History UsefulNotes / ChineseFuneraryCustoms

19th Apr '15 5:58:02 PM Darkstarr
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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang (also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead (since that's where they'd been going before all these missionaries showed up, right?), and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]

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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang (also known as Yanluo), Yanluo or Yen-lo-Wang), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead (since that's where they'd been going before all these missionaries showed up, right?), and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]
2nd Nov '13 7:01:18 PM imheliababe
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Every Chinese celebration is accompanied by copious amounts of yellow incense. Each person takes 3 incense sticks (also called joss sticks) and bows three times to the ancestor/deceased, then places it upright into a large urn made for this purpose. Unless you’re crazy and take an entire fistful. Trust this troper, lighting them is much harder than it looks... They range in size, from a few millimetres in diameter up to huge 2cm (1 inch) wide, ~40cm (18 inch) long incense sticks.

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Every Chinese celebration is accompanied by copious amounts of yellow incense. Each person takes 3 (or 1, or 7, or 9, just make sure it's an odd number <10) incense sticks (also called joss sticks) and bows three times to the ancestor/deceased, then places it upright into a large urn made for this purpose. Unless you’re crazy and take an entire fistful. Trust this troper, lighting them is much harder than it looks...purpose. They range in size, from a few millimetres in diameter up to huge 2cm (1 inch) wide, ~40cm (18 inch) long incense sticks.
4th May '13 12:57:07 PM Nabi
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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead (since that's where they'd been going before all these missionaries showed up, right?), and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]

The smallest denomination is around 1000. They regularly reach into 100 billion. Inflation must be really, ‘’really’’ bad. Sometimes, blank strips of paper are burned, along with paper gold bars and gold and silver ingots. Round pieces of paper with lucky charms and incantations on them are also burned. Learning to fold paper ingots is a skill that gets passed down through families, as traditionally they should be folded on the spot. (Of course, you can buy them ready made now.)

to:

Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also Wang (also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead (since that's where they'd been going before all these missionaries showed up, right?), and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]

The smallest denomination is around 1000. They regularly reach into 100 billion. Inflation must be really, ‘’really’’ ''really'' bad. Sometimes, blank strips of paper are burned, along with paper gold bars and gold and silver ingots. Round pieces of paper with lucky charms and incantations on them are also burned. Learning to fold paper ingots is a skill that gets passed down through families, as traditionally they should be folded on the spot. (Of course, you can buy them ready made now.)
4th May '13 12:54:07 PM Nabi
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At a funeral, it’s important for the entire family to attend. The funeral is led by the oldest male child. However, each person is only supposed to lead the procession once in their life. Therefore, the oldest male child might be ‘reserved’ for the death of the patriarch. Close relatives are meant to wear special white clothes, and depending on exactly how closely related they might wear extra accessories (like rough hemp belts or peaked hoods). Some funeral homes offer black clothing for people who don’t believe in traditional Chinese beliefs e.g. Christians.

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At a funeral, it’s important for the entire family to attend. The funeral is led by the oldest male child. However, each person is only supposed to lead the procession once in their life. Therefore, the oldest male child might be ‘reserved’ for the death of the patriarch. Close relatives are meant to wear special white clothes, and depending on exactly how closely related they might wear extra accessories (like rough hemp belts or peaked hoods). Some funeral homes offer black clothing for people who don’t believe in follow traditional Chinese beliefs beliefs, e.g. Christians.
4th May '13 12:53:23 PM Nabi
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As you’ve probably heard from somewhere, Chinese funerals are ‘’big’’ on burning stuff. Really, really enthusiastic; The Chinese believe that the ashes and smoke carry the spiritual equivalent to the soul of the deceased, and that burning a replica will give the actual item in Hell. For example, burning a paper replica of a gold bar will give the spirit an actual gold bar to use.

to:

As you’ve probably heard from somewhere, Chinese funerals are ‘’big’’ ''big'' on burning stuff. Really, really enthusiastic; The Chinese believe that the ashes and smoke carry the spiritual equivalent to the soul of the deceased, and that burning a replica will give the actual item in Hell. For example, burning a paper replica of a gold bar will give the spirit an actual gold bar to use.
30th Apr '13 7:57:31 PM DracMonster
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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead, and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]

to:

Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would go to ''their'' afterlife instead, instead (since that's where they'd been going before all these missionaries showed up, right?), and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]
30th Apr '13 7:03:29 PM DracMonster
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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would simply go to ''their'' afterlife instead, and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]

to:

Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would simply go to ''their'' afterlife instead, and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]
30th Apr '13 7:01:56 PM DracMonster
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Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.

to:

Possibly one of the more well known aspects, hell money isn’t quite as sinister as it sounds. They are paper replicas of banknotes, with ridiculously large denominations printed on them, for the deceased to spend in the afterlife. Sometimes, they mimic actual bank notes VERY closely - some shops got in trouble for copying the Hong Kong $1000 bank note too closely. They are often ‘issued’ by the Hell Bank, with a large image of the Jade Emperor on the front, and bear the signature of Yan Wang(Also known as Yanluo), King of Hell.
Hell.[[note]]"Hell" being attached to all this stuff comes from a misunderstanding with early missionaries -- the Chinese thought people who didn't convert to Christianity would simply go to ''their'' afterlife instead, and "hell" was simply the English term for it. It just kind of stuck, and carries no connotations of damnation or sinfulness.[[/note]]
9th May '12 7:40:01 AM SeptimusHeap
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[[AC:Disclaimer]]: This section owes itself entirely to personal experience and whatever can be scrounged off the internet. As a result, [[YourMilageMayVary bits might be off, misinterpreted or just plain wrong]].

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[[AC:Disclaimer]]: This section owes itself entirely to personal experience and whatever can be scrounged off the internet. As a result, [[YourMilageMayVary bits might be off, misinterpreted or just plain wrong]].wrong.
16th Dec '11 7:35:05 AM Scaresteam
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As you’ve probably heard from somewhere, Chinese funerals are ‘’big’’ on burning stuff. Really, really enthusiastic. This troper can attest to burning literal crates full of paper ingots on one memorable occasion. The Chinese believe that the ashes and smoke carry the spiritual equivalent to the soul of the deceased, and that burning a replica will give the actual item in Hell. For example, burning a paper replica of a gold bar will give the spirit an actual gold bar to use.

to:

As you’ve probably heard from somewhere, Chinese funerals are ‘’big’’ on burning stuff. Really, really enthusiastic. This troper can attest to burning literal crates full of paper ingots on one memorable occasion. enthusiastic; The Chinese believe that the ashes and smoke carry the spiritual equivalent to the soul of the deceased, and that burning a replica will give the actual item in Hell. For example, burning a paper replica of a gold bar will give the spirit an actual gold bar to use.



In spacious areas graveyards are commonplace, but in more densely populated areas cremation is a more viable option. The urns are just given a (literal) hole in the wall, covered by a marble slab. This troper’s family identifies the right slot (they’re, what, 16cm by 25cm ish?) by going “Okay, fourth down from the top, fifth from the right... number 462, yeah... okay now look at it and bow!” Other families decide to keep the urns at home, and might have an ancestral shrine somewhere in the house.

to:

In spacious areas graveyards are commonplace, but in more densely populated areas cremation is a more viable option. The urns are just given a (literal) hole in the wall, covered by a marble slab. This troper’s family identifies the right slot (they’re, what, 16cm by 25cm ish?) by going “Okay, fourth down from the top, fifth from the right... number 462, yeah... okay now look at it and bow!” Other families decide to keep the urns at home, and might have an ancestral shrine somewhere in the house.
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