History UsefulNotes / CuisinesInAmerica

12th Feb '17 5:36:09 PM HasturHasturHastur
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There's also a fair amount of localized ethnic food as well. Italian-American food is very popular nearly everywhere, with major cuisine centers in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Providence, and generally well above the Olive Garden standard. The Irish are basically synonymous with Boston. Good eastern European Jewish food can be found here and there, but '''great''' Jewish food is probably what New York City is best known for. A lot of Greek restaurant owners live in the Northeast; Greek diner food (see above) is very popular,[[note]]Especially in [[SeriousBusiness New]] [[RunningGag Jersey]][[/note]] and especially around Boston, there's a distinct style of crispy, olive oil-drizzled Greek pizza that keeps a lot of college students going late at night.[[note]]Greek pizza tends to be LoveItOrHateIt with locals when compared against the New York-inspired Italian pizza in the North End, however, and low-quality "______ House of Pizza" restaurants are usually synonymous with Greek pizza in New England and are usually viewed as the domain of townies and hungry drunks.[[/note]] There's a large Portuguese[[note]]mostly from Madeira and the Azores; the Brazilian Portuguese disapora settled elsewhere[[/note]] community along what is collectively known as the South Coast (from Cape Cod, MA to the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound, with Fall River, New Bedford, Taunton, and Providence serving as something of the epicenter of the community), and in those areas, Portuguese food, particularly caldo verde (kale soup with beans, potatoes, and linguiça sausage), is as native as baked scrod or New York pizza. Northern Massachusetts (primarily in Lowell and Lynn) has a very large southeast Asian population largely made up of Vietnam War refugees (it should be noted that its Cambodian population is very distinct from California because rural families were settled in Massachusetts while urban populations were settled in California). Pennsylvania Dutch (actually German) food is famous nation-wide and is often thought of as the pinnacle of country-style or comfort food (though this would be contested by the proponents of Southern cuisine); in addition, Philadelphia has its cheesesteaks (provolone, Cheez Wiz, or go home[[note]]In general, Wiz is more popular, but provolone is the older usage--the sandwich was invented in the 1930s, while Wiz was invented in 1952--and considered characteristic of aficionados. Arguments about which is more "traditional" are common in Philly.[[/note]]), which was invented by Italian-Americans and has some Italian-ish elements (particularly the bread--an Italian roll--and the provolone cheese option) and soft pretzels (which are reflective of German influence) and a few other specialties (including roast pork sandwiches--a derivative of the Central Italian favorite ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porchetta porchetta]]''--served at many places that do cheesesteaks, [=DiNic's=] at Reading Terminal and the small chain Tony Luke's being most famous). Recent immigration has also brought significant amounts of excellent southeast Asian (particularly Vietnamese), Brazilian, and Caribbean food to the area as well. The downside: the further you go from New York City, the less chance you have of finding decent Mexican food, and, when going north, the more likely the "Mexican" restaurants are actually Salvadoran or Colombian.[[note]]There is an old joke from a commercial for a particular brand of salsa featuring cowboys around the fire getting indignant when they find out the salsa is made in "NEW YORK CITY?!" Pay it no mind; NYC has some of the best restaurant cooks in the world, and a ''ton'' of them are from Mexico. NYC salsa is just fine.[[/note]] In New England, very little of the Latino population is Mexican, and is often not even Hispanic [[note]]Brazilians speak Portuguese, Haitians speak Haitian Creole (some also speak French)[[/note]]

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There's also a fair amount of localized ethnic food as well. Italian-American food is very popular nearly everywhere, with major cuisine centers in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Providence, and generally well above the Olive Garden standard. The Irish are basically synonymous with Boston. Good eastern European Jewish food can be found here and there, but '''great''' Jewish food is probably what New York City is best known for. A lot of Greek restaurant owners live in the Northeast; Greek diner food (see above) is very popular,[[note]]Especially in [[SeriousBusiness New]] [[RunningGag Jersey]][[/note]] and especially around Boston, there's a distinct style of crispy, olive oil-drizzled Greek pizza that keeps a lot of college students going late at night.[[note]]Greek pizza tends to be LoveItOrHateIt with locals when compared against the New York-inspired Italian pizza in the North End, however, and low-quality "______ House of Pizza" restaurants are usually synonymous with Greek pizza in New England and are usually viewed as the domain of townies and hungry drunks.[[/note]] drunks[[/note]] Greeks in Providence, meanwhile, went on to create the hot wiener or New York System, which is somewhat similar to the coney dog of Michigan but distinguishes itself with by using pork and veal for the sausage meat and is always topped with meat sauce, yellow mustard, diced onions, and celery salt; a hot wiener with a coffee milk and fries topped with salt and vinegar is a late-night Providence staple. There's also a large Portuguese[[note]]mostly from Madeira and the Azores; the Brazilian Portuguese disapora settled elsewhere[[/note]] community along what is collectively known as the South Coast (from Cape Cod, MA to the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound, with Fall River, New Bedford, Taunton, and Providence serving as something of the epicenter of the community), and in those areas, Portuguese food, particularly caldo verde (kale soup with beans, potatoes, and linguiça sausage), is as native as baked scrod or New York pizza. Northern Massachusetts (primarily in Lowell and Lynn) has a very large southeast Asian population largely made up of Vietnam War refugees (it should be noted that its Cambodian population is very distinct from California because rural families were settled in Massachusetts while urban populations were settled in California). Pennsylvania Dutch (actually German) food is famous nation-wide and is often thought of as the pinnacle of country-style or comfort food (though this would be contested by the proponents of Southern cuisine); in addition, Philadelphia has its cheesesteaks (provolone, Cheez Wiz, or go home[[note]]In general, Wiz is more popular, but provolone is the older usage--the sandwich was invented in the 1930s, while Wiz was invented in 1952--and considered characteristic of aficionados. Arguments about which is more "traditional" are common in Philly.[[/note]]), which was invented by Italian-Americans and has some Italian-ish elements (particularly the bread--an Italian roll--and the provolone cheese option) and soft pretzels (which are reflective of German influence) and a few other specialties (including roast pork sandwiches--a derivative of the Central Italian favorite ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porchetta porchetta]]''--served at many places that do cheesesteaks, [=DiNic's=] at Reading Terminal and the small chain Tony Luke's being most famous). Recent immigration has also brought significant amounts of excellent southeast Asian (particularly Vietnamese), Brazilian, and Caribbean food to the area as well. The downside: the further you go from New York City, the less chance you have of finding decent Mexican food, and, when going north, the more likely the "Mexican" restaurants are actually Salvadoran or Colombian.[[note]]There is an old joke from a commercial for a particular brand of salsa featuring cowboys around the fire getting indignant when they find out the salsa is made in "NEW YORK CITY?!" Pay it no mind; NYC has some of the best restaurant cooks in the world, and a ''ton'' of them are from Mexico. NYC salsa is just fine.[[/note]] In New England, very little of the Latino population is Mexican, and is often not even Hispanic [[note]]Brazilians speak Portuguese, Haitians speak Haitian Creole (some also speak French)[[/note]]
12th Feb '17 10:59:12 AM HasturHasturHastur
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Mainstream brands are the beers that foreigners are usually talking about when they [[ATankardOfMooseUrine make jokes about how bad American beer is]].[[note]]This reputation dates back to the Prohibition era, which shuttered most American breweries for nearly a decade and a half. When they reopened in the 1930s, many had to start almost from scratch, as brewing had been on its way to becoming a LostTechnology -- many pre-Prohibition brewers were now old and retired, and many Prohibition-era brewers of illegal moonshine and "bathtub gin" were about as knowledgeable on the subject as present-day meth lab operators.[[/note]] This is not a very nice thing to say about anyone's alcohol, and casual drinkers don't like hearing it[[note]]Also, honest microbrewers will admit they would ''kill'' to have the degree of standardization from batch to batch that Anheuser-Busch manages to achieve; successful mass production means ''very'' high quality control, with the proviso that "quality" in this instance means more "exactly like the last tanker load and every other one before it" than "subjectively great"[[/note]]. They're meant to appeal to a very broad demographic at a very low price, so they tend to be mass-produced using recipes that result in a fairly inoffensive brew. American mass-market brew (and it isn't just American anymore, as brands like Carling, Kirin, Heineken, Kingfisher, and Tsingtao can attest to) differs from the "traditional" lager and pilsner beers it's based on by the addition of considerable amounts of ''adjuncts''. These are cereal grains other than barley, added to the brew to give alcohol content and a generic sweetness without all the subtle flavors of barley malt and hops. This type of brew isn't just brewed for cheapness; American barley strains have more protein than European varieties and can make a hazier, less presentable brew by themselves, so the addition of corn or rice reduces the amount of haze while keeping the alcohol content to a respectable level. For an idea of what a beer with American ingredients made to a German or Czech recipe would look and taste like, they're often sold as "traditional lagers" or "pre-Prohibition lagers," as they were one of the most if not the most popular beer styles before Prohibition (thanks the the mid-to-late 19th-centuy takeover of the U.S. beer industry and culture by Germans and others from Central Europe). Regional brew Yuengling is probably the largest of this category, although Sam Adams' flagship Boston Lager is in this territory as well, as is Narragansett Lager[[note]]the brand of beer favored--and crushed--by captain Sam Quint in ''{{Film/Jaws}}''[[/note]], another regional specialty. Important note: mainstream American beers are brewed to be served cold--that is, refrigerated (though not with ice cubes). Their flavor will suffer if served at room temperature.

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Mainstream brands are the beers that foreigners are usually talking about when they [[ATankardOfMooseUrine make jokes about how bad American beer is]].[[note]]This reputation dates back to the Prohibition era, which shuttered most American breweries for nearly a decade and a half. When they reopened in the 1930s, many had to start almost from scratch, as brewing had been on its way to becoming a LostTechnology -- many pre-Prohibition brewers were now old and retired, and many Prohibition-era brewers of illegal moonshine and "bathtub gin" were about as knowledgeable on the subject as present-day meth lab operators.[[/note]] This is not a very nice thing to say about anyone's alcohol, and casual drinkers don't like hearing it[[note]]Also, honest microbrewers will admit they would ''kill'' to have the degree of standardization from batch to batch that Anheuser-Busch manages to achieve; successful mass production means ''very'' high quality control, with the proviso that "quality" in this instance means more "exactly like the last tanker load and every other one before it" than "subjectively great"[[/note]].great", without having to worry about batches getting infected or just turning out poorly due to human error[[/note]]. They're meant to appeal to a very broad demographic at a very low price, so they tend to be mass-produced using recipes that result in a fairly inoffensive brew. American mass-market brew (and it isn't just American anymore, as brands like Carling, Kirin, Heineken, Kingfisher, and Tsingtao can attest to) differs from the "traditional" lager and pilsner beers it's based on by the addition of considerable amounts of ''adjuncts''. These are cereal grains other than barley, added to the brew to give alcohol content and a generic sweetness without all the subtle flavors of barley malt and hops. This type of brew isn't just brewed for cheapness; American barley strains have more protein than European varieties and can make a hazier, less presentable brew by themselves, so the addition of corn or rice reduces the amount of haze while keeping the alcohol content to a respectable level. For an idea of what a beer with American ingredients made to a German or Czech recipe would look and taste like, they're often sold as "traditional lagers" or "pre-Prohibition lagers," as they were one of the most if not the most popular beer styles before Prohibition (thanks the the mid-to-late 19th-centuy takeover of the U.S. beer industry and culture by Germans and others from Central Europe). Regional brew Yuengling is probably the largest of this category, although Sam Adams' flagship Boston Lager is in this territory as well, as is Narragansett Lager[[note]]the brand of beer favored--and crushed--by captain Sam Quint in ''{{Film/Jaws}}''[[/note]], another regional specialty. Important note: mainstream American beers are brewed to be served cold--that is, refrigerated (though not with ice cubes). Their flavor will suffer if served at room temperature.
29th Jan '17 11:22:08 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** It's also been suggested that there's a distinct Boston-style pizza (other than the Greek pizza mentioned above); if it's distinguished from New York at all style wise, it ''might'' mean a crust with thicker edges and a thin cornmeal coating on the bottom and edges and a more finely-grated, four- or five-cheese topping, but although Boston pizza in general is very good, it's not all that distinctive.

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** It's also been suggested that there's a distinct Boston-style pizza (other than the Greek pizza mentioned above); pizza; if it's distinguished from New York at all style wise, it ''might'' mean a crust with thicker edges and a thin cornmeal coating on the bottom and edges and a more finely-grated, four- or five-cheese topping, but although Boston pizza in general is very good, it's not all that distinctive. distinctive.
** As mentioned above, Greek pizza is another variant native to New England (mostly New Hampshire and parts of north-central Massachusetts and southern Maine) that is characterized by a chewy, oily crust that comes from being baked in an olive oil-laden pan instead of directly on the rack, along with a thicker, chunkier sauce and relatively light cheese placement (the blend usually being cheddar and mozzarella). Greek pizza restaurants are usually branded as a "House of Pizza" or something similar and typically also serve Greek fare in addition to the usual bevy of grinders, pasta, and fried appetizers (gyros, souvlaki, Greek salads, spanakopita, and baklava are pretty much universal). While distinctive, they are also divisive; while good Greek pizza places ''do'' exist, the general consensus is that your average "Gus's House of Pizza" is going to be a lower-quality place that mostly caters to townies and drunks and has a late closing hour and low price as its main selling point.
24th Jan '17 8:49:35 AM Larkmarn
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* Houston, TX is also known to have excellent Vietnamese food due to being the largest settlement of Vietnamese immigrants in the country.



* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters (and, to a lesser degree, blueberries). (Was on their license plate, from 1987-2000.)

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* The name Maine immediately evokes the image of lobsters (and, to a lesser degree, blueberries). (Was on their In fact, a lobster was the default license plate, plate design from 1987-2000.)1987-2000 and is currently still an optional design.
23rd Jan '17 4:40:05 PM karstovich2
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In the autumn, Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, a harvest holiday commemorating the Wampanoag people helping the Pilgrims survive their first winter by giving them food and teaching them the right agricultural methods. (Of course, Thanksgiving didn't become a federal holiday until well into the 19th century, and the real history between the Pilgrims and Wampanoag nation is much more [[DarkerAndEdgier complicated and unpleasant]], but it's a [[{{Disneyfication}} nice story]] [[LiesToChildren for the kids]]. And it's not to be confused with Canadian Thanksgiving, a month earlier.) Although they've been absorbed into the larger American culture, the traditional Thanksgiving foods are generally thought of as being almost entirely Native-derived--the obligatory turkey, and then typically cranberry sauce (sometimes in a dish with nuts and other fruit, but also it's considered very homey to have it still in the shape of the can), pumpkin pie (as well as apple, rhubarb, pecan, blackberry--but almost never any sort of meat), sweet potatoes, stuffing, et cetera. Since their absorption these foods are now considered quintessentially American. (The above-mentioned New England clambake may be one of the oldest dishes in any cuisine in the world -- it's probably existed in something like the current form since the last Ice Age.)

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In the autumn, Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, a harvest holiday commemorating the Wampanoag people helping the Pilgrims survive their first winter by giving them food and teaching them the right agricultural methods. (Of course, Thanksgiving didn't become a federal holiday until well into the 19th century, and the real history between the Pilgrims and Wampanoag nation is much more [[DarkerAndEdgier complicated and unpleasant]], but it's a [[{{Disneyfication}} nice story]] [[LiesToChildren for the kids]]. And it's not to be confused with Canadian Thanksgiving, a month earlier.) Although they've been absorbed into the larger American culture, the traditional Thanksgiving foods are generally thought of as being almost entirely Native-derived--the obligatory turkey, and then typically cranberry sauce (sometimes in a dish with nuts and other fruit, but also it's considered very homey to have it still in the shape of the can), pumpkin pie (as well as apple, rhubarb, pecan, blackberry--but pecan--also a native crop--blackberry--but almost never any sort of meat), sweet potatoes, stuffing, et cetera. Since their absorption these foods are now considered quintessentially American. (The above-mentioned New England clambake may be one of the oldest dishes in any cuisine in the world -- it's probably existed in something like the current form since the last Ice Age.)
22nd Jan '17 10:45:40 AM karstovich2
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We should note, for the purpose of historical curiosity, that Texas and Kansas City's barbecue traditions are interlinked, as Kansas City was where Texas cattle would be held until being shipped by train to Chicago for slaughter and distribution to the Eastern US; the shared emphasis on beef rather than pork is the result of this. Memphis barbecue may or may not owe something to Carolina barbecue; there are some similarities, and there is a historic link between Tennessee and North Carolina (viz., that Tennessee used to be ''part'' of North Carolina, and Tennessee was initially settled primarily by North and South Carolinians), but it's not so clear-cut as the link between Texas and KC.

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We should note, for the purpose of historical curiosity, that Texas and Kansas City's barbecue traditions are interlinked, as Kansas City was where Texas cattle would be held until being shipped by train to Chicago for slaughter and distribution to the Eastern US; the shared emphasis on beef rather than pork is the result of this. Memphis barbecue may or may not owe something to Carolina barbecue; there are some similarities, and there is a historic link between Tennessee and North Carolina (viz., that Tennessee used to be ''part'' of North Carolina, and Tennessee Memphis in particular was initially settled primarily by a mix of North and South Carolinians), but it's not so clear-cut as the link between Texas and KC.
22nd Jan '17 10:36:51 AM karstovich2
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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, [[UsefulNotes/NewOrleans gumbo]], and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] Mississippi, plus much of the Florida Panhandle and bits of Louisiana[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, [[UsefulNotes/NewOrleans gumbo]], and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.
22nd Jan '17 8:16:01 AM karstovich2
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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.

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* Both UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} and UsefulNotes/NewMexico have foods and cuisine types that are largely related to their indigenous cultures. Hawaii's food culture originates with the Polynesian Native Hawaiian and Polynesian peoples people of the islands, and New Mexico's comes from the Native American Pueblo, Apache, and Navajo foods mixed with Spanish cuisine. Hawaii has an interesting double culinary tradition, with the precolonial Native Hawaiian cuisine surviving largely intact as a symbol of cultural heritage but also serving as an influence over a much more mixed daily cuisine boasting heavy East Asian (especially Japanese), European (especially Portuguese), and American (especially West Coast) influences as well as Native ones. The state cuisines of Hawaii and New Mexico are heavily represented in their major cities. In Hawaii the city of Honolulu proudly sports restaurants like Highway Inn, Ono Hawaiian Food, Helena’s Hawaiian Food, Young’s Fish Market, Yama’s Fish Market, and Haili’s Hawaiian Food. And in New Mexico its largest city, UsefulNotes/{{Albuquerque}}, features restaurants El Modelo, El Pinto, Frontier Restaurant, Garcia's Kitchen, Los Cuates, Little Anita's, Padilla's, Sadie's, and Pueblo Harvest Cafe; New Mexican cuisine is even featured in modern Albuquerque fast food interpretations with the likes of Blake's Lotaburger, Little Anita's Express, Twister's Burgers and Burritos, and Mac's Steak In The Rough.
21st Jan '17 5:13:53 AM fq
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* To settle an age-old bar bet: Tennessee whiskey (which includes the top selling spirit in the world, Jack Daniel's) by US law--specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement[[note]]Weird, eh? Canada incidentally adopted the same guidelines by the same treaty.[[/note]]--must be a straight bourbon whiskey produced in the state of Tennessee. Most, but not all, Tennessee whiskeys undergo an extensive charcoal filtration process before (and, for high end brands, also after) entering the barrel for aging, eliminating unpleasant cogeners and jump-starting the aging process; this process involves vats filled with sugar maple charcoal several feet tall, and takes several days for the whiskey to trickle all the way through. Conversely, any "charcoal-filtered" Kentucky bourbon (even those [[FollowTheLeader in a square black-labeled bottle with "CHARCOAL FILTERED" in big letters on the bottom]]), is only given a brief filtering before bottling to eliminate a phenomena known as "chill haze." (And that doesn't even work all the time; ask anyone who's ever bought Heaven Hill Black Label.[[note]]A particularly cheap bourbon--although since Heaven Hill is ''technically'' straight bourbon (don't ask how; divine or demonic intervention is suspected), it does appear to help the flavor a bit and (significantly, somehow--again, divine or demonic intervention is suspected) substantially reduces the risk of hangover.[[/note]]) In 2013, the state of Tennessee passed a law that essentially codified Tennessee whiskey as a charcoal-mellowed straight bourbon produced in Tennessee, with an exemption for one microdistiller that produces an unfiltered bourbon.

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* To settle an age-old bar bet: Tennessee whiskey (which includes the top selling spirit in the world, Jack Daniel's) by US law--specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement[[note]]Weird, eh? Canada incidentally adopted the same guidelines by the same treaty.[[/note]]--must be a straight bourbon whiskey produced in the state of Tennessee. Most, but not all, Tennessee whiskeys undergo an extensive charcoal filtration process before (and, for high end brands, also after) entering the barrel for aging, eliminating unpleasant cogeners and jump-starting the aging process; this process involves vats filled with sugar maple charcoal several feet tall, and takes several days for the whiskey to trickle all the way through. Conversely, any "charcoal-filtered" Kentucky bourbon (even those [[FollowTheLeader in a square black-labeled bottle with "CHARCOAL FILTERED" in big letters on the bottom]]), is only given a brief filtering before bottling to eliminate a phenomena phenomenon known as "chill haze." (And that doesn't even work all the time; ask anyone who's ever bought Heaven Hill Black Label.[[note]]A particularly cheap bourbon--although since Heaven Hill is ''technically'' straight bourbon (don't ask how; divine or demonic intervention is suspected), it does appear to help the flavor a bit and (significantly, somehow--again, divine or demonic intervention is suspected) substantially reduces the risk of hangover.[[/note]]) In 2013, the state of Tennessee passed a law that essentially codified Tennessee whiskey as a charcoal-mellowed straight bourbon produced in Tennessee, with an exemption for one microdistiller that produces an unfiltered bourbon.
11th Jan '17 6:09:25 PM Polaris
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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.

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Several other foods are closely associated with the South: fried catfish, fried okra, greens (edible leaves, most frequently collards), black-eyed peas, grits (corn meal cooked to oatmeal-like consistency, often served at breakfast, usually with butter and some form of seasoning, but may be served at other times with meat or especially seafood mixed in--shrimp and grits and fried catfish and grits are famous in both Gulf Coast[[note]]Southern Alabama and Mississippi[[/note]] and Soul Food traditions), white gravy (a.k.a. sausage gravy, similar to bechamel sauce; made with sausage drippings, flour, and milk), sawmill gravy (the same, but with ham or bacon drippings), redeye gravy (the same, but without flour and with [[MustHaveCaffeine drip coffee]] replacing the milk), biscuits (essentially soft, buttery savory scones made with a chemical leavener, as opposed to hard biscuit) and gravy, [[UsefulNotes/NewOrleans gumbo]], and baked macaroni and cheese (invented, according to legend, by Virginian UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson). Along with most BBQ regions being in the South, Virginia is famous for ham and Bourbon whiskey is named after Bourbon County, Kentucky.[[note]]Bourbon County has only one microdistillery today, and it didn't open until 2014. However, the longtime lack of a distillery wasn't because the county was "dry", as often reported; Bourbon County is fully "wet", but all of Bourbon County's old distilleries closed when Prohibition was enacted, and it so happened that none of them reopened. However, today's Bourbon County is much smaller than it was in the early 19th century when the whiskey got its name: "Old Bourbon," as it is often called, comprised 34 of today's Kentucky's 120 counties, covering the northeastern quarter of the state, and many bourbon distilleries ''are'' in "Old Bourbon". Also, in case you're wondering, yes, it was named for the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi House of Bourbon]], in gratitude for France's assistance in the UsefulNotes/AmericanWarOfIndependence; the county seat is even named Paris.[[/note]][[note]]Tennessee, the state immediately to the south, is also famous for a similar style of whiskey — the most famous brew being [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Daniel%27s Jack Daniel's]]—but although legally entitled to the appellation (as the production process for Tennessee whiskey is fully compliant with and ''more'' stringent than the official standards for Bourbon whiskey), most Tennessee brewers disavow the "Bourbon" label simply as a matter of local pride. [[SeriousBusiness Friendships have ended and bar fights have started over this distinction.]][[/note]] Sweetened iced tea is a common drink (see below), and almost all major brands of carbonated soft drink (Coca-Cola,[[note]]From Atlanta; "Coke" is even a [[BrandNameTakeover generic term]] for soft drinks in much of the South[[/note]] Pepsi,[[note]]from New Bern, North Carolina[[/note]] Dr Pepper,[[note]]From Waco, Texas[[/note]] Mountain Dew,[[note]]From Knoxville, Tennessee, and named after an Appalachian slang term for moonshine--which was appropriate, as it was developed as a mixer for whiskey[[/note]] and regional favorite R.C.[[note]]From Columbus, Georgia[[/note]]) got their start in the American South.
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