History UsefulNotes / BritishEnglish

17th Jun '16 10:30:55 AM Prfnoff
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* '''Bolshy''': Adjective derived from "Bolshevik" to mean rebellious or uncooperative in a rather general sense.
17th Jun '16 1:29:15 AM erforce
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* '''''Torch''''': A flashlight, shortened from "electric torch". Can completely change how a scene is imagined by American readers, as in a scene with a child reading by torchlight under the covers; it also doubtlessly caused a bit of confusion for American gamers when ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' featured a level named "Torchlight Trouble" which contained no (burning) torches but a very prominent flashlight.

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* '''''Torch''''': A flashlight, shortened from "electric torch". Can completely change how a scene is imagined by American readers, as in a scene with a child reading by torchlight under the covers; it also doubtlessly caused a bit of confusion for American gamers when ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry1'' featured a level named "Torchlight Trouble" which contained no (burning) torches but a very prominent flashlight.
18th May '16 5:24:08 PM Exxolon
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* '''''Chap''''': Old-fashioned term for a man. Tends to be confined to the upper classes or TV adaptations of c.1920s-'50s literature. "Old chap" is a common form of address in these contexts. In ''Series/AlloAllo'', it is signified that characters are speaking "English" when they start talking this way. Expect to see "old bean" or "old boy" in the same context.

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* '''''Chap''''': Old-fashioned term for a man. Tends to be confined to the upper classes or TV adaptations of c.1920s-'50s literature. "Old chap" is a common form of address in these contexts. In ''Series/AlloAllo'', it is signified that characters are speaking "English" when they start talking this way. Expect to see "old bean" or "old boy" in the same context. Also gives it's name to "ChapHop", a British version of HipHop.
8th May '16 3:17:07 PM DavidDelony
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* '''''Prawn''''': Shrimp. Stateside, 'prawn' refers to larger shrimp served in Chinese restaurants.
8th May '16 4:24:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* '''''TheThinBlueLine''''': Presumably a reference to "the thin ''red'' line", an Imperial-era name for the British army. Nothing like the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thin_Blue_Line_(emblem) American Thin Blue Line]], which is the "brotherhood of the police" and often ends up being more like "police joining together to hide other officers' sketchy conduct."

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* '''''TheThinBlueLine''''': '''''The Thin Blue Line''''': Presumably a reference to "the thin ''red'' line", an Imperial-era name for the British army. Nothing like the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thin_Blue_Line_(emblem) American Thin Blue Line]], which is the "brotherhood of the police" and often ends up being more like "police joining together to hide other officers' sketchy conduct."
28th Apr '16 5:44:29 PM jnv11
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** The ''ash'' (æ) and ''ethel'' () are pronounced ''very similarly'' to an 'e', but are not the same sound. Æ and are ''not'' e, they make a different sound that generally only those who can make it can recognise. The nearest American sound to it would be an 'ee', though, so [[Series/HowIMetYourMother Ted was wrong]].

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** The ''ash'' (æ) and ''ethel'' () are pronounced ''very similarly'' to an 'e', but are not the same sound. Æ [=Æ=] and are ''not'' e, they make a different sound that generally only those who can make it can recognise. The nearest American sound to it would be an 'ee', though, so [[Series/HowIMetYourMother Ted was wrong]].
25th Apr '16 3:28:23 PM DavidDelony
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* Some words are the same in both British and American English but are pronounced differently. For example, in British English, the emphasis in the word "adult" is on the first syllable.

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* Some words are the same in both British and American English but are pronounced differently. For example, in British English, the emphasis in the word "adult" is on the first syllable. "Again" rhymes with "pain".
25th Apr '16 3:24:07 PM DavidDelony
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* Some words are the same in both British and American English but are pronounced differently. For example, in British English, the emphasis in the word "adult" is on the first syllable.
22nd Apr '16 11:09:40 PM Midna
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* '''''Brew, a''''': A cup of tea. Note that it is only used when it is given an ordinal indicator (so someone would speak of "a brew" or "some brews": they would never call their drink "my brew", unless you're Creator/PeterKay and your biscuit (see above) has fallen in it, Where I'm from, North England we always say "my brew". E.g. "Which is my brew?". "I've just spilt my brew". "My brew is too hot". "Did you put sugar in my brew"?). Can also be used to refer to a cup of coffee, or a hot drink of whatever specification; however, it ''never'' means a beer (as it does in the US and Canada). "A brew" can also mean the act of making a round of tea/coffee/other hot drinks; "I'm doing a brew, who's having what?"

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* '''''Brew, a''''': A cup of tea. Note that it is only used when it is given an ordinal indicator (so someone would speak of "a brew" or "some brews": they would never call their drink "my brew", unless you're Creator/PeterKay and your biscuit (see above) has fallen in it, Where I'm from, or you're from North England we always say "my brew". E.g. "Which is my brew?". "I've just spilt my brew". "My brew is too hot". "Did you put sugar in my brew"?).England. Can also be used to refer to a cup of coffee, or a hot drink of whatever specification; however, it ''never'' means a beer (as it does in the US and Canada). "A brew" can also mean the act of making a round of tea/coffee/other hot drinks; "I'm doing a brew, who's having what?"


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* '''''Car park''''': A parking lot. You know, because [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin it's where you park cars]].
16th Apr '16 2:17:46 PM MisterApple
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* ''Tea leaf''': Thief.

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* ''Tea '''Tea leaf''': Thief.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.BritishEnglish