History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

20th Jul '16 8:07:46 PM HasturHasturHastur
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* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters. (Was on their license plate, from 1987-2000.)

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* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters.lobsters (and, to a lesser degree, blueberries). (Was on their license plate, from 1987-2000.)



* Vermont and New Hampshire are famous for maple syrup,




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* Steak bomb: Similar in theory to the Philly cheesesteak, it is believe to have originated from the Boston area and is now a mainstay of New England delis, grinder shops, and pizza places. Shaved steak (peppered if the place is any good), provolone or mozzarella, grilled onions, bell peppers, and mushrooms are cooked together on a griddle and then crammed into a sub roll; most places (the closer to Boston, the greater the likelihood) will also include salami. It's a gutbuster that is not for those whose stomachs are averse to lots of grease, but it ''is'' very good.
* Pastrami on rye: A classic of New York Jewish delicatessens (though you can also find plenty of very good and perfectly authentic ones in Los Angeles as well, owing to that city's own fairly sizable Jewish diaspora), it is ''always'' (if it can be called authentic) made up of nothing but enormous amounts of hot pastrami and spicy brown mustard on Jewish rye and is usually served with kosher dill pickles on the side.
5th Jul '16 5:03:42 PM nombretomado
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Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")

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Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of AndrewJackson UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")
25th Jun '16 8:37:36 AM karstovich2
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* In 1981, Wolfgang Puck and Ed [=LaDou=] started Spago, a restaurant that would put just about any topping on a pizza from barbecue chicken to zucchini flowers. Over time almost anything with unusual toppings or seasoned crust has become known as California style.

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* In 1981, Wolfgang Puck and Ed [=LaDou=] started Spago, a restaurant in Beverly Hills, CA that would put just about any topping on a pizza from barbecue chicken to zucchini flowers. Over time almost anything with unusual toppings or seasoned crust has become known as California style.
24th Jun '16 9:07:17 PM karstovich2
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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.


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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

28th May '16 12:20:39 AM KYCubbie
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As hinted at above, the national chains are Pizza Hut, Domino's, Papa John's, and Little Caesar's. They all produce a fairly similar product, with a rather doughy crust and a surfeit of cheese. This is the result of a hybridization of several pizza styles and modifications to suit the tastes of people in the home area of the style--which, by and large, was the Midwest. As mentioned, two of the chains (Domino's and Little Caesar's) started in the Detroit area (broadly defined), while Pizza Hut was originally from Kansas and Papa John's was founded in Louisville, Kentucky (which more or less literally sits on the border between the South and the Midwest--Indiana is just across the river). (Pizza Hut has since been bought up by the Louisville-based Yum! Brands--also responsible for KFC, among other chains--leading to amusing fights between the two megacorps about naming rights in Louisville.)

to:

As hinted at above, the national chains are Pizza Hut, Domino's, Papa John's, and Little Caesar's. They all produce a fairly similar product, with a rather doughy crust and a surfeit of cheese. This is the result of a hybridization of several pizza styles and modifications to suit the tastes of people in the home area of the style--which, by and large, was the Midwest. As mentioned, two of the chains (Domino's and Little Caesar's) started in the Detroit area (broadly defined), while Pizza Hut was originally from Kansas and Papa John's was founded in Louisville, Kentucky Jeffersonville, Indiana (which more or less literally sits on the border between the South Midwest and the Midwest--Indiana South; Louisville, Kentucky is just across the river).Ohio River). (Pizza Hut has since been bought up by the Louisville-based Yum! Brands--also responsible for KFC, among other chains--leading to amusing fights between the two megacorps about naming rights in Louisville.)



The U.S. State of UsefulNotes/NewMexico has a unique style of cuisine, which is sometimes referred to as Mexican food by outsiders. New Mexico, like other American states, has its share of non-authentic "Mexican" restaurants. But, there is a completely separate type of cuisine in the state, which is authentic and unique in-and-of-itself called New Mexican cuisine. It is a merger of ancient Native American and Spanish foods, served in either a smothered Mexican vaquero/cowboy style or in a clean Route 66 Americana style. Restaurants calling this food "Mexican food" or "Mexican and American foods" are usually referring to it being served smothered or the clean style. See the New Mexican section under the "Foods By Region" section.

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The U.S. State state of UsefulNotes/NewMexico has a unique style of cuisine, which is sometimes referred to as Mexican food by outsiders. New Mexico, like other American states, has its share of non-authentic "Mexican" restaurants. But, there is a completely separate type of cuisine in the state, which is authentic and unique in-and-of-itself called New Mexican cuisine. It is a merger of ancient Native American and Spanish foods, served in either a smothered Mexican vaquero/cowboy style or in a clean Route 66 Americana style. Restaurants calling this food "Mexican food" or "Mexican and American foods" are usually referring to it being served smothered or the clean style. See the New Mexican section under the "Foods By Region" section.
8th Apr '16 4:05:47 PM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.
5th Apr '16 4:12:22 PM karstovich2
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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning) white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the south, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

to:

Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning) seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the south, South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.
South.

5th Apr '16 4:08:31 PM karstovich2
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The South is most narrowly defined as the states that formed the Confederacy during the Civil War, minus a few marginal regions --essentially all the states in the southeast going from the Atlantic coast to Arkansas, Louisiana, and east Texas, but not Florida (at least not the lower half). Most broader definitions include Kentucky, a state that stayed in the Union during the Civil War despite slavery being legal there. Some broader definitions may include Maryland and Delaware, also Union slave states, but those states are mostly considered Mid-Atlantic nowadays and are primarily made up of suburbs of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, DC. West Virginia seceded from secession in 1861; the northwest is Midwestern, the northeast Mid-Atlantic, the interior Appalachian. (Appalachia is not quite the same as the lowland South, though, and fought for the North during the Civil War.) The southern parts of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio are "Butternut Country", with a pretty close cultural affinity with the South; and Missouri was settled by Virginians, and was a Northern slave state during the war.

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The South is most narrowly defined as the states that formed the Confederacy during the Civil War, minus a few marginal regions --essentially all the states in the southeast going from the Atlantic coast to Arkansas, Louisiana, and east Texas, but not Florida (at least not the lower half). Most broader definitions include Kentucky, a state that stayed in the Union during the Civil War despite slavery being legal there. Some broader definitions may include Maryland and Delaware, also Union slave states, but those states are mostly considered Mid-Atlantic nowadays and are primarily made up of suburbs of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, DC. West Virginia seceded from secession in 1861; the northwest is Midwestern, the northeast Mid-Atlantic, the interior Appalachian. (Appalachia is not quite the same as the lowland South, though, and fought for the North during the Civil War.) The southern parts of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio are "Butternut Country", with a pretty close cultural affinity with the South; and Missouri was having been settled by Virginians, Virginians and was also having been a Northern slave state during the war.
war, is famously betwixt-and-between, not quite Midwestern, and not quite Southern.
5th Apr '16 3:56:39 PM karstovich2
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.
5th Apr '16 9:44:12 AM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.



* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.
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