History UsefulNotes / CanadianHistory

4th Feb '16 11:23:53 AM Theriocephalus
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'''ca. 20 000 - 10 000 BCE''': Siberians cross the Bering Strait by either a land bridge (due to lower ocean levels as a result of the ice age) or a sheet of ice (due to the… uh, Ice Age). Hundreds of unique cultures grow and develop up and down the Americas from these progenitors.
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'''ca. 20 000 - 10 000 BCE''': Siberians cross the Bering Strait by either a land bridge (due to lower ocean levels as a result of the ice age) Ice Age) or a sheet of ice (due to the… uh, Ice Age). Hundreds of unique cultures grow and develop up and down the Americas from these progenitors.
26th Oct '15 4:55:30 PM kchishol
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'''March 17, 1946:''' Jackie Robinson breaks baseball's colour line when he debuts at shortstop for the Montreal Royals, the International AAA affiliate of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Robinson will be called up for the 1947 season and eventually enter the MLB Hall of Fame.
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'''March 17, 1946:''' Jackie Robinson breaks baseball's colour line when he debuts at shortstop for the Montreal Royals, the International AAA affiliate of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Although the racist pressure on him almost drove him to a nervous breakdown, he survived in part because Montrealers hailed him as their summer sports hero and he backed that adulation with spectacular play. Robinson will be called up for the 1947 season and eventually enter the MLB Hall of Fame.
26th Oct '15 4:51:43 PM kchishol
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'''July 20, 2005:''' Canada becomes the fourth country to legalize gay marriage. Eight provinces had already done so.
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'''July 20, 2005:''' Canada becomes the fourth country to legalize gay marriage. Eight provinces had already done so. so. The political support proved so powerful that when the Conservative PM Steve Harper rose to power, he staged a free vote in Parliament on the issue in anticipation of it going against him in order to move past the issue without alienating his base as fast he could.
26th Oct '15 4:48:23 PM kchishol
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'''April 17, 1982:''' Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II signs the Canada Act, 1982, officially severing all legislative dependence on the United Kingdom. The significance of this act is that Canada is now able to amend her own Constitution, having agreed, more or less, what do with it. The actual content of the act is, typically for Canada, a mishmash of agreements and compromises, hailed by some and deplored by others. Québec doesn't sign; despite two later attempts are reconciliation, Québec still hasn't ratified the 1982 constitution. In typically Canadian fashion, this fact has no legal significance whatsoever, and consumes the country in constitutional infighting for the next decade.
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'''April 17, 1982:''' Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II signs the Canada Act, 1982, officially severing all legislative dependence on the United Kingdom. The significance of this act is that Canada is now able to amend her own Constitution, having agreed, more or less, what do with it. The actual content of the act is, typically for Canada, a mishmash of agreements and compromises, hailed by some and deplored by others. Québec doesn't sign; despite two later attempts are reconciliation, Québec still hasn't ratified the 1982 constitution. In typically Canadian fashion, this fact has no legal significance whatsoever, and consumes the country in constitutional infighting for the next decade. decade. In addition, the constitution's Canadian Charter of Rights of Freedoms enshrined a specific bill of rights into Canada's politics and gave its courts considerable power to interpret and enforce it.
26th Oct '15 4:45:40 PM kchishol
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'''February 12 - 28, 2010:''' Vancouver hosts the XXI Winter Olympic Games. Alexandre Bilodeau breaks his home country's winter gold drought and sparks a gold rush to put Canada at the top of the medals ranking with fourteen gold medals, more than any other host country, capped with a spectacular overtime win in men's ice hockey. The closing ceremonies feature always-enjoyable giant inflatable beavers and possibly the densest concentration of Canadian stereotypes and tropes yet achieved.
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'''February 12 - 28, 2010:''' Vancouver hosts the XXI Winter Olympic Games. Alexandre Bilodeau breaks his home country's winter gold drought and sparks a gold rush to put Canada at the top of the medals ranking with fourteen gold medals, more than any other host country, capped with a spectacular overtime win in men's ice hockey. The closing ceremonies feature always-enjoyable giant inflatable beavers and possibly the densest concentration of Canadian stereotypes and tropes yet achieved.achieved. '''October 19, 2015:''': After nearly 10 years of hard right rule (For Canada) by the Conservative Party under PM Steve Harper, the party was toppled from power. That was made possible by Pierre Trudeau's son, Justin Trudeau, leapfrogged the Liberal Party of Canada from third place to the governing one with a strong majority in Parliament. This kind of victory has not happened since 1925 and it is the first time that the child of a Canadian Prime Minister has won the position himself.
12th Aug '15 2:09:32 PM gemmabeta2
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'''1891:''' John A. Macdonald wins his final election, and celebrates by [[OverlyLongGag getting drunk.]][[note]] Not quite a joke: Macdonald was a ''notorious'' drinker, loved his rum, and frequently ''was'' drunk a lot of the time. In fact, he once showed up to Parliament drunk, vomited during a speech, and declared "That's what I think of the opposition", to rousing applause.[[/note]] He dies later that year, and the whole country offers a toast in his honor. In December, Dr. James Naismith (former PE teacher and director of athletics at [=McGill=] University) invents basketball while an expatriate in the US, at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts.
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'''1891:''' John A. Macdonald wins his final election, and celebrates by [[OverlyLongGag getting drunk.]][[note]] Not quite a joke: Macdonald was a ''notorious'' drinker, loved his rum, and frequently ''was'' drunk a lot of the time. In fact, he once showed up to Parliament drunk, vomited during a speech, and declared "That's what I think of the opposition", to rousing applause. On a less funny note, he was also remembered for that time he, as minister responsible for the colonial militia, passed out drunk in the middle of a Fenian invasion of Canada and slept through the whole crisis.[[/note]] He dies later that year, and the whole country offers a toast in his honor. In December, Dr. James Naismith (former PE teacher and director of athletics at [=McGill=] University) invents basketball while an expatriate in the US, at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts.
2nd Jul '15 10:01:12 AM sinesofinsanity
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'''May 23, 1873:''' John A. Macdonald celebrates the formation of the Northwest Mounted Police by [[RunningGag getting drunk.]] The NWMP march west to enforce law and order in the Northwest Territories and the Native American nations were quite impressed, at least at first, at how helpful they were tamping down the whiskey traders ravaging their communities. Prince Edward Island joins Confederation, and John A. Macdonald celebrates by getting drunk.
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'''May 23, 1873:''' John A. Macdonald celebrates the formation of the Northwest Mounted Police by [[RunningGag getting drunk.]] The NWMP march west to enforce law and order in the Northwest Territories and the Native American nations were quite impressed, at least at first, at how helpful they were tamping down the whiskey traders ravaging their communities. On July 1st Prince Edward Island joins Confederation, and John A. Macdonald celebrates by getting drunk.
1st Jul '15 2:54:05 PM DarkSoldier
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'''1679''': Based on the proposal of trappers Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers (Messers Radishes and Gooseberry), Charles II founds the Hudson's Bay Company, granting it exclusive trade rights (and de facto control) of the Hudson's Bay watershed, 1/3 of modern day Canada. The venerable HBC would go on to supply Europe with beaver pelt hats and First Nations with European technology for the next 200 years. '''1714:''' Britain takes Nova Scotia from France.
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'''1679''': '''May 2, 1670''': Based on the proposal of trappers Pierre-Esprit Radisson and Médard des Groseilliers (Messers Radishes and Gooseberry), Charles II founds the Hudson's Bay Company, granting it exclusive trade rights (and de facto ''de facto'' control) of the Hudson's Bay watershed, 1/3 of modern day Canada. The venerable HBC would go on to supply Europe with beaver pelt hats and First Nations with European technology for the next 200 two hundred years. '''1714:''' Britain takes '''April 1713:''' As part of the Treaty of Utrecht, which ended the War of the Spanish Succession, France cedes nearly all of its New World holdings to Great Britain, including Newfoundland and Nova Scotia from France. Scotia. France retains control over Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton Island.

'''September 12, 1759:''' Battle of the Plains of Abraham, a British force lead by General James Wolfe decisively defeats the French of Louis-Joseph Marquis de Montcalm and captures Québec City. The French forces in New France surrendered a year later. Both Generals were killed in battle. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Death_of_General_Wolfe The Death of General Wolfe]] by Benjamin West remains one of the most famous Canadian historical paintings.
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'''September 12, 1759:''' In the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, a British force lead by General James Wolfe decisively defeats the French of Louis-Joseph Marquis de Montcalm and captures Québec City. The French forces in New France surrendered surrender a year later. Both Generals generals were killed in battle. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Death_of_General_Wolfe The Death of General Wolfe]] by Benjamin West remains one of the most famous Canadian historical paintings.

'''1885:''' Louis Riel, now arguably mentally unstable but still a hero to his people, leads another and more violent rebellion in the west. However, the Canadian Militia uses the partially built (and all but broke) transcontinental railway to get the rebels in a few days to crush the rebellion. As a result, Riel is defeated, tried and executed, which alienated the French Canadian population even while the whole affair gave Macdonald's railroad national dream to unite the nation through a ribbon of steel the final political boost needed to complete it. John A. Macdonald celebrates by getting drunk. Note that Riel is ''to this day'' thought of as a traitor by some Canadians and a hero by others. There are [[HighSchool High Schools]] in UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}} and Ottawa named after him, a [[http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/sites/rielstatue.shtml public monument of him the Manitoba Legislature building]] and a[[http://gov.mb.ca/february_holiday/index.html Manitoba provincial holiday]] in his honour (how many people executed for high treason can claim that?).
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'''1885:''' Louis Riel, now arguably mentally unstable but still a hero to his people, leads another and more violent rebellion in the west. However, the The Canadian Militia militia uses the partially built (and all but broke) transcontinental railway to get the rebels there in a few days to crush the rebellion. As a result, Riel is defeated, tried tried, and executed, which alienated the French Canadian population even while the whole affair gave Macdonald's railroad national dream to unite the nation through a ribbon of steel the final political boost needed to complete it. John A. Macdonald celebrates by getting drunk. Note that Riel is ''to this day'' thought of as a traitor by some Canadians and a hero by others. There are [[HighSchool High Schools]] in UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}} and Ottawa named after him, a [[http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/sites/rielstatue.shtml public monument of him the Manitoba Legislature building]] and a[[http://gov.mb.ca/february_holiday/index.html Manitoba provincial holiday]] in his honour (how many people executed for high treason can claim that?).
15th Jun '15 8:33:26 AM sinesofinsanity
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'''October 30, 1995:''' Québec has its second referendum to see if the province would bargain about leaving Canada. In a tense evening, the No/Non side wins with 50.58%. As it turned, as close as that vote was, it would be the last one for decades. Ironically, the Quebec premier, and the most ardent separatist leader of the day, Jacques Parizeau, inadvertently helped make that possible when he publicly embarrassed the Quebec sovereignty with a petulant SoreLoser speech in which he blamed the defeat on "Money and the ethnic vote." With that outburst, he guaranteed that minority communities would never support future independence with leaders of that kind of attitude, thus the needed "winning conditions" for a third referendum proved hopeless to achieve since then.
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'''October 30, 1995:''' Québec has its second referendum to see if the province would bargain about leaving Canada. In a tense evening, the No/Non side wins with 50.58%. As it turned, as close as that vote was, it would be the last one for decades.so far. Ironically, the Quebec premier, and the most ardent separatist leader of the day, Jacques Parizeau, inadvertently helped make that possible when he publicly embarrassed the Quebec sovereignty with a petulant SoreLoser speech in which he blamed the defeat on "Money and the ethnic vote." With that outburst, he guaranteed that minority communities would never support future independence with leaders of that kind of attitude, thus the needed "winning conditions" for a third referendum proved hopeless to achieve since then.
8th Jun '15 11:45:06 AM kchishol
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'''October 30, 1995:''' Québec has its second referendum to see if the province would bargain about leaving Canada. In a tense evening, the No/Non side wins with 50.58%.
to:
'''October 30, 1995:''' Québec has its second referendum to see if the province would bargain about leaving Canada. In a tense evening, the No/Non side wins with 50.58%. 58%. As it turned, as close as that vote was, it would be the last one for decades. Ironically, the Quebec premier, and the most ardent separatist leader of the day, Jacques Parizeau, inadvertently helped make that possible when he publicly embarrassed the Quebec sovereignty with a petulant SoreLoser speech in which he blamed the defeat on "Money and the ethnic vote." With that outburst, he guaranteed that minority communities would never support future independence with leaders of that kind of attitude, thus the needed "winning conditions" for a third referendum proved hopeless to achieve since then.
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