History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

31st May '17 3:20:55 PM CV12Hornet
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* The 2000s have seen another variety of pizza restaurant arise in Northern California, upscale pizzerias serving Italian-style pizzas with a high degree of authenticity (i.e. wood-fired brick ovens leaving scorching on the crust, as well as proper mozzarella and Italian toppings/recipes such as margherita, often run by recent immigrants). San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area are the main center of this new style; expect long waits for a table and $20 pizzas.
18th May '17 9:15:48 AM Madrugada
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), [[CaptainObvious a sugar substitute derived from corn]]. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then. The health effects of HFCS (particularly as it concerns America's problems with obesity) are a controversial subject, but most health professionals generally agree that this is probably more a function of economics versus any difference from regular cane sugar; it's heavily subsidized and therefore dirt-cheap, allowing food makers to put it in just about anything. In Europe and other places, cane sugar (and in Europe beet sugar[[note]]chemically the same as cane sugar albeit slightly different from HFCS[[/note]] even more so, also due to subsidies and import quotas) is cheaper than HFCS, and not any less prevalent in food. Remember: like your parents told you when you were little, eating too many sweets is bad for your health, whether it's natural cane sugar or HFCS.

to:

** Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), [[CaptainObvious a sugar substitute derived from corn]]. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then. The health effects of HFCS (particularly as it concerns America's problems with obesity) are a controversial subject, but most health professionals generally agree that this is probably more a function of economics versus any difference from regular cane sugar; it's heavily subsidized and therefore dirt-cheap, allowing food makers to put it in just about anything. In Europe and other places, cane sugar (and in Europe beet sugar[[note]]chemically the same as cane sugar albeit slightly different from HFCS[[/note]] even more so, also due to subsidies and import quotas) is cheaper than HFCS, and not any less prevalent in food. Remember: like your parents told you when you were little, eating too many sweets is bad for your health, whether it's natural cane sugar or HFCS.



#Although this might conceivably vary by region a ''little'' (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we put cheese on ''[[TrademarkFavoriteFood everything]]''.[[note]] This has been noticed abroad; James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a ''Series/TopGear'' bit on UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers put[s] cheese on everything]]."[[/note]] On virtually every soup, on virtually every salad, on most kinds of sandwiches... it would be much easier to list the foods our restaurants ''won't'' automatically put cheese on, although it's harder to think of them. One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish.[[note]]And even then, the UsefulNotes/McDonalds Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.[[/note]]

to:

#Although this might conceivably vary by region a ''little'' (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we we're willing to put cheese on ''[[TrademarkFavoriteFood everything]]''.[[note]] This has been noticed abroad; James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a ''Series/TopGear'' bit on UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers put[s] cheese on everything]]."[[/note]] On virtually every soup, on virtually every salad, on most kinds of sandwiches... it would be much easier to list the foods our restaurants ''won't'' automatically put cheese on, although it's harder to think of them. One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish.[[note]]And even then, the UsefulNotes/McDonalds Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.[[/note]]
1st May '17 1:48:28 AM ThePocket
Is there an issue? Send a Message


These drinks fell out of favor as the US expanded west and gained more arable land for grain production. Today, only one distillery in the country--Laird's of Monmouth County, New Jersey[[note]]New Jersey had always been noted for having a particular liking for the stuff; applejack was often called "Jersey Lightning," and laborers on the major roads built in New Jersey in the 18th and early 19th centuries were often paid in the stuff[[/note]]--produces applejack (and even then the stuff is only partly distilled from apples--the rest is rectified grain spirit), and New England is better known for beer than rum. Cider production also largely disappeared, although it has undergone a revival alongside the craft brewing movement in apple-growing regions; the most famous cider in the contemporary US is probably Woodchuck Hard Cider from Vermont, but production has also picked up in New England and in Michigan, New York, and Washington.[[note]]It came naturally in these states because of their strong craft brew cultures and ''giant'' apple crops--particularly Washington, which produces 2/3 of the country's apples; New York and Michigan are the second and third apple-growing states, at about 6% of the national crop each.[[/note]]

to:

These drinks fell out of favor as the US expanded west and gained more arable land for grain production. Today, only one distillery in the country--Laird's of Monmouth County, New Jersey[[note]]New Jersey had always been noted for having a particular liking for the stuff; applejack was often called "Jersey Lightning," and laborers on the major roads built in New Jersey in the 18th and early 19th centuries were often paid in the stuff[[/note]]--produces applejack (and even then the stuff is only partly distilled from apples--the rest is rectified grain spirit), and New England is better known for beer than rum. Cider production also largely disappeared, disappeared[[note]]Hard cider, at least; "apple cider", which is basically just fresh (but unfiltered) apple squeezings, is still popular as a seasonal beverage (starting in early fall, with hot spiced varieties picking up around Thanksgiving and through the winter) and for dunking donuts in.[[/note]], although it has undergone a revival alongside the craft brewing movement in apple-growing regions; the most famous cider in the contemporary US is probably Woodchuck Hard Cider from Vermont, but production has also picked up in New England and in Michigan, New York, and Washington.[[note]]It came naturally in these states because of their strong craft brew cultures and ''giant'' apple crops--particularly Washington, which produces 2/3 of the country's apples; New York and Michigan are the second and third apple-growing states, at about 6% of the national crop each.[[/note]]
26th Apr '17 4:50:26 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


And if you don't feel like driving out to a restaurant to get your food, [[InvertedTrope the chef can drive his or her restaurant to somewhere near you]]: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not quite as common a sight on the highways or at special events.

to:

And if you don't feel like driving out to a restaurant to get your food, [[InvertedTrope the chef can drive his or her restaurant to somewhere near you]]: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not quite as common a sight on the highways or at special events.
''everywhere'' like they are in California. (For instance, in Portland, Oregon, food trucks can't simply serve anywhere, but only from in designated food truck parks.)



Across the American Southwest are taco trucks. They roam the city streets and, as mentioned above, their original customers were Mexican-American workers hungry after a hard day's work, so their hours tend to be later than normal for places to eat, with hours like 4 PM to 2 AM not uncommon. Most also stop at the same locations at the same time every day, so they can always be there when their customers expect them. To this day, they're designed to serve the local population, so not all of them have visible menus--in those cases, you must know what you want to order. Most taco trucks will serve at least tacos and burritos, and the tacos come in small, soft corn tortillas. The meats are cooked on a gas grill, and the tortillas are warmed and seasoned on that same grill. The meats include ''asada'' (marinated beef), ''al pastor'' (marinated pork), ''cabeza'' (beef head), ''lengua'' (beef tongue), and so forth. Fish and shrimp are also available during Lent. These trucks also have tables that fold out for customers to add in onion, cilantro, and salsa. Be careful with the salsa though, as some of these food trucks do not tone down their spiciness for the general American.

National chains include: Taco Bell (cheap, and, in their words, "Mexican-inspired" with no attempt at authenticity), Chevy's (mid-range, and more Tex-Mex), Qdoba (mid-rage, Cali-Mex), Chipotle (high-quality food made on an assembly line, like a deli but with Mexican food), and Moe's (basically Chipotle with a different menu).

to:

Across the American Southwest are taco trucks. They roam the city streets and, as mentioned above, their original customers were Mexican-American workers hungry after a hard day's work, so their hours tend to be later than normal for places to eat, with hours like 4 PM to 2 AM not uncommon. Most also stop at the same locations at the same time every day, so they can always be there when their customers expect them. To this day, they're designed to serve the local population, so not all of them have visible menus--in those cases, you must know what you want to order. Most taco trucks will serve at least tacos and burritos, and the tacos come in small, soft corn tortillas. The meats are cooked on a gas grill, and the tortillas are warmed and seasoned on that same grill. The meats include ''asada'' (marinated beef), ''al pastor'' (marinated pork), ''cabeza'' (beef head), ''lengua'' (beef tongue), and so forth. Fish and shrimp are also available during Lent. These trucks also have tables that fold out for customers to add in onion, cilantro, and salsa. Be careful with the salsa though, as some of these food trucks do not tone down their spiciness for the general American.

American. (For more information on taco trucks and food trucks in general, see the "Food Carts" section below.)

National chains include: Taco Bell (cheap, and, in their words, "Mexican-inspired" with no attempt at authenticity), Chevy's (mid-range, and more Tex-Mex), Qdoba (mid-rage, Cali-Mex), Chipotle (high-quality food made on an assembly line, like a deli but with Mexican food), and Moe's Southwest Grill (basically Chipotle with a different menu).
menu--ironically, Moe's, despite its name, does not actually exist in the American Southwest, so don't bother looking for it there).



During this time Starbucks created heavier, sweeter coffee drinks. While derided by coffee enthusiasts, they caught on with non-coffee drinkers to create an international business. To this day, Starbucks is nearly a separate market from other coffeehouses, even becoming the only coffee option in some areas. While some cities have a plethora of options and local coffeehouses, in others, your choice is between Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts. There has, however, been a recent move towards more locations of the Canadian chain Tim Hortons in the U.S., but only mostly in the Northeast, Michigan and Ohio (Tim Hortons was owned by Wendy's from 1995 to 2006; it now shares ownership with Burger King).

to:

During this time Starbucks created heavier, sweeter coffee drinks. While derided by coffee enthusiasts, they caught on with non-coffee drinkers to create an international business. To this day, Starbucks is nearly a separate market from other coffeehouses, even becoming the only coffee option in some areas. While some cities have a plethora of options and local coffeehouses, in others, your choice is between Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts. There has, however, been a recent move towards more locations of the Canadian chain Tim Hortons in the U.S., but only mostly in the Northeast, Michigan and Ohio (Tim Hortons was owned by Wendy's from 1995 to 2006; it now shares ownership with Burger King).
King). The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf has also undergone a steady expansion. Dunkin' Donuts, incidentally, was exceedingly rare west of the Mississippi River until the mid-2010s.[[note]]Dunkin' Donuts is a mild case of an ArtifactTitle: While they still serve doughnuts, coffee is their main thing now.[[/note]]
26th Apr '17 4:01:57 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Across the American Southwest are taco trucks. They roam the city streets and, as mentioned above, their original customers were Mexican-American workers hungry after a hard day's work, so their hours tend to be later than normal for places to eat, with hours like 4 PM to 2 AM not uncommon. Most also stop at the same locations at the same time every day, so they can always be there when their customers expect them. To this day, they're designed to serve the local population, so not all of them have visible menus--in those cases, you must know what you want to order. Most taco trucks will serve at least tacos and burritos, and the tacos come in small, soft corn tortillas. The meats are cooked on a gas grill, and the tortillas are warmed and seasoned on that same grill, and include ''asada'' (marinated beef), ''al pastor'' (marinated pork), ''cabeza'' (beef head), ''lengua'' (beef tongue), and so forth. Fish and shrimp are also available during Lent. These trucks also have tables that fold out for customers to add in onion, cilantro, and salsa. Be careful with the salsa though, as some of these food trucks do not tone down their spiciness for the general American.

to:

Across the American Southwest are taco trucks. They roam the city streets and, as mentioned above, their original customers were Mexican-American workers hungry after a hard day's work, so their hours tend to be later than normal for places to eat, with hours like 4 PM to 2 AM not uncommon. Most also stop at the same locations at the same time every day, so they can always be there when their customers expect them. To this day, they're designed to serve the local population, so not all of them have visible menus--in those cases, you must know what you want to order. Most taco trucks will serve at least tacos and burritos, and the tacos come in small, soft corn tortillas. The meats are cooked on a gas grill, and the tortillas are warmed and seasoned on that same grill, and grill. The meats include ''asada'' (marinated beef), ''al pastor'' (marinated pork), ''cabeza'' (beef head), ''lengua'' (beef tongue), and so forth. Fish and shrimp are also available during Lent. These trucks also have tables that fold out for customers to add in onion, cilantro, and salsa. Be careful with the salsa though, as some of these food trucks do not tone down their spiciness for the general American.
26th Apr '17 3:55:03 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


And if you don't feel like driving out to get your food, the chef can drive over to somewhere near you: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not quite as common a sight on the highways or at special events.

to:

And if you don't feel like driving out to a restaurant to get your food, [[InvertedTrope the chef can drive over his or her restaurant to somewhere near you: you]]: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not quite as common a sight on the highways or at special events.


Added DiffLines:

Los Angeles is the capital of two specific foods: The chili burger, known locally as the "size" (short for "chili size" due to these burgers being pretty large), and the bacon-wrapped hot dog. The chili burger is, [[ExactlyAsItSaysOnTheTin as its name implies]], a hamburger with chili in it. This chili has no beans, and the meat is simply ground beef, and your typical chili burger has a slice of tomato, a slice of American cheese, diced onions, and pickle slices. Original Tommy's is a chain restricted to Los Angeles that specializes in the chili burger, with a characteristic pointy red roof giving the restaurants the appearance something like a giant letter "A," and locals hold it to a similar level as In-N-Out Burger. (The "Original" is in its name for a reason: There are numerous copycats calling themselves Tommy's. Their quality varies wildly, from something that might appear on ''Series/KitchenNightmares'' to a perfect imitation of Original Tommy's.) The bacon-wrapped hot dog is also exactly as the name describes it: A hot dog, all beef, with bacon wrapped around it. These are predominantly served from pushcarts by street vendors and topped with grilled onions. You can eat it as it is, and most people do, but ketchup and mustard are available upon request--and unlike Chicagoans and New Yorkers, Angelenos won't judge you for putting ketchup on their regional dog.


Added DiffLines:

Across the American Southwest are taco trucks. They roam the city streets and, as mentioned above, their original customers were Mexican-American workers hungry after a hard day's work, so their hours tend to be later than normal for places to eat, with hours like 4 PM to 2 AM not uncommon. Most also stop at the same locations at the same time every day, so they can always be there when their customers expect them. To this day, they're designed to serve the local population, so not all of them have visible menus--in those cases, you must know what you want to order. Most taco trucks will serve at least tacos and burritos, and the tacos come in small, soft corn tortillas. The meats are cooked on a gas grill, and the tortillas are warmed and seasoned on that same grill, and include ''asada'' (marinated beef), ''al pastor'' (marinated pork), ''cabeza'' (beef head), ''lengua'' (beef tongue), and so forth. Fish and shrimp are also available during Lent. These trucks also have tables that fold out for customers to add in onion, cilantro, and salsa. Be careful with the salsa though, as some of these food trucks do not tone down their spiciness for the general American.
26th Apr '17 1:09:32 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. The availability of fresh ingredients has also created a unique landscape of grocery chains: With the exception of Safeway and Sprouts, every major chain found in California--Vons, Ralphs, Albertson's, Trader Joe's, 99 Ranch, Vallarta, Super King, and Stater Bros.--was founded in California and restricted to the state. There have been at least three attempts by outside companies to come in: Food Lion (from the East Coast), Haggen (from Washington state), and Fresh & Easy (from the UK). Food Lion and Haggen both almost went out of business trying, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt twice (after the first filing for bankruptcy, it was bought out by Yucaipa Companies, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt again and took Yucaipa with it); California subsequently gained notoriety in the supermarket industry as a suicidal region to enter. There is currently a fourth attempt by Aldi (from Germany); time will tell how successful they are.

to:

Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. The availability of fresh ingredients has In addition to the aforementioned avocados and wine grapes, California is also created a unique landscape of grocery chains: With the exception of Safeway and Sprouts, every major chain found in California--Vons, Ralphs, Albertson's, Trader Joe's, 99 Ranch, Vallarta, Super King, supplier of pistachios, almonds, alfalfa, artichoke, strawberries, garlic, and Stater Bros.--was founded lemons. To that extent, certain cities in California and restricted to the state. There have been at least three attempts by outside companies to come in: Food Lion (from the East Coast), Haggen (from Washington state), local dishes centered around that crop--for instance, you can find dozens of different uses for artichokes in Castroville, and Fresh & Easy (from the UK). Food Lion and Haggen both almost went out if you enjoy garlic, there's no shortage of business trying, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt twice (after the first filing for bankruptcy, it was bought out by Yucaipa Companies, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt again and took Yucaipa with it); garlic-themed food in Gilroy. Though not as prolific as places like Wisconsin, California subsequently gained notoriety in produces a lot of cheese as well and has dozens of regional cheeses. Monterey Jack is the supermarket industry as a suicidal region to enter. There is currently a fourth attempt by Aldi (from Germany); time will tell how successful they are.
most famous, but if you search hard enough, you can also find stuff like Point Reyes or Humboldt Fog.
26th Apr '17 12:57:53 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Not as famous for its cuisine as other regions, but UsefulNotes/{{California}} is known for its eclectic pizzas, Mission-style burritos, In-N-Out Burger, fusion cuisine in which multiple ethnicities of food are combined together to form the likes of the "bulgogi taco" and the "Peking duck fries," and the California roll. (The origin of the California roll is disputed, however, and may not have even originated in the United States. Nevertheless, the California roll is very popular, and it's considered almost blasphemous for a sushi joint in California to ''not'' have it.)



Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. The availability of fresh ingredients has also created a unique landscape of grocery chains: With the exception of Safeway and Sprouts, every major chain found in California--Vons, Ralphs, Albertson's, Trader Joe's, 99 Ranch, Vallarta, Super King, and Stater Bros.--was founded in California and restricted to the state. There have been at least three attempts by outside companies to come in: Food Lion (from the East Coast), Haggen (from Washington state), and Fresh & Easy (from the UK). Food Lion and Haggen both almost went out of business trying, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt twice, gaining notoriety in the supermarket industry as an extremely difficult region to enter. There is currently a fourth attempt by Aldi (from Germany); time will tell how successful they are.

to:

Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. The availability of fresh ingredients has also created a unique landscape of grocery chains: With the exception of Safeway and Sprouts, every major chain found in California--Vons, Ralphs, Albertson's, Trader Joe's, 99 Ranch, Vallarta, Super King, and Stater Bros.--was founded in California and restricted to the state. There have been at least three attempts by outside companies to come in: Food Lion (from the East Coast), Haggen (from Washington state), and Fresh & Easy (from the UK). Food Lion and Haggen both almost went out of business trying, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt twice, gaining twice (after the first filing for bankruptcy, it was bought out by Yucaipa Companies, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt again and took Yucaipa with it); California subsequently gained notoriety in the supermarket industry as an extremely difficult a suicidal region to enter. There is currently a fourth attempt by Aldi (from Germany); time will tell how successful they are.
26th Apr '17 12:49:14 PM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


With its legendary automobile and {{Suburbia}} culture, Southern California also gave birth to the modern "burgers and fries" drive-thru fast food restaurant style that took the rest of the country ([[EaglelandOsmosis and the world]]) by storm, including TropeCodifier UsefulNotes/McDonalds. Other examples of major chains include Carl's Jr., Jack in the Box, and regional favorite In-N-Out Burger.

to:

With its legendary automobile and {{Suburbia}} culture, Southern California also gave birth to the modern "burgers and fries" drive-thru fast food restaurant style that took the rest of the country ([[EaglelandOsmosis and the world]]) by storm, including TropeCodifier UsefulNotes/McDonalds. Other examples of major chains include Carl's Jr., Jack in the Box, Wienerschnitzel, and regional favorite In-N-Out Burger.
Burger. Pioneer Chicken was once California's nationwide fried chicken chain, but it all but vanished from the popular consciousness once it was bought out and dismantled by Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits.

And if you don't feel like driving out to get your food, the chef can drive over to somewhere near you: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not quite as common a sight on the highways or at special events.

Though not as famous as its cousins to the east, California does have the Santa Maria-style barbecue. Named after the city of Santa Maria on the Central Coast, this type of barbecue is characterized by a dry rub consisting of salt, garlic salt, and black peppers and grilled over Californian coast live oak. It's cooked outside, as the coastal winds are used as part of its cooking process, dramatically affecting both the flavor and the nature of the flames used in it. True to California's Mexican heritage, Santa Maria barbecue is often served with salsa and pinquito beans, and though tri-tip is the most common meat, Santa Maria barbecue chefs sometimes use chorizo and linguica sausages.

Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. The availability of fresh ingredients has also created a unique landscape of grocery chains: With the exception of Safeway and Sprouts, every major chain found in California--Vons, Ralphs, Albertson's, Trader Joe's, 99 Ranch, Vallarta, Super King, and Stater Bros.--was founded in California and restricted to the state. There have been at least three attempts by outside companies to come in: Food Lion (from the East Coast), Haggen (from Washington state), and Fresh & Easy (from the UK). Food Lion and Haggen both almost went out of business trying, and Fresh & Easy went bankrupt twice, gaining notoriety in the supermarket industry as an extremely difficult region to enter. There is currently a fourth attempt by Aldi (from Germany); time will tell how successful they are.
20th Mar '17 4:30:59 PM TristanJeremiah
Is there an issue? Send a Message


America -- AKA UsefulNotes/{{the United States}} -- has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over our art, our population, our languages, and most tellingly, our cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

to:

America -- AKA UsefulNotes/{{the United States}} -- has often been described as a "melting pot"."[[CultureChopSuey melting pot]]". This is very, very true. International influences are all over our art, our population, our languages, and most tellingly, our cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.
This list shows the last 10 events of 679. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.CuisinesInAmerica