History UsefulNotes / BritishAccents

26th Jun '17 6:27:28 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/WithnailAndI'' has Withnail and his Uncle Monty speaking in RP accents, since they both went to {{Oxbridge}}. TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Withnail_and_I tells the tale]] of the [[NoNameGiven nameless]] protagonist and his accent:

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* ''Film/WithnailAndI'' has Withnail and his Uncle Monty speaking in RP accents, since they both went to {{Oxbridge}}. TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Withnail_and_I tells the tale]] of the [[NoNameGiven nameless]] protagonist and his accent:
6th Jun '17 4:53:45 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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This can sometimes create confusion in written communication. For instance, an English writer on an online linguistics forum described childrens' attempts to pronounce letters as sounding like "ar, ber, cer, der", which confused the North Americans on the forum. It turned out that the kids were saying "ah, buh, kuh, duh"; the English writer added an "r" to every syllable because she expected the "uh" sound to end in the letter "r". In addition, this has influenced the spelling of foreign names and words such as Park[[note]]from Korean surname ''Pak''/''Bak''[[/note]], Parcheesi[[note]]from Hindi ''pachisi''[[/note]], Burma/Myanmar[[note]]from Burmese ''Bama''/''Myanma''[[/note]] and char siu[[note]]from Cantonese ''chaa siu''[[/note]]. Scottish accents, however, ''are'' rhotic: the Proclaimers song "Throw the R Away" is a protest against Scottish people being advised to adopt English accents and the anti-Scottish prejudice that gave rise to this advice. Though, it should be noted that not ''all'' English accents are non-rhotic--the West Country accent, for instance, is famously rhotic, as were many other dialects 150 years ago--and there are some Brits who would find that offensive.

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This can sometimes create confusion in written communication. For instance, an English writer on an online linguistics forum described childrens' attempts to pronounce letters as sounding like "ar, ber, cer, der", which confused the North Americans on the forum. It turned out that the kids were saying "ah, buh, kuh, duh"; the English writer added an "r" to every syllable because she expected the "uh" sound to end in the letter "r". In addition, this has influenced the spelling of foreign names and words such as Park[[note]]from Korean surname ''Pak''/''Bak''[[/note]], Parcheesi[[note]]from Hindi ''pachisi''[[/note]], Burma/Myanmar[[note]]from Burmese ''Bama''/''Myanma''[[/note]] and char siu[[note]]from Cantonese ''chaa siu''[[/note]]. Scottish accents, however, ''are'' rhotic: the Proclaimers Music/TheProclaimers song "Throw the R Away" is a protest against Scottish people being advised to adopt English accents and the anti-Scottish prejudice that gave rise to this advice. Though, it should be noted that not ''all'' English accents are non-rhotic--the West Country accent, for instance, is famously rhotic, as were many other dialects 150 years ago--and there are some Brits who would find that offensive.



* The Proclaimers are fairly well known in Scotland for singing in a broad Scots accent, and Glasvegas (although less well known) have an even more audible, very Glaswegian accent.

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* The Proclaimers Music/TheProclaimers are fairly well known in Scotland for singing in a broad Scots accent, and Glasvegas (although less well known) have an even more audible, very Glaswegian accent.
1st Jun '17 7:18:55 AM beergood
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* Music/PJHarvey is from Dorset and has an "[[Music/NickCave accent, which I'm told is 'broad']]". It shows up to very varying degrees in her music.
27th May '17 5:17:48 PM nombretomado
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Mainly Geordie, the urban accent of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (and by extension other regions of Northumbria, but local prejudice will mean they hate you for not knowing the tiny, local variations). Ranges from "distinctive" to "nearly incomprehensible to non-Geordies", which is often played for laughs (as in the case of AlanPartridge's friend Michael). Associated with macho, beer-drinking, sexist guys, especially thanks to the comic strip Andy Capp (actually from Hartlepool), the adult comic ''{{Viz}}'' and the show ''Series/AufWiedersehenPet'' and easy young women who don't wear coats (or much else) when out clubbing even in the middle of winter. Don't call someone from Sunderland a Geordie (similarly, don't call anyone from North of the Tyne a Mackem, as the two groups have quite the rivalry between them - Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned). Another famous North-Eastern accent belongs to Marcus "Day 42 in the ''Series/BigBrother'' house" Bentley, who often exaggerates his natural accent for effect. Creator/AntAndDec are also Geordies.

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Mainly Geordie, the urban accent of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (and by extension other regions of Northumbria, but local prejudice will mean they hate you for not knowing the tiny, local variations). Ranges from "distinctive" to "nearly incomprehensible to non-Geordies", which is often played for laughs (as in the case of AlanPartridge's friend Michael). Associated with macho, beer-drinking, sexist guys, especially thanks to the comic strip Andy Capp (actually from Hartlepool), the adult comic ''{{Viz}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Viz}}'' and the show ''Series/AufWiedersehenPet'' and easy young women who don't wear coats (or much else) when out clubbing even in the middle of winter. Don't call someone from Sunderland a Geordie (similarly, don't call anyone from North of the Tyne a Mackem, as the two groups have quite the rivalry between them - Administrivia/YouHaveBeenWarned). Another famous North-Eastern accent belongs to Marcus "Day 42 in the ''Series/BigBrother'' house" Bentley, who often exaggerates his natural accent for effect. Creator/AntAndDec are also Geordies.
20th May '17 5:54:48 PM nombretomado
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* Another rather famous Liverpudlian is Anne Robinson of the BBC's consumer affairs show ''Watchdog'' and subsequently (and much more infamously) ''TheWeakestLink'', although her accent is effectively indistinguishable from RP.

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* Another rather famous Liverpudlian is Anne Robinson of the BBC's consumer affairs show ''Watchdog'' and subsequently (and much more infamously) ''TheWeakestLink'', ''Series/TheWeakestLink'', although her accent is effectively indistinguishable from RP.
20th May '17 5:44:13 PM nombretomado
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* Almost the entire cast of ''WaterlooRoad'', as the school is set near Manchester... again a variety of accents, including a few outside accents.

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* Almost the entire cast of ''WaterlooRoad'', ''Series/WaterlooRoad'', as the school is set near Manchester... again a variety of accents, including a few outside accents.
22nd Apr '17 10:22:34 PM PaulA
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* The 1993 film version of ''Film/TheSecretGarden'' features a wide range of accents, but most notable is Dickon's broad Yorkshire. (Oddly, his sister Martha sounds much closer to Received Pronunciation.)

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* The 1993 film version of ''Film/TheSecretGarden'' ''Film/{{The Secret Garden|1993}}'' features a wide range of accents, but most notable is Dickon's broad Yorkshire. (Oddly, his (His sister Martha sounds much closer to Received Pronunciation.Pronunciation -- which is consistent with the book, where it's explicitly noted that she is required to when she's at work and only slips back into broad Yorkshire in moments of high emotion.)



* Similarly Bram Stoker's ''{{Dracula}}'' contains dialogue written in phonetic approximation of a North Yorkshire accent (specifically Whitby). Much of this dialogue - written by an Irishman attempting to replicate the local turn of phrase - is especially difficult to understand when read from a modern perspective, coupled with the fact that the book is over a hundred years old and the working class Whitby dialect suggested by Stoker is effectively obsolete nowadays.

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* Similarly Bram Stoker's ''{{Dracula}}'' ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'' contains dialogue written in phonetic approximation of a North Yorkshire accent (specifically Whitby). Much of this dialogue - written by an Irishman attempting to replicate the local turn of phrase - is especially difficult to understand when read from a modern perspective, coupled with the fact that the book is over a hundred years old and the working class Whitby dialect suggested by Stoker is effectively obsolete nowadays.
20th Apr '17 9:56:45 PM ScottMarshall
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** Some of the engines are given specific regional accents to represent where their engine types originated. Since the switch to voice acting, Duck and Oliver speak with West Country accents, because their beloved Great Western Railway primarily served the West Country. Rex, Mike, and Bert have West Country accents as well, although this probably has more to do with their proximity to the Little Western as the railway they're based on is in [[OopNorth Cumbria]]. Donald and Douglas hail from Caledonia in Scotland, while Emily comes from Stirling and Duncan was built in Kilmarnock, hence their Scottish accents. And Skarloey, Rheneas, Sir Handel, and Peter Sam all speak with Welsh accents in reference to their Real Life counterparts on the Talyllyn Railway at Towyn.
20th Apr '17 9:37:38 PM ScottMarshall
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* Ever since the switch from pure narration to voice acting in ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'', Duck and Oliver have had thick West Country accents, which makes sense given where the Great Western Railway ran.
10th Apr '17 5:58:32 PM nombretomado
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-->'''SethMacFarlane:''' "Cockney British, back then, really wanted you to make sure that they knew what you were talking about."\\

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-->'''SethMacFarlane:''' -->'''Creator/SethMacFarlane:''' "Cockney British, back then, really wanted you to make sure that they knew what you were talking about."\\
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