History UsefulNotes / Baseball

28th Aug '16 8:16:01 PM Mdumas43073
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* '''Vin Scully''', a TV/radio announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers for [[LongRunners more than sixty seasons]], is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball announcers ever, if not ''the'' greatest. A recipient of the Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting, he is revered in California (where he's been named state Sportscaster of the Year an unmatched 32 times), and was listed as the greatest sports announcer ever by the American Sportswriters Association. But, more importantly, he's regarded as the soul of the Dodgers, much like Chick Hearn was for basketball's Los Angeles Lakers. During the 1980s Scully was the main play-by-play announcer for NBC's baseball coverage, where his warm, friendly voice became familiar to a nationwide audience; for most of the '90s, he was the annual voice of the World Series on CBS Radio. Some of his most iconic calls include Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Sandy Koufax's perfect game in 1965, Hank Aaron's record-breaking 715th home run (against a Dodgers pitcher) in 1974, Bill Buckner's error in the 1986 World Series, and Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run off Dennis Eckersley in the 1988 World Series. Age has taken its toll, however, and since 2012 Scully only calls Dodger home games and road games against the Angels. He has announced 2016 will be his last season as a broadcaster before retirement, "God willing."

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* '''Vin Scully''', a TV/radio announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers for [[LongRunners more than sixty seasons]], is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball announcers ever, if not ''the'' greatest. A recipient of the Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting, he is revered in California (where he's been named state Sportscaster of the Year an unmatched 32 times), and was listed as the greatest sports announcer ever by the American Sportswriters Association. But, more importantly, he's regarded as the soul of the Dodgers, much like Chick Hearn was for basketball's Los Angeles Lakers. During the 1980s Scully was the main play-by-play announcer for NBC's baseball coverage, where his warm, friendly voice became familiar to a nationwide audience; for most of the '90s, he was the annual voice of the World Series on CBS Radio.audience. Some of his most iconic calls include Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Sandy Koufax's perfect game in 1965, Hank Aaron's record-breaking 715th home run (against a Dodgers pitcher) in 1974, Bill Buckner's error in the 1986 World Series, and Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run off Dennis Eckersley in the 1988 World Series. Age has taken its toll, however, and since 2012 Scully only calls Dodger home games and road games against the Angels. He has announced 2016 will be his last season as a broadcaster before retirement, "God willing."
23rd Aug '16 7:13:37 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* '''Josh Hamilton''' is a standout hitter, now once again playing for the Texas Rangers after having spent the 2013-14 seasons with the Los Angeles Angels. While he's been in the league in some form or another for a long time - he was taken by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays as the first overall pick in the 1999 draft, and reached the big leagues in 2007 after many years of struggles with drugs and alcohol - he really only started to get attention when he started playing for Texas - his dominance at the plate is cited as one of the key factors in their 2010 turnaround. In the 2008 Home Run Derby, he hit a record 28 home runs in the first round, though the amazing performance ended up working against him; by the final round, he had tired himself out slugging so many home runs that he ended up losing to Justin Morneau (as the home run totals were reset for the finals). Early (and later) in his career, he's dealt with his addiction to alcohol - because of this, when the Rangers won the division and their two playoff series in 2010, they celebrated with ginger ale instead. After the season, Hamilton would be named the American League MVP for 2010. His reputation has been tarnished, however, due to his game breaking performance in the winner of the American League West deciding game in 2012 where he notably fumbled a ball that allowed in the runs that broke the then tie between the Rangers and the Athletics. He also got off to a very bad start in his first season with the Angels and though he started hitting better at the end, his final numbers were well below what he'd done with the Rangers. Just before the 2015 season, he suffered a relapse of his addiction, which, combined with his generally subpar performance during his time in Los Angeles, eventually led the Angels to trade him back to the Rangers for virtually nothing. Hamilton began to show some flashes of returning to his previous form in the last half of 2015, but is expected to miss the entire 2016 season after knee surgery.

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* '''Josh Hamilton''' is was a standout hitter, now once again playing hitter best known for his time with the Texas Rangers after having spent the 2013-14 seasons with the Los Angeles Angels. Rangers. While he's been in the league in some form or another for a long time - he was taken by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays as the first overall pick in the 1999 draft, and reached the big leagues in 2007 after many years of struggles with drugs and alcohol - he really only started to get attention when he started playing for Texas in 2008 - his dominance at the plate is cited as one of the key factors in their 2010 turnaround. In the 2008 Home Run Derby, he hit a record 28 home runs in the first round, though the amazing performance ended up working against him; by the final round, he had tired himself out slugging so many home runs that he ended up losing to Justin Morneau (as the home run totals were reset for the finals). Early (and later) in his career, he's dealt with his addiction to alcohol - because of this, when the Rangers won the division and their two playoff series in 2010, they celebrated with ginger ale instead. After the season, Hamilton would be named the American League MVP for 2010. His reputation has been tarnished, however, due to his game breaking a clumsy performance in the winner of the 2012 American League West deciding game in 2012 Division Championship Game where he notably fumbled a ball that allowed in the runs that broke the then tie then-tie between the Rangers and the Athletics. He also After signing with the Los Angeles Angels just before 2013, he got off to a very bad start in his first season with the Angels them and though he started hitting better at the end, his final numbers were well below what he'd done with the Rangers. Just before the 2015 season, he suffered a relapse of his addiction, which, combined with his generally subpar performance during his time in Los Angeles, eventually led the Angels to trade him back to the Rangers for virtually nothing. Hamilton began to show some flashes of returning to his previous form in the last half of 2015, but is expected to miss the entire 2016 season after knee surgery.surgery; the Rangers ended up releasing him in late summer 2016, but are open to resigning him for the 2017 season.
19th Aug '16 8:03:34 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* '''Aroldis Chapman''', currently of the Chicago Cubs, is best known for his time as the Cincinnati Reds' closer. He currently holds the world record for the fastest fastball, having reached velocities as high as 106 MPH, and often throws over 100 (in fact, MLB's website had to add a special filter to their fastest pitches leaderboard due to the fact that almost all of the top 50+ have been thrown by Chapman). His high fastball velocity has made him one of the best in the game at striking people out, retiring nearly half the batters he faces that way, an insanely high number even for a relief pitcher. In 2016, MLB gave him a 30-day suspension for a domestic violence incident that occurred in October 2015 during which he, among other things, shot a wall with a handgun 8 times in anger. That didn't prevent the Yankees from acquiring him from the struggling Reds during that offseason, or the Cubs from trading for him during the 2016 season.

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* '''Aroldis Chapman''', currently of the Chicago Cubs, is best known for his time as the Cincinnati Reds' closer. He currently holds the world record for the fastest fastball, having reached velocities as high as 106 MPH, and often throws over 100 (in fact, MLB's website had to add a special filter to their fastest pitches leaderboard due to the fact that almost all of the top 50+ have been thrown by Chapman). His high fastball velocity has made him one of the best in the game at striking people out, retiring nearly half the batters he faces that way, an insanely high number even for a relief pitcher. In early 2016, MLB gave him a 30-day suspension for a domestic violence incident that occurred in October 2015 during which he, among other things, shot a wall with a handgun 8 times in anger. That didn't prevent the Yankees from acquiring him from the struggling Reds during that the 2015-2016 offseason, or the Cubs from trading for him during the 2016 season.
18th Aug '16 11:06:59 PM KYCubbie
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Other than the earlier elaborated leagues in North America, professional leagues (or professional ''level'' in the case of Communist Cuba) exist in (in rough order of level of play- although not necessarily of the baseball playing abilities of that country): Japan, Cuba, Korea, Mexico,[[note]]Where the local Mexican League is officially a AAA-level Minor League in the North American system[[/note]] the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, the Netherlands, Italy and China. Australia has had professional baseball on-and-off since the 80's, but has not had a stable league since 2002—three years after the country's one MLB player ''bought'' the entire league. A new league, the Australian Baseball League, was established for the Southern Hemisphere summer of 2010–11; it looks certain to remain in operation for at least the immediate future, seeing that MLB owns a majority stake in the league. Colombia, Nicaragua, the Philippines and several other European countries have semi-professional leagues, although little information is available on them.

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Other than the earlier elaborated leagues in North America, professional leagues (or professional ''level'' in the case of Communist Cuba) exist in (in rough order of level of play- although not necessarily of the baseball playing abilities of that country): Japan, Cuba, Korea, Mexico,[[note]]Where the local Mexican League is officially a AAA-level Minor League in the North American system[[/note]] the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, the Netherlands, Italy and China. China.

Australia has had professional baseball on-and-off since the 80's, but has not had after 2002 went about a decade without a stable league. (The demise of that league since 2002—three came three years after the country's one MLB player ''bought'' the entire league. league.) A new league, the Australian Baseball League, was established for the Southern Hemisphere summer of 2010–11; it 2010–11. It now looks certain to be a stable fixture in the Aussie sporting landscape, though not at the profile of, say, Aussie rules, cricket, rugby, or soccer. Soon after the league was formed, MLB purchased a majority stake, with Baseball Australia (the national federation) owning the remainder. MLB sold out to BA in 2016, but will remain in operation an advisory role for at least the immediate future, seeing that MLB owns a majority stake future. The sport has experienced explosive growth at the youth level in the league. 21st century—the country had no Little League-affiliated youth leagues before 2007, but by 2012 close to 400 were operating, and the country has had its own berth in the Little League World Series since 2013.

Colombia, Nicaragua, the Philippines and several other European countries have semi-professional leagues, although little information is available on them.
18th Aug '16 10:56:18 PM KYCubbie
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* '''Aroldis Chapman''', currently of the New York Yankees, is best known for his time as the Cincinnati Reds' closer. He currently holds the world record for the fastest fastball, having reached velocities as high as 106 MPH, and often throws over 100 (in fact, MLB's website had to add a special filter to their fastest pitches leaderboard due to the fact that the top 50+ have all been thrown by Chapman). His high fastball velocity has made him one of the best in the game at striking people out, retiring nearly half the batters he faces that way, an insanely high number even for a relief pitcher. In 2016, MLB gave him a 30-day suspension for a domestic violence incident that occurred in October 2015 during which he, among other things, shot a wall with a handgun 8 times in anger (though that didn't prevent the Yankees from acquiring him from the struggling Reds).

to:

* '''Aroldis Chapman''', currently of the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, is best known for his time as the Cincinnati Reds' closer. He currently holds the world record for the fastest fastball, having reached velocities as high as 106 MPH, and often throws over 100 (in fact, MLB's website had to add a special filter to their fastest pitches leaderboard due to the fact that almost all of the top 50+ have all been thrown by Chapman). His high fastball velocity has made him one of the best in the game at striking people out, retiring nearly half the batters he faces that way, an insanely high number even for a relief pitcher. In 2016, MLB gave him a 30-day suspension for a domestic violence incident that occurred in October 2015 during which he, among other things, shot a wall with a handgun 8 times in anger (though that anger. That didn't prevent the Yankees from acquiring him from the struggling Reds).Reds during that offseason, or the Cubs from trading for him during the 2016 season.
18th Aug '16 11:19:50 AM KYCubbie
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* '''Prince Fielder''' is currently the Texas Rangers' designated hitter. He started out as a first baseman for the Milwaukee Brewers, then signed a massive contract with the Detroit Tigers in 2012 and played there for two years before being traded to the Rangers in the 2013–14 offseason. Fielder is famous for hitting lots of home runs, usually topping 40 and reaching 50 in 2007, when he was still with the Milwaukee Brewers. Unusually for power hitters, he also usually hits for decent batting averages and walks more often than he strikes out. He's also famous for being one of the fattest players in the game; in the book ''{{Film/Moneyball}}'', he's described as being "too fat even for the A's," a very rare thing at the time; he very briefly flirted with vegetarianism in his pro career in an attempt to lose weight. As he's not a very {{Acrofatic}} player, he's a slow runner and a bad defender, even at first base, which makes his last name somewhat of a misnomer. (A name, which, incidentally, he inherited from his father Cecil Fielder, who was a well-known slugger in his own right.) A neck injury caused him to miss most of the 2014 season, and injury concerns and his defensive shortcomings led the Rangers to mostly move him off first base and make him their full-time DH when he returned in 2015. He bounced back from the injury well, hitting much like his old self and winning the AL Comeback Player of the Year Award.

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* '''Prince Fielder''' is currently was the Texas Rangers' designated hitter.hitter until being forced to "retire" (explanation for the quote marks below) during the 2016 season due to recurring neck injuries. He started out as a first baseman for the Milwaukee Brewers, then signed a massive contract with the Detroit Tigers in 2012 and played there for two years before being traded to the Rangers in the 2013–14 offseason. Fielder is was famous for hitting lots of home runs, usually topping 40 and reaching 50 in 2007, when he was still with the Milwaukee Brewers. Unusually for power hitters, he also usually hits hit for decent batting averages and walks walked more often than he strikes struck out. He's He was also famous for being one of the fattest players in the game; in the book ''{{Film/Moneyball}}'', he's described as being "too fat even for the A's," a very rare thing at the time; he very briefly flirted with vegetarianism in his pro career in an attempt to lose weight. As he's not he wasn't a very {{Acrofatic}} player, he's he was a slow runner and a bad defender, even at first base, which makes his last name somewhat of a misnomer. (A name, which, incidentally, he inherited from his father Cecil Fielder, who was a well-known slugger in his own right.) A neck injury caused him to miss most of the 2014 season, and injury concerns and his defensive shortcomings led the Rangers to mostly move him off first base and make him their full-time DH when he returned in 2015. He bounced back from the injury well, hitting much like his old self and winning the AL Comeback Player of the Year Award. Sadly, his neck problems returned in 2016, forcing him to undergo a more serious operation. When he was told by team doctors he wouldn't be cleared to play again, he called time on his MLB career. (He didn't formally retire because if he did so, [[MoneyDearBoy he'd give up the $100 million left on his contract]]; since he's unable to play for medical reasons, he will continue to be paid.) Prince ended up with the same career home run total as his father: 319.
17th Aug '16 10:05:12 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* '''Alex Rodriguez''' of the NY Yankees was baseball's highest paid player from 2001, when he signed a 10-year, $250 million contract with the Texas Rangers, to 2014, when his salary was exceeded thanks to larger contracts given to Clayton Kershaw and Miguel Cabrera. A shortstop in the first half of his career with the Mariners and Rangers, he moved to third base upon being traded to the Yankees in 2004, as the Yankees already had Derek Jeter at shortstop. His status as one of the game's all-time greats has never been in any doubt; he was a prime MVP candidate every year from his age-21 season in 1996 to about 2010 (he won the award three times, and arguably should have won more), when age and injuries started to rob him of some of his skill. His large contract combined with the fact that he used performance-enhancing drugs several times throughout his career make him one of baseball's most passionately disliked figures. His most passionate haters are mostly fans of the Red Sox (because he's a Yankee, because a trade that might have brought him to Boston instead of New York in 2003 failed, and for some in-game incidents, most notably slapping the ball out of Red Sox pitcher Bronson Arroyo's glove in the 2004 ALCS) or the Mariners (because he started in Seattle, then left after the 2000 season and signed the aforementioned massive contract). But even some Yankees fans hate him, for nebulous reasons ranging from "he's cold and distant" to "he hasn't played in a World Series" (not true after 2009) to "he doesn't deliver big hits when you need them" (an assertion not backed up by statistics), to opting out of his contract during the last game of the 2007 World Series (the Yankees weren't playing in it, having been eliminated in the first round of the postseason, but the timing still attracted lots of criticism) to sign a slightly bigger 10-year contract with the Yankees shortly after, to his recent decline in production, among others. Known by his nickname "A-Rod", but prior to 2009 his lack of postseason performance led to detractors (including within the Yankees locker room) to call him "A-Fraud", and his admission in 2009 to having used steroids earlier in his career while playing for the Rangers inevitably led to him being called "A-Roid". Injuries have slowed his production tremendously in the last couple of years, leading many to consider his days of being an elite player to be over. He was banned for the 2014 season due to allegedly obtaining (and using) large amounts of [=PEDs=] from Biogenesis, a now-closed South Florida "anti-aging clinic". That said, he had a bit of a resurgence after coming back in 2015, joining the 3,000-hit club and passing Willie Mays to go into fourth on the career home run list along the way.

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* '''Alex Rodriguez''' Rodriguez''', formerly of the NY Yankees Yankees, was baseball's highest paid player from 2001, when he signed a 10-year, $250 million contract with the Texas Rangers, to 2014, when his salary was exceeded thanks to larger contracts given to Clayton Kershaw and Miguel Cabrera. A shortstop in the first half of his career with the Mariners and Rangers, he moved to third base upon being traded to the Yankees in 2004, as the Yankees already had Derek Jeter at shortstop. His status as one of the game's all-time greats has never been in any doubt; he was a prime MVP candidate every year from his age-21 season in 1996 to about 2010 (he won the award three times, and arguably should have won more), when age and injuries started to rob him of some of his skill. His large contract combined with the fact that he used performance-enhancing drugs several times throughout his career make him one of baseball's most passionately disliked figures. His most passionate haters are mostly fans of the Red Sox (because he's a Yankee, because a trade that might have brought him to Boston instead of New York in 2003 failed, and for some in-game incidents, most notably slapping the ball out of Red Sox pitcher Bronson Arroyo's glove in the 2004 ALCS) or the Mariners (because he started in Seattle, then left after the 2000 season and signed the aforementioned massive contract). But even some Yankees fans hate him, for nebulous reasons ranging from "he's cold and distant" to "he hasn't played in a World Series" (not true after 2009) to "he doesn't deliver big hits when you need them" (an assertion not backed up by statistics), to opting out of his contract during the last game of the 2007 World Series (the Yankees weren't playing in it, having been eliminated in the first round of the postseason, but the timing still attracted lots of criticism) to sign a slightly bigger 10-year contract with the Yankees shortly after, to his recent decline in production, among others. Known by his nickname "A-Rod", but prior to 2009 his lack of postseason performance led to detractors (including within the Yankees locker room) to call him "A-Fraud", and his admission in 2009 to having used steroids earlier in his career while playing for the Rangers inevitably led to him being called "A-Roid". Injuries have slowed his production tremendously in the last couple of years, leading many to consider his days of being an elite player to be over. He was banned for the 2014 season due to allegedly obtaining (and using) large amounts of [=PEDs=] from Biogenesis, a now-closed South Florida "anti-aging clinic". That said, While he had a bit of a resurgence after coming back in 2015, joining the 3,000-hit club and passing Willie Mays to go into fourth on the career home run list along the way. way, he struggled to produce the next season and seems to made the decision to end his playing career, playing his last game as a Yankee in the middle of the 2016 season (with one year on his contract left to go).



* '''Ichiro Suzuki''', an outfielder who currently plays for the Miami Marlins, is the first Japanese position player to have a protracted, successful career in the American majors. After many years of being one of the NPB's biggest stars, including 3 MVP awards, he came to America in 2001, signing a contract with the Seattle Mariners. He immediately became one of Major League Baseball's best players, hitting .350 and stealing 56 bases that year, helping the Mariners win a record-tying 116 regular-season games, and winning both the AL Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. He continued to play at an elite level for the next decade, with a record 10 straight seasons with at least 200 hits from 2001 to 2010. In 2004, his best season, he collected 262 hits, breaking the major league record for hits in a single season. He is well-known for his unusual hitting style- rather than try to always hit the ball as hard as he can, Ichiro prefers to "slap" the ball into gaps, trying mainly to hit balls wherever no fielder is standing. Despite not appearing in the majors until he was 27, he is very close to 3,000 MLB hits, despite him no longer being a regular starter due to age-related decline. If you combine the 1200+ hits that he got in Japan with his MLB totals, he has more hits than Pete Rose, leading to an intense debate over whether Ichiro should be considered baseball's hit king instead of Rose. Ichiro is considered a lock for the Hall of Fame once he becomes eligible. He is also an apparent victim of MemeticMutation.

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* '''Ichiro Suzuki''', an outfielder who currently plays for the Miami Marlins, is the first Japanese position player to have a protracted, successful career in the American majors. After many years of being one of the NPB's biggest stars, including 3 MVP awards, he came to America in 2001, signing a contract with the Seattle Mariners. He immediately became one of Major League Baseball's best players, hitting .350 and stealing 56 bases that year, helping the Mariners win a record-tying 116 regular-season games, and winning both the AL Rookie of the Year and MVP Awards. He continued to play at an elite level for the next decade, with a record 10 straight seasons with at least 200 hits from 2001 to 2010. In 2004, his best season, he collected 262 hits, breaking the major league record for hits in a single season. He is well-known for his unusual hitting style- rather than try to always hit the ball as hard as he can, Ichiro prefers to "slap" the ball into gaps, trying mainly to hit balls wherever no fielder is standing. Despite not appearing in the majors until he was 27, he is very close to reached 3,000 MLB hits, despite him hits in 2016, even though by then he was no longer being a regular starter due to age-related decline. If you combine the 1200+ hits that he got in Japan with his MLB totals, he has more hits than Pete Rose, leading to an intense debate over whether Ichiro should be considered baseball's hit king instead of Rose. Ichiro is considered a lock for the Hall of Fame once he becomes eligible. He is also an apparent victim of MemeticMutation.
30th Jul '16 4:31:07 PM Mdumas43073
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* '''Vin Scully''', a TV/radio announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers for [[LongRunners more than sixty seasons]], is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball announcers ever, if not ''the'' greatest. A recipient of the Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting, he is revered in California (where he's been named state Sportscaster of the Year an unmatched 32 times), and was listed as the greatest sports announcer ever by the American Sportswriters Association. But, more importantly, he's regarded as the soul of the Dodgers, much like Chick Hearn was for basketball's Los Angeles Lakers. During the 1980s, he was the main play-by-play announcer for NBC's baseball coverage, where his warm, friendly voice became familiar to a nationwide audience. Some of his most iconic calls include Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Sandy Koufax's perfect game in 1965, Hank Aaron's record-breaking 715th home run (against a Dodgers pitcher) in 1974, Bill Buckner's error in the 1986 World Series, and Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run off Dennis Eckersley in the 1988 World Series. Age has taken its toll, however, and since 2012 Scully only calls Dodger home games and road games against the Angels. He has announced 2016 will be his last season as a broadcaster before retirement, "God willing."

to:

* '''Vin Scully''', a TV/radio announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers for [[LongRunners more than sixty seasons]], is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball announcers ever, if not ''the'' greatest. A recipient of the Baseball Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting, he is revered in California (where he's been named state Sportscaster of the Year an unmatched 32 times), and was listed as the greatest sports announcer ever by the American Sportswriters Association. But, more importantly, he's regarded as the soul of the Dodgers, much like Chick Hearn was for basketball's Los Angeles Lakers. During the 1980s, he 1980s Scully was the main play-by-play announcer for NBC's baseball coverage, where his warm, friendly voice became familiar to a nationwide audience.audience; for most of the '90s, he was the annual voice of the World Series on CBS Radio. Some of his most iconic calls include Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Sandy Koufax's perfect game in 1965, Hank Aaron's record-breaking 715th home run (against a Dodgers pitcher) in 1974, Bill Buckner's error in the 1986 World Series, and Kirk Gibson's game-winning home run off Dennis Eckersley in the 1988 World Series. Age has taken its toll, however, and since 2012 Scully only calls Dodger home games and road games against the Angels. He has announced 2016 will be his last season as a broadcaster before retirement, "God willing."
30th Jul '16 4:26:47 PM Mdumas43073
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** Then there is the rarely seen "play-in" or tiebreaker game, sometimes known as a one-game playoff (emphasis singular). This is a 163rd game following the 162-game season, and is only played when two or more teams have identical records at the end of the season and a postseason berth is on the line. It is considered a regular season game, and all statistics accumulated during play count in the regular season numbers. The most recent of these games to occur was in 2013, when the Tampa Bay Rays and Texas Rangers faced off for a wild-card spot in the AL. Prior to 2012, no playoff was held if both teams qualified for the postseason anyway (that is, if the loser would still be in line for the wild card); the team with the better record in head-to-head competition was considered the division champion while the other was relegated to the wild card. When the postseason expanded in 2012, Major League Baseball decreed that going forward, all ties for a division lead would be settled with a one-game playoff (settling ties between two division-winning teams from different divisions or two wild card teams with a tie-breaker game would be rather silly- it wouldn't have much of an effect on which teams reached the division series) even if both teams would make the playoffs anyway, with the winner getting the division title and the loser getting a wild card. This was presumably done in the interest of fairness since the wild card team now had to face a one-game sudden death situation instead of automatically gaining a berth in the Division Series anyway.
* In mid-February, about six weeks prior to tge start of the season, teams will gather for Spring Training to prepare for the upcoming season by getting back into game shape, practicing with their teammates, and playing exhibition games (games that don't count in the league regular season standings) against other teams training nearby. Due to a combination of tradition and practicality, half the teams (mostly from the eastern half of the country) hold spring training at small ballparks in Florida, nicknamed the Grapefruit League, while the other half train in Arizona, known as the Cactus League. Teams play exhibitions against their respective teams regardless of regular season league alignments, which is much less notable than it was before the introduction of regular season interleague games. The time is used to evaluate and settle on a regular season roster, and decide who has to start the season in the minor leagues. Also notable is that pitchers and catchers will report a few days before other players (as the difficulty of pitching means they need the time to get into shape), leading to (particularly passionate) fans talking about the number of days till pitchers and catchers report as a way to deal with a long slog of winter.

to:

** Then there is the rarely seen "play-in" or tiebreaker game, sometimes known as a one-game playoff (emphasis singular). This is a 163rd game following the 162-game regular season, and is only played when two or more teams have identical records at the end of the season and a postseason berth is on the line. It is considered a regular season game, and all statistics accumulated during play count in the regular season numbers. The most recent of these games to occur was in 2013, when the Tampa Bay Rays and Texas Rangers faced off for a wild-card spot in the AL. Prior to 2012, no playoff was held if both teams qualified for the postseason anyway (that is, if the loser would still be in line for the wild card); the team with the better record in head-to-head competition was considered the division champion while the other was relegated to the wild card. When the postseason expanded in 2012, Major League Baseball decreed that going forward, all ties for a division lead would be settled with a one-game playoff (settling ties between two division-winning teams from different divisions or two wild card teams with a tie-breaker game would be rather silly- silly -- it wouldn't have much of an effect on which teams reached the division series) even if both teams would make the playoffs anyway, with the winner getting the division title and the loser getting a wild card. This was presumably done in the interest of fairness since the wild card team now had to face a one-game sudden death situation instead of automatically gaining a berth in the Division Series anyway.
* In mid-February, about six weeks prior to tge the start of the season, teams will gather for Spring Training to prepare for the upcoming season by getting back into game shape, practicing with their teammates, and playing exhibition games (games that don't count in the league regular season standings) against other teams training nearby. Due to a combination of tradition and practicality, half the teams (mostly from the eastern half of the country) hold spring training at small ballparks in Florida, nicknamed the Grapefruit League, while the other half train in Arizona, known as the Cactus League. Teams play exhibitions against their respective teams regardless of regular season league alignments, which is much less notable than it was before the introduction of regular season interleague games. The time is used to evaluate and settle on a regular season roster, and decide who has to start the season in the minor leagues. Also notable is that pitchers and catchers will report a few days before other players (as the difficulty of pitching means they need the time to get into shape), leading to (particularly passionate) fans talking about the number of days till pitchers and catchers report as a way to deal with a long slog of winter.
29th Jul '16 6:00:42 PM Specialist290
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The outfield is roughly divided into thirds, as well, with the divisions being called "left field", "center field", and "right field". Much like [[UsefulNotes/CricketRules cricket]] positions, the precise lines between these are somewhat fuzzy; unlike cricket positions, all three are always manned.[[note]]Well, ''almost'' always. Managers have been known, on occasion, to bring one of their outfielders in to play a "fifth infielder" position," but this is only done in exceptional circumstances.[[/note]]

to:

The outfield is roughly divided into thirds, as well, with the divisions being called "left field", "center field", and "right field". Much like [[UsefulNotes/CricketRules cricket]] positions, the precise lines between these are somewhat fuzzy; unlike cricket positions, all three are always manned.[[note]]Well, ''almost'' always. Managers have been known, on occasion, to bring one of their outfielders in to play a "fifth infielder" position," but this is only done in exceptional circumstances. It's generally more common in amateur games than professional ones.[[/note]]
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