History UsefulNotes / CollegiateAmericanFootball

26th Jun '16 3:07:36 AM gewunomox
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** UCLA vs. USC ("The Battle for the Victory Bell"/"[[RageAgainstTheMachine The Battle of Los Angeles]]")

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** UCLA vs. USC ("The Battle for the Victory Bell"/"[[RageAgainstTheMachine Bell"/"[[Music/RageAgainstTheMachine The Battle of Los Angeles]]")
30th Apr '16 12:43:58 AM KYCubbie
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* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] will begin a transition to FBS in the 2016 season; at that time, it will become a full but non-football Sun Belt member, with the football team joining in 2017.

to:

* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season; Idaho soon announced that it would return to FCS football starting in the 2018 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] will begin a transition to FBS in the 2016 season; at that time, it will become a full but non-football Sun Belt member, with the football team joining in 2017.
10th Mar '16 2:08:34 AM KYCubbie
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* The newest independent is '''[=UMass=]''', more properly the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Minutemen had been a fairly decent team at the FCS level, even winning a national championship in 1998, but decided to move up to FBS, gaining football-only membership in the MAC starting with the 2011 season. [=UMass=] enjoyed little success at its new level, and decided to turn down an offer of full MAC membership; the MAC responded by not renewing their football-only membership contract.[[note]]Unlike most FBS schools, football isn't the biggest sport at [=UMass=]. It's at best second behind men's basketball, and possibly behind men's ice hockey as well. [=UMass=]' main conference, the Atlantic 10, is ''far'' better in basketball than the MAC—in fact, not far from the level of the Power Five leagues in that sport. Additionally, the school was a geographic outlier in the Great Lakes-based MAC.[[/note]] It remains to be seen whether [=UMass=] will stay at FBS level or return to FCS... watch this space.


to:

* The newest independent is '''[=UMass=]''', more properly the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Minutemen had been a fairly decent team at the FCS level, even winning a national championship in 1998, but decided to move up to FBS, gaining football-only membership in the MAC starting with the 2011 2012 season. [=UMass=] enjoyed little success at its new level, and yet decided to turn down an offer of full MAC membership; the MAC responded by not renewing their football-only membership contract.contract after it ended with the 2015 season.[[note]]Unlike most FBS schools, football isn't the biggest sport at [=UMass=]. It's at best second behind men's basketball, and possibly behind men's ice hockey as well. [=UMass=]' main conference, the Atlantic 10, is ''far'' better in basketball than the MAC—in fact, not far from the level of the Power Five leagues in that sport. Additionally, the school was a geographic outlier in the Great Lakes-based MAC.[[/note]] It remains to be seen whether [=UMass=] will stay at FBS level or return to FCS... watch this space.

10th Mar '16 2:04:59 AM KYCubbie
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There have been a few systems that have attempted to pair up #1 and #2 ranked teams in a championship bowl game; complaining about the systems is in some circles as cherished a pastime as football itself. The current system is the College Football Playoff (CFP), launched in 2014, with the survivor being recognized as national champions.[[note]]While the NCAA does not operate an FBS national championship, its record books list national champions crowned by various outside parties, including polls, computer rankings, historians, and the BCS.[[/note]] The season ends with numerous ''bowl games'' that are played between schools. The "New Year's Six" games associated with the CFP are:

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There have been a few systems that have attempted to pair up #1 and #2 ranked teams in a championship bowl game; complaining about the systems is in some circles as cherished a pastime as football itself. The current system is the College Football Playoff (CFP), launched in 2014, with the survivor being recognized as national champions.[[note]]While the NCAA does not operate an FBS national championship, its record books list national champions crowned by various outside parties, including polls, computer rankings, historians, the BCS, and now the BCS.CFP.[[/note]] The season ends with numerous ''bowl games'' that are played between schools. The "New Year's Six" games associated with the CFP are:



The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for {{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]], Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the Cactus Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Copper Bowl, Insight.com Bowl, Insight Bowl, Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, and [=TicketCity=] Cactus Bowl[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all [=GoDaddy=] Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag Formerly the GMAC Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or the Bahamas Bowl. There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]

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The lower tier of bowl games exists solely as cash grabs and {{Padding}} for {{ESPN}} Creator/{{ESPN}} during the traditionally quiet holiday week in sports, and the stadiums and cities the games are played in (until ESPN grabbed a monopoly on most bowl games in the 1990's, most of these games were still few and far between, aired on syndicated broadcast television and were special). If there was a playoff in college football, the teams in these bowls would be blown out of the first round of the playoffs by the top teams or not even make it, as they usually have records which are only one game above .500 (if that)[[note]]However, since most bowls have a lot of discretion in who they invite, and how much money the bowl thinks they'll make is often the deciding factor rather than trying to get the best team, sometimes actual good teams will get screwed over by the higher-tier bowls and get forced to settle for beating the hell out a scrub team in a bottom-tier bowl. Common victims of this are schools like Boise State, which usually wins its bowl games but is considered a less attractive choice because, being from tiny Idaho, they have a relatively small fanbase.[[/note]]. These games are usually sponsored by NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast, such as the [[OverlyLongName San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl]], Quick Lane Bowl[[note]]Successor to the Motor City Bowl, later known as the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl[[/note]], [=AdvoCare=] Texas Bowl [[note]]Originally just the Texas Bowl, then the [[OverlyLongName Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas]][[/note]], the Foster Farms Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Diamond Walnut Bowl; then the Emerald Bowl, which sounds innocuous but was actually named for Emerald Nuts; and still later the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl[[/note]], the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl[[note]]Formerly the [=MPCComputers.com=] Bowl and the Humanitarian Bowl[[/note]], the Belk Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Queen City Bowl, Continental Tire Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl[[/note]], the Cactus Bowl[[note]]Formerly the Copper Bowl, Insight.com Bowl, Insight Bowl, Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, and [=TicketCity=] Cactus Bowl[[/note]], the Camping World Independence Bowl[[note]]Historically just the Independence Bowl, notable only because the 1982 edition was the first college football game ever broadcast by Creator/{{ESPN}}.[[/note]] or the St. Petersburg Bowl[[note]]Returned to its historic name of the St. Petersburg Bowl after a couple of years as the [[OverlyLongName Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl St. Petersburg]][[/note]]. Many of these bowls ''used'' to have less embarrassing names, before the trend of sponsors using their own name as the ''sole'' name of the bowl instead of just tagging their name in front of the bowl name (something near-universally loathed by football fans) came about[[note]]This also means that when a sponsorship expires, the bowl will pick up an entirely new name. Which means that in addition to all their other shortcomings, these bowls also don't even have a consistent ''identity''[[/note]]. These games are solely of interest to the universities playing only (or will be a future OldShame if your team is invited to the not-very-prestigious-at-all [=GoDaddy=] Bowl[[note]][[RunningGag Formerly the GMAC Bowl]][[/note]]), and about the only accomplishment to be earned by the players outside of a free unwanted trip to Detroit, Boise, Shreveport, Louisiana or Birmingham, Alabama is a CosmeticAward which [[TrailersAlwaysLie means nothing]]. Unless the team lucks out and gets invited to the [[HulaAndLuaus Hawaii Bowl]] or the Bahamas Bowl. There now so many lower tier bowl games that ''a majority of FBS teams'' will play in a bowl game every year, a fact widely ridiculed by fans. In the 2010–11 season, there was even some worry that there wouldn't be enough bowl eligible teams[[note]]A team must win at least half of its game to be bowl eligible.[[/note]] to play all the bowl games, which would have required teams with losing records to be invited to fill the remaining slots; two years later, this worry resurfaced when four separate teams ended up on postseason bans at once and all four would've otherwise been bowl eligible including one that went undefeated. While ultimately this didn't happen, it illustrates what a meager accomplishment being invited to a minor bowl has become. Once again, there are conference tie-ins for these bowls, but they tend to be a lot less strictly enforced than in higher-tier bowls (especially since a conference might not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all its tie-ins, but also because a major conference probably doesn't care all that much about the tie-in for its 6th place team and a minor conference lacks the influence to do anything about it if their tie-in is ignored). Since non-AQ conferences' tie-ins are exclusively with the bottom-tier bowls, non-AQ champions are almost always stuck in these bowls, but with exceptional seasons they can become BCS busters and jump all the way to the top four bowls.[[note]]Utah in 2004 (beat Pitt in the Fiesta Bowl), Boise State in 2006 (beat Oklahoma in an epic Fiesta Bowl), Hawaii in 2007 (curbstomped by Georgia in the Sugar Bowl), Utah in 2008 (beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl), Boise State and TCU in 2009 (controversially matched against one another in the Fiesta Bowl, which BCS critics declared the "[[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement Separate But Equal]] Bowl", with Boise State winning), TCU again in 2010 (beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl), and Northern Illinois in 2012 (thrashed by Florida State in the Orange Bowl). Two of these schools later joined AQ conferences—Utah joined what would become the Pac-12 in 2011, and TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012.[[/note]]



Not all American universities, that sponsor varsity football, play within the bowl system. The NCAA has three divisions and Divisions II and III actually have a normal football playoff system. Likewise, Division I has a special subdivision called the "Football Championship Subdivision,"[[note]]Previously, the "Football Bowl Subdivision" and "Football Championship Subdivision" were called Division I-A and Division I-AA. These names are still often used unofficially, as many fans find the new names clunky and stupid. The abbreviations "FBS" and "FCS" are also used more often than the full names due to not sounding quite as lame.[[/note]] where Division I schools, that don't want to put as much emphasis on football as their larger cousins, can play. The current all-divisions record holder for most consecutive winning seasons is Division III's Linfield College, currently at 57. Each of these have their own playoff system to determine a national champion. While most regular season games are done within a division, several teams will play one or two games outside of their division. Teams in the NCAA's Divisions II and III sometimes even play non-NCAA teams. Playing lower-division teams isn't without its risks; when a highly regarded FBS team loses to an FCS team (such as the infamous defeat of then #5 ranked UsefulNotes/UniversityOfMichigan by FCS opponent Appalachian State in 2007, quite possibly the biggest upset in college football history), they become a national laughing stock.[[note]]Amazingly, Michigan scheduled Appalachian State (a traditional FCS powerhouse that won three consecutive playoff championships in 2005-2007) again for the 2014 season; however, Appalachian State had become a transitional FBS member by then. Michigan won easily this time around.[[/note]] Also, only one FCS win can count toward bowl eligibility for an FBS team, meaning that if a team schedules two such games they'll need to have at least a 7-5 record instead of 6-6 to qualify for a bowl. By design, this usually discourages FBS teams from playing against more than one FCS team per year. Despite the great majority of these games resulting in a win for the higher-division team, the lower division schools are happy to play them because the higher-division team invariably [[MoneyDearBoy pays them a lot of money to do it]].

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Not all American universities, that sponsor varsity football, play within the bowl system. The NCAA has three divisions and Divisions II and III actually have a normal football playoff system. Likewise, Division I has a special subdivision called the "Football Championship Subdivision,"[[note]]Previously, the "Football Bowl Subdivision" and "Football Championship Subdivision" were called Division I-A and Division I-AA. These names are still often used unofficially, as many fans find the new names clunky and stupid. The abbreviations "FBS" and "FCS" are also used more often than the full names due to not sounding quite as lame.[[/note]] where Division I schools, that don't want to put as much emphasis on football as their larger cousins, can play. The current all-divisions record holder for most consecutive winning seasons is Division III's Linfield College, currently at 57.58. Each of these have their own playoff system to determine a national champion. While most regular season games are done within a division, several teams will play one or two games outside of their division. Teams in the NCAA's Divisions II and III sometimes even play non-NCAA teams. Playing lower-division teams isn't without its risks; when a highly regarded FBS team loses to an FCS team (such as the infamous defeat of then #5 ranked UsefulNotes/UniversityOfMichigan by FCS opponent Appalachian State in 2007, quite possibly the biggest upset in college football history), they become a national laughing stock.[[note]]Amazingly, Michigan scheduled Appalachian State (a traditional FCS powerhouse that won three consecutive playoff championships in 2005-2007) again for the 2014 season; however, Appalachian State had become a transitional FBS member by then. Michigan won easily this time around.[[/note]] Also, only one FCS win can count toward bowl eligibility for an FBS team, meaning that if a team schedules two such games they'll need to have at least a 7-5 record instead of 6-6 to qualify for a bowl. By design, this usually discourages FBS teams from playing against more than one FCS team per year. Despite the great majority of these games resulting in a win for the higher-division team, the lower division schools are happy to play them because the higher-division team invariably [[MoneyDearBoy pays them a lot of money to do it]].



* The '''Mid-American Conference''', which covers the Great Lakes area. Also has an outlier for football only in [=UMass=] (Massachusetts), but the Minutemen are effectively being kicked out after the 2015 season.

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* The '''Mid-American Conference''', which covers the Great Lakes area. Also has For a few years, it had an outlier for football only in [=UMass=] (Massachusetts), but the Minutemen are were effectively being kicked out after the 2015 season.



* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico).

Additionally, there are three independent football programs in Division I FBS that do not belong to a conference.

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* The '''Sun Belt Conference''', like the SEC and Conference USA, is mostly located in the South, but for football only, it includes the distinctly not-Southern state of Idaho (as well as the more Southwestern, but still "Sun Belt", state of New Mexico).

Mexico). The teams from Idaho and New Mexico will be bounced from the football league after the 2017 season. Coastal Carolina[[note]]in South Carolina[[/note]] will begin a transition to FBS in the 2016 season; at that time, it will become a full but non-football Sun Belt member, with the football team joining in 2017.

Additionally, there are three four independent football programs in Division I FBS (as of the upcoming 2016 season) that do not belong to a conference.





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\n* The newest independent is '''[=UMass=]''', more properly the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Minutemen had been a fairly decent team at the FCS level, even winning a national championship in 1998, but decided to move up to FBS, gaining football-only membership in the MAC starting with the 2011 season. [=UMass=] enjoyed little success at its new level, and decided to turn down an offer of full MAC membership; the MAC responded by not renewing their football-only membership contract.[[note]]Unlike most FBS schools, football isn't the biggest sport at [=UMass=]. It's at best second behind men's basketball, and possibly behind men's ice hockey as well. [=UMass=]' main conference, the Atlantic 10, is ''far'' better in basketball than the MAC—in fact, not far from the level of the Power Five leagues in that sport. Additionally, the school was a geographic outlier in the Great Lakes-based MAC.[[/note]] It remains to be seen whether [=UMass=] will stay at FBS level or return to FCS... watch this space.

7th Mar '16 8:13:41 PM KYCubbie
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A list of the major awards for college football players presented annually. There are several governing bodies in charge of selecting the various award winners, so some of the awards may seem a little repetitive in terms of what the award stands for. (Ex. the Heisman, Archie Griffin, Maxwell, and Walter Camp awards all being practically the same.) The "most recent winners" listed are from the 2015 season unless otherwise noted.

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A list of the major awards for college football players presented annually. There are several governing bodies in charge of selecting the various award winners, so some of the awards may seem a little repetitive in terms of what the award stands for. (Ex. the Heisman, Archie Griffin, Maxwell, and Walter Camp awards all being practically the same.) The "most recent winners" listed are all from the 2015 season; those who repeated from the 2014 season unless otherwise are also noted.
4th Mar '16 9:46:37 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Chic Harley Award''': Also known as the "College Football Player of the Year" award. Like the Archie Griffin Award, it is not uncommon for the winner of the Heisman to win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Marcus Mariota, Oregon (2014)

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* '''Chic Harley Award''': Also known as the "College Football Player of the Year" award. Like the Archie Griffin Award, it is not uncommon for the winner of the Heisman to win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Marcus Mariota, Oregon (2014)Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford



* '''Jet Award''': The newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 will be retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' Tyler Lockett, Kansas State (2014)

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* '''Jet Award''': The newest major award (first presented in 2011[[note]]While the award was created in 2011, winners for each season from 1959 through 2010 will be retroactively chosen, one year at a time.[[/note]]), which is given to the top return specialist in college football. "Jet" comes from the nickname of legendary 1970s Nebraska receiver/return man Johnny Rodgers. ''Most recent winner:'' Tyler Lockett, Kansas State (2014)[=McCaffrey=]



* '''Paul Hornung Award''': Another relatively new award (first given in 2010), presented to the most versatile player in college football. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford

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* '''Paul Hornung Award''': Another relatively new award (first given in 2010), presented to the most versatile player in college football. ''Most recent winner:'' Christian [=McCaffrey=], Stanford[=McCaffrey=]
9th Feb '16 11:26:30 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Manning Award''': Another award given to the best quarterback in college football; named after the Manning quarterbacking family.[[note]]Archie and his sons Peyton and Eli[[/note]] Whenever a QB wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. Unlike most college football awards, it's given ''after'' the bowl games. ''Most recent winner:'' Mariota (2014)

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* '''Manning Award''': Another award given to the best quarterback in college football; named after the Manning quarterbacking family.[[note]]Archie and his sons Peyton and Eli[[/note]] Whenever a QB wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. Unlike most college football awards, it's given ''after'' the bowl games. ''Most recent winner:'' Mariota (2014)Watson



* '''Archie Manning''': College Football Hall of Famer who had a legendary career at Ole Miss. Was a Heisman finalist twice, falling just short both times. Went on to have a moderately successful pro career and is better known nowadays as the father of Creator/{{Peyton|Manning}} and Eli Manning. A member of the NCAA College Football Playoff Selection Committee, though he took a leave of absence for the second half of the 2014 regular season, citing health reasons.

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* '''Archie Manning''': College Football Hall of Famer who had a legendary career at Ole Miss. Was a Heisman finalist twice, falling just short both times. Went on to have a moderately successful pro career and is better known nowadays as the father of Creator/{{Peyton|Manning}} and Eli Manning. A member He was one of the NCAA first members of the College Football Playoff Selection Committee, though he but took a health-related leave of absence for in the second half fall of the 2014 regular season, citing health reasons.and resigned from the committee the next spring, never having participated in any voting.
17th Jan '16 11:59:58 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Archie Manning''': College Football Hall of Famer who had a legendary career at Ole Miss. Was a Heisman finalist twice, falling just short both times. Went on to have a moderately successful pro career and is better known nowadays as the father of Peyton and Eli Manning. A member of the NCAA College Football Playoff Selection Committee, though he took a leave of absence for the second half of the 2014 regular season, citing health reasons.

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* '''Archie Manning''': College Football Hall of Famer who had a legendary career at Ole Miss. Was a Heisman finalist twice, falling just short both times. Went on to have a moderately successful pro career and is better known nowadays as the father of Peyton Creator/{{Peyton|Manning}} and Eli Manning. A member of the NCAA College Football Playoff Selection Committee, though he took a leave of absence for the second half of the 2014 regular season, citing health reasons.
17th Jan '16 11:58:27 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Tim Tebow''': Two-time BCS Championship winning QB for Florida and winner of the 2007 Heisman Trophy. He is one of the great running [=QBs=] in NCAA history, with a unique style of preferring to plow through defenders like a fullback (most running quarterbacks are more agile and try to avoid hits). Went on to a brief, somewhat controversial NFL career. Returned to college football as an analyst for the SEC Network; gave the NFL another try in 2015 with the Philadelphia Eagles, but was one of the last roster cuts.

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* '''Keenan Reynolds''': The triggerman for Navy's option offense from 2012 to 2015, Reynolds is notable for a couple of reasons. First, he is arguably one of the greatest running [=QBs=] in NCAA history, notably setting an all-time FBS record for most career rushing touchdowns (88). Second, despite holding one of the NCAA's highest-profile records, he will ''never'' be in the College Football Hall of Fame (at least under current rules). The Hall currently requires that inductees have received first-team All-America honors before being considered. In the modern game, [=QBs=] are evaluated mostly as passers, with running being a secondary factor. However, Navy's offense is heavily run-oriented (being more similar to the types of option offenses seen in the last third of the 20th century), which means that Reynolds was never able to put up the type of passing numbers that would have given him All-American notice.
* '''Tim Tebow''': Two-time BCS Championship winning QB for Florida and winner of the 2007 Heisman Trophy. He is one of the great Another candidate for greatest running [=QBs=] QB in NCAA history, with a unique style of preferring to plow through defenders like a fullback (most running quarterbacks are more agile and try to avoid hits). Went on to a brief, somewhat controversial NFL career. Returned to college football as an analyst for the SEC Network; gave the NFL another try in 2015 with the Philadelphia Eagles, but was one of the last roster cuts.
17th Jan '16 11:47:46 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Archie Griffin Award''': While the Heisman is given to the "most outstanding" player, the Archie Griffin award is given to the "most ''valuable''" player in college football. (Which, unsurprisingly, is also frequently the Heisman winner.) ''Most recent winner:'' Ezekiel Elliott, Ohio State (2014)

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* '''Archie Griffin Award''': While the Heisman is given to the "most outstanding" player, the Archie Griffin award is given to the "most ''valuable''" player in college football. (Which, unsurprisingly, is also frequently the Heisman winner.) ''Most recent winner:'' Ezekiel Elliott, Ohio State (2014)Deshaun Watson, Clemson



* '''Davey O'Brien Award''': Award given to the best quarterback in college football. Whenever a quarterback wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Deshaun Watson, Clemson

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* '''Davey O'Brien Award''': Award given to the best quarterback in college football. Whenever a quarterback wins the Heisman, there is a good chance that he will win this award as well. ''Most recent winner:'' Deshaun Watson, ClemsonWatson


Added DiffLines:

* '''Nick Saban''': Currently the colossus of college coaching, with four national titles at Alabama since his 2007 arrival (2009, 2011, 2012, 2015). Also coached LSU to a national title in 2003, and before that enjoyed great success at Toledo and Michigan State. We will not mention his [[DorkAge two seasons with the Miami Dolphins]] between LSU and Bama.
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