History UsefulNotes / Baseball

23rd May '17 9:23:15 PM Mdumas43073
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* '''Mel Allen''' was another well-known broadcaster, who served as the voice of the New York Yankees from 1939 to 1964, a period that coincided with what was arguably the team's golden age: during Allen's years behind the mike, the Yankees won 19 American League pennants and 13 World Series championships, and fielded such legendary players as Joe [=DiMaggio=], Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto. Allen also called numerous World Series and All-Star Games on radio and television, and served as a narrator for Fox Movietone newsreels, making him (and his catchphrase, "How about that!") well-known to sports fans throughout the country. He was unceremoniously fired from the Yankees in 1964, but re-emerged in the late '70s as host and narrator of the syndicated highlights series ''This Week in Baseball'', a role he held until his death in 1996. Allen was -- along with his Brooklyn rival, frequent World Series partner, and eventual Yankee colleague Red Barber -- the first to receive the Ford C. Frick Award for baseball broadcasting from Hall of Fame in 1978.

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* '''Mel Allen''' was another well-known broadcaster, who served as the voice of the New York Yankees from 1939 to 1964, a period that coincided with what was arguably the team's golden age: during Allen's years behind the mike, the Yankees won 19 American League pennants and 13 World Series championships, and fielded such legendary players as Joe [=DiMaggio=], Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto.Rizzuto (who himself became a popular and long-tenured broadcaster for the team after retiring as a player). Allen also called numerous World Series and All-Star Games on radio and television, and served as a narrator for Fox Movietone newsreels, making him (and his catchphrase, "How about that!") well-known to sports fans throughout the country. He was unceremoniously fired from the Yankees in 1964, but re-emerged in the late '70s as host and narrator of the syndicated highlights series ''This Week in Baseball'', a role he held until his death in 1996. Allen was -- along was--along with his Brooklyn rival, frequent World Series partner, and eventual Yankee colleague Red Barber -- the Barber--the first to receive the Ford C. Frick Award for baseball broadcasting from Hall of Fame in 1978.
23rd May '17 9:04:08 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/TyCobb_2253.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:320:Ty Cobb, batting for the Detroit Tigers in 1908]]

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[[quoteright:320:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/TyCobb_2253.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:320:Ty
org/pmwiki/pub/images/tycobb1908.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Ty
Cobb, batting for the Detroit Tigers in 1908]]
23rd May '17 9:01:53 PM Mdumas43073
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* Among gay men, the one on top during sexual intercourse is said to be the "pitcher" and the one on the bottom is said to be the "catcher".

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* Among gay men, the one on top during sexual intercourse is said to be the "pitcher" and the one on the bottom is said to be the "catcher".
23rd May '17 9:00:55 PM Mdumas43073
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23rd May '17 9:00:17 PM Mdumas43073
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* Among gay men, the one on top is said to be the "pitcher" and the one on the bottom is said to be the "catcher".

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* Among gay men, the one on top during sexual intercourse is said to be the "pitcher" and the one on the bottom is said to be the "catcher".
11th May '17 7:27:42 PM karstovich2
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* '''Creator/BabeRuth'''[[note]]"Babe" was a nickname, because of the baby fat he carried in his face. His real name was George Herman Ruth, Jr.[[/note]] was, for many years, recognized as the greatest player ever, and probably the most influential player ever. If you've only heard of one ballplayer, it's probably him. He was originally a pitcher, and awesome, but changed position when management determined he was even more awesome as an everyday position player--and absolutely ''glorious'' as a hitter. He basically invented the modern concept of power hitting, and was more or less the prototypical "fat power hitter" of the kind that populates today's outfields and first bases. He hit lots of home runs at a time when everybody else hit hardly any, which prompted baseball leaders to change the ball and thus lower the DifficultyLevels of hitting, leading largely to today's game. Was sold to the NY Yankees by the Boston Red Sox, which supposedly cursed the Sox to not win a World Series ever again (or at least until 2004). His records have since mostly been broken (but as any hardcore fan will point out, while Ruth's records have been broken by a collection of men, you must remember that they were all set by ''one''). A great BoisterousBruiser, he loved eating,[[note]]He was famous for eating a dozen hot dogs at a single sitting[[/note]] drinking,[[note]]Early in his career, he had a whiskey and ginger ale at ''breakfast''--and this was ''during'' Prohibition[[/note]] womanizing,[[note]]He had several mistresses, girlfriends, and flings, not to mention being a much-liked customer at whorehouses across the country[[/note]] and general carousing, and he is subject of numerous tall tales about his sex and alcohol-related experiences; he was nevertheless noted for being a fundamentally decent, fun-loving guy who was [[FriendToAllChildren good with kids]]. Was rumored to be partially black, which back in his day was a pretty big deal. He was once given a rather enormous contract which let him earn more than the President, in an era when people didn't think that was a good thing. His response: "[[BadAssBoast I had a]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny better year than he did]]." [[note]]The President at the time was UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover and the year was 1929, so Ruth's statement was probably accurate.[[/note]]

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* '''Creator/BabeRuth'''[[note]]"Babe" was a nickname, because of the baby fat he carried in his face. His real name was George Herman Ruth, Jr.[[/note]] was, for many years, recognized as the greatest player ever, and probably the most influential player ever. If you've only heard of one ballplayer, it's probably him. He was originally a pitcher, and awesome, but changed position when management determined he was even more awesome as an everyday position player--and absolutely ''glorious'' as a hitter. He basically invented the modern concept of power hitting, and was more or less the prototypical "fat power hitter" of the kind that populates today's outfields and first bases.bases (he was even left-handed). He hit lots of home runs at a time when everybody else hit hardly any, which prompted baseball leaders to change the ball and thus lower the DifficultyLevels of hitting, leading largely to today's game. Was sold to the NY Yankees by the Boston Red Sox, which supposedly cursed the Sox to not win a World Series ever again (or at least until 2004). His records have since mostly been broken (but as any hardcore fan will point out, while Ruth's records have been broken by a collection of men, you must remember that they were all set by ''one''). A great BoisterousBruiser, he loved eating,[[note]]He was famous for eating a dozen hot dogs at a single sitting[[/note]] drinking,[[note]]Early in his career, he had a whiskey and ginger ale at ''breakfast''--and this was ''during'' Prohibition[[/note]] womanizing,[[note]]He had several mistresses, girlfriends, and flings, not to mention being a much-liked customer at whorehouses across the country[[/note]] and general carousing, and he is subject of numerous tall tales about his sex and alcohol-related experiences; he was nevertheless noted for being a fundamentally decent, fun-loving guy who was [[FriendToAllChildren good with kids]]. Was rumored to be partially black, which back in his day was a pretty big deal. He was once given a rather enormous contract which let him earn more than the President, in an era when people didn't think that was a good thing. His response: "[[BadAssBoast I had a]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny better year than he did]]." [[note]]The President at the time was UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover and the year was 1929, so Ruth's statement was probably accurate.[[/note]]
10th May '17 8:55:42 PM karstovich2
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You will notice that this increasing standardization came in the 1850s. You might also recall that UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar began in 1861. You might think these two had something to do with each other. If so, you would be right. New York, being the largest city in the country, provided a large number of soldiers to the Union Army, and New Yorkers had the opportunity to spread their baseball rules across the Army in the long stretches of encamped boredom the troops experienced. They even managed to spread the game to the South, as many New York units were assigned to guard Confederate prisoners--and war or no war, they taught their prisoners their favorite game. Thus New York baseball became America's baseball.

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You will notice that this increasing standardization came these nearly-modern rules coalesced in the 1850s. You might also recall that UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar began in 1861. You might think these two had something to do with each other. If so, you would be right. New York, being the largest city in the country, provided a large number of soldiers to the Union Army, and New Yorkers had the opportunity to spread their baseball rules across the Army in the long stretches of encamped boredom the troops experienced. They even managed to spread the game to the South, as many New York units were assigned to guard Confederate prisoners--and war or no war, they taught their prisoners their favorite game. Thus 1850s New York baseball became America's baseball.
26th Apr '17 1:35:43 PM InfinityPlusTwo
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* '''Manny Ramirez''', over the course of his career, has been one of the most dangerous hitters in baseball, but also one of baseball's most unpredictable characters. His frequent mental lapses, both on and off the field, have cost his teams a game or two and have been referred to as "Manny being Manny". Most controversially, in the latter part of his career, he acquired a reputation for playing outstanding baseball his first few months with a new team, but at some point thereafter wearing out his welcome and resorting to childish outbursts and lackadaisical play until he's shipped off somewhere else. He twice tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs; after the second test, he chose to retire rather than face a 100-game suspension. [[TenMinuteRetirement Or not.]] He requested a reinstatement, and signed with yet another team (the Athletics), then another one (the Rangers), then joined the Cubs' AAA team in 2014 as a player/coach to mentor some of the Cubs' top prospects (and maybe have some chance of getting back to the Major Leagues, where he hasn't played since his 100-game suspension/retirement). He spent 2015 as a hitting consultant for the Cubs, and though he hasn't officially retired yet, it's looking more and more like his playing days are over.

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* '''Manny Ramirez''', over the course of his career, has been one of the most dangerous hitters in baseball, but also one of baseball's most unpredictable characters. His frequent mental lapses, both on and off the field, have cost his teams a game or two and have been referred to as "Manny being Manny". Most controversially, in the latter part of his career, he acquired a reputation for playing outstanding baseball his first few months with a new team, but at some point thereafter wearing out his welcome and resorting to childish outbursts and lackadaisical play until he's shipped off somewhere else. He twice tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs; after the second test, he chose to retire rather than face a 100-game suspension. [[TenMinuteRetirement Or not.]] He requested a reinstatement, and signed with yet another team (the Athletics), then another one (the Rangers), then joined the Cubs' AAA team in 2014 as a player/coach to mentor some of the Cubs' top prospects (and maybe have some chance of getting back to the Major Leagues, where he hasn't played since his 100-game suspension/retirement). He spent 2015 as a hitting consultant for the Cubs, and though he hasn't officially retired yet, it's looking more and more like his playing days are over. Is currently making yet another comeback attempt, with the Kochi Fighting Dogs of the Shikoku Island League Plus, an Independent Japanese League.



* '''Cliff Lee''' is a free agent pitcher who last played for the Philadelphia Phillies. He came up with the Indians, and had a few ups and downs before cementing himself as one of the best left-handed pitchers in the game with his Cy Young-winning season in 2008, with 22 wins, 2.54 ERA, and 170 Strikeouts. He has a reputation as one of the best pitchers in the postseason: In the first 7 postseason games he pitched, he went 7-0 and allowed just 9 runs in total. On account of the struggles of many of his teams, he was a human trade rumor in his prime, though it appears that trading him is cursed: He was traded 3 times in the span of about a year (from the Indians to the Phillies in July 2009, from the Phillies to the Mariners in December 2009, and from the Mariners to the Rangers in July 2010), and each time the minor-league players gotten in return for him failed to accomplished much at the major league level. When he returned to the Phillies, he was still solid to excellent whenever he actually took the mound, but his career has been derailed by injuries, to the point where he hasn't pitched since mid-2014.

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* '''Cliff Lee''' is a free agent pitcher who last played for the Philadelphia Phillies. He came up with the Indians, and had a few ups and downs before cementing himself as one of the best left-handed pitchers in the game with his Cy Young-winning season in 2008, with 22 wins, 2.54 ERA, and 170 Strikeouts. He has a reputation as one of the best pitchers in the postseason: In the first 7 postseason games he pitched, he went 7-0 and allowed just 9 runs in total. On account of the struggles of many of his teams, he was a human trade rumor in his prime, though it appears that trading him is cursed: He and was at one point traded 3 times in the span of about a year (from the Indians to the Phillies in July 2009, from the Phillies to the Mariners in December 2009, and from the Mariners to the Rangers in July 2010), and 2010). For a long time, some fans would joke that trading him was cursed, because in each time of those three trades, the minor-league players gotten in return for him failed to accomplished much at the major league level.level- at least, not until 2014, when Carlos Carrasco (part of the Indians/Phillies trade mentioned above) became a pretty good starting pitcher for the Indians, 5 years after they traded for him. When he returned to the Phillies, he was still solid to excellent whenever he actually took the mound, but his career has been derailed by injuries, to the point where he hasn't pitched since mid-2014.



* '''Madison Bumgarner''' is a starting pitcher for the San Francisco Giants. An imposing left-hander with a deceptively easy delivery, Bumgarner was mostly known for two things - being the junior member of the heralded Giants rotation (he debuted in the majors at the age of 20 and pitched in the World Series[[note]]very well, throwing 8 shutout innings for a Game 4 win[[/note]] as a 21 year-old rookie), and for being the ''second''-best left-handed pitcher in the NL West division, overshadowed by [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter the downright unbelievable Clayton Kershaw]]. However, Bumgarner achieved national prominence in 2014 when, with the rest of the Giants' once-vaunted pitching staff in tatters around him, he put the Giants on his back and carried them to a championship. His overall postseason stats - 52.5 innings with a 1.03 ERA, 45 strikeouts to 6 walks - were some of the [[http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/sports_nut/2014/10/madison_bumgarner_world_series_just_one_pitcher_in_baseball_history_had.html greatest in baseball history]], and he emphatically cemented his case by coming into the deciding Game 7 as a reliever, on two days' rest[[note]]The modern standard is 4 days in between games.[[/note]] and throwing five shutout innings for the win. His postseason stats as a whole are impressive- He has a 2.14 career postseason ERA- but his World Series stats are absolutely insane. In 36 innings over 5 World Series games in 2010, 2012, and 2014, Bumgarner has allowed a grand total of ''one'' run, good for an 0.25 ERA. Also notable as one of the best hitting pitchers of recent years—his home run stats since 2013 would project to 30-plus homers over a full season. In fact, on June 30, 2016, with the Giants set to meet their cross-Bay rivals, the A's, in Oakland with Bumgarner starting, Giants manager Bruce Bochy announced that the team would not use a DH[[note]](since the game was in Oakland, AL rules, with the DH, would be used)[[/note]] and let Bumgarner bat for himself. This would be the first time in ''40 years'' that a team deliberately chose to let a pitcher hit instead of a DH.[[note]]The only other time in that period that a team had a pitcher hitting instead of a DH (Andy Sonnenstine for the Rays in 2009) was because of a lineup card mixup.[[/note]] The move worked–Bumgarner doubled in his first at-bat of the night, leading to a 6-run third inning for the Giants.

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* '''Madison Bumgarner''' is a starting pitcher for the San Francisco Giants. An imposing left-hander with a deceptively easy delivery, Bumgarner was mostly known for two things - being the junior member of the heralded Giants rotation (he debuted in the majors at the age of 20 and pitched in the World Series[[note]]very well, throwing 8 shutout innings for a Game 4 win[[/note]] as a 21 year-old rookie), and for being the ''second''-best left-handed pitcher in the NL West division, overshadowed by [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter the downright unbelievable Clayton Kershaw]]. However, Bumgarner achieved national prominence in 2014 when, with the rest of the Giants' once-vaunted pitching staff in tatters around him, he put the Giants on his back and carried them to a championship. His overall postseason stats - 52.5 innings with a 1.03 ERA, 45 strikeouts to 6 walks - were some of the [[http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/sports_nut/2014/10/madison_bumgarner_world_series_just_one_pitcher_in_baseball_history_had.html greatest in baseball history]], and he emphatically cemented his case by coming into the deciding Game 7 as a reliever, on two days' rest[[note]]The modern standard is 4 days in between games.[[/note]] and throwing five shutout innings for the win. His postseason stats as a whole are impressive- He has a 2.14 career postseason ERA- but his World Series stats are absolutely insane. In 36 innings over 5 World Series games in 2010, 2012, and 2014, Bumgarner has allowed a grand total of ''one'' run, good for an 0.25 ERA. Also notable as one of the best hitting pitchers of recent years—his home run stats since 2013 would project to 30-plus homers over a full season. In fact, on June 30, 2016, with the Giants set to meet their cross-Bay rivals, the A's, in Oakland with Bumgarner starting, Giants manager Bruce Bochy announced that the team would not use a DH[[note]](since the game was in Oakland, AL rules, with the DH, would be used)[[/note]] and let Bumgarner bat for himself. This would be the first time in ''40 years'' that a team deliberately chose to let a pitcher hit instead of a DH.[[note]]The only other time in that period that a team had a pitcher hitting instead of a DH (Andy Sonnenstine for the Rays in 2009) was because of a lineup card mixup.[[/note]] The move worked–Bumgarner doubled in his first at-bat of the night, leading to a 6-run third inning for the Giants. Is currently on the DL because of a shoulder injury he got when he crashed his dirt bike.
24th Apr '17 5:57:16 PM OnoderaTearer
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* '''Harry Kalas''' was briefly an announcer for the Houston Astros. Shortly after, he became the announcer for the Philadelphia Phillies, which he did until his passing in April of 2009. Kalas was a well known voice not only among Phillies fans, but also was known for doing voiceover work for the NFL, after the passing of original voiceover artist John Facenda. Kalas was known for his memorable home run calls, and had the catch phrase "Swing ... and a long drive, this ball is ... outta here!" when calling a home run.
* '''Stan "The Man" Musial''' played his entire career for the St. Louis Cardinals and is considered not only the greatest Cardinal of all time, but also one of the greatest men ever to play the game. Not just as a player, but as a person. He was a 3-time MVP, 3-time World Series Champion, 24-time All-Star, and had a .331 lifetime batting average, 3,630 hits[[labelnote:*]]In one of the most remarkable statistical oddities in MLB history, Musial had exactly the same number of hits at home and away (1,815).[[/labelnote]], 475 home runs, and 1,951 [=RBIs=], but he also gave away more autographs than any other player and became an iconic civic figure in the city of St. Louis. He was so nice and kind--he cheered up everyone he met (from sick children in hospitals to ordinary adults) and aged into a CoolOldGuy with a harmonica--that he verges into BoringInvincibleHero territory, but in the best way possible (like a RealLife Franchise/{{Superman}} or ComicBook/CaptainAmerica--he was just that ''good''). A proud son of Polish (father) and Czech (mother) immigrants, he made trips to Poland to help popularize baseball there, and became good friends with Pope John Paul II in the process; they eventually named a stadium after him and gave him Poland's highest civilian honor. He was just about the best and least-controversial example of FandomSacredCow there ever was. Hank Aaron has said of him, "I didn't just like Stan Musial. I wanted to ''be'' like him." Even [[JerkAss Ty Cobb]] said that Stan was the closest there'd be to a perfect player. Oh, and he once found out on a family trip that he had [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff fans in Australia and Tahiti]]. Stan the Man ranks among the greatest of the greats, but he's not often talked about because he was never a Yankee or a Dodger. But when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969, then-Commissioner Ford Frick said, "Here stands baseball's perfect warrior. Here stands baseball's perfect knight." Those words were etched into The Man's statue at Busch Stadium, which has been covered in flowers and memorabilia since he passed away on January 19, 2013, at age 92. Before his death, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the U.S.'s highest civilian honor, from President Obama in December 2011, thanks to a grassroots petition campaign conducted by members of Cardinal Nation.[[note]] Fun fact: During Musial's high school days in Pennsylvania, one of his baseball and basketball teammates was Buddy Griffey, father and grandfather of the baseball-playing Ken Griffeys. Musial and his white basketball teammates once threatened to forfeit a major tournament because a hotel restaurant wouldn't seat Buddy in the main dining room.[[/note]]

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* '''Harry Kalas''' was briefly an announcer for the Houston Astros. Shortly after, he became the announcer for the Philadelphia Phillies, which he did until his passing in April of 2009. Kalas was a well known voice not only among Phillies fans, but also was known for doing voiceover work for the NFL, after the passing of original voiceover artist John Facenda. Kalas was known for his memorable home run calls, and had the catch phrase "Swing ... "Swing... and a long drive, this ball is ...is... outta here!" when calling a home run.
* '''Stan "The Man" Musial''' played his entire career for the St. Louis Cardinals and is considered not only the greatest Cardinal of all time, but also one of the greatest men ever to play the game. Not just as a player, but as a person. He was a 3-time MVP, 3-time World Series Champion, 24-time All-Star, and had a .331 lifetime batting average, 3,630 hits[[labelnote:*]]In one of the most remarkable statistical oddities in MLB history, Musial had exactly the same number of hits at home and away (1,815).[[/labelnote]], 475 home runs, and 1,951 [=RBIs=], but he also gave away more autographs than any other player and became an iconic civic figure in the city of St. Louis. He was so nice and kind--he cheered up everyone he met (from sick children in hospitals to ordinary adults) and aged into a CoolOldGuy with a harmonica--that he verges into BoringInvincibleHero territory, but in the best way possible (like a RealLife Franchise/{{Superman}} or ComicBook/CaptainAmerica--he was just that ''good''). A proud son of Polish (father) and Czech (mother) immigrants, he made trips to Poland to help popularize baseball there, and became good friends with [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope John Paul II II]] in the process; they eventually named a stadium after him and gave him Poland's highest civilian honor. He was just about the best and least-controversial example of FandomSacredCow a SacredCow there ever was. Hank Aaron has said of him, "I didn't just like Stan Musial. I wanted to ''be'' like him." Even [[JerkAss Ty Cobb]] said that Stan was the closest there'd be to a perfect player. Oh, and he once found out on a family trip that he had [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff fans in Australia and Tahiti]]. Stan the Man ranks among the greatest of the greats, but he's not often talked about because he was never a Yankee or a Dodger. But when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969, then-Commissioner Ford Frick said, "Here stands baseball's perfect warrior. Here stands baseball's perfect knight." Those words were etched into The Man's statue at Busch Stadium, which has been covered in flowers and memorabilia since he passed away on January 19, 2013, at age 92. Before his death, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the U.S.'s highest civilian honor, from President Obama UsefulNotes/BarackObama in December 2011, thanks to a grassroots petition campaign conducted by members of Cardinal Nation.[[note]] Fun [[note]]Fun fact: During Musial's high school days in Pennsylvania, one of his baseball and basketball teammates was Buddy Griffey, father and grandfather of the baseball-playing Ken Griffeys. Musial and his white basketball teammates once threatened to forfeit a major tournament because a hotel restaurant wouldn't seat Buddy in the main dining room.[[/note]]
24th Apr '17 5:50:42 PM OnoderaTearer
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* '''Curt Schilling''' during his playing career was known for not only being an outstanding pitcher (helping the Philadelphia Phillies enter the 1993 World Series, as well as forming the other half of the co-MVP pitching duo that won the Diamondbacks the 2001 World Series), but one of the gutsiest competitors you'll ever find. While pitching for the Red Sox in the 2004 ALCS against the New York Yankees, he tore a ligament in his ankle, yet was able to pitch again in the series thanks to a brand new experimental surgical procedure, albeit one which did not prevent him from bleeding. The Red Sox came back from a 3-0 deficit to win that series, and Schilling's bloody sock became an iconic image of the team's first World Championship in 86 years. Later in his career and after his retirement, Schilling became known for his outspoken political views. He's a hardcore Republican who has openly supported several prominent Republican candidates for public office, notably actively campaigning for John [=McCain=] during his 2008 Presidential run and Donald Trump during his 2016 run. Rumors have long abounded that Schilling would run for public office himself, and he has announced intentions to run for one of Massachusetts' Senate seats in 2018. He's also known as a [[OneOfUs fairly hardcore gamer]] who plays [=MMORPGs=] (once another player that hit a home run off of him claimed it was to avenge an Everquest character Schilling had betrayed) and started his own game studio, 38 Studios, after his jersey number. 38 Studios released one game, the 2012 RPG ''VideoGame/KingdomsOfAmalurReckoning'', [[AcclaimedFlop which was well liked by critics, but ultimately failed sales-wise]]. This led to a major scandal after the company defaulted on its loan to the state of Rhode Island, leaving the company bankrupt and Schilling's reputation in ruins. Worked as an ESPN analyst, while battling cancer, until being fired in 2016 for posting comments critical of pro-transgender bathroom policies on his personal Website/{{Facebook}} page.

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* '''Curt Schilling''' during his playing career was known for not only being an outstanding pitcher (helping the Philadelphia Phillies enter the 1993 World Series, as well as forming the other half of the co-MVP pitching duo that won the Diamondbacks the 2001 World Series), but one of the gutsiest competitors you'll ever find. While pitching for the Red Sox in the 2004 ALCS against the New York Yankees, he tore a ligament in his ankle, yet was able to pitch again in the series thanks to a brand new experimental surgical procedure, albeit one which did not prevent him from bleeding. The Red Sox came back from a 3-0 deficit to win that series, and Schilling's bloody sock became an iconic image of the team's first World Championship in 86 years. Later in his career and after his retirement, Schilling became known for his outspoken political views. He's a hardcore Republican who has openly supported several prominent Republican candidates for public office, notably actively campaigning for John [=McCain=] during his 2008 Presidential run and Donald Trump during his 2016 run. Rumors have long abounded that Schilling would run for public office himself, and he has announced intentions to run for one of Massachusetts' Senate seats in 2018. He's also known as a [[OneOfUs fairly hardcore gamer]] who plays [=MMORPGs=] (once another player that hit a home run off of him claimed it was to avenge an Everquest ''VideoGame/{{Everquest}}'' character Schilling had betrayed) and started his own game studio, 38 Studios, after his jersey number. 38 Studios released only one game, the 2012 RPG ''VideoGame/KingdomsOfAmalurReckoning'', [[AcclaimedFlop which was well liked by critics, but ultimately failed sales-wise]]. This led to a major scandal after the company defaulted on its loan to the state of Rhode Island, leaving the company bankrupt and Schilling's reputation in ruins. Worked as an ESPN analyst, while battling cancer, until being fired in 2016 for posting comments critical of pro-transgender bathroom policies on his personal Website/{{Facebook}} page.
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