History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

20th Feb '18 5:21:16 PM karstovich2
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The difference arises from the differing backgrounds; Creole cuisine arises from the mixed culture of colonial New Orleans, consisting of direct immigrants from France, African slaves and freedmen, Spanish and other random immigrants, and people descended from the extensive intermarriage among them, while the Cajuns by and large primarily descend from Acadians (people of French ancestry who had settled in Acadia--what is now New Brunswick in Canada) who left for Louisiana after the British more or less forced them out of their homeland during the [[UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar "French and Indian War"]].[[note]]Acadia had been taken over in 1710 as part of [[UsefulNotes/WarOfTheSpanishSuccession "Queen Anne's War"]], and many Acadians left for Louisiana at that time, but the later war led to a much larger exodus.[[/note]] Culinarily, the main divide separating the two would probably be the incorporation of tomatoes and/or butter in Creole dishes, these being traces of the Spanish and upper-crust French influences, respectively; authentic Cajun dishes, which have remained much closer to French peasant food and have a weaker Spanish influence, eschew tomatoes and generally use vegetable oil as their main cooking fat (traditionally, the Cajun cooking fat was lard, but vegetable oil is ''much'' cheaper). That said, the styles do borrow a lot from each other (much as French ''haute cuisine'' will sometimes borrow something cool from French regional cooking, and vice versa). Also, because they are much more similar to each other than to anything else, the distinction between them blurs the further you go from southern Louisiana. Both have also updated with French cuisine, incorporating and refining, and now many metropolitan areas around the country feature five star New Orleans-style restaurants.

Has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace. Zatarain's and various brands of Louisiana-style hot sauce (a thin, watery affair made with mashed peppers, vinegar, and salt that has been allowed to ferment; Tabasco is the most famous, while Crystal, Louisiana, and Trappey's are also reasonably well-known) are the most famous nationally available food products that are based in or have originated from Louisiana.

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The difference arises from the differing backgrounds; Creole cuisine arises from the mixed culture of colonial New Orleans, consisting of direct immigrants from France, African slaves and freedmen, Spanish and other random immigrants, and people descended from the extensive intermarriage among them, while them. Meanwhile, the Cajuns by and large primarily descend from Acadians (people Acadians: people of French ancestry who had settled in Acadia--what is now New Brunswick in Canada) who left for Louisiana Canada, which the British had taken over in 1710 after the [[UsefulNotes/WarOfTheSpanishSuccession "Queen Anne's War"]]. The British more or less forced them many if not most Acadians out of their homeland during the [[UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar "French and Indian War"]].[[note]]Acadia had been taken over in 1710 as part of [[UsefulNotes/WarOfTheSpanishSuccession "Queen Anne's War"]], and many these families joined a small band of Acadians left for who had settled in Louisiana at that time, but after the later war led to initial takeover half a much larger exodus.[[/note]] century earlier.

Culinarily, the main divide separating the two would probably be the incorporation of tomatoes and/or butter in Creole dishes, these being traces of the Spanish and upper-crust French influences, respectively; authentic respectively. Authentic Cajun dishes, which have remained much closer to French peasant food and have a weaker Spanish influence, eschew tomatoes and generally use vegetable oil as their main cooking fat (traditionally, the Cajun cooking fat was lard, but vegetable oil is ''much'' cheaper). That said, the styles do borrow a lot from each other (much as French ''haute cuisine'' will sometimes borrow something cool from French regional cooking, and vice versa). Also, because they are much more similar to each other than to anything else, the distinction between them blurs the further you go from southern Louisiana. Both have also updated with French cuisine, incorporating and refining, and now many metropolitan areas around the country feature five star New Orleans-style restaurants.

Has Louisiana cooking has become near-synonymous with the two best-known evangelists of the style, Emeril Lagasse and Paul Prudhomme. Prudhomme is interesting because he was actually Cajun (from Saint Landry Parish in the heart of Acadiana), but adapted his style to Creole preferences (like working with tomatoes and butter) when he moved to New Orleans and took over the Commander's Palace restaurant, a bastion of Creole cooking (although he cooking. Prudhomme also introduced a number of Cajun styles into Creole, like blackening). most notably blackening (now a standard technique not only in Creole cuisine but in kitchens around the world). Prudhomme later took on Lagasse as his protégé; Lagasse is actually not from Louisiana (he's half-French Canadian, half-Portuguese, and originally from Boston), but Prodhomme Prudhomme saw a spark in him and hired him for the kitchen at the Commander's Palace. Zatarain's and various brands of Louisiana-style hot sauce (a thin, watery affair made with mashed peppers, vinegar, and salt that has been allowed to ferment; Tabasco is the most famous, while Crystal, Louisiana, and Trappey's are also reasonably well-known) are the most famous nationally available food products that are based in or have originated from Louisiana.
18th Feb '18 9:22:11 PM karstovich2
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Speaking of which... Two different cuisines which get lumped together because they come from Louisiana and start with the letter "C." Both began as colonial-era cuisines from whatever ingredients could be foraged from Louisiana Territory, and have increased in popularity across the US. Creole food used classic 19th-century [[UsefulNotes/SnailsAndSoOn French recipes]] with local ingredients--e.g. replacing the carrots of the French ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix mirepoix]]'' with the bell peppers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_trinity_(cuisine) holy trinity]]--with influences from Spanish Caribbean and African cooking. Cajun cuisine is simpler country-folks cooking.

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Speaking of which... Two different cuisines which get lumped together because they come from Louisiana and start with the letter "C." Both began as colonial-era cuisines from whatever ingredients could be foraged from Louisiana Territory, and have increased in popularity across the US. Creole food used classic 19th-century [[UsefulNotes/SnailsAndSoOn French recipes]] with local ingredients--e.g. replacing the carrots of the French ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix mirepoix]]'' with the bell peppers of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_trinity_(cuisine) holy trinity]]--with influences from Spanish Caribbean and African cooking. Cajun cuisine is simpler country-folks cooking.cooking, deriving from French regional cooking (particularly northern and western France, as most ancestral Cajuns came from Normandy, Brittany, Poitou, and Aquitaine).
18th Feb '18 9:11:21 PM karstovich2
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* You may laugh, but there's actually a good reason New Jersey is called the Garden State; a good number of fruits and vegetables grow well there. In particular, blueberries and cranberries grow well in the poor, acidic soils of the state's southern portions, and the climate of the state produces the regionally-famous Jersey tomatoes (historically the basis for Campbell's tomato soup, back when the Camden factory was still running) in the summer and Jersey asparagus in the spring.

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* You may laugh, but there's actually a good reason New Jersey is called the Garden State; a good number of fruits and vegetables grow well there. In particular, blueberries and cranberries grow well in the poor, acidic soils of the state's southern portions, and the climate of the state produces the regionally-famous Jersey asparagus in the spring and Jersey tomatoes (historically the basis for Campbell's tomato soup, back when the Camden factory was still running) in the summer and Jersey asparagus in the spring.summer.
18th Feb '18 9:08:35 PM karstovich2
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* Texas is historically famous for beef cattle.
* Vermont and New Hampshire are famous for maple syrup,

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* Texas is historically famous for beef cattle.
cattle. It's not on the license plates, but there's a reason the University of Texas is the Longhorns.
* Vermont and New Hampshire are famous for maple syrup, syrup.


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* You may laugh, but there's actually a good reason New Jersey is called the Garden State; a good number of fruits and vegetables grow well there. In particular, blueberries and cranberries grow well in the poor, acidic soils of the state's southern portions, and the climate of the state produces the regionally-famous Jersey tomatoes (historically the basis for Campbell's tomato soup, back when the Camden factory was still running) in the summer and Jersey asparagus in the spring.
18th Feb '18 8:56:07 PM karstovich2
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On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night.

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On the higher end, you've got plenty of fancy restaurants that deal in higher-end meats (venison, buffalo, quail, pheasant, et cetera) and higher-class steaks. Generally, if you're looking at [=USDA=] Prime beef, it's gonna be served in a fancy restaurant. Finally, if the cuisine is listed as "New American", you'll be looking at a fairly large bill at the end of the night.
night, although the meaning of this has changed over time; when the label was invented in the 1980s, it was code for ludicrous extravagances like the ones described in ''Literature/AmericanPsycho'', but after the Great Recession of 2008, it more commonly describes remixes of American ComfortFood (like fried chicken, hamburgers, and macaroni and cheese, or regional dishes like cheesesteaks and hotdish) with extra attention to ingredient quality and added ingredients.
7th Jan '18 11:47:28 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
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America -- AKA UsefulNotes/{{the United States}} -- has often been described as a "[[CultureChopSuey melting pot]]". This is very, very true. International influences are all over our art, our population, our languages, and most tellingly, our cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.c

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America -- AKA UsefulNotes/{{the United States}} -- has often been described as a "[[CultureChopSuey melting pot]]". This is very, very true. International influences are all over our art, our population, our languages, and most tellingly, our cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.c
A.
29th Dec '17 1:33:12 AM KYCubbie
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** Detroit-style pizza is rather similar, but is not quite as pie-like (the toppings are on top of the very thick bread, rather than inside a "pie", and the cheese is in a thinner layer that may be either on top of or under the sauce--or both) and is generally square (they were originally baked in industrial parts trays--way to be stereotypical, Detroit) with a golden crust (the pan is liberally brushed with olive oil or butter prior to baking). This style arguably served as the basis for the large chains' deep-dish pan pizzas (of the four major national chains, Little Caesar's is from Detroit and Domino's is from nearby Ann Arbor), and is a descendant of Sicilian style pizza.
* Midwest-style pizza has a thinner, crisper crust and a wider range of toppings than New York pizzas. Although the term isn't famous, the style is very popular thanks to international chain Pizza Hut, headquarted in Wichita, Kansas. Oddly enough, a square-slice variety of this, known as "pub pizza," is eaten in Chicago more often than the deep-dish variety mentioned above -- usually while in a rush during the day or drunk late at night.

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** Detroit-style pizza is rather similar, but is not quite as pie-like (the toppings are on top of the very thick bread, rather than inside a "pie", and the cheese is in a thinner layer that may be either on top of or under the sauce--or both) and is generally square (they were originally baked in industrial parts trays--way to be stereotypical, Detroit) with a golden crust (the pan is liberally brushed with olive oil or butter prior to baking). This style arguably served as the basis for the large chains' deep-dish pan pizzas (of the four major national chains, Little Caesar's Caesars is from Detroit and Domino's is from nearby Ann Arbor), and is a descendant of Sicilian style pizza.
* Midwest-style pizza has a thinner, crisper crust and a wider range of toppings than New York pizzas. Although the term isn't famous, the style is very popular thanks to international chain Pizza Hut, headquarted founded in Wichita, Kansas.Kansas (though now headquartered in the [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas suburbs]]). Oddly enough, a square-slice variety of this, known as "pub pizza," is eaten in Chicago more often than the deep-dish variety mentioned above -- usually while in a rush during the day or drunk late at night.



Buffalo wings, sometimes called hot wings, were invented at a bar/restaurant run by Italian-Americans in [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkState Buffalo, New York]]; stories behind the invention of the dish go that it was either at the request of the owner's son or a result of receiving a shipment of chicken wings instead of the chicken backs needed for the restaurant's pasta sauce (maybe both). These are chicken wings that are deep-fried, grilled, or baked and then coated in a spicy hot sauce (historically made by mixing butter with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank%27s_RedHot Frank's RedHot]] or some other cayenne-based sauce); traditionally they're served with celery and either blue cheese or ranch dressing to serve as a cooling contrast. Many pizza places also do wings, and so in much if not most of the country, pizza and hot wings (and perhaps garlic knots) are the go-to food for watching sports; "sitting on the couch with your buddies wearing football jerseys drinking beer and eating pizza and wings while watching the SuperBowl" (or some other big football game) is basically a trope of 21st-century American middle-class manhood.

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Buffalo wings, sometimes called hot wings, were invented at a bar/restaurant run by Italian-Americans in [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkState Buffalo, New York]]; stories behind the invention of the dish go that it was either at the request of the owner's son or a result of receiving a shipment of chicken wings instead of the chicken backs needed for the restaurant's pasta sauce (maybe both). These are chicken wings that are deep-fried, grilled, or baked and then coated in a spicy hot sauce (historically made by mixing butter with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank%27s_RedHot Frank's RedHot]] or some other cayenne-based sauce); traditionally they're served with celery and either blue cheese or ranch dressing to serve as a cooling contrast. Many pizza places also do wings, and so in much if not most of the country, pizza and hot wings (and perhaps garlic knots) are the go-to food for watching sports; "sitting on the couch with your buddies wearing football jerseys drinking beer and eating pizza and wings while watching the SuperBowl" UsefulNotes/SuperBowl" (or some other big football game) is basically a trope of 21st-century American middle-class manhood.



As hinted at above, the national chains are Pizza Hut, Domino's, Papa John's, and Little Caesar's. They all produce a fairly similar product, with a rather doughy crust and a surfeit of cheese. This is the result of a hybridization of several pizza styles and modifications to suit the tastes of people in the home area of the style--which, by and large, was the Midwest. As mentioned, two of the chains (Domino's and Little Caesar's) started in the Detroit area (broadly defined), while Pizza Hut was originally from Kansas and Papa John's was founded in Jeffersonville, Indiana (which more or less literally sits on the border between the Midwest and the South; Louisville, Kentucky is just across the Ohio River). (Pizza Hut has since been bought up by the Louisville-based Yum! Brands--also responsible for KFC, among other chains--leading to amusing fights between the two megacorps about naming rights in Louisville.)

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As hinted at above, the national chains are Pizza Hut, Domino's, Papa John's, and Little Caesar's.Caesars. They all produce a fairly similar product, with a rather doughy crust and a surfeit of cheese. This is the result of a hybridization of several pizza styles and modifications to suit the tastes of people in the home area of the style--which, by and large, was the Midwest. As mentioned, two of the chains (Domino's and Little Caesar's) Caesars) started in the Detroit area (broadly defined), while Pizza Hut was originally from Kansas and Papa John's was founded in Jeffersonville, Indiana (which more or less literally sits on the border between the Midwest and the South; Louisville, Kentucky is just across the Ohio River). (Pizza Hut has since been bought up by the Louisville-based Yum! Brands--also responsible for KFC, among other chains--leading to amusing fights between the two megacorps about naming rights in Louisville.)
29th Dec '17 1:17:47 AM KYCubbie
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Depending on who you ask, Southern cuisine is either the best ([[SeriousBusiness or the only]]) food in America, or a complete joke that treats food as something that should be hosed down in fat until it's unrecognizable. Butter, lard, and other greasy fats are common ingredients. It should be no surprise that the Southern states have among the highest obesity rates in the country.[[note]]Not the highest of all, though. A 2013 study found that the heaviest region in the country was actually the Great Plains Midwest--the corridor running from Minnesota and the Dakotas down to Kansas. Why did previous studies miss this? Southerners, it turns out, are more ''honest'' about their weight to survey takers. That said, there's a reason FatSweatySouthernerInAWhiteSuit is a trope: honesty aside, Southerners still a good bit heftier on average than the country as a whole.[[/note]] Recently-fired Food Network personality PaulaDeen specializes in this cooking. That said, there are healthy (OK, health''ier'') ways of making this cuisine; Deen's fellow Georgian [[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]] is fond of pointing out ways to make classic Southern goodies in a responsible and balanced manner that still respects tradition.

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Depending on who you ask, Southern cuisine is either the best ([[SeriousBusiness or the only]]) food in America, or a complete joke that treats food as something that should be hosed down in fat until it's unrecognizable. Butter, lard, and other greasy fats are common ingredients. It should be no surprise that the Southern states have among the highest obesity rates in the country.[[note]]Not the highest of all, though. A 2013 study found that the heaviest region in the country was actually the Great Plains Midwest--the corridor running from Minnesota and the Dakotas down to Kansas. Why did previous studies miss this? Southerners, it turns out, are more ''honest'' about their weight to survey takers. That said, there's a reason FatSweatySouthernerInAWhiteSuit is a trope: honesty aside, Southerners still a good bit heftier on average than the country as a whole.[[/note]] Recently-fired Former Food Network personality PaulaDeen Paula Deen specializes in this cooking. That said, there are healthy (OK, health''ier'') ways of making this cuisine; Deen's fellow Georgian [[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]] is fond of pointing out ways to make classic Southern goodies in a responsible and balanced manner that still respects tradition.



Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi, plus much of the Florida Panhandle and bits of Louisiana[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, [[UsefulNotes/NewOrleans gumbo]], and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi, plus much of the Florida Panhandle and bits of Louisiana[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, [[UsefulNotes/NewOrleans gumbo]], and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers distillers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Dew,[[note]]from Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.



Also: Cincinnati is famous for its really ''weird'' chili (it is made with "sweet" spices -- allspice, cinnamon, sometimes even cocoa -- and is served over spaghetti) and for goetta (a kind of meatloaf made out of minced pig parts and steel cut oatmeal), and Indiana as a whole is famous for breaded fried pork tenderloin sandwiches (which originated right outside Fort Wayne[[note]]Roughly halfway between Cleveland and Chicago[[/note]]).

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Also: Cincinnati is famous for its really ''weird'' chili (it is made with "sweet" spices -- allspice, cinnamon, sometimes even cocoa -- and is served over spaghetti) and for goetta (a kind of meatloaf made out of minced pig parts and steel cut steel-cut oatmeal), and Indiana as a whole is famous for breaded fried pork tenderloin sandwiches (which originated right outside Fort Wayne[[note]]Roughly Wayne[[note]]roughly halfway between Cleveland and Chicago[[/note]]).



And if you don't feel like driving out to a restaurant to get your food, [[InvertedTrope the chef can drive his or her restaurant to somewhere near you]]: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not ''everywhere'' like they are in California. (For instance, in Portland, Oregon, food trucks can't simply serve anywhere, but only from in designated food truck parks.)

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And if you don't feel like driving out to a restaurant to get your food, [[InvertedTrope the chef can drive his or her restaurant to somewhere near you]]: California has a sprawling food truck scene, with at least tens of thousands of them traveling all over the state, due to a combination of a long history of Mexican-style taco trucks serving the local workers at the end of their days evolving into this and very permissive state laws that allow food trucks to park almost anywhere regular cars can park. Other states have a lot of food trucks too, such as Oregon and New York, but they have tighter laws about where they can serve food and are thus not ''everywhere'' like they are in California. (For instance, in Portland, Oregon, food trucks can't simply serve anywhere, but only from in within designated food truck parks.)



Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. In addition to the aforementioned avocados and wine grapes, California is also a major supplier of pistachios, almonds, alfalfa, artichoke, strawberries, garlic, and lemons. To that extent, certain cities in California have local dishes centered around that crop--for instance, you can find dozens of different uses for artichokes in Castroville, and if you enjoy garlic, there's no shortage of garlic-themed food in Gilroy. Though not as prolific as places like Wisconsin, California produces a lot of cheese as well and has dozens of regional cheeses. Monterey Jack is the most famous, but if you search hard enough, you can also find stuff like Point Reyes or Humboldt Fog.

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Due to the robust agriculture industry in California, located mainly in the central San Joaquin Valley, regardless of what type of food it is, Californians get quite accustomed to very fresh, local ingredients. Out of this sprang a local hamburger chain, Farmer Boys, that boasts that every ingredient all ingredients in its signature burgers and salads were locally obtained. In addition to the aforementioned avocados and wine grapes, California is also a major supplier of pistachios, almonds, alfalfa, artichoke, strawberries, garlic, and lemons. To that extent, certain cities in California have local dishes centered around that crop--for instance, you can find dozens of different uses for artichokes in Castroville, and if you enjoy garlic, there's no shortage of garlic-themed food in Gilroy. Though not as prolific as places like Wisconsin, California produces a lot of cheese as well and has dozens of regional cheeses. Monterey Jack is the most famous, but if you search hard enough, you can also find stuff like Point Reyes or Humboldt Fog.



Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like [=McDonald's=] and Subway offer green chile on their products UsefulNotes/McDonalds even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos.

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Most places in New Mexico offer some type of New Mexican cuisine, usually in the form of offering green New Mexico chile. Obviously local chains like Blake's Lotaburger and Dion's Pizza offer the chopped pepper as a topping, but even national chains like [=McDonald's=] UsefulNotes/McDonalds and Subway offer green chile on their products UsefulNotes/McDonalds products. [=McDonald's=] even offers a special Green Chile Double Cheeseburger combo due to its local popularity. Some local chains specialize in New Mexican cuisine, like Little Anita's and Twisters Burritos.



At the southern edge of the Northeast, there's Maryland and Delaware, where it starts to blend into Southern. Maryland is particularly famous for seafood (especially crab and most especially crab cakes) that is vaguely Northeastern in style, and in northern Delaware around Wilmington, cheesesteaks are considered local food (Philly is 20 minutes by Amtrak, half an hour away by freeway, and 40-50 minutes by commuter train), but Maryland also has "Chicken Maryland," a unique take on the Southern fried chicken (pan-fried in an oven, with the bits stuck to the pan turned into a cream gravy at the end) native to Maryland's Chesapeake Bay shoreline, particularly the Eastern Shore,[[note]]Maryland, of course, surrounds Chesapeake Bay. The Eastern Shore is the part of Maryland on the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin eastern shore]] of Chesapeake Bay, and constitutes the western coast of the Delmarva Peninsula.[[/note]] that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff took off in Europe, Australia, and Latin America]] after being published in one of Auguste Escoffier's cookbooks despite having virtually no following in the US outside of Eastern Maryland.

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At the southern edge of the Northeast, there's Maryland and Delaware, where it starts to blend into Southern. Maryland is particularly famous for seafood (especially crab and most especially crab cakes) that is vaguely Northeastern in style, and in northern Delaware around Wilmington, cheesesteaks are considered local food (Philly is 20 minutes by Amtrak, half an hour away by freeway, and 40-50 minutes by commuter train), but Maryland also has "Chicken Maryland," Maryland", a unique take on the Southern fried chicken (pan-fried in an oven, with the bits stuck to the pan turned into a cream gravy at the end) native to Maryland's Chesapeake Bay shoreline, particularly the Eastern Shore,[[note]]Maryland, of course, surrounds Chesapeake Bay. The Eastern Shore is the part of Maryland on the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin eastern shore]] of Chesapeake Bay, and constitutes the western coast of the Delmarva Peninsula.[[/note]] that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff took off in Europe, Australia, and Latin America]] after being published in one of Auguste Escoffier's cookbooks despite having virtually no following in the US outside of Eastern Maryland.
15th Dec '17 4:19:27 PM Jhonny
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Not its own type of cuisine, but a type of business, also referred to as "lunch trucks" or "roach coaches". While called carts/trucks, these are often shacks or semi-mobile structures parked in vacant lots and in groups resembling a mall food court. These groups of carts often feature unique food items, including sometimes bizarre twists on domestic or international cuisine. UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, Oregon and the rest of [[UsefukNotes/TheOtherRainforest the Pacific Northwest]] are noted for having the best food carts in the nation, while in New York City the "dirty water" hot dog stand -- and its modern variant, the falafel cart with the [[FunnyForeigner odd Arab vendor]]--is almost a trope unto itself. Interestingly, the "Halal cart" is now a regional East Coast chain in major cities (found in D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, and Jersey City at a minimum), with cart owners franchising from the original "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Halal_Guys Halal Guys]]" (a couple of Egyptian cart owners) in NYC, with their own rather unique menu (featuring an odd hybrid of actual Middle Eastern food with Greek, leading to falafel, fish, grilled chicken, or forcemeat-based "lamb gyro" in sandwiches or over rice, topped with vegetables and both "white sauce"--which somehow involves mayonnaise but also other, undisclosed things--and different degrees of hot sauce)--although we should note that a lot of these guys are not actual franchisees but simply "inspired" by the NYC originals.

to:

Not its own type of cuisine, but a type of business, also referred to as "lunch trucks" or "roach coaches". While called carts/trucks, these are often shacks or semi-mobile structures parked in vacant lots and in groups resembling a mall food court. These groups of carts often feature unique food items, including sometimes bizarre twists on domestic or international cuisine. UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, Oregon and the rest of [[UsefukNotes/TheOtherRainforest [[UsefulNotes/TheOtherRainforest the Pacific Northwest]] are noted for having the best food carts in the nation, while in New York City the "dirty water" hot dog stand -- and its modern variant, the falafel cart with the [[FunnyForeigner odd Arab vendor]]--is almost a trope unto itself. Interestingly, the "Halal cart" is now a regional East Coast chain in major cities (found in D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, and Jersey City at a minimum), with cart owners franchising from the original "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Halal_Guys Halal Guys]]" (a couple of Egyptian cart owners) in NYC, with their own rather unique menu (featuring an odd hybrid of actual Middle Eastern food with Greek, leading to falafel, fish, grilled chicken, or forcemeat-based "lamb gyro" in sandwiches or over rice, topped with vegetables and both "white sauce"--which somehow involves mayonnaise but also other, undisclosed things--and different degrees of hot sauce)--although we should note that a lot of these guys are not actual franchisees but simply "inspired" by the NYC originals.
15th Dec '17 4:43:48 AM Lymantria
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Not its own type of cuisine, but a type of business, also referred to as "lunch trucks" or "roach coaches". While called carts/trucks, these are often shacks or semi-mobile structures parked in vacant lots and in groups resembling a mall food court. These groups of carts often feature unique food items, including sometimes bizarre twists on domestic or international cuisine. UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, Oregon and the rest of [[TheOtherRainforest the Pacific Northwest]] are noted for having the best food carts in the nation, while in New York City the "dirty water" hot dog stand -- and its modern variant, the falafel cart with the [[FunnyForeigner odd Arab vendor]]--is almost a trope unto itself. Interestingly, the "Halal cart" is now a regional East Coast chain in major cities (found in D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, and Jersey City at a minimum), with cart owners franchising from the original "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Halal_Guys Halal Guys]]" (a couple of Egyptian cart owners) in NYC, with their own rather unique menu (featuring an odd hybrid of actual Middle Eastern food with Greek, leading to falafel, fish, grilled chicken, or forcemeat-based "lamb gyro" in sandwiches or over rice, topped with vegetables and both "white sauce"--which somehow involves mayonnaise but also other, undisclosed things--and different degrees of hot sauce)--although we should note that a lot of these guys are not actual franchisees but simply "inspired" by the NYC originals.

to:

Not its own type of cuisine, but a type of business, also referred to as "lunch trucks" or "roach coaches". While called carts/trucks, these are often shacks or semi-mobile structures parked in vacant lots and in groups resembling a mall food court. These groups of carts often feature unique food items, including sometimes bizarre twists on domestic or international cuisine. UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, Oregon and the rest of [[TheOtherRainforest [[UsefukNotes/TheOtherRainforest the Pacific Northwest]] are noted for having the best food carts in the nation, while in New York City the "dirty water" hot dog stand -- and its modern variant, the falafel cart with the [[FunnyForeigner odd Arab vendor]]--is almost a trope unto itself. Interestingly, the "Halal cart" is now a regional East Coast chain in major cities (found in D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, and Jersey City at a minimum), with cart owners franchising from the original "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Halal_Guys Halal Guys]]" (a couple of Egyptian cart owners) in NYC, with their own rather unique menu (featuring an odd hybrid of actual Middle Eastern food with Greek, leading to falafel, fish, grilled chicken, or forcemeat-based "lamb gyro" in sandwiches or over rice, topped with vegetables and both "white sauce"--which somehow involves mayonnaise but also other, undisclosed things--and different degrees of hot sauce)--although we should note that a lot of these guys are not actual franchisees but simply "inspired" by the NYC originals.
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