History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

3rd Nov '16 7:13:53 AM case
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* A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
* Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
* There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

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* ** A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
* ** Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
* ** There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.
3rd Nov '16 7:13:24 AM case
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#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" Ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is ''way'' different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

to:

#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" Ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is ''way'' different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.
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2nd Nov '16 7:54:32 PM karstovich2
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Mainstream brands are the beers that foreigners are usually talking about when they [[ATankardOfMooseUrine make jokes about how bad American beer is]].[[note]]This reputation dates back to the Prohibition era, which shuttered most American breweries for nearly a decade and a half. When they reopened in the 1930s, many had to start almost from scratch, as brewing had been on its way to becoming a LostTechnology -- many pre-Prohibition brewers were now old and retired, and many Prohibition-era brewers of illegal moonshine and "bathtub gin" were about as knowledgeable on the subject as present-day meth lab operators.[[/note]] This is not a very nice thing to say about anyone's alcohol, and casual drinkers don't like hearing it[[note]]Also, honest microbrewers will admit they would ''kill'' to have the degree of standardization from batch to batch that Anheuser-Busch manages to achieve; successful mass production means ''very'' high quality control, with the proviso that "quality" in this instance means more "exactly like the last tanker load and every other one before it" than "subjectively great"[[/note]]. They're meant to appeal to a very broad demographic at a very low price, so they tend to be mass-produced using recipes that result in a fairly inoffensive brew. American mass-market brew (and it isn't just American anymore, as brands like Carling, Kirin, Heineken, Kingfisher, and Tsingtao can attest to) differs from the "traditional" lager and pilsner beers it's based on by the addition of considerable amounts of ''adjuncts''. These are cereal grains other than barley, added to the brew to give alcohol content and a generic sweetness without all the subtle flavors of barley malt and hops. This type of brew isn't just brewed for cheapness; American barley strains have more protein than European varieties and can make a hazier, less presentable brew by themselves, so the addition of corn or rice reduces the amount of haze while keeping the alcohol content to a respectable level. For an idea of what a beer with American ingredients made to a German or Czech recipe would look and taste like, they're often sold as "traditional lagers" or "pre-prohibition lagers;" regional brew Yuengling is probably the largest of this category, although Sam Adams' flagship Boston Lager is in this territory as well, as is Narragansett Lager[[note]]the brand of beer favored--and crushed--by captain Sam Quint in ''{{Film/Jaws}}''[[/note]], another regional specialty. Important note: mainstream American beers are brewed to be served cold--that is, refrigerated (though not with ice cubes). Their flavor will suffer if served at room temperature.

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Mainstream brands are the beers that foreigners are usually talking about when they [[ATankardOfMooseUrine make jokes about how bad American beer is]].[[note]]This reputation dates back to the Prohibition era, which shuttered most American breweries for nearly a decade and a half. When they reopened in the 1930s, many had to start almost from scratch, as brewing had been on its way to becoming a LostTechnology -- many pre-Prohibition brewers were now old and retired, and many Prohibition-era brewers of illegal moonshine and "bathtub gin" were about as knowledgeable on the subject as present-day meth lab operators.[[/note]] This is not a very nice thing to say about anyone's alcohol, and casual drinkers don't like hearing it[[note]]Also, honest microbrewers will admit they would ''kill'' to have the degree of standardization from batch to batch that Anheuser-Busch manages to achieve; successful mass production means ''very'' high quality control, with the proviso that "quality" in this instance means more "exactly like the last tanker load and every other one before it" than "subjectively great"[[/note]]. They're meant to appeal to a very broad demographic at a very low price, so they tend to be mass-produced using recipes that result in a fairly inoffensive brew. American mass-market brew (and it isn't just American anymore, as brands like Carling, Kirin, Heineken, Kingfisher, and Tsingtao can attest to) differs from the "traditional" lager and pilsner beers it's based on by the addition of considerable amounts of ''adjuncts''. These are cereal grains other than barley, added to the brew to give alcohol content and a generic sweetness without all the subtle flavors of barley malt and hops. This type of brew isn't just brewed for cheapness; American barley strains have more protein than European varieties and can make a hazier, less presentable brew by themselves, so the addition of corn or rice reduces the amount of haze while keeping the alcohol content to a respectable level. For an idea of what a beer with American ingredients made to a German or Czech recipe would look and taste like, they're often sold as "traditional lagers" or "pre-prohibition lagers;" regional "pre-Prohibition lagers," as they were one of the most if not the most popular beer styles before Prohibition (thanks the the mid-to-late 19th-centuy takeover of the U.S. beer industry and culture by Germans and others from Central Europe). Regional brew Yuengling is probably the largest of this category, although Sam Adams' flagship Boston Lager is in this territory as well, as is Narragansett Lager[[note]]the brand of beer favored--and crushed--by captain Sam Quint in ''{{Film/Jaws}}''[[/note]], another regional specialty. Important note: mainstream American beers are brewed to be served cold--that is, refrigerated (though not with ice cubes). Their flavor will suffer if served at room temperature.
23rd Oct '16 11:49:50 AM karstovich2
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* The UsefulNotes/TwinCities give us the fascinating argument about the area's unique variety of burger, which involves putting a slice of cheese ''inside'' the raw patty as well as on top. The two claimants--Matt's Bar and the 5-8 Club, both of Cedar Avenue in South Minneapolis[[note]]Though fortunately they're about three miles apart[[/note]]--go so far as to ''spell'' it differently: the 5-8 calls it the "Juicy Lucy," but Matt's ''insists'' that it's really the "[[InheritedIlliteracyTitle Jucy Lucy]]". This goes to the point where the 5-8 staff wear shirts saying "If it's spelled right, it's done right," while Matt's advertising says, "If it's spelled right, [[SubvertedRhymeEveryOccasion you are eating a shameless rip-off!]]"
* In Los Angeles, there's the dispute over the origin of the French dip sandwich between Cole's[[note]]In full: Cole's Pacific Electric Buffet[[/note]] and Philippe's.[[note]]Also called "Philippe's The Original"[[/note]] Interestingly, ''neither'' place serves the sandwich as it is usually done elsewhere, even in L.A.; rather than having the roast beef and cheese on a dry baguette with ''jus'' on the side, the sandwich is instead served "wet" with the ''jus'' poured on the bread (making it somewhat similar to a Chicago Italian beef sandwich, but with cheese and no peppers).[[note]]It's also similar to a Philadelphia roast beef sandwich, but that's an extremely unlikely influence; that sandwich is obscure even in Philly.[[/note]]

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* The UsefulNotes/TwinCities give us the fascinating argument about the area's unique variety of burger, which involves putting a slice of cheese ''inside'' the raw patty as well as on top.top, with the result that when the burger is cooked, the cheese has melted very thoroughly and you have to be careful how you bite into it lest you get a jet of scalding-hot liquid cheese spraying directly into your mouth. The two claimants--Matt's Bar and the 5-8 Club, both of Cedar Avenue in South Minneapolis[[note]]Though fortunately they're about three miles apart[[/note]]--go so far as to ''spell'' it differently: the 5-8 calls it the "Juicy Lucy," but Matt's ''insists'' that it's really the "[[InheritedIlliteracyTitle Jucy Lucy]]". This goes to the point where the 5-8 staff wear shirts saying "If it's spelled right, it's done right," while Matt's advertising says, "If it's spelled right, [[SubvertedRhymeEveryOccasion you are eating a shameless rip-off!]]"
* In Los Angeles, there's the dispute over the origin of the French dip sandwich between Cole's[[note]]In full: Cole's Pacific Electric Buffet[[/note]] and Philippe's.[[note]]Also called "Philippe's The Original"[[/note]] Interestingly, ''neither'' place serves the sandwich as it is usually done elsewhere, even in L.A.; rather than having the roast beef and cheese on a dry baguette with ''jus'' on the side, the sandwich is instead served "wet" with the ''jus'' poured on the bread (making it somewhat similar to a Chicago Italian beef sandwich, but with cheese being standard rather than optional and no peppers).[[note]]It's also similar to a Philadelphia roast beef sandwich, but that's an extremely unlikely influence; that sandwich is obscure even in Philly.[[/note]]
22nd Oct '16 5:30:36 AM Morgenthaler
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On a related note, there are many Americanized Chinese restaurants that claim to serve "Hunan" cuisine or have "Hunan" in their name. Authentic Hunan cuisine is quite distinctive (featuring a spicy hot-garlicky-oily-smokey flavor profile[[note]]Which frankly really would go down rather well in the US[[/note]] and lots of fresh vegetables) and difficult to find in the US. The usual explanation for this phenomenon is that when UsefulNotes/RichardNixon visited China and was welcomed with a lavish banquet, whenever he found a particularly tasty dish he would ask MaoZedong where the dish was from. Mao, having been born a peasant[[note]]A rich peasant, but a peasant nonetheless[[/note]] in Hunan Province, [[CreatorProvincialism pretended that these were all dishes from Hunan]], and Nixon returned to the US singing the praises of Hunan cuisine.

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On a related note, there are many Americanized Chinese restaurants that claim to serve "Hunan" cuisine or have "Hunan" in their name. Authentic Hunan cuisine is quite distinctive (featuring a spicy hot-garlicky-oily-smokey flavor profile[[note]]Which frankly really would go down rather well in the US[[/note]] and lots of fresh vegetables) and difficult to find in the US. The usual explanation for this phenomenon is that when UsefulNotes/RichardNixon visited China and was welcomed with a lavish banquet, whenever he found a particularly tasty dish he would ask MaoZedong UsefulNotes/MaoZedong where the dish was from. Mao, having been born a peasant[[note]]A rich peasant, but a peasant nonetheless[[/note]] in Hunan Province, [[CreatorProvincialism pretended that these were all dishes from Hunan]], and Nixon returned to the US singing the praises of Hunan cuisine.
15th Oct '16 8:30:19 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half way "authentic" Ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is ''way'' different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

to:

#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half way half-way "authentic" Ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is ''way'' different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.
15th Oct '16 8:28:15 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs (a hybrid of the last two)]], Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss[[note]]a derivative of Emmentaler[[/note]] (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca; the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name; how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile[[note]]With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions; the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity.[[/note]] and more distant ones...um...not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta[[note]]Also note that there's American ''cheese'', which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasturized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese"; both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way[[/note]]. There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses--artisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least TheNineties. With ''very'' rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.

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** Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs (a hybrid of the last two)]], Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss[[note]]a derivative of Emmentaler[[/note]] (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca; the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name; how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile[[note]]With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions; the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity.[[/note]] and more distant ones...um... um... not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta[[note]]Also note that there's American ''cheese'', which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasturized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese"; both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way[[/note]]. There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses--artisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least TheNineties. With ''very'' rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
12th Oct '16 10:56:24 AM HasturHasturHastur
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#Although this might conceivably vary by region a ''little'' (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we put cheese on ''[[TrademarkFavoriteFood everything]]''.[[note]] This has been noticed abroad; James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a ''Series/TopGear'' bit on UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers put[s] cheese on everything]]."[[/note]] On virtually every soup, on virtually every salad, on most kinds of sandwiches... it would be much easier to list the foods our restaurants ''won't'' automatically put cheese on, although it's harder to think of them. One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish.[[note]]And even then, the UsefulNotes/McDonalds Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese.[[/note]]

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#Although this might conceivably vary by region a ''little'' (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we put cheese on ''[[TrademarkFavoriteFood everything]]''.[[note]] This has been noticed abroad; James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a ''Series/TopGear'' bit on UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers put[s] cheese on everything]]."[[/note]] On virtually every soup, on virtually every salad, on most kinds of sandwiches... it would be much easier to list the foods our restaurants ''won't'' automatically put cheese on, although it's harder to think of them. One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish.[[note]]And even then, the UsefulNotes/McDonalds Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese.cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.[[/note]]



There's also a fair amount of localized ethnic food as well. Italian-American food is very popular nearly everywhere, with major cuisine centers in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Providence, and generally well above the Olive Garden standard. The Irish are basically synonymous with Boston. Good eastern European Jewish food can be found here and there, but '''great''' Jewish food is probably what New York City is best known for. A lot of Greek restaurant owners live in the Northeast; Greek diner food (see above) is very popular,[[note]]Especially in [[SeriousBusiness New]] [[RunningGag Jersey]][[/note]] and especially around Boston, there's a distinct style of crispy, olive oil-drizzled Greek pizza that keeps a lot of college students going late at night.[[note]]Greek pizza tends to be LoveItOrHateIt with locals when compared against the New York-inspired Italian pizza in the North End, however.[[/note]] There's a large Portuguese community along what is collectively known as the South Coast (from Cape Cod, MA to the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound), and in those areas, Portuguese food, particularly caldo verde (kale soup with beans, potatoes, and linguiça sausage), is as native as baked scrod or New York pizza. Northern Massachusetts has a very large southeast Asian population largely made up of Vietnam War refugees (it should be noted that its Cambodian population is very distinct from California because rural families were settled in Massachusetts while urban populations were settled in California). Pennsylvania Dutch (actually German) food is famous nation-wide and is often thought of as the pinnacle of country-style or comfort food (though this would be contested by the proponents of Southern cuisine); in addition, Philadelphia has its cheesesteaks (provolone, Cheez Wiz, or go home[[note]]In general, Wiz is more popular, but provolone is the older usage--the sandwich was invented in the 1930s, while Wiz was invented in 1952--and considered characteristic of aficionados. Arguments about which is more "traditional" are common in Philly.[[/note]]), which was invented by Italian-Americans and has some Italian-ish elements (particularly the bread--an Italian roll--and the provolone cheese option) and soft pretzels (which are reflective of German influence) and a few other specialties (including roast pork sandwiches--a derivative of the Central Italian favorite ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porchetta porchetta]]''--served at many places that do cheesesteaks, [=DiNic's=] at Reading Terminal and the small chain Tony Luke's being most famous). Recent immigration has also brought significant amounts of excellent southeast Asian (particularly Vietnamese), Brazilian, and Caribbean food to the area as well. The downside: the further you go from New York City, the less chance you have of finding decent Mexican food, and, when going north, the more likely the "Mexican" restaurants are actually Salvadoran or Colombian.[[note]]There is an old joke from a commercial for a particular brand of salsa featuring cowboys around the fire getting indignant when they find out the salsa is made in "NEW YORK CITY?!" Pay it no mind; NYC has some of the best restaurant cooks in the world, and a ''ton'' of them are from Mexico. NYC salsa is just fine.[[/note]] In New England, very little of the Latino population is Mexican, and is often not even Hispanic [[note]]Brazilians speak Portuguese, Haitians speak Haitian Creole (some also speak French)[[/note]]

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There's also a fair amount of localized ethnic food as well. Italian-American food is very popular nearly everywhere, with major cuisine centers in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Providence, and generally well above the Olive Garden standard. The Irish are basically synonymous with Boston. Good eastern European Jewish food can be found here and there, but '''great''' Jewish food is probably what New York City is best known for. A lot of Greek restaurant owners live in the Northeast; Greek diner food (see above) is very popular,[[note]]Especially in [[SeriousBusiness New]] [[RunningGag Jersey]][[/note]] and especially around Boston, there's a distinct style of crispy, olive oil-drizzled Greek pizza that keeps a lot of college students going late at night.[[note]]Greek pizza tends to be LoveItOrHateIt with locals when compared against the New York-inspired Italian pizza in the North End, however.however, and low-quality "______ House of Pizza" restaurants are usually synonymous with Greek pizza in New England and are usually viewed as the domain of townies and hungry drunks.[[/note]] There's a large Portuguese[[note]]mostly from Madeira and the Azores; the Brazilian Portuguese disapora settled elsewhere[[/note]] community along what is collectively known as the South Coast (from Cape Cod, MA to the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound), Sound, with Fall River, New Bedford, Taunton, and Providence serving as something of the epicenter of the community), and in those areas, Portuguese food, particularly caldo verde (kale soup with beans, potatoes, and linguiça sausage), is as native as baked scrod or New York pizza. Northern Massachusetts (primarily in Lowell and Lynn) has a very large southeast Asian population largely made up of Vietnam War refugees (it should be noted that its Cambodian population is very distinct from California because rural families were settled in Massachusetts while urban populations were settled in California). Pennsylvania Dutch (actually German) food is famous nation-wide and is often thought of as the pinnacle of country-style or comfort food (though this would be contested by the proponents of Southern cuisine); in addition, Philadelphia has its cheesesteaks (provolone, Cheez Wiz, or go home[[note]]In general, Wiz is more popular, but provolone is the older usage--the sandwich was invented in the 1930s, while Wiz was invented in 1952--and considered characteristic of aficionados. Arguments about which is more "traditional" are common in Philly.[[/note]]), which was invented by Italian-Americans and has some Italian-ish elements (particularly the bread--an Italian roll--and the provolone cheese option) and soft pretzels (which are reflective of German influence) and a few other specialties (including roast pork sandwiches--a derivative of the Central Italian favorite ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porchetta porchetta]]''--served at many places that do cheesesteaks, [=DiNic's=] at Reading Terminal and the small chain Tony Luke's being most famous). Recent immigration has also brought significant amounts of excellent southeast Asian (particularly Vietnamese), Brazilian, and Caribbean food to the area as well. The downside: the further you go from New York City, the less chance you have of finding decent Mexican food, and, when going north, the more likely the "Mexican" restaurants are actually Salvadoran or Colombian.[[note]]There is an old joke from a commercial for a particular brand of salsa featuring cowboys around the fire getting indignant when they find out the salsa is made in "NEW YORK CITY?!" Pay it no mind; NYC has some of the best restaurant cooks in the world, and a ''ton'' of them are from Mexico. NYC salsa is just fine.[[/note]] In New England, very little of the Latino population is Mexican, and is often not even Hispanic [[note]]Brazilians speak Portuguese, Haitians speak Haitian Creole (some also speak French)[[/note]]



National chains include: Subway (playing the New York association and the "healthier than fast food" bit to the hilt -- also notably [[http://ezlocal.com/blog/post/10-largest-fast-food-chains-2013.aspx the largest fast-food chain in the country]] with more locations than the runners-up, [=McDonald's=] and Pizza Hut, ''combined''), Quizno's. Panera Bread is a slightly more upscale take on the concept.

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National chains include: Subway (playing the New York association and the "healthier than fast food" bit to the hilt -- also notably [[http://ezlocal.com/blog/post/10-largest-fast-food-chains-2013.aspx the largest fast-food chain in the country]] with more locations than the runners-up, [=McDonald's=] and Pizza Hut, ''combined''), Quizno's.Quizno's, Jimmy John's, Jersey Mike's, and Firehouse Subs. Panera Bread is a slightly more upscale take on the concept.



"Craft beers", also known as microbrews, are meant for a more discriminating clientele, and usually come in smaller batches; the American Brewers' Association defines a microbrewery as one that produces less than 15,000 American barrels a year. This conflation of craft and microbrew is no longer strictly true; a number of formerly small craft breweries are today producing well over 15,000 barrels, most notably the Boston Beer Company (makers of Sam Adams, the first craft brewery to make a splash), which makes 2.5 million barrels; there are about 100 craft breweries that produce between 15,000 and 6,000,000 barrels[[note]]the point at which the ABA considers you a "macrobrewery"[[/note]] termed "regional craft breweries." These beers have come into their own as a high-class drinking option, with many places even having beer sommeliers who can recommend the best beer to complement your meal. These brews tend to be more flavorful (and there are literally hundreds of brands to choose from), but are much more expensive, due both to the smaller batch sizes and to the higher variety of flavors calling for more varied ingredients. Snobs drink exclusively craft beer, and look down upon mainstream brands in much the same way (and for much the same reasons) as foreigners are stereotyped as doing. These breweries also tend to have a quirky, tongue-in-cheek style to their packaging, and the actual beers are often creative, and indeed wildly experimental, combining strange ingredients[[note]]ranging from the traditional-but-weird, like oysters in stout, to the absolutely novel, like cocoa nibs, maple syrup, and [[BaconAddiction bacon]]; while the origins of this tendency are up for debate, Dogfish Head Brewery was among the first to start doing this, and is certainly one of the most high-profile practitioners of it as well.[[/note]] and methods from disparate beer styles, to the distaste of some (mostly European) traditionalists, though the prevailing sentiment abroad seems to be "American brewers will try anything once, and while it doesn't always work, it's awesome when it does". American craft beer also tends to be highly alcoholic (particularly barleywines and Russian imperial stouts, which almost always go into double-digit ABV counts and are a go-to for any craft brewer looking for a high-gravity dark beer) and unusually hoppy, as well, although a few breweries--mostly those that have a primarily English influence (e.g. Yards of Philadelphia)--do buck that trend. The old joking about American mass-market lager is slowly being replaced by an argument between American and European beer snobs about whether or not the US is currently the best place in the world to drink beer. Some states with a significant craft beer culture are California, Colorado, Oregon [[note]]Portland lays claim to having the most microbreweries of any city ''in the world'' [[/note]], Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Michigan,[[note]]Where there's a serious bill to get a British-style regulation to require a pint of beer at a bar to always be exactly a pint (although of course it's to ensure that pints are American 16-oz ones, not the British 20-oz).[[/note]] Louisiana, Maine, and Washington.[[note]]The state grows up to 50% of domestic hops production, mostly in the Yakima Valley, so brewers have easy access to key ingredients[[/note]]

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"Craft beers", also known as microbrews, are meant for a more discriminating clientele, and usually come in smaller batches; the American Brewers' Association defines a microbrewery as one that produces less than 15,000 American barrels a year. This conflation of craft and microbrew is no longer strictly true; a number of formerly small craft breweries are today producing well over 15,000 barrels, most notably the Boston Beer Company (makers of Sam Adams, the first craft brewery to make a splash), which makes 2.5 million barrels; there are about 100 craft breweries that produce between 15,000 and 6,000,000 barrels[[note]]the point at which the ABA considers you a "macrobrewery"[[/note]] termed "regional craft breweries." These beers have come into their own as a high-class drinking option, with many places even having beer sommeliers who can recommend the best beer to complement your meal. These brews tend to be more flavorful (and there are literally hundreds of brands to choose from), but are much more expensive, due both to the smaller batch sizes and to the higher variety of flavors calling for more varied ingredients. Snobs drink exclusively craft beer, and look down upon mainstream brands in much the same way (and for much the same reasons) as foreigners are stereotyped as doing. These breweries also tend to have a quirky, tongue-in-cheek style to their packaging, and the actual beers are often creative, and indeed wildly experimental, combining strange ingredients[[note]]ranging from the traditional-but-weird, like oysters in stout, to the absolutely novel, like cocoa nibs, maple syrup, and [[BaconAddiction bacon]]; while the origins of this tendency are up for debate, Dogfish Head Brewery was among the first to start doing this, and is certainly one of the most high-profile practitioners of it as well.[[/note]] and methods from disparate beer styles, to the distaste of some (mostly European) traditionalists, though the prevailing sentiment abroad seems to be "American brewers will try anything once, and while it doesn't always work, it's awesome when it does". American craft beer also tends to be highly alcoholic (particularly barleywines and Russian imperial stouts, which almost always go into double-digit ABV counts and are a go-to for any craft brewer looking for a high-gravity dark beer) and unusually hoppy, as well, although a few breweries--mostly those that have a primarily English influence (e.g. Yards of Philadelphia)--do buck that trend.trend, and there has been a recent boom in sours; while it's too early to call, there does seem to be some evidence that the market is beginning to move away from West Coast-style hop nukes. The old joking about American mass-market lager is slowly being replaced by an argument between American and European beer snobs about whether or not the US is currently the best place in the world to drink beer. Some states with a significant craft beer culture are California, Colorado, Oregon [[note]]Portland lays claim to having the most microbreweries of any city ''in the world'' [[/note]], Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Michigan,[[note]]Where there's a serious bill to get a British-style regulation to require a pint of beer at a bar to always be exactly a pint (although of course it's to ensure that pints are American 16-oz ones, not the British 20-oz).[[/note]] Louisiana, Maine, and Washington.[[note]]The state grows up to 50% of domestic hops production, mostly in the Yakima Valley, so brewers have easy access to key ingredients[[/note]]
26th Sep '16 5:00:28 PM Jhonny
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#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian).

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#Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, [[HollywoodCuisine which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines]]. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place); this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian).
Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half way "authentic" Ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is ''way'' different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.
26th Sep '16 4:53:38 PM Jhonny
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** Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), [[CaptainObvious a sugar substitute derived from corn]]. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then. The health effects of HFCS (particularly as it concerns America's problems with obesity) are a controversial subject, but most health professionals generally agree that this is probably more a function of economics versus any difference from regular cane sugar; it's heavily subsidized and therefore dirt-cheap, allowing food makers to put it in just about anything. In Europe and other places, cane sugar is cheaper than HFCS, and not any less prevalent in food. Remember: like your parents told you when you were little, eating too many sweets is bad for your health, whether it's natural cane sugar or HFCS.

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** Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), [[CaptainObvious a sugar substitute derived from corn]]. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then. The health effects of HFCS (particularly as it concerns America's problems with obesity) are a controversial subject, but most health professionals generally agree that this is probably more a function of economics versus any difference from regular cane sugar; it's heavily subsidized and therefore dirt-cheap, allowing food makers to put it in just about anything. In Europe and other places, cane sugar (and in Europe beet sugar[[note]]chemically the same as cane sugar albeit slightly different from HFCS[[/note]] even more so, also due to subsidies and import quotas) is cheaper than HFCS, and not any less prevalent in food. Remember: like your parents told you when you were little, eating too many sweets is bad for your health, whether it's natural cane sugar or HFCS.
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