History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

16th Nov '17 9:12:45 AM HasturHasturHastur
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Has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace.

to:

Has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace.
Palace. Zatarain's and various brands of Louisiana-style hot sauce (a thin, watery affair made with mashed peppers, vinegar, and salt that has been allowed to ferment; Tabasco is the most famous, while Crystal, Louisiana, and Trappey's are also reasonably well-known) are the most famous nationally available food products that are based in or have originated from Louisiana.
25th Oct '17 10:32:11 AM bitemytail
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Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")

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Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod UsefulNotes/TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")
10th Oct '17 2:50:45 PM Malady
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Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")

to:

Although America is very firmly beer country today, it wasn't always so. In TheColonialPeriod and up until the presidency of UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson (more or less), hard cider and applejack--a freeze-distilled brandy made from cider--were the drinks of choice for Americans. In fact, at least one major successful presidential campaign during that era[[note]]That of WilliamHenryHarrison.UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison.[[/note]] openly played up the image that the candidate was a [[RatedMForManly rough-and-tumble man's man]] who lived in a log cabin and loved drinking cider. The vast open spaces of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins had yet to be settled by whites, and so America--strange to say--was grain-poor. So they made their drinks from apples--which were easy to grow in America's climate and terrain--instead. New England was also big on rum in the colonial period, buying molasses to distill into rum with the proceeds of its triangular-trade shipping fees ("[[Theatre/SeventeenSeventySix Molaaaassssses to rummm, to slaaaves]]...")
18th Sep '17 12:43:13 PM ZombieAladdin
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#Our food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order; it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice. (See #4 below.) Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. (However, this would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers).

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#Our food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order; it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice. ice (See #4 below.) below), and in part because some parts of the United States have arid climates that will dehydrate you if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. (However, this would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers).
13th Sep '17 7:27:34 AM WaterBlap
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Note that there is a divide between Americanized Chinese food and authentic Chinese cuisine. Americanized Chinese has its own standard dishes almost always based on the cuisine of Canton and Hong Kong (e.g., Chow Mein, General Tso's Chicken (named after Imperial Chinese General [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Zuo]] Zongtang), Orange Chicken, Hunan Beef, etc.) which bear little resemblance to traditional mainland Chinese dishes, but are widely available in the US and have been adapted to Western tastes. Numerous dishes also exist which have Americanized versions substantially different from the original, such as sweet and sour pork, twice-cooked pork, or kung pao chicken. Authentic Chinese uses a wider range of ingredients, [[ForeignQueasine many of which are unfamiliar or alarming to Westerners]], such as pig ears, pork belly,[[note]]Which really shouldn't disgust Americans that much, since it's the same cut of meat as [[BaconAddiction bacon]][[/note]] or duck's feet, and tend to use a [[FireBreathingDiner much greater variety of spices]], especially hot peppers of many kinds. Such cuisine is available in the United States at certain specialized Chinese restaurants; your typical "mom-and-pop" Chinese place that isn't a buffet often also has it on a "secret menu" printed only in Chinese for Chinese customers. This can cause some hilarity when ''n''th-generation Chinese-Americans who don't speak Chinese (or speak but don't read) or [[InterchangeableAsianCultures other East Asians, like Koreans and Japanese]][[note]]Typically by an inattentive waiter[[/note]] are given the authentic menu without asking for it and have to sheepishly explain that they want the English menu, please... Also causing hilarity is when a non-Asian who actually speaks Chinese demands the authentic menu, and then can't handle the spiciness of the dish he/she ordered.

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Note that there is a divide between Americanized Chinese food and authentic Chinese cuisine. Americanized Chinese has its own standard dishes almost always based on the cuisine of Canton and Hong Kong (e.g., Chow Mein, General Tso's Chicken (named after Imperial Chinese General [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Zuo]] Zongtang), Orange Chicken, Hunan Beef, etc.) which bear little resemblance to traditional mainland Chinese dishes, but are widely available in the US and have been adapted to Western tastes. Numerous dishes also exist which have Americanized versions substantially different from the original, such as sweet and sour pork, twice-cooked pork, or kung pao chicken. Authentic Chinese uses a wider range of ingredients, [[ForeignQueasine many of which are unfamiliar or alarming to Westerners]], such as pig ears, pork belly,[[note]]Which really shouldn't disgust Americans that much, since it's the same cut of meat as [[BaconAddiction bacon]][[/note]] bacon[[/note]] or duck's feet, and tend to use a [[FireBreathingDiner much greater variety of spices]], especially hot peppers of many kinds. Such cuisine is available in the United States at certain specialized Chinese restaurants; your typical "mom-and-pop" Chinese place that isn't a buffet often also has it on a "secret menu" printed only in Chinese for Chinese customers. This can cause some hilarity when ''n''th-generation Chinese-Americans who don't speak Chinese (or speak but don't read) or [[InterchangeableAsianCultures other East Asians, like Koreans and Japanese]][[note]]Typically by an inattentive waiter[[/note]] are given the authentic menu without asking for it and have to sheepishly explain that they want the English menu, please... Also causing hilarity is when a non-Asian who actually speaks Chinese demands the authentic menu, and then can't handle the spiciness of the dish he/she ordered.



"Craft beers", also known as microbrews, are meant for a more discriminating clientele, and usually come in smaller batches; the American Brewers' Association defines a microbrewery as one that produces less than 15,000 American barrels a year. This conflation of craft and microbrew is no longer strictly true; a number of formerly small craft breweries are today producing well over 15,000 barrels, most notably the Boston Beer Company (makers of Sam Adams, the first craft brewery to make a splash), which makes 2.5 million barrels; there are about 100 craft breweries that produce between 15,000 and 6,000,000 barrels[[note]]the point at which the ABA considers you a "macrobrewery"[[/note]] termed "regional craft breweries." These beers have come into their own as a high-class drinking option, with many places even having beer sommeliers who can recommend the best beer to complement your meal. These brews tend to be more flavorful (and there are literally hundreds of brands to choose from), but are much more expensive, due both to the smaller batch sizes and to the higher variety of flavors calling for more varied ingredients. Snobs drink exclusively craft beer, and look down upon mainstream brands in much the same way (and for much the same reasons) as foreigners are stereotyped as doing. These breweries also tend to have a quirky, tongue-in-cheek style to their packaging, and the actual beers are often creative, and indeed wildly experimental, combining strange ingredients[[note]]ranging from the traditional-but-weird, like oysters in stout, to the absolutely novel, like cocoa nibs, maple syrup, and [[BaconAddiction bacon]]; while the origins of this tendency are up for debate, Dogfish Head Brewery was among the first to start doing this, and is certainly one of the most high-profile practitioners of it as well.[[/note]] and methods from disparate beer styles, to the distaste of some (mostly European) traditionalists, though the prevailing sentiment abroad seems to be "American brewers will try anything once, and while it doesn't always work, it's awesome when it does". American craft beer also tends to be highly alcoholic (particularly barleywines and Russian imperial stouts, which almost always go into double-digit ABV counts and are a go-to for any craft brewer looking for a high-gravity dark beer) and unusually hoppy, as well, although a few breweries--mostly those that have a primarily English influence (e.g. Yards of Philadelphia)--do buck that trend, and there has been a recent boom in sours; while it's too early to call, there does seem to be some evidence that the market is beginning to move away from West Coast-style hop nukes. The old joking about American mass-market lager is slowly being replaced by an argument between American and European beer snobs about whether or not the US is currently the best place in the world to drink beer. Some states with a significant craft beer culture are California, Colorado, Oregon [[note]]Portland lays claim to having the most microbreweries of any city ''in the world'' [[/note]], Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Michigan,[[note]]Where there's a serious bill to get a British-style regulation to require a pint of beer at a bar to always be exactly a pint (although of course it's to ensure that pints are American 16-oz ones, not the British 20-oz).[[/note]] Louisiana, Maine, and Washington.[[note]]The state grows up to 50% of domestic hops production, mostly in the Yakima Valley, so brewers have easy access to key ingredients[[/note]]

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"Craft beers", also known as microbrews, are meant for a more discriminating clientele, and usually come in smaller batches; the American Brewers' Association defines a microbrewery as one that produces less than 15,000 American barrels a year. This conflation of craft and microbrew is no longer strictly true; a number of formerly small craft breweries are today producing well over 15,000 barrels, most notably the Boston Beer Company (makers of Sam Adams, the first craft brewery to make a splash), which makes 2.5 million barrels; there are about 100 craft breweries that produce between 15,000 and 6,000,000 barrels[[note]]the point at which the ABA considers you a "macrobrewery"[[/note]] termed "regional craft breweries." These beers have come into their own as a high-class drinking option, with many places even having beer sommeliers who can recommend the best beer to complement your meal. These brews tend to be more flavorful (and there are literally hundreds of brands to choose from), but are much more expensive, due both to the smaller batch sizes and to the higher variety of flavors calling for more varied ingredients. Snobs drink exclusively craft beer, and look down upon mainstream brands in much the same way (and for much the same reasons) as foreigners are stereotyped as doing. These breweries also tend to have a quirky, tongue-in-cheek style to their packaging, and the actual beers are often creative, and indeed wildly experimental, combining strange ingredients[[note]]ranging from the traditional-but-weird, like oysters in stout, to the absolutely novel, like cocoa nibs, maple syrup, and [[BaconAddiction bacon]]; bacon; while the origins of this tendency are up for debate, Dogfish Head Brewery was among the first to start doing this, and is certainly one of the most high-profile practitioners of it as well.[[/note]] and methods from disparate beer styles, to the distaste of some (mostly European) traditionalists, though the prevailing sentiment abroad seems to be "American brewers will try anything once, and while it doesn't always work, it's awesome when it does". American craft beer also tends to be highly alcoholic (particularly barleywines and Russian imperial stouts, which almost always go into double-digit ABV counts and are a go-to for any craft brewer looking for a high-gravity dark beer) and unusually hoppy, as well, although a few breweries--mostly those that have a primarily English influence (e.g. Yards of Philadelphia)--do buck that trend, and there has been a recent boom in sours; while it's too early to call, there does seem to be some evidence that the market is beginning to move away from West Coast-style hop nukes. The old joking about American mass-market lager is slowly being replaced by an argument between American and European beer snobs about whether or not the US is currently the best place in the world to drink beer. Some states with a significant craft beer culture are California, Colorado, Oregon [[note]]Portland lays claim to having the most microbreweries of any city ''in the world'' [[/note]], Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Michigan,[[note]]Where there's a serious bill to get a British-style regulation to require a pint of beer at a bar to always be exactly a pint (although of course it's to ensure that pints are American 16-oz ones, not the British 20-oz).[[/note]] Louisiana, Maine, and Washington.[[note]]The state grows up to 50% of domestic hops production, mostly in the Yakima Valley, so brewers have easy access to key ingredients[[/note]]
7th Sep '17 12:15:51 PM penguinist
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Your area may not have all of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat; and if you live in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, you're probably within walking distance (or at least [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway subway distance]]) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments--and several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

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Your area may not have all only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat; and if you live in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, you're probably within walking distance (or at least [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway subway distance]]) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments--and several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.
13th Aug '17 4:31:10 PM HasturHasturHastur
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Like Chinese, Mexican food is very regional. Some of these regions are in the U.S. with the major types being Tex-Mex, Cali-Mex, and New Mexican. These aren't so much Americanized versions of Mexican as these areas were originally part of Mexico. However, the most Americanized restaurants generally label themselves as Tex-Mex. Anything labeled "Authentic Mexican Cuisine" is very Americanized, often to the point of replacing traditional sauces with brown gravy. Some restaurants serve Mexican food aimed at immigrants hewing more toward cuisine found in Mexico. [[GratuitousSpanish Often these have "taquería" in the name, even if their specialty isn't tacos]].

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Like Chinese, Mexican food is very regional. Some of these regions are in the U.S. with the major types being Tex-Mex, Cali-Mex, and New Mexican. These aren't so much Americanized versions of Mexican as these areas were originally part of Mexico. However, the most Americanized restaurants generally label themselves as Tex-Mex. Anything labeled "Authentic Mexican Cuisine" is very Americanized, often to the point of replacing traditional sauces with brown gravy. Some restaurants serve Mexican food aimed at immigrants hewing more toward cuisine found in Mexico. [[GratuitousSpanish Often these have "taquería" in the name, even if their specialty isn't tacos]].
tacos]]. If it's a hole in the wall with a hot sauce rack full of Valentina, Tapatio, and El Yucateco, a beverage cooler full of Jarritos, Sidral Mundet, and Sangria Senoral (and possibly also large jugs full of ''horchata'', ''aguas frescas'', and ''agua de Jamaica'' on the counter), a TV playing ''telenovelas'', and staff who loudly converse in (often profanity-laden) Mexican Spanish and possibly have their kids running around (if it's a ''really'' small operation), odds are good that you've found a relatively authentic independent/mom & pop Mexican place and should make a point of running in if you've got a craving.
4th Aug '17 9:29:07 PM karstovich2
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* The classic form of this argument is probably in Philadelphia with its famous cheesesteaks. Two establishments--Pat's King of Steaks and Geno's Steaks--both claim to be the original place where someone chopped up some thin-sliced steak, tossed in some onions, topped it with cheese, and put it all in a long roll. To add to the sense of rivalry, they are right across the street from each other, at the intersection of 9th St. and Passyunk Avenue in South Philly. Both have capitalized on their fame and now attract large crowds from out of town. True to expectations, many local aficionados reject both Pat's and Geno's for another place; some swear by Tony Luke's (also originally South Philly, although now a small chain), while others advance John's Roast Pork (also South Philly; famous for cheesesteaks despite the name), and still others swear by Jim's Steaks (on South Street popular with late-night revelers, as South is a bar street on the dividing line between South Philly and Center City[[note]]That's "downtown," but [[InsistentTerminology don't tell a Philadelphian that]][[/note]]) and still others have their own preferred holes-in-the-wall. Still other people reject the hegemony of the cheesesteak and declare for the lesser-known Philadelphia roast pork sandwich, where the top contenders are Tony Luke's (again), John's (again), and Tommy [=DiNic's=] (in the relatively [[StealthPun tony]] Reading Terminal Market in Center City).

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* The classic form of this argument is probably in Philadelphia with its famous cheesesteaks. Two establishments--Pat's King of Steaks and Geno's Steaks--both claim to be the original place where someone chopped up some thin-sliced steak, tossed in some onions, topped it with cheese, and put it all in a long roll. To add to the sense of rivalry, they are right across the street from each other, at the intersection of 9th St. and Passyunk Avenue in South Philly. Both have capitalized on their fame and now attract large crowds from out of town. True to expectations, many local aficionados reject both Pat's and Geno's for another place; some swear by Tony Luke's (also originally South Philly, although now a small chain), while others advance John's Roast Pork (also South Philly; famous for cheesesteaks despite the name), name, and only a few blocks away from the original Tony Luke's), and still others swear by Jim's Steaks (on South Street popular with late-night revelers, as South is a bar street on the dividing line between South Philly and Center City[[note]]That's "downtown," but [[InsistentTerminology don't tell a Philadelphian that]][[/note]]) and still others have their own preferred holes-in-the-wall. Still other people reject the hegemony of the cheesesteak and declare for the lesser-known Philadelphia roast pork sandwich, where the top contenders are Tony Luke's (again), John's (again), and Tommy [=DiNic's=] (in the relatively [[StealthPun tony]] Reading Terminal Market in Center City).
1st Aug '17 8:08:10 PM karstovich2
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Speaking of which... Two different cuisines which get lumped together because they come from Louisiana and start with the letter "C." Both began as colonial-era cuisines from whatever ingredients could be foraged from Louisiana Territory, and have increased in popularity across the US. Creole food used classic 19th-century [[UsefulNotes/SnailsAndSoOn French recipes]] with local ingredients--e.g. replacing the carrots of the French ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix mirepoix]]'' with the bell peppers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_trinity_(cuisine) holy trinity]]--with influences from Spanish Caribbean and African cooking. Cajun cuisine is simpler country-folks cooking. The difference arises from the differing backgrounds; Creole cuisine arises from the mixed culture of colonial New Orleans, consisting of direct immigrants from France, African slaves and freedmen, Spanish and other random immigrants, and people descended from the extensive intermarriage among them, while the Cajuns by and large primarily descend from Acadians (people of French ancestry who had settled in Acadia--what is now New Brunswick in Canada) who left for Louisiana after the British more or less forced them out of their homeland during the [[UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar "French and Indian War"]].[[note]]Acadia had been taken over in 1710 as part of [[UsefulNotes/WarOfTheSpanishSuccession "Queen Anne's War"]], and many Acadians left for Louisiana at that time, but the later war led to a much larger exodus.[[/note]] Culinarily, the main divide separating the two would probably be the incorporation of tomatoes and/or butter in Creole dishes, these being traces of the Spanish and upper-crust French influences, respectively; authentic Cajun dishes, which have remained much closer to French peasant food and have a weaker Spanish influence, eschew tomatoes and generally use vegetable oil as their main cooking fat (traditionally, the Cajun cooking fat was lard, but vegetable oil is ''much'' cheaper). Cross-pollination due to cultural proximity blurs the distinction between them the further you go from southern Louisiana. Both have also updated with French cuisine, incorporating and refining, and now many metropolitan areas around the country feature five star New Orleans-style restaurants.

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Speaking of which... Two different cuisines which get lumped together because they come from Louisiana and start with the letter "C." Both began as colonial-era cuisines from whatever ingredients could be foraged from Louisiana Territory, and have increased in popularity across the US. Creole food used classic 19th-century [[UsefulNotes/SnailsAndSoOn French recipes]] with local ingredients--e.g. replacing the carrots of the French ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix mirepoix]]'' with the bell peppers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_trinity_(cuisine) holy trinity]]--with influences from Spanish Caribbean and African cooking. Cajun cuisine is simpler country-folks cooking.

The difference arises from the differing backgrounds; Creole cuisine arises from the mixed culture of colonial New Orleans, consisting of direct immigrants from France, African slaves and freedmen, Spanish and other random immigrants, and people descended from the extensive intermarriage among them, while the Cajuns by and large primarily descend from Acadians (people of French ancestry who had settled in Acadia--what is now New Brunswick in Canada) who left for Louisiana after the British more or less forced them out of their homeland during the [[UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar "French and Indian War"]].[[note]]Acadia had been taken over in 1710 as part of [[UsefulNotes/WarOfTheSpanishSuccession "Queen Anne's War"]], and many Acadians left for Louisiana at that time, but the later war led to a much larger exodus.[[/note]] Culinarily, the main divide separating the two would probably be the incorporation of tomatoes and/or butter in Creole dishes, these being traces of the Spanish and upper-crust French influences, respectively; authentic Cajun dishes, which have remained much closer to French peasant food and have a weaker Spanish influence, eschew tomatoes and generally use vegetable oil as their main cooking fat (traditionally, the Cajun cooking fat was lard, but vegetable oil is ''much'' cheaper). Cross-pollination due That said, the styles do borrow a lot from each other (much as French ''haute cuisine'' will sometimes borrow something cool from French regional cooking, and vice versa). Also, because they are much more similar to cultural proximity blurs each other than to anything else, the distinction between them blurs the further you go from southern Louisiana. Both have also updated with French cuisine, incorporating and refining, and now many metropolitan areas around the country feature five star New Orleans-style restaurants.
1st Aug '17 8:04:23 PM karstovich2
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Has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace.

to:

Has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace.
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