History UsefulNotes / Bangladesh

12th Aug '16 3:30:25 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bg-map_1487.gif

to:

http://static.[[quoteright:330:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bg-map_1487.gif
gif]]
23rd Jun '15 6:44:41 AM ARaihan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In the newly independent state, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was its founder as well as first President. He ruled for the first few years but was soon deposed in a military coup that led to his death. Two counter-coups later, General Ziaur Rahman (no relation to Mujib) became the military ruler of Bangladesh, a position he held from 1976 to 1981 before he too was assassinated. The military continued its control over the state until the 1990s, when the widow of General Rahman and the daughter of Mujib became the leaders of the two largest parties in the country, and setting up a rivalry that continues to the present.

Bangladesh is rather poor (but not so poor now, the UN says that it is a lower-middle class state, unlike its rival Pakistan which is still down there with the lower-class countries) and fairly corrupt. This changes based on who is on power. Generally, the Awami League, lead by Sheikh Hasina-- who is the current PM, tends to be less corrupt, but the BNP and Jamaat-e-Islam (which incidentally, despite being Muslim, has a legendary affinity for alcohol) take corruption [[UpToEleven to the next level.]] It also has a ridiculously high population for its size - 164 million and counting, making it the world's most densely peopled region and the 7th most populous country! (that's more people than ''Russia''.) However, it has been making strides as of late and now seems to be better off in many respects from Pakistan. For one thing, it has become a favored country for cheap manufacturing especially by western clothing companies, but because of extremely low wages considering any union organizing is viciously attacked. Furthermore, work and safety standards are dangerously lax with no meaningful enforcement that contributed to tragedies like the 2013 factory collapse that forced some Western consumers to ponder the true price at the cheap goods made there.

to:

In the newly independent state, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was its founder as well as first President. He ruled for the first few years but was soon deposed in a military coup that led to his death. Two counter-coups later, General Ziaur Rahman (no relation to Mujib) became the military ruler of Bangladesh, a position he held from 1976 to 1981 before he too was assassinated. The military continued its control over the state until the 1990s, when the widow of General Rahman and the daughter of Mujib became the leaders of the two largest parties in the country, and setting up a rivalry that continues to the present.

Bangladesh is rather poor (but not so poor now, the UN says that it is a lower-middle class state, unlike its rival Pakistan which is still down there with the lower-class countries) and fairly corrupt. This changes based on who is on power. Generally, the Awami League, lead by Sheikh Hasina-- who is the current PM, tends to be less corrupt, but the BNP and Jamaat-e-Islam (which incidentally, despite being Muslim, has a legendary affinity for alcohol) take corruption [[UpToEleven to the next level.]] It also has a ridiculously high population for its size - 164 million and counting, making it the world's most densely peopled region and the 7th most populous country! (that's more people than ''Russia''.) However, it has been making strides as of late and now seems to be better off in many respects from Pakistan. For one thing, it has become a favored country for cheap manufacturing especially by western clothing companies, but because of extremely low wages considering any union organizing is viciously attacked. Furthermore, work and safety standards are dangerously lax with no meaningful enforcement that contributed to tragedies like the 2013 factory collapse that forced some Western consumers to ponder the true price at the cheap goods made there.
14th Jun '15 10:03:32 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As an interesting fact the border region with West Bengal is somewhat... confusing. In an arrangement dating back to the Princely states there are sections of Bangladesh surrounded entirely in West Bengal and parts of West Bengal entirely in Bangladesh. To make matters more confusing these enclaves can have enclaves within them. It gets so bad there are parts of Bangladesh, inside part of India, inside part of Bangladesh, inside India. Given that this causes problems for people living in these areas the two governments (as of late 2011) have decided to abolish these areas completely and allow those living there to either change citizenship or be given funds to relocate. The treaty putting most of this into affect was ratified in June 2015.

to:

As an interesting fact the border region with West Bengal is somewhat... confusing. In an arrangement dating back to the Princely states there are sections of Bangladesh surrounded entirely in West Bengal and parts of West Bengal entirely in Bangladesh. To make matters more confusing these enclaves can have enclaves within them. It gets so bad there are parts of Bangladesh, inside part of India, inside part of Bangladesh, inside India. Given that this causes problems for people living in these areas the two governments (as of late 2011) have decided to abolish these areas completely and allow those living there to either change citizenship or be given funds to relocate. The treaty putting most of this into affect effect was ratified in June 2015.
14th Jun '15 9:40:24 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike. Indeed, when, in 1905, the [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj British authorities]] decided it would be a good idea to split Bengal, previously a single unit, into predominantly-Muslim East Bengal and predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (the idea being to distract the Bengalis from the Indian independence movement, in which they were quite active, by stoking religious division), the Bengalis protested vehemently and forced the reunification of Bengal within six years. (From this episode, Bangladesh got its national anthem, "''Amar Sonar Bangla''", written by the Hindu Bengali poet--and eventual first non-white Nobel laureate--Rabindranath Tagore to protest the division; Tagore incidentally also wrote "''Jana Gana Mana''", which ended up the national anthem of independent India, and yes, it's in Bengali). However, upon the end of British rule, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal was therefore partitioned--again--into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike. Indeed, when, in 1905, the [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj British authorities]] decided it would be a good idea to split Bengal, previously a single unit, into predominantly-Muslim East Bengal and predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (the idea being to distract the Bengalis from the Indian independence movement, in which they were quite active, by stoking religious division), the Bengalis in both regions and of both religions protested vehemently and forced the reunification of Bengal within six years. (From this episode, Bangladesh got its national anthem, "''Amar Sonar Bangla''", written by the Hindu Bengali poet--and eventual first non-white Nobel laureate--Rabindranath Tagore to protest the division; Tagore incidentally also wrote "''Jana Gana Mana''", which ended up the national anthem of independent India, and yes, it's in Bengali). However, upon the end of British rule, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal was therefore partitioned--again--into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:39:29 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike. Indeed, when, in 1905, the [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj British authorities]] decided it would be a good idea to split Bengal, previously a single unit, into predominantly-Muslim East Bengal and predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (the idea being to distract the Bengalis from the Indian independence movement, in which they were quite active, by stoking religious division), the Bengalis protested vehemently and forced the reunification of Bengal within six years. (From this episode, Bangladesh got its national anthem, "''Amar Sonar Bangla''", written by the Hindu Bengali poet--and eventual first non-white Nobel laureate--Rabindranath Tagore to protest the division; Tagore incidentally also wrote "''Jana Gana Mana''", which ended up the national anthem of independent India, and yes, it's in Bengali). However, upon the end of British rule, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike. Indeed, when, in 1905, the [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj British authorities]] decided it would be a good idea to split Bengal, previously a single unit, into predominantly-Muslim East Bengal and predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (the idea being to distract the Bengalis from the Indian independence movement, in which they were quite active, by stoking religious division), the Bengalis protested vehemently and forced the reunification of Bengal within six years. (From this episode, Bangladesh got its national anthem, "''Amar Sonar Bangla''", written by the Hindu Bengali poet--and eventual first non-white Nobel laureate--Rabindranath Tagore to protest the division; Tagore incidentally also wrote "''Jana Gana Mana''", which ended up the national anthem of independent India, and yes, it's in Bengali). However, upon the end of British rule, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal was therefore partitioned into partitioned--again--into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:38:15 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India ("''Jana Gana Mana''") and Bangladesh ("''Amar Sonar Bangla''") were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that alike. Indeed, when, in 1905, the [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj British authorities]] decided it would be a good idea to split Bengal, previously a single unit, into predominantly-Muslim East Bengal and predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (the idea being to distract the Bengalis from the Indian independence movement, in which they were quite active, by stoking religious division), the Bengalis protested vehemently and forced the reunification of Bengal within six years. (From this episode, Bangladesh got its national anthem, "''Amar Sonar Bangla''", written by the Hindu Bengali poet--and eventual first non-white Nobel laureate--Rabindranath Tagore to protest the division; Tagore incidentally also wrote "''Jana Gana Mana''", which ended up the national anthems anthem of both India ("''Jana Gana Mana''") independent India, and Bangladesh ("''Amar Sonar Bangla''") were written yes, it's in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. Bengali). However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, British rule, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, Bengal was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:31:06 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Sonar Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana ("''Jana Gana Mana) Mana''") and Bangladesh (Amar ("''Amar Sonar Bangla) Bangla''") were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:30:35 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Shona Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Shona Sonar Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:28:22 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Shona Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions would be assigned to Pakistan, and predominantly Hindu ones to India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Shona Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions of the now-former British India would be assigned to Pakistan, a new majority-Muslim country, and predominantly Hindu ones to the newly-independent India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
14th Jun '15 9:26:58 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions would be assigned to Pakistan, and predominantly Hindu ones to India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".

to:

Bangladesh's history is a complex weaving of ethnicity and religion. The Bengali people have lived in Bengal, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, in the fertile valley and delta of the Ganges River, since the 7th century CE, and have shared a common (if changing) language and culture ever since. Starting in the twelfth century, Islam spread among the Bengali people (first spread by Sufi missionaries, and later encouraged by various Muslim dynasties), predominantly in the eastern region; the western region remained predominantly Hindu, but a common Bengali identity was still recognized by Muslim and Hindu Bengalis alike.alike--it is not insignificant that the national anthems of both India (Jana Gana Mana) and Bangladesh (Amar Shona Bangla) were written in Bengali by the same man, the (Hindu) Bengali poet (and first non-European Nobel laureate) Creator/RabindranathTagore. However, upon the end of UsefulNotes/TheRaj, the political decision was that predominantly Muslim regions would be assigned to Pakistan, and predominantly Hindu ones to India. Bengal, previously a single administrative unit, was therefore partitioned into predominantly-Hindu West Bengal (which was assigned to India), and predominantly-Muslim East Bengal, which along with the northwestern provinces of British India became the new country of UsefulNotes/{{Pakistan}}. Bangladesh became East Pakistan, separated geographically from West Pakistan by... all of India. This awkward federation was off to a bad start from the beginning when the West imposed Urdu as the official language of Pakistan, which irked the Bengali-speaking population of the East, which was also the more populous of the two Pakistans. Not only that, but all political, martial and economic power was located in the West, leaving the East powerless and relatively expendable, as was made clear in 1965 when Pakistan's then-dictator, Field Marshal Ayub Khan, declared that "the best defense of East Pakistan laid in West Pakistan".
This list shows the last 10 events of 32. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Bangladesh