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History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

8th Apr '16 4:05:47 PM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.
5th Apr '16 4:12:22 PM karstovich2
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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning) white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the south, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning) seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the south, South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]No distilleries exist today in Bourbon County, although this is not because the county is "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.
South.

5th Apr '16 4:08:31 PM karstovich2
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The South is most narrowly defined as the states that formed the Confederacy during the Civil War, minus a few marginal regions --essentially all the states in the southeast going from the Atlantic coast to Arkansas, Louisiana, and east Texas, but not Florida (at least not the lower half). Most broader definitions include Kentucky, a state that stayed in the Union during the Civil War despite slavery being legal there. Some broader definitions may include Maryland and Delaware, also Union slave states, but those states are mostly considered Mid-Atlantic nowadays and are primarily made up of suburbs of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, DC. West Virginia seceded from secession in 1861; the northwest is Midwestern, the northeast Mid-Atlantic, the interior Appalachian. (Appalachia is not quite the same as the lowland South, though, and fought for the North during the Civil War.) The southern parts of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio are "Butternut Country", with a pretty close cultural affinity with the South; and Missouri was settled by Virginians, and was a Northern slave state during the war.

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The South is most narrowly defined as the states that formed the Confederacy during the Civil War, minus a few marginal regions --essentially all the states in the southeast going from the Atlantic coast to Arkansas, Louisiana, and east Texas, but not Florida (at least not the lower half). Most broader definitions include Kentucky, a state that stayed in the Union during the Civil War despite slavery being legal there. Some broader definitions may include Maryland and Delaware, also Union slave states, but those states are mostly considered Mid-Atlantic nowadays and are primarily made up of suburbs of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, DC. West Virginia seceded from secession in 1861; the northwest is Midwestern, the northeast Mid-Atlantic, the interior Appalachian. (Appalachia is not quite the same as the lowland South, though, and fought for the North during the Civil War.) The southern parts of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio are "Butternut Country", with a pretty close cultural affinity with the South; and Missouri was having been settled by Virginians, Virginians and was also having been a Northern slave state during the war.
war, is famously betwixt-and-between, not quite Midwestern, and not quite Southern.
5th Apr '16 3:56:39 PM karstovich2
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage (and something to squeeze money out of tourists) but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.
5th Apr '16 9:44:12 AM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.



* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.
4th Apr '16 7:14:20 PM karstovich2
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.
4th Apr '16 7:13:23 PM karstovich2
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. These cuisines are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. These Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe.
26th Mar '16 11:46:09 AM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. These cuisines are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, and Sadie's.

to:

* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. These cuisines are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Sadie's.Pueblo Harvest Cafe.
26th Mar '16 11:03:53 AM VeryBerry
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with with Spanish cuisine. These cuisines are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico, the UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}} restaurants El Pinto, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Padilla's, and Sadie's.



* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.



* Idaho is famous for its potatoes, to the point where "Famous Potatoes" is even written on the license plate.



* California is famous for avocados and wine.



* Idaho is famous for its potatoes, to the point where "Famous Potatoes" is even written on the license plate.
* Iowa and Nebraska are nearly synonymous with corn (maize).
* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters. (Was on their license plate, from 1987-2000.)



* California is famous for avocados and wine.

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* California New Mexico is known for the state's chile pepper, which comes in either red or green.
* Texas is historically
famous for avocados and wine.beef cattle.



* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters. (Was on their license plate, from 1987-2000.)
* Texas is historically famous for beef cattle.
* Iowa and Nebraska are nearly synonymous with corn (maize).



!![[AC:Hawaiian]]
* UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} has an entire pre-colonial Polynesian cuisine that has survived largely intact, as well as a new post-colonization cuisine that fuses Polynesian, American, European, and East Asian elements. Characteristic of the former are ''poi'' (purple taro porridge), pit-roasted pig, and innumerable fish dishes; characteristic of the latter are Spam musubi[[note]](a grilled slice of Spam mated to a rectangle of sticky rice by a strip of ''nori'' seaweed- reportedly a favorite of the [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama first Hawaiian-born President]])[[/note]], Portuguese sweet bread, plate lunch, and innumerable fish dishes. Hawaiian cuisine's emphasis on the islands' bounty of fish has led to some Hawaiian names for fish leaking out into the general American culinary lexicon, with "mahi-mahi" for what is otherwise called "dolphinfish" and "ahi" for bigeye and yellowfin tuna being the most prominent.



UsefulNotes/NewMexico is home to its own unique variety of food. Based on the ancient cuisine of Pueblo Native Americans and the Spanish Europeon culinary styles. This food centers around the state's unique red and/or green chile peppers, a type of Native American Indian frybread called sopapillas, sauteed squash called calabacitas, diced fried potatos called papitas, and desserts and snacks such as biscochitos (sugar/cinnamon cookies) and piñon (pine nuts). Served in a smothered Mexican-style or in a clean 40s Americana style. Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like McDonald's and Subway offer green chile on their products McDonald's even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos. The most prominent restaurants for New Mexican cuisine are Sadies's in the Albuquerque Metropolitan Area, Joseph's in Santa Fe, Pueblo Harvest Cafe in Albuquerque, Monroe's in Albuquerque, Los Cuates in Albuquerque, El Pinto in Albuquerque, and numerous others. Companies like Bueno Foods, 505 Southwestern, The Authentic New Mexican, and others offer authentic New Mexican products for New Mexican cuisine.

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UsefulNotes/NewMexico is home to its own unique variety of food. Based on the ancient cuisine of Pueblo Native Americans and the Spanish Europeon culinary styles. This food centers around the state's unique red and/or green chile peppers, a type of Native American Indian frybread called sopapillas, sauteed squash called calabacitas, diced fried potatos called papitas, and desserts and snacks such as biscochitos (sugar/cinnamon cookies) and piñon (pine nuts). Served in a smothered Mexican-style or in a clean 40s Americana style. style.

Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like McDonald's and Subway offer green chile on their products McDonald's UsefulNotes/McDonalds even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos. Burritos.

The most prominent restaurants for New Mexican cuisine are Sadies's in the Albuquerque Metropolitan Area, Joseph's in Santa Fe, Pueblo Harvest Cafe in Albuquerque, Monroe's in Albuquerque, Los Cuates in Albuquerque, El Pinto in Albuquerque, and numerous others. Companies like Bueno Foods, 505 Southwestern, The Authentic New Mexican, and others offer authentic New Mexican products for New Mexican cuisine.
20th Mar '16 2:45:06 PM VeryBerry
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UsefulNotes/NewMexico is home to its own unique variety of food. Based on the ancient cuisine of Pueblo Native Americans and the Spanish Europeon culinary styles. This food centers around the state's unique red and/or green chile peppers, a type of Native American Indian frybread called sopapillas, sauteed squash called calabacitas, diced fried potatos called papitas, and desserts and snacks such as biscochitos (sugar/cinnamon cookies) and piñon (pine nuts). Served in a smothered Mexican-style or in a clean 40s Americana style. Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like McDonald's and Subway offer green chile on their products McDonald's even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos. The most prominent restaurants for New Mexican cuisine are Sadies's in the Albuquerque Metropolitan Area, Joseph's in Santa Fe, Monroe's in Albuquerque, Los Cuates in Albuquerque, El Pinto in Albuquerque, and numerous others. Companies like Bueno Foods, 505 Southwestern, The Authentic New Mexican, and others offer authentic New Mexican products for New Mexican cuisine.

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UsefulNotes/NewMexico is home to its own unique variety of food. Based on the ancient cuisine of Pueblo Native Americans and the Spanish Europeon culinary styles. This food centers around the state's unique red and/or green chile peppers, a type of Native American Indian frybread called sopapillas, sauteed squash called calabacitas, diced fried potatos called papitas, and desserts and snacks such as biscochitos (sugar/cinnamon cookies) and piñon (pine nuts). Served in a smothered Mexican-style or in a clean 40s Americana style. Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like McDonald's and Subway offer green chile on their products McDonald's even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos. The most prominent restaurants for New Mexican cuisine are Sadies's in the Albuquerque Metropolitan Area, Joseph's in Santa Fe, Pueblo Harvest Cafe in Albuquerque, Monroe's in Albuquerque, Los Cuates in Albuquerque, El Pinto in Albuquerque, and numerous others. Companies like Bueno Foods, 505 Southwestern, The Authentic New Mexican, and others offer authentic New Mexican products for New Mexican cuisine.
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