History UsefulNotes / BritishEducationSystem

24th Jun '17 10:46:44 AM nombretomado
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* Outward Bound (TM) trips - An entire year group goes away on a residential trip, usually 4 or 5 days, with their teachers, round about Year 6/Primary 7 to do teambuilding things - rock climbing, abseiling, archery, swimming in freezing cold lakes, illicit midnight feasts - sort of a [[XMeetsY marriage]] of Scouting and Enid Blyton, minus some of the racism (depending on where you are...). All to fuse the class(es) as a proactive unit of independent yet cooperative students ready to take on the exciting new challenges of high school as well creating a whole host of happy childhood memories... while your friends' school went Disneyland Paris to learn French[[note]]That was us. In the year when ''nobody does French''[[/note]].

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* Outward Bound (TM) trips - An entire year group goes away on a residential trip, usually 4 or 5 days, with their teachers, round about Year 6/Primary 7 to do teambuilding things - rock climbing, abseiling, archery, swimming in freezing cold lakes, illicit midnight feasts - sort of a [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY marriage]] of Scouting and Enid Blyton, minus some of the racism (depending on where you are...). All to fuse the class(es) as a proactive unit of independent yet cooperative students ready to take on the exciting new challenges of high school as well creating a whole host of happy childhood memories... while your friends' school went Disneyland Paris to learn French[[note]]That was us. In the year when ''nobody does French''[[/note]].
18th Mar '17 2:00:49 AM MrCandle
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* School discos - A staple of school stories set in the '80s and '90s. Rather than the elegantly styled prom found in American schools, a British "School Disco" is an excruciatingly embarrassing event, chaperoned by teachers and with a bad DJ (sometimes the Headmaster, if no-one else can be found) blaring cheesy pop music. The ultimate horror is to have to be picked up by one's dad, or for him to come in and make his way to the dancefloor. These days most schools have a prom (although usually a modest one by American standards), so the trope is largely redundant.

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* School discos - A staple of school stories set in the '80s and '90s. Rather than the elegantly styled prom found in American schools, a British "School Disco" is an excruciatingly embarrassing event, chaperoned by teachers and with a bad DJ (sometimes the Headmaster, if no-one else can be found) blaring cheesy pop music. The ultimate horror is to have to be [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents picked up by one's dad, or for him to come in and make his way to the dancefloor.dancefloor]]. These days most schools have a prom (although usually a modest one by American standards), so the trope is largely redundant.
25th Feb '17 9:46:32 AM Mt
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Should you fail to reach the requirements for either of your choices or choose to turn down all your offers, you may choose to go through "Clearing" - applying for any places that are left (advertised on-line or in the press). This was the subject of much contention in 2010, due to the sheer numbers of student applications made that year, and is likely to be the same in 2011. A similar system called UCAS Extra exists for students who get turned down by every single university they apply to, and allows them to find course places between February and July, before the main Clearing rush (though if your application fails that dismally, it's often a better idea to bite the bullet and start a new set of A-Levels the following September). You can retake A-Levels at the same Sixth Form/ College for free the year after you leave (18-19 year olds) but if you plan on doing them again you have to pay and generally have to go someplace else to do them. This is changing, the government don't want to pay anymore, but aren't even offering the chance to resist if the student pays except in exceptional circumstances: the same for resitting the first year of college, too. This and the harder A-Level courses are turning people further off them.

to:

Should you fail to reach the requirements for either of your choices or choose to turn down all your offers, you may choose to go through "Clearing" - applying for any places that are left (advertised on-line or in the press). This was the subject of much contention in 2010, due to the sheer numbers of student applications made that year, and is likely to be the same in 2011.year. A similar system called UCAS Extra exists for students who get turned down by every single university they apply to, and allows them to find course places between February and July, before the main Clearing rush (though if your application fails that dismally, it's often a better idea to bite the bullet and start a new set of A-Levels the following September). You can retake A-Levels at the same Sixth Form/ College for free the year after you leave (18-19 year olds) but if you plan on doing them again you have to pay and generally have to go someplace else to do them. This is changing, the government don't want to pay anymore, but aren't even offering the chance to resist if the student pays except in exceptional circumstances: the same for resitting the first year of college, too. This and the harder A-Level courses are turning people further off them.
9th Jul '16 6:56:24 AM TheKaizerreich
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* Earrings are only allowed for girls and must be one stud per ear.

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* [[DoubleStandard Earrings are only allowed for girls girls]] and must be one stud per ear.
3rd Jul '16 6:47:56 PM deadwaste
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* The Bike Sheds - where people a) smoke, b) get intimate (snogging or higher) or c) [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs do]] them[[SmokingHotSex both]] (at once).

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* The Bike Sheds - where people a) smoke, b) get intimate (snogging or higher) or c) [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs do]] them[[SmokingHotSex them [[SmokingHotSex both]] (at once).



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24th Dec '15 4:31:16 PM nombretomado
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University degrees are usually three or four (if you study out) years. The first year often only counts in allowing you to do the other two or three. The completion of a degree course is usually the only time a typical Briton attends a graduation ceremony. Most schools and sixth form colleges simply don't have them. For UK students, a degree at an English university currently costs £9,000 a year; however, this is not paid for upfront by the student or his or her family; rather the government Student Loans Company pays this, and the student only begins to pay off the debt after he or she is earning over £21,000 p.a. This money is taken away beforehand like taxes and stuff, so you never really know it's gone (or that you had it in the first place). In addition, the SLC provides Living Costs loans and grants. It used to be free to study in Scotland, but the laws have changed so [[BritishRoyalFamily St. Andrew's]] isn't as popular anymore.

to:

University degrees are usually three or four (if you study out) years. The first year often only counts in allowing you to do the other two or three. The completion of a degree course is usually the only time a typical Briton attends a graduation ceremony. Most schools and sixth form colleges simply don't have them. For UK students, a degree at an English university currently costs £9,000 a year; however, this is not paid for upfront by the student or his or her family; rather the government Student Loans Company pays this, and the student only begins to pay off the debt after he or she is earning over £21,000 p.a. This money is taken away beforehand like taxes and stuff, so you never really know it's gone (or that you had it in the first place). In addition, the SLC provides Living Costs loans and grants. It used to be free to study in Scotland, but the laws have changed so [[BritishRoyalFamily [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily St. Andrew's]] isn't as popular anymore.
26th Nov '15 7:46:09 AM catriona176
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** There is almost an (unwritten) tier system in place for positioning what people accept/call/claim as public schools which, linked with potential markers such as HMC headmaster, East India Club membership privileges or a tie on the wall of The Bear, can cause even more confusion and/or snobbery depending on what agenda is posessed by the person with whom you are speaking. Whilst it is (generally) accepted that Winchester, Eton, Harrow, King's Canterbury, Rugby and similar are the top tier and the older, more respected (depending on snobbery of course) Grammars are (sometimes)grudgingly allowed in the bottom one, where absolutely everyone else comes will probably entirely depend on whether you went to St Pauls, Charterhouse, Rodean, The Dragon/Malborough, Abingdon, Westminster, Ampleforth...

to:

** There is almost an (unwritten) tier system in place for positioning what people accept/call/claim as public schools which, linked with potential markers such as HMC headmaster, East India Club membership privileges or a tie on the wall of The Bear, can cause even more confusion and/or snobbery depending on what agenda is posessed possessed by the person with whom you are speaking. Whilst it is (generally) accepted that Winchester, Eton, Harrow, King's Canterbury, Rugby and similar are the top tier and the older, more respected (depending on snobbery of course) Grammars are (sometimes)grudgingly allowed in the bottom one, where absolutely everyone else comes will probably entirely depend on whether you went to St Pauls, Charterhouse, Rodean, The Dragon/Malborough, Abingdon, Westminster, Ampleforth...
26th Nov '15 7:33:06 AM catriona176
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Education is now compulsory until 18, and many pupils who pass go to a Sixth Form or a College and later University, nicknamed "Uni", or choose to do an apprenticeship. A sixth form will be part of a school, a college is usually a separate establishment - they are technically the same except you can't study apprenticeships at a [=VIth=] Form. The name "Sixth Form" derives from the fact that Years 7-11 used to be, and in some places still are, called First to Fifth Years, with 'Form' the diminutive (there are still forms, but there are now multiple in a year instead of being the equivalent). Years 12 and 13 used to be called Lower Sixth and Upper Sixth, and these terms are still used in better schools. Most students will do 4 subjects in the first year and 3 in the second, but some higher achieving students may be encouraged to take 5 then 4, and students with 7 or more A Levels are rare but not unheard of. The pre-requisite for A-levels is usually 12 points from your best 8 [=GCSEs=], which is the equivalent of 4 Bs and 4 Cs, but most places will want you to get a B or above in the subject areas you're carrying on to A Level as they're harder. The grades themselves are decided by [=UMS=] points (magic maths turns your exam marks into a random number, hopefully at least 70) so why the education system doesn't just set a [=UMS=] minimum we don't know. Some University offers, it's worth noting, are based solely on these points (which also appear at [=GCSE=] but only [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford]] care about them) so volunteer or other projects are undertaken by students in order to gain more.

to:

Education is now compulsory until 18, and many pupils who pass go to a Sixth Form or a College and later University, nicknamed "Uni", or choose to do an apprenticeship. A sixth form will be part of a school, a college is usually a separate establishment - they are technically the same except you can't study apprenticeships at a [=VIth=] Form. The name "Sixth Form" derives from the fact that Years 7-11 used to be, and in some places still are, called First to Fifth Years, with 'Form' the diminutive (there are still forms, but there are now multiple in a year instead of being the equivalent). Years 12 and 13 used to be called Lower Sixth and Upper Sixth, and these terms are still used in better certain schools. Most students will do 4 subjects in the first year and 3 in the second, but some higher achieving students may be encouraged to take 5 then 4, and students with 7 or more A Levels are rare but not unheard of. The pre-requisite for A-levels is usually 12 points from your best 8 [=GCSEs=], which is the equivalent of 4 Bs and 4 Cs, but most places will want you to get a B or above in the subject areas you're carrying on to A Level as they're harder. The grades themselves are decided by [=UMS=] points (magic maths turns your exam marks into a random number, hopefully at least 70) so why the education system doesn't just set a [=UMS=] minimum we don't know. Some University offers, it's worth noting, are based solely on these points (which also appear at [=GCSE=] but only [[{{Oxbridge}} Oxford]] care about them) so volunteer or other projects are undertaken by students in order to gain more.
15th Oct '15 11:57:54 AM res20stupid
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Added DiffLines:

** The School Formal is a special event similar to the American Prom, having been imported from the states. Typically it's regulated to those in Upper Form and studying their A-Levels. Unlike the American proms and UK discos, it's often a more formal affair consisting of only a single dinner at a venue in some cases, or a dinner and a dance. The real party is after when the formal students leave (expect a lot of underage drinking).
14th Oct '15 10:07:20 AM Absoltheharbinger
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