History UsefulNotes / BritishAccents

16th Feb '17 2:35:21 PM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Real life examples:'''
* Jackie Wright, Belfast-born sidekick/ButtMonkey on TheBennyHillShow.
* Ian Paisley - "criminality" used to be one of his favourite words.

to:

'''Real life '''Real-life examples:'''
* Jackie Wright, Belfast-born sidekick/ButtMonkey on TheBennyHillShow.
''Series/TheBennyHillShow''.
* Ian Paisley - -- "criminality" used to be one of his favourite favorite words.



* For ''Disney/TheAristocats'' there are three characters with this accent. The goose sisters since they are visitors from England who are visiting Paris. Marie also has this accent mixed with a mid-altantic accent which is odd since her mother Duchess has a French accent and her brothers Toulouse and Berlioz have American accents when all the cats are supposed to be French. Marie was voiced by a young Louise English who is british. Louise would later be featured in the British show ''Series/TheBennyHillShow'' in the late 70's and 80's.

to:

* For ''Disney/TheAristocats'' there are three characters with this accent. The goose sisters since they are visitors from England who are visiting Paris. Marie also has this accent mixed with a mid-altantic accent which is odd since her mother Duchess has a French accent and her brothers Toulouse and Berlioz have American accents when all the cats are supposed to be French. Marie was voiced by a young Louise English who is british. Louise would later be featured in the British show ''Series/TheBennyHillShow'' in the late 70's '70s and 80's.'80s.
14th Feb '17 9:23:25 AM 06tele
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** The above are descriptions of middle- and upper-class Edinburgh accents. Working-class Edinburghians, as seen in films such as ''Film/{{Trainspotting}}'', have a much stronger accent than implied above: Ewen Bremner as Spud in particular has a particularly impenetrable version of it. Unlike the stereotypical Glasgow accent, which is spoken at the back of the mouth, the Edinburgh version is front of the mouth and tends to be sharper, less booming and guttural, and spat out rather than grunted.
13th Feb '17 4:32:28 AM Chabal2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Redwall}}'' is absolutely packed with FunetikAksent dialogue, mostly based on real accents. Burr aye, ee molers iz ee best known. Vermin tend to be generic pseudo-cockney/thug/[[TalkLikeAPirate piratical]], or with completely fictional accents such as Wraith's TrrrillingRrrs, though there were two in ''Salamandastron'' who spoke with a noticeable Brummie twang (especially in the audiobook) and the BigBad characters tend to use Standard English.

to:

* ''Series/{{Redwall}}'' ''Literature/{{Redwall}}''
** The series
is absolutely packed with FunetikAksent dialogue, mostly based on real accents. Burr aye, ee molers iz ee best known. Vermin tend to be generic pseudo-cockney/thug/[[TalkLikeAPirate piratical]], or with completely fictional accents such as Wraith's TrrrillingRrrs, though there were two in ''Salamandastron'' who spoke with a noticeable Brummie twang (especially in the audiobook) and the BigBad characters tend to use Standard English.


Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar'':
** Every faction has different accents, with Eldar and Space Marines using high-class accents, the Imperial Guard having lower class ones, and the Tau having East Asian-speaking English ones.
** While orks have always had Cockney accents, Kaptin Bluddflagg of Retribution adds TalkLikeAPirate and the occasional descent into Irish... [[ NinjaZombiePirateRobot and is all the more beloved for it.]]
** The Baneblade from the campaign's second mission sports a magnificent Scottish accent.
7th Jan '17 3:49:01 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This is Creator/RowanAtkinson's accent. At least for general usage. Atkinson also does a very good Geordie accent (mostly used on older [[NotTheNineOClockNews NTNON]] sketches, on account of being from County Durham.

to:

* This is Creator/RowanAtkinson's accent. At least for general usage. Atkinson also does a very good Geordie accent (mostly used on older [[NotTheNineOClockNews [[Series/NotTheNineOClockNews NTNON]] sketches, on account of being from County Durham.
31st Dec '16 6:48:55 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Lena Meyer-Landrut, the German winner of the EurovisionSongContest 2010, sings with a Cockney accent. She blames her English teacher.

to:

* Lena Meyer-Landrut, the German winner of the EurovisionSongContest Series/EurovisionSongContest 2010, sings with a Cockney accent. She blames her English teacher.
31st Dec '16 2:56:59 AM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/DoctorWho'' is an interesting case, due to the length of time it's existed and the [[TheNthDoctor number of people]] who've played the role. There are various {{fanwank}} ideas over why the Doctor's accent changes, too.
** The first six Doctors, and the eleventh, used RP pretty consistently. (Although Creator/TomBaker, especially, could slip to his native Scouse occasionally - see OohMeAccentsSlipping.)

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' is an interesting case, due to the length of time it's existed and the [[TheNthDoctor number of people]] who've played the title role. There are various {{fanwank}} ideas over why the Doctor's accent changes, too.
** The first six Doctors, and the eleventh, Eleventh, used RP pretty consistently. (Although Creator/TomBaker, especially, could slip to his native Scouse occasionally - see OohMeAccentsSlipping.)



** Paul [=McGann=] as the Eighth Doctor is an interesting case -- [=McGann=], who's from Liverpool, makes a game attempt at RP, but it [[OohMeAccentsSlipping fades in and out]]. ([=McGann=], on the DVDCommentary, chalks it up to being tired during the shoot.) In AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho, he relaxed considerably, but you can clearly tell that when he's being particularly emotional, because his accent tends to get ''more'' Scouse. [[TropesAreNotBad It doesn't sound so bad...]] at all, in fact.

to:

** Paul [=McGann=] as the Eighth Doctor is an interesting case -- [=McGann=], who's from Liverpool, makes a game attempt at RP, but it [[OohMeAccentsSlipping fades in and out]]. ([=McGann=], on the DVDCommentary, chalks it up to being tired during the shoot.) In AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho, he relaxed considerably, but you can clearly tell that when he's being particularly emotional, because his accent tends to get ''more'' Scouse. [[TropesAreNotBad It doesn't sound so bad...]] at all, in fact.



--->'''Rose:''' If you are an alien, how comes you sound like you're from the north?
--->'''The Doctor:''' Lots of planets have a north!

to:

--->'''Rose:''' If you are an alien, how comes you sound like you're from the north?
--->'''The
north?\\
'''The
Doctor:''' Lots of planets have a north!
31st Dec '16 2:52:22 AM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most of the cast of ''Film/HotFuzz'' displays the accent, being that the movie is set in a fictional West Country town. Star Creator/SimonPegg was born in Gloucester and director Edgar Wright grew up in Wells, Somerset.

to:

* ''Film/HotFuzz'':
**
Most of the cast of ''Film/HotFuzz'' displays the accent, being that the movie is set in a fictional West Country town. Star Creator/SimonPegg was born in Gloucester and director Edgar Wright grew up in Wells, Somerset.
26th Dec '16 8:28:08 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A very notable example is DCI Gene Hunt from ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' and ''AshesToAshes''.

to:

* A very notable example is DCI Gene Hunt from ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' and ''AshesToAshes''.''Series/AshesToAshes''.
14th Dec '16 12:55:27 PM dpisel01
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The phrase most likely to give away someone trying to bluff any British accent is "Bloody Hell" and, especially its more gutterspeak variant, "Bloody 'ell." This phrase may be the most flexible in British English and can be used to express a staggering array of emotions, dependant on context, syllable stress, syllable length, volume, whether teeth are gritted or not, the social class of the speaker, and so on. Everything from mild surprise to absolute outrage, from slight irritation to an overwhelming sense of awe can be expressed with these two simple words. It is often the first "swear" that children learn, each region has its own subtle variants and there really isn't an "RP" way to use it. Americans seeking to bluff their way in British English should never, ever attempt to use the dropped-H version. They will be busted in a flash (another excellent [[BluffTheImpostor shibboleth]] is "water", which packs a lot of tricky phonemic differences into a small package). And that's before the ''Australian'' variants come into play.

Speaking of which, many Americans seem to believe the Australian accent is a British accent, as demonstrated by the use of a "fake British accent" by Ross Geller in Friends which is in fact far closer to an Australian accent. As Australia and Britain are on opposite sides of the world, this is not the case, but keep in mind that many Americans ''literally cannot tell the difference''. Most people are far better at distinguishing their own accent from other accents than they are at distinguishing two accents they don't hear often, and the average American may not be exposed to a non-American accent until well into adulthood.

One of the big differences between the accents most commonly heard in England and those most common in North America is something called ''rhoticity'': in a nutshell, American and Canadian accents are ''rhotic'' (except New England and urban Black American accents; Southern American accents used to often have this trait but the modern-day Southern United States is almost completely rhotic) and British accents (except Scottish, Northern Irish and the West Country) are ''non-rhotic''.[[labelnote:More information]]See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhotic_and_non-rhotic_accents the Wikipedia article for rhotic and non-rhotic accents]] for more information on rhoticity and which regions of the United States and United Kingdom have rhotic or non-rhotic accents.[[/labelnote]] People with non-rhotic accents do not pronounce the letter "r" as a consonant when it ends a word or syllable, whereas those with rhotic accents pronounce it in almost all situations. (Instead, a syllable-final "r" is pronounced as an alteration of the vowel: thus ''bat'', ''Bart'', ''bet'', ''Bert'', etc. all have different vowels. The typical non-rhotic accent has roughly twice as many vowel phonemes as the typical rhotic accent.)

to:

The phrase most likely to give away someone trying to bluff any British accent is "Bloody Hell" and, especially its more gutterspeak variant, "Bloody 'ell." This phrase may be the most flexible in British English and can be used to express a staggering array of emotions, dependant on context, syllable stress, syllable length, volume, whether teeth are gritted or not, the social class of the speaker, and so on. Everything from mild surprise to absolute outrage, from slight irritation to an overwhelming sense of awe can be expressed with these two simple words. It is often the first "swear" that children learn, each region has its own subtle variants and there really isn't an "RP" way to use it. Americans seeking to bluff their way in British English should never, ever attempt to use the dropped-H version. They will be busted in a flash (another excellent [[BluffTheImpostor shibboleth]] is "water", which packs a lot of tricky phonemic differences into a small package). And that's before the ''Australian'' variants come into play.

Speaking of which, many Americans seem to believe the Australian accent is a British accent, as demonstrated by the use of a "fake British accent" by Ross Geller in Friends which is in fact far closer to an Australian accent. As Australia and Britain are on opposite sides of the world, this is not the case, but keep in mind that many Americans ''literally cannot tell the difference''. Most people are far better at distinguishing their own accent from other accents than they are at distinguishing two accents they don't hear often, and the average American may not be exposed to a non-American accent until well into adulthood.

adulthood (when complaining about the supposed inability to distinguish between certain accents, many Brits rather stupidly forget that America's closest point to the UK is nearly 3,000 miles of ocean away and that with this distance comes far fewer opportunities for exposure to British accents).

One of the big differences between the accents most commonly heard in England and those most common in North America is something called ''rhoticity'': in a nutshell, American and Canadian accents are ''rhotic'' (except New England England, New York, and urban Black American accents; Southern American accents used to often have this trait but the modern-day Southern United States is almost completely rhotic) and British accents (except Scottish, Northern Irish and the West Country) are ''non-rhotic''.[[labelnote:More information]]See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhotic_and_non-rhotic_accents the Wikipedia article for rhotic and non-rhotic accents]] for more information on rhoticity and which regions of the United States and United Kingdom have rhotic or non-rhotic accents.[[/labelnote]] People with non-rhotic accents do not pronounce the letter "r" as a consonant when it ends a word or syllable, whereas those with rhotic accents pronounce it in almost all situations. (Instead, a syllable-final "r" is pronounced as an alteration of the vowel: thus ''bat'', ''Bart'', ''bet'', ''Bert'', etc. all have different vowels. The typical non-rhotic accent has roughly twice as many vowel phonemes as the typical rhotic accent.)
10th Dec '16 1:47:21 AM Doryna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Despite the above mention of Jeremy Clarkson, TopGear has a better star for representing the Brummie accent: Richard Hammond actually ''is'' from Birmingham, and it becomes obvious whenever he talks.

to:

* Despite the above mention of Although Jeremy Clarkson, TopGear has Clarkson likes to mock it, ''Series/TopGear'' and ''Series/TheGrandTour'' have a better star for representing the Brummie accent: Richard Hammond actually ''is'' from Birmingham, and it becomes obvious whenever he talks.
This list shows the last 10 events of 573. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.BritishAccents