History UsefulNotes / BritishEnglish

23rd Aug '16 11:43:18 AM Wyldchyld
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* '''Cwm''': Valley. The Welsh use is for any valley. It's made its way into English as 'combe' (steep, narrow valleys with no waterways) and as the word 'cwm' to describe a cirque (a rounded glacial valley that the Scots call a 'corrie').
23rd Aug '16 11:36:24 AM Wyldchyld
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* '''Loshins''': Sweets ('candies' to Americans).
23rd Aug '16 11:34:50 AM Wyldchyld
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* '''Clecs''': Lies, or 'tall tales'. To carry clecs is the same as to tell tales (in the sense of making things up, not as in being a ''tell-tale''.)

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* '''Clecs''': Lies, or 'tall tales'. To carry clecs is the same as to tell tales (in the sense of making things up, not as in being a ''tell-tale''.)) and if you have a reputation for carrying clecs, you'll be called a cleckerbox!
* '''Cwat''': To crouch down or squat (used the same way as ''twti-down'' (see below).



* '''Cyff''': Poorly, not very well. "She won't be in work today -- woke up a bit cyff, she did".



* '''Kokum''': Sly, crafty, manipulative. "He's right kokum, he is. Better keep an eye on him!"



* '''Rhonc''' or '''Ronk''': Arrogant, insufferable. People who are rhonc cannot be reasoned with.



* '''Twt''': Small or tiny. Unexpectedly pervasive: even non-Welsh-born adults who have lived in Wales for only a year or two make remarks like 'Elsie's a bit twt' or 'didn't like the house, too twt for me'.

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* '''Twt''': '''Twt''' or '''Dwt''': Small or tiny. Unexpectedly pervasive: even non-Welsh-born adults who have lived in Wales for only a year or two make remarks like 'Elsie's a bit twt' or 'didn't like the house, too twt for me'. The word can also be used as 'twtty/dwtty' as in 'that's a bit dwtty for me'.
* '''Twti-down''': To crouch down or squat. Used the same way as ''cwat'' (see above).
8th Aug '16 4:50:09 AM HarfynnTeuport
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* '''''Fag''''': Slang for a cigarette. Don't be alarmed if someone says they're going outside to "suck on a fag".
** As a verb, means having a younger boy act as a servant to an older boy in a public school (one of the common jobs was lugging firewood, or faggots); considering the US meaning, this has even more potential for humorous confusion, especially since there's been some recent controversy regarding the practice for those exact reasons.

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* '''''Fag''''': Slang for a cigarette. Don't be alarmed if someone says they're going outside to "suck "[[AccidentalInnuendo suck on a fag".
fag]]" or to "[[BuryYourGays smoke a fag]]". The term stems from the word "faggot", one of its meanings being a bundle of sticks for firewood. These resembled the tied bundles of cigarettes commonly seen in tobacconists before cartons came into being. The Latin root of the word, ''fascis'', means "bundle".
** As a verb, means it refers to having a younger boy act as a servant to an older boy in a public school (one ("fagging"); one of the common jobs was lugging firewood, or faggots); considering faggots, as noted above. Considering the US meaning, this has even more potential for humorous confusion, especially since there's been some recent controversy regarding the practice for those exact reasons.
4th Aug '16 9:47:31 PM DavidDelony
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* '''''Chips''''': Used to describe what would be called "French Fries" in the US; as in "Fish and chips". "Fries" in the UK refers specifically to the thin-cut variety they sell at [=McDonald's=], although these are also referred to as chips. Do not call chips as bought from a fish and chip shop fries, this is a matter of deep importance to some and will not hesitate to correct you. See "crisps" for what Americans call "chips" (confusingly, "corn chips" or "tortilla chips" refer to the same thing as they do in the States).

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* '''''Chips''''': Used to describe what would be called "French Fries" in the US; U.S.; as in "Fish and chips". "Fries" in the UK refers specifically to the thin-cut variety they sell at [=McDonald's=], although these are also referred to as chips.chips to add to the confusion. Do not call chips as bought from a fish and chip shop fries, this is a matter of deep importance to some and will not hesitate to correct you. "Chips" refers to the thick-cut variety known as "steak fries" in the U.S. See "crisps" for what Americans call "chips" (confusingly, "corn chips" or "tortilla chips" refer to the same thing as they do in the States).
27th Jul '16 5:28:29 AM moloch
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* '''''Garda/Guards''''': The Irish police, from Garda Síochána na hÉireann.

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* '''''Garda/Guards''''': The Irish police, from Garda Síochána na hÉireann. It's one ''garda'', many ''gardaí'' ((''gardee'').
17th Jun '16 10:30:55 AM Prfnoff
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* '''Bolshy''': Adjective derived from "Bolshevik" to mean rebellious or uncooperative in a rather general sense.
17th Jun '16 1:29:15 AM erforce
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* '''''Torch''''': A flashlight, shortened from "electric torch". Can completely change how a scene is imagined by American readers, as in a scene with a child reading by torchlight under the covers; it also doubtlessly caused a bit of confusion for American gamers when ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' featured a level named "Torchlight Trouble" which contained no (burning) torches but a very prominent flashlight.

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* '''''Torch''''': A flashlight, shortened from "electric torch". Can completely change how a scene is imagined by American readers, as in a scene with a child reading by torchlight under the covers; it also doubtlessly caused a bit of confusion for American gamers when ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry1'' featured a level named "Torchlight Trouble" which contained no (burning) torches but a very prominent flashlight.
18th May '16 5:24:08 PM Exxolon
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* '''''Chap''''': Old-fashioned term for a man. Tends to be confined to the upper classes or TV adaptations of c.1920s-'50s literature. "Old chap" is a common form of address in these contexts. In ''Series/AlloAllo'', it is signified that characters are speaking "English" when they start talking this way. Expect to see "old bean" or "old boy" in the same context.

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* '''''Chap''''': Old-fashioned term for a man. Tends to be confined to the upper classes or TV adaptations of c.1920s-'50s literature. "Old chap" is a common form of address in these contexts. In ''Series/AlloAllo'', it is signified that characters are speaking "English" when they start talking this way. Expect to see "old bean" or "old boy" in the same context. Also gives it's name to "ChapHop", a British version of HipHop.
8th May '16 3:17:07 PM DavidDelony
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* '''''Prawn''''': Shrimp. Stateside, 'prawn' refers to larger shrimp served in Chinese restaurants.
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