History UsefulNotes / BritishAccents

26th Jun '16 8:15:12 PM PaulA
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* Philip Glenister, DCI Gene Hunt in the original UK version of ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' and its sequel ''AshesToAshes'', speaks with what is presumably intended to be a Mancunian accent, despite originating from considerably further south. His efforts to replicate an [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents American accent]] for a subsequent ITV drama, ''{{Demons}}'', however, were less successful...

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* Philip Glenister, DCI Gene Hunt in the original UK version of ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' and its sequel ''AshesToAshes'', ''Series/AshesToAshes'', speaks with what is presumably intended to be a Mancunian accent, despite originating from considerably further south. His efforts to replicate an [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents American accent]] for a subsequent ITV drama, ''{{Demons}}'', ''Series/{{Demons}}'', however, were less successful...
21st Jun '16 4:03:48 AM gewunomox
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* Oddly enough, these assumptions can be averted outside of England if tropers of a certain age think back to all of the DuranDuran interviews they remember and recollect how Nick Rhodes and John Taylor spoke. Both of these people are born-and-bred Brummies with definite and distinct Birmingham accents, yet they drove girls (and gay men) crazy throughout the world, in part because of how they spoke. John Taylor was even one of the biggest teen idols of the '80s, with millions of teen girls plastering his posters all over their bedroom walls and hanging onto every one of the words he spoke. Nick and John -- two childhood friends making "Brummie" sound sexy around the world since 1981.

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* Oddly enough, these assumptions can be averted outside of England if tropers of a certain age think back to all of the DuranDuran Music/DuranDuran interviews they remember and recollect how Nick Rhodes and John Taylor spoke. Both of these people are born-and-bred Brummies with definite and distinct Birmingham accents, yet they drove girls (and gay men) crazy throughout the world, in part because of how they spoke. John Taylor was even one of the biggest teen idols of the '80s, with millions of teen girls plastering his posters all over their bedroom walls and hanging onto every one of the words he spoke. Nick and John -- two childhood friends making "Brummie" sound sexy around the world since 1981.
30th May '16 4:43:54 PM karstovich2
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' has its characters use appropriate accents for their location - and station. Sean Bean and the Stark clan use appropriately Grim Northern accents The Baratheons tend more Midlands. Those from the South generally use RP, or at least quasi-[=RPish=] accents suitable to the South of England (e.g.: King's Landing commoners will often speak in an Estuary accent--see Gendry and Hot Pie), with the more precise, posh and clipped the accent also serving as an indicator of status (and/or villainy). Peter Dinklage's slightly more floral and exaggerated take is character-appropriate and serves well (and all in all pretty good for a [[UsefulNotes/NewJersey Jersey boy from Morristown]]--although that accent slips in once in a while).



*** Gwen's actress Rose Leslie is actually Scottish aristocracy, and her real-life RP accent contrasts very much with the Yorkshire accent she affects as Gwen.

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*** Gwen's actress Rose Leslie Creator/RoseLeslie is actually Scottish aristocracy, and her real-life RP accent contrasts very much with the Yorkshire accent she affects as Gwen.


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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' has its characters use appropriate accents for their location - and station. Sean Bean and the Stark clan use appropriately Grim Northern accents; Wildlings have similar accents, shading towards Scottish (as demonstrated by Ygritte--incidentally also played by Rose Leslie, who again actually speaks RP despite being Scottish on account of how she's actually upper-class). The Baratheons tend more Midlands. Those from the South generally use RP, or at least quasi-[=RPish=] accents suitable to the South of England (e.g.: King's Landing commoners will often speak in an Estuary accent--see Gendry and Hot Pie), with the more precise, posh and clipped the accent also serving as an indicator of status (and/or villainy). Peter Dinklage's slightly more floral and exaggerated take is character-appropriate and serves well (and all in all pretty good for a [[UsefulNotes/NewJersey Jersey boy from Morristown]]--although that accent slips in once in a while).
30th May '16 4:40:07 PM karstovich2
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*** The most common accent is Yorkshire--the majority of downstairs actors having been recruited from the county or from nearby Lancashire--with Alfred and William's father being particularly bucolic. As noted above, Anna, Daisy, and William's actors are all actually Yorkshire born and raised.

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*** The most common accent is Yorkshire--the majority of downstairs actors having been recruited from the county or from nearby Lancashire--with Alfred and William's father Mr. Mason (William's father) being particularly bucolic. As noted above, Anna, Daisy, and William's actors are all actually Yorkshire born and raised.
28th May '16 9:02:03 AM superkeijikun
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'', Tracer, the game's resident British character, has a noticeable Cockney accent.
26th May '16 10:03:59 AM Willbyr
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* In the English dub of ''BlackButler'' all of the characters have some form of British accent, mainly beause, well it's set in Britain of course.

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* In the English dub of ''BlackButler'' ''Manga/BlackButler'' all of the characters have some form of British accent, mainly beause, well it's set in Britain of course.



* Creator/GregAyres does a fairly well-done RP accent as Negi Springfield, the child-teacher protagonist in the anime incarnations of ''MahouSenseiNegima.'' Well done it may be, he's actually doing the wrong accent because both KenAkamatsu and an early volume of the manga stated that Negi was originally from Wales.
* ''Hellsing'' has quite a few.

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* Creator/GregAyres does a fairly well-done RP accent as Negi Springfield, the child-teacher protagonist in the anime incarnations of ''MahouSenseiNegima.''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima.'' Well done it may be, he's actually doing the wrong accent because both KenAkamatsu and an early volume of the manga stated that Negi was originally from Wales.
* ''Hellsing'' ''Manga/{{Hellsing}}'' has quite a few.
24th May '16 9:58:13 PM Doug86
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* Geordies are depicted as constantly using the word [[LikeIsLikeAComma "like"]] as punctuation, like, and they only have one vowel, man. "Æ"... This is also the one part of England where the letter "R" is pronounced gutturally, as it is in standard French.

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* Geordies are depicted as constantly using the word [[LikeIsLikeAComma "like"]] as punctuation, like, and they only have one vowel, man. "Æ"..."[=Æ=]"... This is also the one part of England where the letter "R" is pronounced gutturally, as it is in standard French.
23rd May '16 3:37:53 AM lexii
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Almost never heard in fiction, the only exceptions being British made war films of the 30's, 40's, and 50's... and MontyPython.

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Almost Essentially an exaggerated form of Heightened RP, this accent is almost never heard in fiction, the only exceptions being British made war films of the 30's, 40's, and 50's... and MontyPython.
23rd May '16 3:32:41 AM lexii
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Nobles, [[SmartPeopleSpeakTheQueensEnglish geniuses]], snobs, the BattleButler, the QuintessentialBritishGentleman, the EvilBrit, and people who studied in {{Oxbridge}} or worked for the BBC. The "tapped r" sound (used in a few other British accents) is commonly but inaccurately parodied as "veddy" (for "very"). American media often makes the mistake that [[IAmVeryBritish all Brits speak RP]]. It should be noted that, in simplistic terms, there are two forms of RP in everyday use -- ''Moderate'' and ''Heightened''. Both follow the same rules of pronunciation, but Moderate is more relaxed and tends to be encountered more amongst the young, whereas Heightened is far more strangulated, plummy, and generally only encountered in older people. The Queen uses Heightened RP, whereas her grandson Harry uses Moderate, for example. It is also important to note that almost ALL middle-class people in the UK, regardless of the region they live in (from Cornwall to Scotland), speak RP -- it is an accent of social class, as opposed to region. The closest thing to an American equivalent is Midwestern (centered on the state of Iowa), which is used in American media as "standard American English".

to:

Nobles, [[SmartPeopleSpeakTheQueensEnglish geniuses]], snobs, the BattleButler, the QuintessentialBritishGentleman, the EvilBrit, and people who studied in {{Oxbridge}} or worked for the BBC. The "tapped r" sound (used in a few other British accents) is commonly but inaccurately parodied as "veddy" (for "very"). American media often makes the mistake that [[IAmVeryBritish all Brits speak RP]]. It should be noted that, in simplistic terms, there are two forms of RP in everyday use -- ''Moderate'' and ''Heightened''. Both follow the same rules of pronunciation, but Moderate is more relaxed and tends to be encountered more amongst the young, whereas Heightened is far more strangulated, plummy, and generally only encountered in older people. The Queen uses Heightened RP, whereas her grandson Harry uses Moderate, for example. It is also important to note that almost ALL middle-class upper-class people in the UK, regardless of the region they live in (from Cornwall to Scotland), speak RP -- it is an accent of social class, as opposed to region. The closest thing to an American equivalent is Midwestern (centered on the state of Iowa), which is used in American media as "standard American English".
19th May '16 12:59:06 PM mlsmithca
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* Franchise/TombRaider:
** ''VideoGame/TombRaider2013'':
*** [[TheCaptain Conrad Roth]] from has a [[OopNorth Northern accent]], and hails from Sheffield/South Yorkshire. Lara once calls him a "Northern bastard" when trying to wake him up from a DisneyDeath.
*** Lara herself has an [[UsefulNotes/HomeCounties Estuary]] accent, the native one of her actress, who comes from Berkshire.
*** [[FatherNeptune Grim]] comes from Glasgow, and has the customary accent.

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* Franchise/TombRaider:
**
''VideoGame/TombRaider2013'':
*** ** [[TheCaptain Conrad Roth]] from has a [[OopNorth Northern accent]], and hails from Sheffield/South Yorkshire. Lara once calls him a "Northern bastard" when trying to wake him up from a DisneyDeath.
*** ** Lara herself has an [[UsefulNotes/HomeCounties Estuary]] accent, the native one of her actress, who comes from Berkshire.
*** ** [[FatherNeptune Grim]] comes from Glasgow, and has the customary accent.



* In ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'''s "Lara Kroft-Macaroni-And-Cheese" Arc, the titular character character speaks in a Cockney accent. The ''Franchise/TombRaider'' character who is being spoofed speaks in RP.
* ''WebComic/TurnSignalsOnALandRaider'' has Corporal Cavendish, a on-and-off character who appears when models have to be proxied due to breakage...[[/folder]]

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* In ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'''s "Lara Kroft-Macaroni-And-Cheese" Arc, the titular character title character speaks in a Cockney accent. The ''Franchise/TombRaider'' character who is being spoofed speaks in RP.
* ''WebComic/TurnSignalsOnALandRaider'' has Corporal Cavendish, a on-and-off character who appears when models have to be proxied due to breakage...breakage...
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.BritishAccents