History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

25th May '18 9:57:04 AM KYCubbie
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Italian, like American and Chinese before it, can be found in virtually any price point you want to search. Lower-end restaurants are usually local pizzerias, which are described below. High-end Italian restaurants have a much broader menu, and may call themselves [[GratuitousItalian bistros, trattorias, or ristorantes]]. The number of places you can find (especially at the higher-end) is usually proportional to a city's Italian population. Italian isn't a generally popular choice for fast food (Fazoli's being a rare example), as it takes a while to cook and tends to have a low portability (though see pizza, below).

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Italian, like American and Chinese before it, can be found in virtually any price point you want to search. Lower-end restaurants are usually local pizzerias, which are described below. High-end Italian restaurants have a much broader menu, and may call themselves [[GratuitousItalian bistros, trattorias, or ristorantes]]. The number of places you can find (especially at the higher-end) is usually proportional to a city's Italian population. Italian isn't a generally popular choice for fast food (Fazoli's being a rare example), example[[note]]Incidentally, Fazoli's originated in ''Lexington, Kentucky''—far removed from any significant centers of Italian-American culture.[[/note]]), as it takes a while to cook and tends to have a low portability (though see pizza, below).
21st Apr '18 4:21:43 AM jormis29
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The first Chinese restaurants were buffets, set up to feed migrant workers who lived in tiny kitchen-less apartments. Americans slowly started going to these restaurants, and eventually they turned into sit-down restaurants for family dining, although all-you-can-eat buffets are still a mainstay of Chinese restaurants. Most would run meal specials where for a single price one could order items from two columns and also get egg rolls and soup. This is mostly a DeadHorseTrope, but it pops up in 20th century media like the film ''With Six You Get Eggroll''.

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The first Chinese restaurants were buffets, set up to feed migrant workers who lived in tiny kitchen-less apartments. Americans slowly started going to these restaurants, and eventually they turned into sit-down restaurants for family dining, although all-you-can-eat buffets are still a mainstay of Chinese restaurants. Most would run meal specials where for a single price one could order items from two columns and also get egg rolls and soup. This is mostly a DeadHorseTrope, but it pops up in 20th century media like the film ''With Six You Get Eggroll''.
''Film/WithSixYouGetEggroll''.
14th Apr '18 8:00:59 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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A special note must be made of Boston's somewhat outsized influence on the country's cuisine as a whole -- the Boston neighborhood of Brighton is home to WGBH, the station that produced Julia Child's first three shows, while the nearby town of Brookline has America's Test Kitchen, the publishers of ''Cook's Illustrated'' magazine and the ''America's Test Kitchen'' TV show, one of the most popular cooking shows on the air in the US. Boston isn't necessarily the Hub of the culinary USA – most of its prominent chefs are regional celebrities at best, apart from maybe Ming Tsai, and apart from a local franchise of Le Cordon Bleu it has little in the way of nationally recognized cooking schools [[note]]:Although Johnson and Wales in Providence, RI is only about an hour away.[[/note]] – but it's responsible, directly or indirectly, for teaching a lot of people how to be better cooks.

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A special note must be made of Boston's somewhat outsized influence on the country's cuisine as a whole -- the Boston neighborhood of Brighton is home to WGBH, the station that produced Julia Child's Creator/JuliaChild's first three shows, while the nearby town of Brookline has America's Test Kitchen, the publishers of ''Cook's Illustrated'' magazine and the ''America's Test Kitchen'' TV show, one of the most popular cooking shows on the air in the US. Boston isn't necessarily the Hub of the culinary USA – most of its prominent chefs are regional celebrities at best, apart from maybe Ming Tsai, and apart from a local franchise of Le Cordon Bleu it has little in the way of nationally recognized cooking schools [[note]]:Although Johnson and Wales in Providence, RI is only about an hour away.[[/note]] – but it's responsible, directly or indirectly, for teaching a lot of people how to be better cooks.
25th Mar '18 4:51:13 PM karstovich2
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Baking is a big deal in the Midwest, particularly as regards all manner of desserts; brownies were invented in Chicago, and Midwestern homes are famous for cakes, bars, and cookies. As Creator/DavidFosterWallace (raised in Central Illinois) put it in a 1993 essay:

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Baking is a big deal in the Midwest, particularly as regards all manner of desserts; brownies were invented in Chicago, and Midwestern homes are famous for cakes, bars, and cookies. As Creator/DavidFosterWallace (raised in Central Illinois) put it in a 1993 essay: essay about the Illinois State Fair:


Added DiffLines:

(Wallace would later have to be hospitalized from too much Midwestern baked goodness.)
23rd Mar '18 10:28:44 PM karstovich2
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Louisiana cooking has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking. Prudhomme also introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, most notably blackening (now a standard technique not only in Creole cuisine but in kitchens around the world). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prudhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace. Zatarain's and various brands of Louisiana-style hot sauce (a thin, watery affair made with mashed peppers, vinegar, and salt that has been allowed to ferment; Tabasco is the most famous, while Crystal, Louisiana, and Trappey's are also reasonably well-known) are the most famous nationally available food products that are based in or have originated from Louisiana.

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Louisiana cooking has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking. Prudhomme also introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, most notably blackening (now a standard technique not only in Creole cuisine but in kitchens around the world). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Québécois, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prudhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace. Zatarain's and various brands of Louisiana-style hot sauce (a thin, watery affair made with mashed peppers, vinegar, and salt that has been allowed to ferment; Tabasco is the most famous, while Crystal, Louisiana, and Trappey's are also reasonably well-known) are the most famous nationally available food products that are based in or have originated from Louisiana.
23rd Mar '18 10:16:43 PM karstovich2
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The most famous dish in this style is fried chicken, which, aside from being fried with some sort of coating, has an extremely wide range of recipes. Chicken was a rare treat, with black communities referring to it as the "gospel bird" as it was something saved for when the pastor visited for dinner. As chicken farming improved, it became cheap enough to be used by one of the first road-oriented restaurant chains, "Chicken in the Rough." Fried chicken was traditionally shallow-fried in a pan (typically in about a half-inch of oil in a cast-iron skillet), but the process was revolutionized when Colonel Harland Sanders invented the pressure fryer, a type of pressure cooker that could cook chicken in a few minutes. It was this, not his herb blend, that helped him launch UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken.[[note]]For the record, Sanders' recipe was probably pretty good, even if it wasn't the key to his success, but apparently Sanders became convinced late in life that KFC had stopped using it. Sanders died in 1980.[[/note]] Today, most restaurants use this fryer or deep fry pre-cooked chicken, with the pan-fried method saved for upscale restaurants and home.

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The most famous dish in this style is fried chicken, which, aside from being fried with some sort of coating, has an extremely wide range of recipes. Chicken was a rare treat, with black communities referring to it as the "gospel bird" as it was something saved for when the pastor visited for dinner. As chicken farming improved, it became cheap enough to be used by one of the first road-oriented restaurant chains, "Chicken in the Rough." Fried chicken was traditionally shallow-fried in a pan (typically in about a half-inch to an inch of oil in a cast-iron skillet), but the process was revolutionized when Colonel Harland Sanders invented the pressure fryer, a type of pressure cooker that could cook chicken in a few minutes. It was this, not his herb blend, that helped him launch UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken.[[note]]For the record, Sanders' recipe was probably pretty good, even if it wasn't the key to his success, but apparently Sanders became convinced late in life that KFC had stopped using it. Sanders died in 1980.[[/note]] Today, most restaurants use this fryer or deep fry pre-cooked chicken, with the pan-fried method saved for upscale restaurants and home.
23rd Mar '18 10:16:01 PM karstovich2
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The most famous dish in this style is fried chicken, which, aside from being fried with some sort of coating, has an extremely wide range of recipes. Chicken was a rare treat, with black communities referring to it as the "gospel bird" as it was something saved for when the pastor visited for dinner. As chicken farming improved, it became cheap enough to be used by one of the first road-oriented restaurant chains, "Chicken in the Rough." Fried chicken was traditionally cooked in a pan, but the process was revolutionized when Colonel Harland Sanders invented the pressure fryer, a type of pressure cooker that could cook chicken in a few minutes. It was this, not his herb blend, that helped him launch UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken.[[note]]For the record, Sanders' recipe was probably pretty good, even if it wasn't the key to his success, but apparently Sanders became convinced late in life that KFC had stopped using it. Sanders died in 1980.[[/note]] Today, most restaurants use this fryer or deep fry pre-cooked chicken, with the pan-fried method saved for upscale restaurants and home.

to:

The most famous dish in this style is fried chicken, which, aside from being fried with some sort of coating, has an extremely wide range of recipes. Chicken was a rare treat, with black communities referring to it as the "gospel bird" as it was something saved for when the pastor visited for dinner. As chicken farming improved, it became cheap enough to be used by one of the first road-oriented restaurant chains, "Chicken in the Rough." Fried chicken was traditionally cooked shallow-fried in a pan, pan (typically in about a half-inch of oil in a cast-iron skillet), but the process was revolutionized when Colonel Harland Sanders invented the pressure fryer, a type of pressure cooker that could cook chicken in a few minutes. It was this, not his herb blend, that helped him launch UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken.[[note]]For the record, Sanders' recipe was probably pretty good, even if it wasn't the key to his success, but apparently Sanders became convinced late in life that KFC had stopped using it. Sanders died in 1980.[[/note]] Today, most restaurants use this fryer or deep fry pre-cooked chicken, with the pan-fried method saved for upscale restaurants and home.
23rd Mar '18 10:06:18 PM karstovich2
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* New Mexico is known for the state's chile pepper, which comes in either red or green.

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* New Mexico is known for the state's chile pepper, which comes in either red or green. Not on the license plates, but by law "red or green?" is New Mexico's official state question; out-of-staters should respond "Christmas" (i.e. a mix of both) to signal they want to keep the peace.
23rd Mar '18 9:54:23 PM karstovich2
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On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night, although the meaning of this has changed over time. When the label was invented in the 1980s, it was code for ludicrous extravagances like the ones described in ''Literature/AmericanPsycho'', and retained that connotation through the 90s and early 2000s. However, after the Great Recession of 2008, "New American" more commonly describes remixes of American ComfortFood (like fried chicken, hamburgers, and macaroni and cheese, or regional dishes like cheesesteaks and hotdish) with extra attention to ingredient quality and twists on the formula. Thus mac and cheese might feature a mix of artisanal cheeses instead of day-glo orange powder, or a burger might be made with fine meats and topped with unique cheeses and vegetables, or a cheesesteak might feature "whiz" that's actually a house-made cheddar Mornay sauce (and yes, one of the big things with this "New American" is an emphasis on good cheese, because good cheese is discriminating but comforting).

to:

On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night, although the meaning of this has changed over time. When the label was invented in the 1980s, it was code for ludicrous extravagances like the ones described in ''Literature/AmericanPsycho'', and retained that connotation through the 90s and early 2000s. However, after the Great Recession of 2008, "New American" more commonly describes remixes of American ComfortFood (like fried chicken, hamburgers, and macaroni and cheese, or regional dishes like cheesesteaks and hotdish) with that gain extra refinement through attention to ingredient quality and creative twists on the formula.recipe, but stay comforting by refusing to overcomplicate. Thus mac and cheese might feature a mix of artisanal cheeses instead of day-glo orange powder, or a burger might be made with fine meats and topped with unique cheeses and vegetables, or a cheesesteak might feature "whiz" that's actually a house-made cheddar Mornay sauce (and yes, one of the big things with this "New American" is an emphasis on good cheese, because good cheese is discriminating but comforting).
23rd Mar '18 9:51:34 PM karstovich2
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On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night, although the meaning of this has changed over time; when the label was invented in the 1980s, it was code for ludicrous extravagances like the ones described in ''Literature/AmericanPsycho'', but after the Great Recession of 2008, it more commonly describes remixes of American ComfortFood (like fried chicken, hamburgers, and macaroni and cheese, or regional dishes like cheesesteaks and hotdish) with extra attention to ingredient quality and added ingredients.

to:

On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night, although the meaning of this has changed over time; when time. When the label was invented in the 1980s, it was code for ludicrous extravagances like the ones described in ''Literature/AmericanPsycho'', but and retained that connotation through the 90s and early 2000s. However, after the Great Recession of 2008, it "New American" more commonly describes remixes of American ComfortFood (like fried chicken, hamburgers, and macaroni and cheese, or regional dishes like cheesesteaks and hotdish) with extra attention to ingredient quality and added ingredients.
twists on the formula. Thus mac and cheese might feature a mix of artisanal cheeses instead of day-glo orange powder, or a burger might be made with fine meats and topped with unique cheeses and vegetables, or a cheesesteak might feature "whiz" that's actually a house-made cheddar Mornay sauce (and yes, one of the big things with this "New American" is an emphasis on good cheese, because good cheese is discriminating but comforting).
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