History UsefulNotes / Chicago

21st May '16 2:06:36 PM wuggles
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* ''Series/TheRealONeals''
19th May '16 4:06:44 AM KYCubbie
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* ''Austin'': Chicago's largest neighborhood, this historically middle-class community fell on hard times in 1970s. Things haven't gotten much better since. It has one of the highest crime rates in the city, though the sheer size of the neighborhood is probably skewing the figures. It is also home to the only Wal-Mart to ever be opened within Chicago city limits.

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* ''Austin'': Chicago's largest neighborhood, this historically middle-class community fell on hard times in 1970s. Things haven't gotten much better since. It has one of the highest crime rates in the city, though the sheer size of the neighborhood is probably skewing the figures. It is also home to the only Wal-Mart UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}} to ever be opened within Chicago city limits.



* ''Ravenswood'': A working class neighborhood that owes its existence to Ravenswood branch of what is now the Brown 'L' line. Has lots of apartment buildings and quite a few pockets of gentrification.[[/folder]]

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* ''Ravenswood'': A working class neighborhood that owes its existence to the Ravenswood branch of what is now the Brown 'L' line. Has lots of apartment buildings and quite a few pockets of gentrification.[[/folder]]



** Also home to a large number of Police and Firefighter households.

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** Also home to a large number of Police police and Firefighter firefighter households.



Sports in Chicago are [[SeriousBusiness very passionate subjects]], although their fans tend to have a well-deserved reputation for idealizing the sports instead of looking at them objectively.[[note]]Remember the [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Superfans?]] Some Chicagoans didn't realize they were being made fun of.[[/note]] With UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup in 2010, Chicago became the first city on the continent to win all four of its big major professional sports championships in a 25-year span[[note]]1986 Super Bowl, 1991-93, 1996-98 NBA Championships, 2005 World Series (White Sox), 2010 Stanley Cup[[/note]]. Its record was broken a year later by UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} when the Bruins' [[UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup Stanley Cup]] win brought the span down to seven years. However if you include soccer in the mix, Chicago regains the title as the New England Revolution have never won an MLS cup.

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Sports in Chicago are [[SeriousBusiness very passionate subjects]], although their fans tend to have a well-deserved reputation for idealizing the sports instead of looking at them objectively.[[note]]Remember the [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Superfans?]] Some Chicagoans didn't realize they were being made fun of.[[/note]] With UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup in 2010, Chicago became the first city on the continent to win all four of its big major professional sports championships in a 25-year span[[note]]1986 Super Bowl, 1991-93, 1996-98 NBA Championships, 2005 World Series (White Sox), 2010 Stanley Cup[[/note]]. Its record was broken a year later by UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} when the Bruins' [[UsefulNotes/TheStanleyCup Stanley Cup]] win brought the span down to seven years. However if you include soccer in the mix, Chicago regains the title as the New England Revolution have never won an [[UsefulNotes/MajorLeagueSoccer MLS cup.
Cup]].



* The [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Bulls]] led by Michael Jordan in TheNineties are considered one of, if not ''the'' greatest, sporting dynasty of all time. After a few years ranging from OK to bad they have resurged on the heels of area native Derrick Rose.

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* The [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Bulls]] led by Michael Jordan UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan in TheNineties are considered one of, if not ''the'' greatest, sporting dynasty of all time. After a few years ranging from OK to bad they have resurged on the heels of area native Derrick Rose.



* Women's soccer has the Chicago Red Stars, which have been members of four different leagues in their first five years of play. Currently, they play in the National Women's Soccer League, which is the country's ''third'' attempt to establish a professional women's soccer league.[[note]]The NWSL was preceded by the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003) and Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011). The NWSL was founded in 2012 and played its first season in 2013.[[/note]]

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* Women's soccer has the Chicago Red Stars, which have been were members of four different leagues in their first five years of play. Currently, they play in the National Women's Soccer League, which is the country's ''third'' attempt to establish a professional women's soccer league.[[note]]The NWSL was preceded by the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003) and Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011). The NWSL was founded in 2012 and played its first season in 2013.[[/note]]



* ''Series/HillStreetBlues'': While the city is technically unnamed on the show, the opening credits utilize Chicago locations

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* ''Series/HillStreetBlues'': While the city is technically unnamed on the show, the opening credits utilize Chicago locationslocations.
19th May '16 3:51:42 AM KYCubbie
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Chicago, Illinois: incorporated in 1837. The name comes from the Algonquian word ''shikaakwa'', or "wild onion"[[note]]Or "smelly onion" depending on how you translate it[[/note]]. We kid you not: it was [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what was growing]] in the swampland around Lake Michigan that was perfectly situated for continental-scale commerce. It's the third most populous city in the United States and a fabled fortress of jazz, [[TheMafia organized crime]], Michael Jordan, [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Daaaaaa Bearsss]], the 1893 World's Fair, deep-dish pizza, Frank Lloyd Wright, house music, improvisational theatre, pinball, lots and lots of drawbridges, two baseball teams known for perennial mediocrity which fiercely battle for the city's love/scorn, skyscrapers, revolving doors, [[note]][[http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swinging-times-why-chicago-has-so-many-revolving-doors-114058 it's estimated]] that Chicago has one-third of the revolving doors ''in the entire world''[[/note]] a very pleasant lakefront, very unpleasant winters, [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama our current president]], and a certain roughneck Midwestern charm. Its nickname of "The Windy City" was coined by Charles Dana of the ''New York Sun'' to dismiss Chicago politicians promising that if they got the World's Fair in 1893, it would be awesome, as being full of hot air. (They got the fair, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome and it was indeed awesome.]]) Aside from that, the city had a massive fire in 1871, widely suspected in UrbanLegend of having been started by a cow, which leveled much of the city and killed 200-300 people. [[note]]That is, the fire did. [[DontExplaintheJoke Not the cow.]] [[WildMassGuessing We think.]]The cow survived the fire[[/note]]

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Chicago, Illinois: incorporated in 1837. The name comes from the Algonquian word ''shikaakwa'', or "wild onion"[[note]]Or "smelly onion" depending on how you translate it[[/note]]. We kid you not: it was [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin what was growing]] in the swampland around Lake Michigan that was perfectly situated for continental-scale commerce. It's the third most populous city in the United States and a fabled fortress of jazz, [[TheMafia organized crime]], Michael Jordan, UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan, [[Series/SaturdayNightLive Daaaaaa Bearsss]], the 1893 World's Fair, deep-dish pizza, Frank Lloyd Wright, house music, improvisational theatre, pinball, lots and lots of drawbridges, two baseball teams known for perennial mediocrity which fiercely battle for the city's love/scorn, skyscrapers, revolving doors, [[note]][[http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/swinging-times-why-chicago-has-so-many-revolving-doors-114058 it's estimated]] that Chicago has one-third of the revolving doors ''in the entire world''[[/note]] a very pleasant lakefront, very unpleasant winters, [[UsefulNotes/BarackObama our current president]], and a certain roughneck Midwestern charm. Its nickname of "The Windy City" was coined by Charles Dana of the ''New York Sun'' to dismiss Chicago politicians promising that if they got the World's Fair in 1893, it would be awesome, as being full of hot air. (They got the fair, [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome and it was indeed awesome.]]) Aside from that, the city had a massive fire in 1871, widely suspected in UrbanLegend of having been started by a cow, which leveled much of the city and killed 200-300 people. [[note]]That is, the fire did. [[DontExplaintheJoke Not the cow.]] [[WildMassGuessing We think.]]The cow survived the fire[[/note]]
11th May '16 4:02:57 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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** ''Chicago Med''

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** ''Chicago Med''''Series/ChicagoMed''
11th May '16 3:58:30 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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* ''Near West Side'': Can refer to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the collection of west side neighborhoods nearest the loop]] as a whole, but more commonly known for the area between the West Loop, University Village, and Medical Village that includes the United Center, home of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Blackhawks]] and [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Bulls]]. Former location of the Chicago Stadium which is regarded as the loudest sports venue in history[[note]]taken as a great point of pride for Chicagoans, so much that when the UC was built, they went out of their way to replicate the acoustics[[/note]], most notably during the Crowning Moment of both [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Awesome]] and [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming Heartwarming]] that was the 1991 NHL All-Star Game[[note]]The slightly controversial tradation of cheering during the National Anthem that began in the 80s was codified by the outburst of patriotism when the ASG was held the day after the US invasion of Kuwait that marked the start of the Persian Gulf War[[/note]].[[/folder]]

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* ''Near West Side'': Can refer to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the collection of west side neighborhoods nearest the loop]] as a whole, but more commonly known for the area between the West Loop, University Village, and Medical Village that includes the United Center, home of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Blackhawks]] and [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Bulls]]. Former location of the Chicago Stadium which is regarded as the loudest sports venue in history[[note]]taken as a great point of pride for Chicagoans, so much that when the UC was built, they went out of their way to replicate the acoustics[[/note]], most notably during the Crowning Moment of both [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Awesome]] and [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming Heartwarming]] that was the 1991 NHL All-Star Game[[note]]The slightly controversial tradation tradition of cheering during the National Anthem that began in the 80s '80s was codified by the outburst of patriotism when the ASG was held the day after the US invasion of Kuwait that marked the start of the Persian Gulf War[[/note]].[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

** ''Chicago Med''
16th Apr '16 9:45:11 AM Berrenta
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* Last, but not least is the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Blackhawks]]. Like the sport itself, the Hawks have classically played last fiddle to the more popular sports and their teams. The Hawks entered a severe DorkAge in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]], mostly because of a penny-pinching owner, who was most well known for '''not letting Blackhawks games air locally'''. [[ItGotBetter However]], the passing of said owner (now in the hands of his son), along with management changes and hot draft picks, allowed them to win the Stanley Cup victory in 2010. With success comes popularity, however, and many diehard fans began to be grumble about [[ItsPopularNowItSucks those new, young, ethnically diverse people who have the nerve to claim to be fans of equal value as they are]], and how said interest in the Hawks has increased ticket prices. Despite early exits from the playoffs the next two years, the team remained relatively successful and popularity continued to grow. They set a league record in 2013 playing 24 consecutive games without a regulation loss, that being half of the lockout-shortened 48 game schedule. They would go on to win their second President's Trophy[[note]]awarded to the team with the best record at the end of the regular season[[/note]] in franchise history and take their second Stanley Cup in four years. Despite concerns of the lockout alienating fans, the teams popularity has only grown and they are currently by a wide margin the city's biggest name in sports, easily eclipsing both struggling baseball teams in local media coverage and even pushing the still-well-regarded Bulls out of the limelight, something that would have been unthinkable a few years earlier.

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* Last, but not least is the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Blackhawks]]. Like the sport itself, the Hawks have classically played last fiddle to the more popular sports and their teams. The Hawks entered a severe DorkAge in the late [[TheNineties 1990s]], mostly because of a penny-pinching owner, who was most well known for '''not letting Blackhawks games air locally'''. [[ItGotBetter However]], However, the passing of said owner (now in the hands of his son), along with management changes and hot draft picks, allowed them to win the Stanley Cup victory in 2010. With success comes popularity, however, and many diehard fans began to be grumble about [[ItsPopularNowItSucks those new, young, ethnically diverse people who have the nerve to claim to be fans of equal value as they are]], and how said interest in the Hawks has increased ticket prices. Despite early exits from the playoffs the next two years, the team remained relatively successful and popularity continued to grow. They set a league record in 2013 playing 24 consecutive games without a regulation loss, that being half of the lockout-shortened 48 game schedule. They would go on to win their second President's Trophy[[note]]awarded to the team with the best record at the end of the regular season[[/note]] in franchise history and take their second Stanley Cup in four years. Despite concerns of the lockout alienating fans, the teams popularity has only grown and they are currently by a wide margin the city's biggest name in sports, easily eclipsing both struggling baseball teams in local media coverage and even pushing the still-well-regarded Bulls out of the limelight, something that would have been unthinkable a few years earlier.
1st Apr '16 7:51:38 PM LordGoatKing
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Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus being that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]." However some Chicago residents in recent years have seen some of "[[TheGodfather The Rahm Father]]'s" dealings like [[SeriousBusiness privatizing the city's parking meters]] for the next quarter century as [[BerserkButton infuriating]].

to:

Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus being that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]." However some Chicago residents in recent years have seen some of "[[TheGodfather The Rahm Father]]'s" dealings like [[SeriousBusiness privatizing the city's parking meters]] for the next quarter century 75 years as [[BerserkButton infuriating]].
1st Apr '16 7:50:44 PM LordGoatKing
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Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus being that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]." However some Chicago residents in recent years have seen "[[TheGodfather The Rahm Father]]'s" attempts to manipulate Chicago's old political machine as lackluster at best.

to:

Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus being that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]." However some Chicago residents in recent years have seen some of "[[TheGodfather The Rahm Father]]'s" attempts to manipulate Chicago's old political machine dealings like [[SeriousBusiness privatizing the city's parking meters]] for the next quarter century as lackluster at best.[[BerserkButton infuriating]].



The city is also very particular about its [[UsefulNotes/CuisinesInAmerica pizza and hot dogs]]. Chicago is famous for its deep dish pizza, developed in the 40s (although it isn't known who exactly invented it). With its deep crust, resembles a pie more then other kinds of pizzas. Unlike other pizzas, the ingredients are assembled "backwards", starting with the cheese as the first layer, then a meat layer, a vegtable layer, and then the sauce last. This is due to a longer baking time that would burn the toppings and cheese if it was assembled in the same way as other pizzas.

As for its hot dogs, the quintessential Chicago-style hot dog must have a poppy seed bun, an all beef frank, yellow mustard, chopped onions, bright green relish, a pickle spear, tomato slices, a hot pepper and celery salt. The one ingredient that must not be used is ketchup. If you ask for ketchup, be prepared to get accused of having the palette of a child and laughed at.

to:

The city is also very particular about its [[UsefulNotes/CuisinesInAmerica pizza and hot dogs]]. Chicago is famous for its deep dish pizza, developed in the 40s (although it isn't known who exactly invented it). With its deep crust, resembles a pie more then other kinds of pizzas. Unlike other pizzas, the ingredients are assembled "backwards", starting with the cheese as the first layer, then a meat layer, a vegtable vegetable layer, and then the sauce last. This is due to a longer baking time that would burn the toppings and cheese if it was assembled in the same way as other pizzas.

As for its hot dogs, the quintessential Chicago-style hot dog must have a poppy seed bun, an all beef frank, yellow mustard, chopped onions, bright green relish, a pickle spear, tomato slices, a hot pepper and celery salt. Some vendors in certain neighborhoods are also known to add raw cucumber slices, but they are not counted as absolutely needed. The one ingredient that must not be used is ketchup. If you ask for ketchup, be prepared to get accused of having the palette of a child and laughed at.
1st Apr '16 7:33:44 PM LordGoatKing
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Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus is that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]."

to:

Chicago's most famous mayor was Richard J. Daley, who spent 21 years on the job before dying. Known (among other things) as "The Man On Five" after the floor his office was on. The last of the big "bosses" in U.S. politics, he was allegedly responsible for UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy's suspicious Illinois electoral victory in 1960[[note]]It's important to note that as bad as Daley was, the Illinois GOP was just as bad; when Daley said that the Republicans had announced 500 votes for UsefulNotes/RichardNixon in a small town near Peoria that only had 50 voters, he wasn't ''entirely'' exaggerating.[[/note]] and built one of the most theatrically corrupt political machines in American history. This machine still exists, though it's more bipartisan and less powerful than it used to be. He was quite good at his job, though prone to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush-style [[{{Malaproper}} misspeaking]] and dogged by controversies like the violence surrounding the 1968 Democratic Convention. His son is Richard M. Daley, who remained in office for 22 years, surpassing his father in length of tenure and arguably having as much if not more clout. In 2010, he decided not to follow in his father's footsteps and try to die on the job, so he stepped down after his sixth term—leaving the reins to former [[TheWhiteHouse White House]] Chief of Staff [[MemeticBadass/RealLife Rahm Emanuel]]. Emanuel took office on May 16, 2011; consensus is being that while Daley is a ToughActToFollow, if anyone could do it, it would be "[[FanNickname Rahmbo]]."
" However some Chicago residents in recent years have seen "[[TheGodfather The Rahm Father]]'s" attempts to manipulate Chicago's old political machine as lackluster at best.
17th Mar '16 11:12:55 AM Prfnoff
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* ''Film/BatmanBegins'' and ''Film/TheDarkKnight''
** Chris Nolan hardly bothers to disguise Chicago as Gotham City in the first two Franchise/{{Batman}} films. His Caped Crusader broods on the Sears Tower, races through the underground tunnels of Lower Wacker Drive, rides the Batpod through the Metra Electric station at Randolph Street (you can even see street signage for the Pedway), and fights it out with the Joker on a famous stretch of [=LaSalle Street=]. The bank robbery that opens ''The Dark Knight'' was filmed at the old central post office on Van Buren Street, and Wayne Enterprises is headquartered in the Chicago Board of Trade Building. However, the flying-overhead [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Gotham_City_Batman_Begins.jpg view]] used in 'Film/BatmanBegins'' is the canon layout of Gotham.



* ''Film/TheMatrix''
** To an extent. The Brothers Wachowski, Chicagoans, named most of the Mega City's streets after actual Chicago roads; however, it was filmed in UsefulNotes/{{Sydney}}.
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