History UsefulNotes / CollegiateAmericanFootball

19th Nov '17 6:10:18 PM KYCubbie
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* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2017 game will be the 153rd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944. The game is so old that it predates rivalry trophies—the winning team just gets to keep the game ball.

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* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2017 game will be was the 153rd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944. The game is so old that it predates rivalry trophies—the winning team just gets to keep the game ball.
6th Nov '17 12:43:47 PM KYCubbie
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* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2017 game will be the 153rd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944.

to:

* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2017 game will be the 153rd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944.
1944. The game is so old that it predates rivalry trophies—the winning team just gets to keep the game ball.



* '''Felix "Doc" Blanchard''' & '''Glenn Davis''': One of the most famous running duos in the sport's history, "Mr. Inside" (Blanchard) and "Mr. Outside" (Davis) played at Army from 1944 to 1946, helping the Cadets[[note]]now known as Black Knights[[/note]] to a 27–0–1 record, with the only blemish being a famous scoreless tie against Notre Dame in 1946. They set a record for most touchdowns by a pair of teammates that lasted for over 50 years, and Davis set records for yards per carry in a season (11.5) and career (8.3) that stand to this day. Each won a Heisman Trophy, Blanchard in 1945 (the first junior to win) and Davis in 1946, and both are in the College Football Hall of Fame.

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* '''Felix "Doc" Blanchard''' & '''Glenn Davis''': One of the most famous running duos in the sport's history, "Mr. Inside" (Blanchard) and "Mr. Outside" (Davis) played at Army from 1944 to 1946, helping the Cadets[[note]]now known as Black Knights[[/note]] to a 27–0–1 record, with the only blemish being a famous scoreless tie against Notre Dame in 1946. They set a record for most touchdowns by a pair of teammates that lasted for over 50 years, and Davis set records a record for yards per carry in a career (8.3) that stands to this day.[[note]]Speaking of long-standing records, the officially recognized FBS record for yards per carry in a season (11.5) and career (8.3) that stand dates to this day. 1939, when UCLA's Jackie Robinson averaged 12.2 yards per carry. Yes, ''that UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson''.[[/note]] Each won a Heisman Trophy, Blanchard in 1945 (the first junior to win) and Davis in 1946, and both are in the College Football Hall of Fame.
30th Oct '17 12:06:41 AM KYCubbie
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* Cincinnati vs. Miami[[note]]The one in Ohio this time[[/note]] - The longest-running current non- conference rivalry in the United States (though they were briefly in the same conference in the late 1940s and early 1950s), the most-played currently active rivalry between teams from the same state, and the oldest rivalry west of the Allegheny Mountains. They play for the Victory Bell. Since Cincinnati moved to the Big East in 2005, however, the rivalry has been rather one-sided, with Miami's last victory coming in 2005.

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* Cincinnati vs. Miami[[note]]The one in Ohio this time[[/note]] - The longest-running current non- conference non-conference rivalry in the United States (though they were briefly in the same conference in the late 1940s and early 1950s), the most-played currently active FBS rivalry between teams from the same state, state (see immediately below for an even more frequently-played intrastate rivalry), and the oldest rivalry west of the Allegheny Mountains. They play for the Victory Bell. Since Cincinnati moved to the Big East in 2005, however, the rivalry has been rather one-sided, with Miami's last victory coming in 2005.



* '''John Gagliardi''': The winningest coach in college football history by wins, regardless of division. Began his head coaching career in 1949 at NAIA school Carroll College in Montana. He then went to Saint John's of Minnesota, an NCAA D-III school, in 1953, and stayed there for ''60 seasons'', finally retiring in 2012 with 489 total wins. The award for the top D-III player bears his name.
* '''Larry Kehres''': The winningest coach in college football history by percentage, regardless of division. Coached at D-III Mount Union in Ohio from 1986 to 2012, also serving as AD in his final years on the sidelines. Holds all-division records for winning percentage (.929), national titles (11), unbeaten regular seasons (21), and conference titles (23, with the last 21 of them being ''in succession'').

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* '''John Gagliardi''': Gagliardi''':[[note]]pronounced "guh-LAHR-dee"[[/note]] The winningest coach in college football history by wins, regardless of division. Began his head coaching career in 1949 at NAIA school Carroll College in Montana. He then went to Saint John's of Minnesota, an NCAA D-III school, in 1953, and stayed there for ''60 seasons'', ''[[LongRunners 60 seasons]]'', finally retiring in 2012 with 489 total wins. The award for the top D-III player bears his name.
* '''Larry Kehres''': Kehres''':[[note]]pronounced "CARE-us"[[/note]] The winningest coach in college football history by percentage, regardless of division. Coached at D-III Mount Union in Ohio from 1986 to 2012, also serving as AD in his final years on the sidelines. Holds all-division records for winning percentage (.929), national titles (11), unbeaten regular seasons (21), and conference titles (23, with the last 21 of them being ''in succession'').



* '''Archie Griffin''': Star running back for Ohio St. and, to date, the only two-time winner of the Heisman trophy. He is also the only player to ever start in four Rose Bowl games. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1986. Also known for being rather undersized for the position, even by today's standards. (5'9", 182)
* '''Bronislaw "Bronko" Nagurski''': Was a legendary, [[CanadaEh Canadian born]] fullback for Minnesota, who also played tackle on defense. Legend has it that he was virtually impossible to tackle with the ball in his hands. He is a member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame. He also made a career as a [[Main/ProfessionalWrestling pro wrestler]] when his football career was over. The award given annually to the best defensive player in college football is named after him.

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* '''Archie Griffin''': Star running back for Ohio St. State and, to date, the only two-time winner of the Heisman trophy. He is also the only player to ever start in four Rose Bowl games. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1986. Also known for being rather undersized for the position, even by today's standards. (5'9", 182)
* '''Bronislaw "Bronko" Nagurski''': Was a legendary, [[CanadaEh Canadian born]] fullback for Minnesota, who also played tackle on defense. Legend has it that he was virtually impossible to tackle with the ball in his hands. He is a member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame. He also made a career as a [[Main/ProfessionalWrestling [[ProfessionalWrestling pro wrestler]] when his football career was over. The award given annually to the best defensive player in college football is named after him.
25th Oct '17 7:44:12 PM Lirodon
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The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for Creator/{{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]] (now defunct), Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare V100=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the [[OverlyLongName Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl]][[note]]A new bowl game in Tucson that debuted in 2015, held at the original site of the Copper[=/=]Cactus Bowl before its move to Phoenix[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all Dollar General Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag formerly the GMAC Bowl and GoDaddy Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or Bahamas Bowl. There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. In fact, the proliferation of bowls got so ridiculous that the NCAA called time on it in 2016, imposing a three-year freeze on certification of new bowl games. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]

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The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for Creator/{{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special).special. In fact, ESPN actually runs many of these bowls ''themselves'' nowadays). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]] (now defunct), Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare V100=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the [[OverlyLongName Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl]][[note]]A new bowl game in Tucson that debuted in 2015, held at the original site of the Copper[=/=]Cactus Bowl before its move to Phoenix[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all Dollar General Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag formerly the GMAC Bowl and GoDaddy Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie [[VictoryIsBoring means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to a bowl in a nice vacation spot, such as the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or Bahamas Bowl. Bowl, of course.

There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. In fact, the proliferation of bowls got so ridiculous that the NCAA called time on it in 2016, imposing a three-year freeze on certification of new bowl games. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]
24th Oct '17 11:21:16 PM spiritsunami
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* The '''Big Ten''' (sometimes called "[=B1G=]", from its logo), which covers the Midwest and, for some reason (OK, ''[[MoneyDearBoy this]]'' reason), includes members in the distinctly non-Midwestern states of Maryland and New Jersey. It's the oldest conference of the NCAA, dating back all the way to the 1890s. Confusingly, it has fourteen member teams. The Big Ten champion is guaranteed a spot in the Rose Bowl. While the conference has many storied schools, the best-known are arguably (as of 2017) [[TheRival eternal rivals]] [[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfMichigan Michigan]] and Ohio State.
* The '''Big 12''' consists of teams from Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Iowa and West Virginia (which is nowhere near any of the other states with Big 12 teams). It's the newest of the major conferences, having been formed when two other conferences merged into one. Unlike the other Big Five conferences, the Big 12 determines its champion based on the best record, not a conference championship game. The Big 12 champion is guaranteed a spot in the Sugar Bowl, with the second team potentially going to the Orange Bowl. Just to make things confusing, the Big 12 has ten teams. Yes, the Big Ten has 14 teams (12 from 2011 to 2014) and the Big 12 has ten (it seriously considered expanding to 12 or 14 in the 2016 offseason, but decided against it). No, that doesn't make any sense. [[MST3KMantra Don't think about it too hard.]]

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* The '''Big Ten''' (sometimes called "[=B1G=]", from its logo), which covers originally just covered the Midwest and, for some reason (OK, ''[[MoneyDearBoy this]]'' reason), includes Great Lakes region but recently expanded in both directions to include members in the distinctly non-Midwestern states of Nebraska, Maryland and New Jersey. It's the oldest conference of the NCAA, dating back all the way to the 1890s. Confusingly, it has fourteen member teams. The Big Ten champion is guaranteed a spot in the Rose Bowl. While the conference has many storied schools, the best-known are arguably (as of 2017) [[TheRival eternal rivals]] [[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfMichigan Michigan]] and Ohio State.
* The '''Big 12''' consists of teams from Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Iowa and West Virginia (which is nowhere near any of the other states with Big 12 teams). It's the newest of the major conferences, having been formed when two other conferences merged into one. Unlike the other Big Five conferences, the Big 12 determines its champion based on the best record, not a conference championship game. The Big 12 champion is guaranteed a spot in the Sugar Bowl, with the second team potentially going to the Orange Bowl. Just to make things confusing, the Big 12 has ten teams. Yes, the Big Ten has 14 teams (12 from 2011 to 2014) and the Big 12 has ten (it seriously considered expanding to 12 or 14 in the 2016 offseason, but decided against it). No, that doesn't make any sense. [[MST3KMantra Don't think about it too hard.]]]] Because they only have ten members, they lack the two-divisional format that the other Power Five conferences have and play a full round-robin, but starting in 2017, they hold a championship game anyway.



* The '''American Athletic Conference''' is considered the successor to the Big East, which collapsed due to instability between the basketball and football sides of that conference, but unlike the Big East, it isn't considered a power conference. Geographically, its members are all over the place; most are from the old Big East, but it also includes teams from Texas and Oklahoma. [[MilitaryAcademy Navy]], located in the old Big East footprint, joined for football only in 2015.

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* The '''American Athletic Conference''' is considered the successor to the Big East, which collapsed due to instability between the basketball and football sides of that conference, but unlike the Big East, it isn't considered a power conference. Geographically, its members are all over the place; most are from the old Big East, but it also includes teams from Texas and Oklahoma. [[MilitaryAcademy Navy]], located in the old Big East footprint, joined for football only in 2015. It's usually considered the strongest of the Group of Five.



* '''Army''' (the United States Military Academy), one of the service academy teams. Navy's football team was also independent until it joined the American Athletic Conference in 2015, while Air Force has been in conferences since 1980, first in the Western Athletic Conference and since 1999 in the the Mountain West Conference. Like Navy and Air Force, Army is considered on par with the "Group of 5" teams. However, two of the Power Five leagues (the Big Ten and SEC) have included Army as a surrogate Power Five opponent for purposes of non-conference scheduling.[[note]]All of the Power Five leagues except the Pac-12 are phasing in requirements that each conference member play at least one non-conference game against another Power Five team.[[/note]] The Army-Navy game serves as the traditional last game of the season, and it is still televised nationally despite both service academies having been out of top 25 contention for decades; the service academies have very strict academic and physical requirements (specifically weight limits) that preclude the ability to compete with more forgiving civilian schools.

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* '''Army''' (the United States Military Academy), one of the service academy teams. Navy's football team was also independent until it joined the American Athletic Conference in 2015, while Air Force has been in conferences since 1980, first in the Western Athletic Conference and since 1999 in the the Mountain West Conference. Like Navy and Air Force, Army is considered on par with the "Group of 5" teams. However, two of the Power Five leagues (the Big Ten and SEC) have included Army as a surrogate Power Five opponent for purposes of non-conference scheduling.[[note]]All of the Power Five leagues except the Pac-12 are phasing in requirements that each conference member play at least one non-conference game against another Power Five team.[[/note]] The Army-Navy game serves as the traditional last game of the season, and it is still televised nationally despite both service academies having been out of top 25 title contention for decades; the service academies have very strict academic and physical requirements (specifically weight limits) that preclude the ability to compete with more forgiving civilian schools.



** California (Berkeley) vs. Stanford ("The Big Game"; see also "The Play." Often considered the modern version of Harvard vs. Yale, being played between a pair of very academically prestigious schools... but unlike Harvard and Yale, they still frequently play good football.)

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** California (Berkeley) vs. Stanford ("The Big Game"; see also "The Play." Play," which refers to the downright surreal [[DownToTheLastPlay ending]] to the 1982 edition of The Big Game.) Often considered the modern version of Harvard vs. Yale, being played between a pair of very academically prestigious schools... but unlike Harvard and Yale, they still frequently play good football.)



* Cincinnati vs. Miami[[note]]The one in Ohio this time[[/note]] - The longest-running current non- conference rivalry in the United States (though they were briefly in the same conference in the late 1940s and early 1950s), the most-played currently active rivalry between teams from the same state, and the oldest rivalry west of the Allegheny Mountains. They play for the Victory Bell. Since Cincinnati moved to the Big East in 2005, however, the rivalry has been rather one-sided, with Miami's last victory coming in 2005.



* '''Tim Tebow''': Two-time BCS Championship winning QB for Florida and winner of the 2007 Heisman Trophy. Another candidate for greatest running QB in NCAA history, with a unique style of preferring to plow through defenders like a fullback (most running quarterbacks are more agile and try to avoid hits). Went on to a brief, somewhat controversial NFL career. Returned to college football as an analyst for the SEC Network; gave the NFL another try in 2015 with the Philadelphia Eagles, but was one of the last roster cuts.

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* '''Tim Tebow''': Two-time BCS Championship winning QB for Florida and winner of the 2007 Heisman Trophy. Another candidate for greatest running QB in NCAA history, with a unique style of preferring to plow through defenders like a fullback (most running quarterbacks are more agile and try to avoid hits). Went on to a brief, somewhat controversial NFL career. Returned to college football as an analyst for the SEC Network; gave the NFL another try in 2015 with the Philadelphia Eagles, but was one of the last roster cuts.cuts, and is now playing minor league baseball.
19th Sep '17 12:29:37 PM KYCubbie
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The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for Creator/{{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]], Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare V100=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the [[OverlyLongName Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl]][[note]]A new bowl game in Tucson that debuted in 2015, held at the original site of the Copper[=/=]Cactus Bowl before its move to Phoenix[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all Dollar General Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag formerly the GMAC Bowl and GoDaddy Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or Bahamas Bowl. There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. In fact, the proliferation of bowls got so ridiculous that the NCAA called time on it in 2016, imposing a three-year freeze on certification of new bowl games. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]

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The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for Creator/{{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]], Bowl]] (now defunct), Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare V100=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the [[OverlyLongName Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl]][[note]]A new bowl game in Tucson that debuted in 2015, held at the original site of the Copper[=/=]Cactus Bowl before its move to Phoenix[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all Dollar General Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag formerly the GMAC Bowl and GoDaddy Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or Bahamas Bowl. There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. In fact, the proliferation of bowls got so ridiculous that the NCAA called time on it in 2016, imposing a three-year freeze on certification of new bowl games. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]



* The '''Atlantic Coast Conference''', which started out as a conference covering the Carolinas and Virginia, but has since extended out to cover teams from all over the East Coast as far north as Boston College and as far south as [=UMiami=]. It now has spread well beyond the East Coast to include Louisville for all sports and Notre Dame[[note]]in Indiana[[/note]] for most sports apart from football. Notre Dame isn't officially part of any football conference, but it is considered connected to the ACC due to that school's full but non-football membership.[[note]]Notre Dame has committed to play five games each season against other ACC members, and to play each other ACC school at least once every three years. Also, it was written into Notre Dame's ACC membership agreement that Notre Dame football can't join any conference other than the ACC before 2026, later extended to 2036.[[/note]] The ACC champion is guaranteed a spot in the Orange Bowl, and Notre Dame also has a chance to get in the Orange Bowl, depending on the year. Home to current national champion Clemson.

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* The '''Atlantic Coast Conference''', which started out as a conference covering the Carolinas and Virginia, but has since extended out to cover teams from all over the East Coast as far north as Boston College and as far south as [=UMiami=]. It now has spread well beyond the East Coast to include Louisville for all sports and Notre Dame[[note]]in Indiana[[/note]] for most sports apart from football. Notre Dame isn't officially part of any football conference, but it is considered connected to the ACC due to that school's full but non-football membership.[[note]]Notre Dame has committed to play five games each season against other ACC members, and to play each other ACC school at least once every three years. Also, it was written into Notre Dame's ACC membership agreement that Notre Dame football can't join any conference other than the ACC before 2026, later extended to 2036.[[/note]] The ACC champion is guaranteed a spot in the Orange Bowl, and Notre Dame also has a chance to get in the Orange Bowl, depending on the year. Home to current national champion Clemson.Clemson, plus traditional powers Florida State and Miami.



* The '''Pac-12''' covers the entire West Coast, as well as Arizona, Colorado, and Utah. For most of TheNewTens, it was considered the second-strongest conference in the NCAA, though the Big Ten is now pushing the SEC for supremacy, and the Pac-12 champion plays the Big Ten champion in the Rose Bowl. Oregon is currently the flagship team of the conference, known for its flashy offense and flashier uniforms.
* The '''Southeastern Conference''', better known as the '''SEC''', is considered far and away the strongest college football conference (and the only one where a chant for the '''conference''' [which consists of "SEC! SEC!"] exists among the schools within it). As with all the other conferences, its name isn't 100% geographically accurate, since it has teams from Missouri and eastern Texas. The SEC is home to some of the biggest rivalries, coaches, and players in all of college football right now, especially the SEC West division, to the point that from 2007, the year the BCS National Championship Game was established as separate from any other bowl game, to the end of the BCS system, there was at least one SEC team playing every year, and it wasn't until the last of those that a non-SEC team won. In fact, the reason the BCS finally collapsed was that the 2012 championship paired two SEC West teams against each other, which caused chaos with scheduling other bowl matchups and demonstrated how poorly designed the BCS really was. While the league has many traditional football powers (plus [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg basketball superpower Kentucky]]), the biggest name in recent years is Alabama, with four national titles since current head coach Nick Saban arrived in 2007. Around November it becomes a RunningGag that the SEC champion should be promoted to the NFL, with that league's worst team relegated; that's how strong the SEC is.

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* The '''Pac-12''' covers the entire West Coast, as well as Arizona, Colorado, and Utah. For most of TheNewTens, it was considered the second-strongest conference in the NCAA, though the ACC and Big Ten is are now pushing the SEC for supremacy, and the Pac-12 champion plays the Big Ten champion in the Rose Bowl. Oregon is currently the flagship team of the conference, known for its flashy offense and flashier uniforms.
* The '''Southeastern Conference''', better known as the '''SEC''', is has long been considered far and away the strongest college football conference (and the only one where a chant for the '''conference''' [which consists of "SEC! SEC!"] exists among the schools within it). As with all the other conferences, its name isn't 100% geographically accurate, since it has teams from Missouri and eastern Texas. The SEC is home to some of the biggest rivalries, coaches, and players in all of college football right now, especially the SEC West division, to the point that from 2007, the year the BCS National Championship Game was established as separate from any other bowl game, to the end of the BCS system, there was at least one SEC team playing every year, and it wasn't until the last of those that a non-SEC team won. In fact, the reason the BCS finally collapsed was that the 2012 championship paired two SEC West teams against each other, which caused chaos with scheduling other bowl matchups and demonstrated how poorly designed the BCS really was. While the league has many traditional football powers (plus [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg basketball superpower Kentucky]]), the biggest name in recent years is Alabama, with four national titles since current head coach Nick Saban arrived in 2007. Around November it becomes a RunningGag that the SEC champion should be promoted to the NFL, with that league's worst team relegated; that's how strong the SEC is.



* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season; Idaho soon announced that it would return to FCS football starting in the 2018 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] joins Sun Belt football in 2017, the second year of its transition to FBS; it had already joined the Sun Belt as a full but non-football member in 2016.

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* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season; Idaho soon announced that it would return to FCS football starting in the 2018 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] joins joined Sun Belt football in 2017, the second year of its transition to FBS; it had already joined the Sun Belt as a full but non-football member in 2016.



* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2016 game was the 152nd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944.

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* Lafayette vs. Lehigh ("The Rivalry") – A matchup between two lower-level FCS teams, both members of the Patriot League and located in the Lehigh Valley of eastern UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}. It's notable here as the most-played matchup in college football history (the 2016 2017 game was will be the 152nd) 153rd) and the longest uninterrupted rivalry (since 1897) in all of college football. The Leopards and Mountain Hawks first played in 1884; the large number of games is because the teams played twice each season from 1884 to 1901 (except 1896, when they didn't play at all, and 1891, when they played ''three times''), as well as in the war years of 1943 and 1944.
23rd Aug '17 8:00:52 PM Gsueagle31049
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The rules of collegiate football are very similar to those detailed on the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball page about American football]], so we won't go into them here save for the most basic explanation: 11 guys on offense, 11 guys on defense. Scoring is almost the same as in the professional leagues as well--the defending team has long been able to score a point on a blocked PAT (a rule that the NFL didn't adopt until 2015) and college overtime rules are '''complicated'''[[note]]Each team starts a possession on the opposing team's 25 yard line. The first team posts a score (which can include 0 points), then the other team has to match it to continue OT or beat it to win; otherwise, the first team wins. After the 2nd possession for both teams, the PAT kick on a touchdown is banned; teams must go for two if they score a touchdown.[[/note]]. There are a few different rule changes[[note]]The most obvious ones being that the game clock temporarily stops to move the chain on each first down, the NFL's iconic two-minute warning is not utilized, the ball carrier is down the moment his knee or body touches the ground instead of needing to be touched by a defender, receivers only need to get one foot in-bounds rather than two, and in a recently implemented change, a touchback puts the ball on the 25 yard line for kickoffs (but a touchback on punts is still the 20 yard line).[[/note]], but nothing enough to disrupt the basic flow of the game.

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The rules of collegiate football are very similar to those detailed on the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball page about American football]], so we won't go into them here save for the most basic explanation: 11 guys on offense, 11 guys on defense. Scoring is almost the same as in the professional leagues as well--the defending team has long been able to score a point on a blocked PAT (a rule that the NFL didn't adopt until 2015) and college overtime rules are '''complicated'''[[note]]Each team starts a possession on the opposing team's 25 yard line. The first team posts a score (which can include 0 points), then the other team has to match it to continue OT or beat it to win; otherwise, the first team wins. After the 2nd possession for both teams, the PAT kick on a touchdown is banned; teams must go for two if they score a touchdown.[[/note]]. There are a few different rule changes[[note]]The most obvious ones being that the game clock temporarily stops to move the chain on each first down, the NFL's iconic two-minute warning is not utilized, utilized (unless the stadium's clock is malfunctioning), the ball carrier is down the moment his knee or body touches the ground instead of needing to be touched by a defender, receivers only need to get one foot in-bounds rather than two, and in a recently implemented change, a touchback puts the ball on the 25 yard line for kickoffs (but a touchback on punts is still the 20 yard line).[[/note]], but nothing enough to disrupt the basic flow of the game.
1st Aug '17 10:16:22 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Conference USA''', which includes teams from all over the South and whose geographical center has been the most flexible since its 1995 formation. Its membership has shifted more towards the Sun Belt as conference realignments changed up its membership. Right now, its most notable team is one that doesn't even play football, at least for now—UAB, or Alabama–Birmingham, dropped the sport after the 2014 season, citing financial concerns. However, further developments made it clear that the move had at least as much to do with University of Alabama system politics as finances, which led to a strong move to bring football back. UAB relented, announcing that football would return in 2017.

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* '''Conference USA''', which includes teams from all over the South and whose geographical center has been the most flexible since its 1995 formation. Its membership has shifted more towards the Sun Belt as conference realignments changed up its membership. Right now, its most notable teams are Western Kentucky, which has won the league's last two titles, and UAB (Alabama–Birmingham), whose football team is one that doesn't even play football, at least for now—UAB, or Alabama–Birmingham, returns in 2017 after a two-season hiatus. The latter school had dropped the sport after the 2014 season, citing financial concerns. However, further developments made it clear that concerns, but the move had at least was heavily criticized as much to do with University of being more about Alabama system politics as finances, which led to than money; see [[https://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2015/6/2/8702385/uab-football-return this story]] for a strong move to bring football back. UAB relented, announcing that football would return in 2017.quick overview.



* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season; Idaho soon announced that it would return to FCS football starting in the 2018 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] began a transition to FBS in the 2016 season, joining the Sun Belt as a full but non-football member; the football team will join in 2017.

to:

* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season; Idaho soon announced that it would return to FCS football starting in the 2018 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] began a joins Sun Belt football in 2017, the second year of its transition to FBS in the 2016 season, joining FBS; it had already joined the Sun Belt as a full but non-football member; the football team will join member in 2017.2016.



8th Apr '17 11:53:58 AM KYCubbie
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* '''Jet Award''': Along with the Rice Award, the newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 are being retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford (2015)
* '''Jim Thorpe Award''': Award given to the top defensive back in college football. ''Most recent winner:'' Adoree' Jackson, USC

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* '''Jet Award''': Along with the Rice Award, the newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 are being retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford (2015)
Adoree' Jackson, USC
* '''Jim Thorpe Award''': Award given to the top defensive back in college football. ''Most recent winner:'' Adoree' Jackson, USCJackson
10th Feb '17 9:53:36 PM KYCubbie
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A list of the major awards for college football players presented annually. There are several governing bodies in charge of selecting the various award winners, so some of the awards may seem a little repetitive in terms of what the award stands for. (Ex. the Heisman, Archie Griffin, Maxwell, and Walter Camp awards all being practically the same.) The "most recent winners" listed, except as noted, are from the 2016 season, with repeat winners from prior seasons also noted.

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A list of the major awards for college football players presented annually. There are several governing bodies in charge of selecting the various award winners, so some of the awards may seem a little repetitive in terms of what the award stands for. (Ex. the Heisman, Archie Griffin, Maxwell, and Walter Camp awards all being practically the same.) The "most recent winners" listed, except as noted, are from the 2016 season, with repeat winners from prior seasons also noted.



* '''Archie Griffin Award''': While the Heisman is given to the "most outstanding" player, the Archie Griffin award is given to the "most ''valuable''" player in college football. You might think that this award would largely overlap with the Heisman, but you'd be wrong. The award has been presented since 1999, but of the 16 winners so far (two players have won twice), only four won the Heisman in the same season. ''Most recent winner:'' Sam Darnold, USC

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* '''Archie Griffin Award''': While the Heisman is given to the "most outstanding" player, the Archie Griffin award is given to the "most ''valuable''" player in college football. You might think that this award would largely overlap with the Heisman, but you'd be wrong. The award has been presented since 1999, but of the 16 winners so far (two players have won twice), only four won of the 18 Griffin Awards presented so far have gone to that season's Heisman in the same season.winner. ''Most recent winner:'' Sam Darnold, USC



* '''Chic Harley Award''': Also known as the "College Football Player of the Year" award. Like the Archie Griffin Award, it is not uncommon for the winner of the Heisman to win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford (2015)

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* '''Chic Harley Award''': Also known as the "College Football Player of the Year" award. Like the Archie Griffin Award, it is not uncommon for the winner of the Heisman to win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford (2015)Deshaun Watson, Clemson



* '''Davey O'Brien Award''': Award given to the best quarterback in college football. Whenever a quarterback wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Deshaun Watson, Clemson (2015 and 2016)

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* '''Davey O'Brien Award''': Award given to the best quarterback in college football. Whenever a quarterback wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Deshaun Watson, Clemson Watson (2015 and 2016)



* '''Jet Award''': Along with the Rice Award, the newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 are being retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' [=McCaffrey=] (2015)

to:

* '''Jet Award''': Along with the Rice Award, the newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 are being retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' [=McCaffrey=] Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford (2015)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.CollegiateAmericanFootball