History UsefulNotes / BritishEducationSystem

24th Dec '15 4:31:16 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


University degrees are usually three or four (if you study out) years. The first year often only counts in allowing you to do the other two or three. The completion of a degree course is usually the only time a typical Briton attends a graduation ceremony. Most schools and sixth form colleges simply don't have them. For UK students, a degree at an English university currently costs £9,000 a year; however, this is not paid for upfront by the student or his or her family; rather the government Student Loans Company pays this, and the student only begins to pay off the debt after he or she is earning over £21,000 p.a. This money is taken away beforehand like taxes and stuff, so you never really know it's gone (or that you had it in the first place). In addition, the SLC provides Living Costs loans and grants. It used to be free to study in Scotland, but the laws have changed so [[BritishRoyalFamily St. Andrew's]] isn't as popular anymore.

to:

University degrees are usually three or four (if you study out) years. The first year often only counts in allowing you to do the other two or three. The completion of a degree course is usually the only time a typical Briton attends a graduation ceremony. Most schools and sixth form colleges simply don't have them. For UK students, a degree at an English university currently costs £9,000 a year; however, this is not paid for upfront by the student or his or her family; rather the government Student Loans Company pays this, and the student only begins to pay off the debt after he or she is earning over £21,000 p.a. This money is taken away beforehand like taxes and stuff, so you never really know it's gone (or that you had it in the first place). In addition, the SLC provides Living Costs loans and grants. It used to be free to study in Scotland, but the laws have changed so [[BritishRoyalFamily [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily St. Andrew's]] isn't as popular anymore.
26th Nov '15 7:46:09 AM catriona176
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There is almost an (unwritten) tier system in place for positioning what people accept/call/claim as public schools which, linked with potential markers such as HMC headmaster, East India Club membership privileges or a tie on the wall of The Bear, can cause even more confusion and/or snobbery depending on what agenda is posessed by the person with whom you are speaking. Whilst it is (generally) accepted that Winchester, Eton, Harrow, King's Canterbury, Rugby and similar are the top tier and the older, more respected (depending on snobbery of course) Grammars are (sometimes)grudgingly allowed in the bottom one, where absolutely everyone else comes will probably entirely depend on whether you went to St Pauls, Charterhouse, Rodean, The Dragon/Malborough, Abingdon, Westminster, Ampleforth...

to:

** There is almost an (unwritten) tier system in place for positioning what people accept/call/claim as public schools which, linked with potential markers such as HMC headmaster, East India Club membership privileges or a tie on the wall of The Bear, can cause even more confusion and/or snobbery depending on what agenda is posessed possessed by the person with whom you are speaking. Whilst it is (generally) accepted that Winchester, Eton, Harrow, King's Canterbury, Rugby and similar are the top tier and the older, more respected (depending on snobbery of course) Grammars are (sometimes)grudgingly allowed in the bottom one, where absolutely everyone else comes will probably entirely depend on whether you went to St Pauls, Charterhouse, Rodean, The Dragon/Malborough, Abingdon, Westminster, Ampleforth...
26th Nov '15 7:33:06 AM catriona176
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Education is now compulsory until 18, and many pupils who pass go to a Sixth Form or a College and later University, nicknamed "Uni", or choose to do an apprenticeship. A sixth form will be part of a school, a college is usually a separate establishment - they are technically the same except you can't study apprenticeships at a [=VIth=] Form. The name "Sixth Form" derives from the fact that Years 7-11 used to be, and in some places still are, called First to Fifth Years, with 'Form' the diminutive (there are still forms, but there are now multiple in a year instead of being the equivalent). Years 12 and 13 used to be called Lower Sixth and Upper Sixth, and these terms are still used in better schools. Most students will do 4 subjects in the first year and 3 in the second, but some higher achieving students may be encouraged to take 5 then 4, and students with 7 or more A Levels are rare but not unheard of. The pre-requisite for A-levels is usually 12 points from your best 8 [=GCSEs=], which is the equivalent of 4 Bs and 4 Cs, but most places will want you to get a B or above in the subject areas you're carrying on to A Level as they're harder. The grades themselves are decided by [=UMS=] points (magic maths turns your exam marks into a random number, hopefully at least 70) so why the education system doesn't just set a [=UMS=] minimum we don't know. Some University offers, it's worth noting, are based solely on these points (which also appear at [=GCSE=] but only [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford]] care about them) so volunteer or other projects are undertaken by students in order to gain more.

to:

Education is now compulsory until 18, and many pupils who pass go to a Sixth Form or a College and later University, nicknamed "Uni", or choose to do an apprenticeship. A sixth form will be part of a school, a college is usually a separate establishment - they are technically the same except you can't study apprenticeships at a [=VIth=] Form. The name "Sixth Form" derives from the fact that Years 7-11 used to be, and in some places still are, called First to Fifth Years, with 'Form' the diminutive (there are still forms, but there are now multiple in a year instead of being the equivalent). Years 12 and 13 used to be called Lower Sixth and Upper Sixth, and these terms are still used in better certain schools. Most students will do 4 subjects in the first year and 3 in the second, but some higher achieving students may be encouraged to take 5 then 4, and students with 7 or more A Levels are rare but not unheard of. The pre-requisite for A-levels is usually 12 points from your best 8 [=GCSEs=], which is the equivalent of 4 Bs and 4 Cs, but most places will want you to get a B or above in the subject areas you're carrying on to A Level as they're harder. The grades themselves are decided by [=UMS=] points (magic maths turns your exam marks into a random number, hopefully at least 70) so why the education system doesn't just set a [=UMS=] minimum we don't know. Some University offers, it's worth noting, are based solely on these points (which also appear at [=GCSE=] but only [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford]] care about them) so volunteer or other projects are undertaken by students in order to gain more.
15th Oct '15 11:57:54 AM res20stupid
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The School Formal is a special event similar to the American Prom, having been imported from the states. Typically it's regulated to those in Upper Form and studying their A-Levels. Unlike the American proms and UK discos, it's often a more formal affair consisting of only a single dinner at a venue in some cases, or a dinner and a dance. The real party is after when the formal students leave (expect a lot of underage drinking).
14th Oct '15 10:07:20 AM Absoltheharbinger
Is there an issue? Send a Message
14th Oct '15 10:07:18 AM Absoltheharbinger
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** This is partly why Brits are so surprised by how SeriousBusiness the Americans take school sports teams. School sports teams in the UK are funded mainly by the school, but do not attract outside sponsors, and are generally considered affairs of minor note but not exactly important at the end of the day. Allso, basically the only major teams are football (soccer), rugby and in some areas cross-country running.
30th Sep '14 10:21:19 AM Berry23
Is there an issue? Send a Message


(Entertainment in this case pretty much translating to 'getting drunk in their own student apartments')

to:

(Entertainment in this case pretty much translating to 'getting drunk in their own student apartments')
a pub instead of at Frat parties')
30th Sep '14 10:19:53 AM Berry23
Is there an issue? Send a Message


More and more Universities are becoming Americanised. The Brits may claim to hate everything that {{Eagleland}} embodies, but they really do love this new trend. Like being called "colleges", having 'proper' campuses, offering Liberal Arts (whatever it is...), having American Football teams, and pretty much everything else fun. Not that British Universities aren't fun, they just are typically very academically-oriented and unaffiliated with the principles of fun.

to:

More and more Universities are becoming Americanised. The Brits may claim to hate everything that {{Eagleland}} embodies, but they really do love this new trend. Like being called "colleges", having 'proper' campuses, offering Liberal Arts (whatever it is...), having American Football teams, and pretty much everything else fun. no one is really too sure). Not that British Universities aren't fun, they just are typically very academically-oriented academically oriented and unaffiliated with the principles of fun.
students are expected to entertain themselves.
(Entertainment in this case pretty much translating to 'getting drunk in their own student apartments')
10th Jul '14 10:01:08 PM SamCurt
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For a more in-depth discussion on British Higher Education, see BritishUnis.

to:

For a more in-depth discussion on British Higher Education, see BritishUnis.
UsefulNotes/BritishUnis.
12th Jun '14 2:20:04 PM MightyMeerkat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


After two or three years in what is called Infant School, children will move up to Junior School. Often these schools will be in the same building and joined into a single Primary School. Standardised testing used to happen at the end of year 2 and year 6 but these are being phased out. They are called [=SATs=], by the way, so (Americans) if someone British tells you that their grades were all 5 in their [=SATs=] aged 10 then they're smart, but not University smart.

to:

After two or three years in what is called Infant School, School or Keystage 1, children will move up to Junior School.School, or Keystage 2. Often these schools will be in the same building and joined into a single Primary School. Standardised testing used to happen at the end of year 2 and year 6 but these are being phased out. They are called [=SATs=], by the way, so (Americans) if someone British tells you that their grades were all 5 in their [=SATs=] aged 10 then they're smart, but not University smart.
This list shows the last 10 events of 14. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.BritishEducationSystem