History UsefulNotes / BritishEnglish

28th Mar '17 6:38:00 PM nombretomado
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* '''''Plonker''''': Someone who is oafish or foolish (e.g. "[[OnlyFoolsAndHorses Rodney, you plonker!]]"). Broadly similar to 'wanker', with the added insult of being a fool. Less offensive than wanker, however. Allegedly originated as a slang term for a particular UsefulNotes/WorldWarI artillery shell that happened to be [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything somewhat phallic in shape]], and from there came to mean a penis, a meaning that's almost entirely disappeared since.

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* '''''Plonker''''': Someone who is oafish or foolish (e.g. "[[OnlyFoolsAndHorses "[[Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses Rodney, you plonker!]]"). Broadly similar to 'wanker', with the added insult of being a fool. Less offensive than wanker, however. Allegedly originated as a slang term for a particular UsefulNotes/WorldWarI artillery shell that happened to be [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything somewhat phallic in shape]], and from there came to mean a penis, a meaning that's almost entirely disappeared since.
25th Feb '17 3:27:15 PM nombretomado
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* '''''Herb''''': is pronounced with an "h" at the start. Brits find it slightly odd/amusing when an American mentions "erbs". The same tends to apply to other words with an unpronounced "h" sound. See EddieIzzard's take on this one [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cs5H7cgcpkg here]].

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* '''''Herb''''': is pronounced with an "h" at the start. Brits find it slightly odd/amusing when an American mentions "erbs". The same tends to apply to other words with an unpronounced "h" sound. See EddieIzzard's Creator/EddieIzzard's take on this one [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cs5H7cgcpkg here]].
21st Feb '17 3:21:59 PM DavidDelony
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* '''''Chips''''': Used to describe what would be called "French Fries" in the U.S.; as in "Fish and chips". "Fries" in the UK refers specifically to the thin-cut variety they sell at [=McDonald's=], although these are also referred to as chips to add to the confusion. Do not call chips as bought from a fish and chip shop fries, this is a matter of deep importance to some and will not hesitate to correct you. "Chips" refers to the thick-cut variety known as "steak fries" in the U.S. See "crisps" for what Americans call "chips" (confusingly, "corn chips" or "tortilla chips" refer to the same thing as they do in the States).

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* '''''Chips''''': Used to describe what would be called "French Fries" in the U.S.; as in "Fish and chips". "Fries" in the UK refers specifically to the thin-cut variety they sell at [=McDonald's=], although these are also referred to as chips to add to the confusion. Do not call chips as bought from a fish and chip shop fries, this is a matter of deep importance to some and will not hesitate to correct you. "Chips" refers specifically to the thick-cut variety known as "steak fries" in the U.S. Here's where it starts to get weird: fish and chips has the same name in the US as it does in the UK, but the "chips" are usually the smaller style of fries stateside. See "crisps" for what Americans call "chips" (confusingly, "corn chips" or "tortilla chips" refer to the same thing as they do in the States).
21st Feb '17 2:54:01 PM DavidDelony
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* '''Gone off''': Food that has spoiled.

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* '''Gone '''Go off''': Food that has spoiled.Of food, to spoil.
20th Feb '17 4:58:12 PM nombretomado
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* '''''Scotland Yard''''': A term which refers to the London Metropolitan Police as a collective, as in "Last night, Scotland Yard warned the public that escaped murderer Adolf [=McMachete=] is not to be approached under any circumstances." Due to the [[BritainIsOnlyLondon "we all live in London"]] mentality of the [[BritishNewspapers British press]], it is sometimes used to refer to the UK Police Forces as a whole. It comes from the location of the old public entrance to the Met headquarters opened on Great Scotland Yard (a street in St. James's, Westminster, which was apparently so-called because the London diplomatic offices of the Kingdom of Scotland had been there before the Union). When the Metropolitan police moved to a new and deeply ugly building in Victoria, it was dubbed "New Scotland Yard". In old dramas, famous detectives will sometimes be referred to as [[SmithOfTheYard X of the Yard.]]

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* '''''Scotland Yard''''': A term which refers to the London Metropolitan Police as a collective, as in "Last night, Scotland Yard warned the public that escaped murderer Adolf [=McMachete=] is not to be approached under any circumstances." Due to the [[BritainIsOnlyLondon "we all live in London"]] mentality of the [[BritishNewspapers [[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers British press]], it is sometimes used to refer to the UK Police Forces as a whole. It comes from the location of the old public entrance to the Met headquarters opened on Great Scotland Yard (a street in St. James's, Westminster, which was apparently so-called because the London diplomatic offices of the Kingdom of Scotland had been there before the Union). When the Metropolitan police moved to a new and deeply ugly building in Victoria, it was dubbed "New Scotland Yard". In old dramas, famous detectives will sometimes be referred to as [[SmithOfTheYard X of the Yard.]]
19th Feb '17 10:02:35 AM Bisected8
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%%* '''Cack-handed'''

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%%* '''Cack-handed'''* '''Cack''': Faeces, sometimes used as a milder version of "crap" ("What a load of cack"). As a verb it can also mean the act of soiling oneself ("He just went and cacked himself!").
* '''Cack-handed''': Clumsy or done in a manner that does more harm than good (compare "ham fisted"). Also an old fashioned and mildly offensive word for [[TheSouthpaw a left handed person]] and (very rarely) by extension a derisive term for left wing political views the speaker deems harmful.



** Can also be a lower-class form of address/greeting, as in "Orright chap?"

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** Can also be a lower-class form of address/greeting, as in "Orright chap?"chap?", usually when addressing someone younger.
19th Feb '17 8:49:56 AM enitharmon
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* '''''Wog''''': Slang for "foreigner", usually used to mean people of Middle Eastern or South Asian descent (though one old British proverb, popularized by a Labour backbencher to mock imperialists, joked that "the wogs begin at [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} Calais]]"). The term is of uncertain origin; there are numerous theories, one of which claims that it originated with the construction of the Egyptian railway in the 1850s or of the Suez Canal in the 1890s depending on which version you hear, where the locals employed to work on the project were denoted as "[[FunWithAcronyms Workers/Working on Government Service]]"; but none of them are confirmed (the only thing known for certain is that "wog" dates back to Victorian times), and they're all suspect as no acronym coinage has been confirmed to date back earlier than World War 1. Widely considered to be quite derogatory and offensive, and not something you use in polite company; even as far back as TheSeventies [[Series/FawltyTowers Basil Fawlty]]'s acceptance of the term was used to depict him as a LowerClassLout.

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* '''''Wog''''': Slang for "foreigner", usually used to mean people of Middle Eastern or South Asian descent (though one old British proverb, popularized by a Labour backbencher to mock imperialists, joked that "the wogs begin at [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} Calais]]"). The term is of uncertain origin; there are numerous theories, one of which claims that it originated with the construction of the Egyptian railway in the 1850s or of the Suez Canal in the 1890s depending on which version you hear, where the locals employed to work on the project were denoted as "[[FunWithAcronyms Workers/Working on Government Service]]"; but none of them are confirmed (the only thing known for certain is that "wog" dates back to Victorian times), and they're all suspect as no acronym coinage has been confirmed to date back earlier than World War 1. Widely considered to be quite derogatory and offensive, and not something you use in polite company; even as far back as TheSeventies [[Series/FawltyTowers Basil Fawlty]]'s acceptance of the term was used to depict him as a LowerClassLout. Or, indeed, ten years earlier than that when ArchieBunker 's ultra-bigoted prototype AlfGarnett was given it several times an episode. Garnett claimed it used to be "Western Oriental Gentleman" but now it was just wog.
4th Feb '17 11:50:55 AM Prfnoff
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%%* '''Bun fight'''


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%%* '''Cack-handed'''
30th Jan '17 8:01:13 PM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

* '''''Cross with''''': Mad at. "Cross" may occasionally be used in US English, but "mad" is far more common in US English.
26th Dec '16 1:48:23 PM nombretomado
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* '''''Scuffers''''' or '''''Scuppers''''': An old Liverpool term, popularized by ''Series/ZCars'', a classic British PoliceProcedural. Starred '''BrianBlessed''' as "Fancy Smith". The second form may be connected to the verb "to be scuppered".

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* '''''Scuffers''''' or '''''Scuppers''''': An old Liverpool term, popularized by ''Series/ZCars'', a classic British PoliceProcedural. Starred '''BrianBlessed''' '''Creator/BrianBlessed''' as "Fancy Smith". The second form may be connected to the verb "to be scuppered".
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