontent but pacifies it to prevent real agitation) to provide a more comprehensive and thorough secular worldview.
worldview than {{Deism}}.
27th Dec '14 11:44:32 PM JulianLapostat
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Some like Creator/{{Voltaire}} was highly critical of Church superstitions and his writings in ''Candide, Zadig, The Ingenu'' enjoyed a wider audience than the author of the atheist pamphlet, "The Three Imposters". Likewise, it was Creator/ThomasPaine who wrote the widely read and popular ''The Age of Reason'', which provided Biblical criticism from a Deist perspective that was widely read by most readers. While Deists such as Voltaire was critical of atheism as well [[note]]it was in response to "The Three Imposters" that Voltaire stated "If God does not exist, it is necessary to invent him[[/note], a lot of his arguments and ideas, as well as that of Paine's inspired later atheist writers and authors, who took the advantages of later scientific developments such as Darwin's evolutionary theory as well as Marxist critique to provide a more comprehensive and thorough secular worldview.

to:

Some like Creator/{{Voltaire}} was highly critical of Church superstitions and his writings in ''Candide, Zadig, The Ingenu'' enjoyed a wider audience than the author of the atheist pamphlet, "The Three Imposters". Likewise, it was Creator/ThomasPaine who wrote the widely read and popular ''The Age of Reason'', which provided Biblical criticism from a Deist perspective that was widely read by most readers. While Deists such as Voltaire was critical of atheism as well [[note]]it was in response to "The Three Imposters" that Voltaire stated "If God does not exist, it is necessary to invent him[[/note], him[[/note]], a lot of his arguments and ideas, as well as that of Paine's inspired later atheist writers and authors, who took the advantages of later scientific developments such as Darwin's evolutionary theory as well as Marxist critique to provide a more comprehensive and thorough secular worldview.
27th Dec '14 11:44:03 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

Ironically, during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment, the most anti-clerical and critical views of organized religion and Christianity came from authors of a deist perspective. While atheist authors did exist, for the most part their arguments of ReligionIsWrong did not catch a wide audience or be treated as anything more than a "shock" or "scandal" among the educated elite, they were seen even by non-believers as pranksters rather than someone posing a real challenge to the Church. Deist authors by arguing for a natural religion based on then-scientific knowledge, by being "for" something provided a more coherent argument at the time to live a non-Christian, secular life. During the French Revolution, deists had wide support from liberal aristocrats and middle and lower-middle class people as well as working class agitators, while atheist radicals were quite famous for attacking and destroying Church property and even threatening pro-revolutionary priests such as Henri Gregoire (who wanted a liberal Catholic Church, clamped down on anti-semitism and campaigned for abolitionism) during the dechristianizing campaign. Robespierre, a famous Deist, managed to clamp down on excesses of dechristianization, by stating that "atheism is aristocratic" seeing it as a viewpoint that essentially states [[WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons that common people are idiotic for having religious sentiment]]. He used Deism to erode the role of the Church and clampdown on dechristianizing excess, by wedding it to revolutionary doctrine to create a new nationalist Cult of the Supreme Being which bore fruit in the most popular, elaborate and widely attended Revolutionary Festival of the era. Nationalism during the Revolution often had a quasi-religious fervor where people saw democracy and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment as new doctrines for a non-denominational Church.

Some like Creator/{{Voltaire}} was highly critical of Church superstitions and his writings in ''Candide, Zadig, The Ingenu'' enjoyed a wider audience than the author of the atheist pamphlet, "The Three Imposters". Likewise, it was Creator/ThomasPaine who wrote the widely read and popular ''The Age of Reason'', which provided Biblical criticism from a Deist perspective that was widely read by most readers. While Deists such as Voltaire was critical of atheism as well [[note]]it was in response to "The Three Imposters" that Voltaire stated "If God does not exist, it is necessary to invent him[[/note], a lot of his arguments and ideas, as well as that of Paine's inspired later atheist writers and authors, who took the advantages of later scientific developments such as Darwin's evolutionary theory as well as Marxist critique to provide a more comprehensive and thorough secular worldview.
26th Dec '14 4:11:39 PM Quag15
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'''Deism''' is a theological theory proposing that a god created the Universe but is an AllPowerfulBystander who has since refrained from any activity in it. It was espoused by many European scientific thinkers of the 18th century (the Enlightenment age), some leaders of TheFrenchRevolution and some US founding fathers such as Creator/BenjaminFranklin, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson and Creator/ThomasPaine.

to:

'''Deism''' is a theological theory proposing that a god created the Universe but is an AllPowerfulBystander who has since refrained from any activity in it. It was espoused by many European scientific thinkers of the 18th century (the Enlightenment age), some leaders of TheFrenchRevolution UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and some US founding fathers such as Creator/BenjaminFranklin, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson and Creator/ThomasPaine.



* TheFrenchRevolution: Deism and deists also had a huge influence on the French Revoluton. {{Creator/Voltaire}} was a deist, for example.

to:

* TheFrenchRevolution: UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution: Deism and deists also had a huge influence on the French Revoluton. {{Creator/Voltaire}} was a deist, for example.
15th Apr '14 7:38:11 AM LongLiveHumour
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'''Deism''' is a theological theory proposing that a god created the Universe but is an AllPowerfulBystander who has since refrained from any activity in it. It was espoused by many European scientific thinkers of the 18th century (the Enlightenment age), some leaders of TheFrenchRevolution and some US founding fathers such as Creator/BenjaminFranklin, ThomasJefferson and Creator/ThomasPaine.

to:

'''Deism''' is a theological theory proposing that a god created the Universe but is an AllPowerfulBystander who has since refrained from any activity in it. It was espoused by many European scientific thinkers of the 18th century (the Enlightenment age), some leaders of TheFrenchRevolution and some US founding fathers such as Creator/BenjaminFranklin, ThomasJefferson UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson and Creator/ThomasPaine.



* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.

to:

* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that ThomasJefferson UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.
15th Jan '14 11:30:57 AM LongLiveHumour
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* TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.

to:

* TheAmericanRevolution: UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Deism would probably be almost completely forgotten today, if not for the fact that many leaders of the American Revolution considered themselves Deists. As philosophically-minded, anti-establishment figures in the 18th century, it's practically certain that at least a few of them would be. While exact numbers are hard to pin down and the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment applies, it's unquestionable that ThomasJefferson took it upon himself to edit supernatural elements out of Literature/TheBible, and Creator/BenFranklin found Deism so persuasive it led to a good quote for StrawmanHasAPoint.
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