History UsefulNotes / AustralianPolitics

2nd Aug '17 4:17:57 AM Enderguy059
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There are currently two major political parties and a few significant minor parties. The current ruling party is the Coalition, the alliance between the Liberal Party and the National Party, which gained power after the Labor Party lost the 2013 election after maintaining power for six years (Australian Prime Ministers can stay in power for as long as the public votes their parties in and their parties continue to support them). (NB: Australian spell labor "labour" unless it's the Labor party, named the American way from a charming early twentieth-century vogue for 'modernised spelling' -- the disco of its day. This does allow for the joke that the Labor Party can't spell and the Liberal Party can't use a dictionary.)


to:

There are currently two major political parties and a few significant minor parties. The current ruling party is the Coalition, the alliance between the Liberal Party and the National Party, which gained power after the Labor Party lost the 2013 election after maintaining power for six years (Australian Prime Ministers can stay in power for as long as the public votes their parties in and their parties continue to support them). (NB: Australian spell labor "labour" unless it's the Labor party, named the American way from a charming early twentieth-century vogue for 'modernised 'modernized spelling' -- the disco of its day. This does allow for the joke that the Labor Party can't spell and the Liberal Party can't use a dictionary.)




* '''The Coalition''': Made up of two parties: the '''Liberal Party of Australia''', the larger and more powerful partner, and the '''National Party of Australia''', the smaller hanger-on. Despite its name, these days the Liberal Party is generally more conservative than Labor (hence creating awkward terminology, such as "small-'l' liberal"); they have historically claimed to be a classical liberal party but have since become more closely identified with social conservatism. The National Party originated as the "Country Party", and in principle stands for the interests of rural people, which can coincide with porkbarrelling. The Coalition gains much of its support from rural voters and richer suburbs, although in recent years they have gained increasing support in outer suburbs. Generally, the Liberals represent urban and suburban districts while the Nationals represent rural districts; as part of the coalition agreement, each party will not run candidates against an incumbent MP from the other party. Members of the coalition parties will have a very wide range of political views ranging from Christian social conservatism to classical liberalism to 'third-way' centralism, averaging out to centre-right.

to:

* '''The Coalition''': Made up of two parties: the '''Liberal Party of Australia''', the larger and more powerful partner, and the '''National Party of Australia''', the smaller hanger-on. Despite its name, these days the Liberal Party is generally more conservative than Labor (hence creating awkward terminology, such as "small-'l' liberal"); they have historically claimed to be a classical liberal party but have since become more closely identified with social conservatism. The National Party originated as the "Country Party", and in principle stands for the interests of rural people, which can coincide with porkbarrelling.pork-barreling. The Coalition gains much of its support from rural voters and richer suburbs, although in recent years they have gained increasing support in outer suburbs. Generally, the Liberals represent urban and suburban districts while the Nationals represent rural districts; as part of the coalition agreement, each party will not run candidates against an incumbent MP from the other party. Members of the coalition parties will have a very wide range of political views ranging from Christian social conservatism to classical liberalism to 'third-way' centralism, averaging out to centre-right.



* '''Labor''': The Australian Labor Party is Australia's oldest political party, having formed during the late 19th century. The ALP began as (and to a degree still is) the political arm of the Australian worker's union movement. Support from union bosses is still an important political commodity within the ALP. Initially, they were relatively strong socialists who advocated the nationalisation of the means of production. They had a rather brutal split with the Catholic-dominated Democratic Labor Party in the 1950s, which shed them of much of their socially-conservative base and caused them to become more identified as the party of social liberalism (but also led to them being out of government for all but three of the next 23 years); by the time they returned to power, they had shifted to a social-democratic party that was accommodating to a certain measure of privatisation and deregulation. The Labor Party most recently held government from 2007 to 2013. Its support bases are the outer suburbs of the major cities, industrial provincial areas (the Hunter Valley, the Illawarra, and Geelong are the most prominent), and certain gentrified inner-city seats. As with the Coalition, Labor members have a very wide range of political views ranging from old-style socialism to Christian social conservatism to 'third-way' centralism, averaging out to a more or less centre-left position.

to:

* '''Labor''': The Australian Labor Party is Australia's oldest political party, having formed during the late 19th century. The ALP began as (and to a degree still is) the political arm of the Australian worker's union movement. Support from union bosses is still an important political commodity within the ALP. Initially, they were relatively strong socialists who advocated the nationalisation nationalization of the means of production. They had a rather brutal split with the Catholic-dominated Democratic Labor Party in the 1950s, which shed them of much of their socially-conservative base and caused them to become more identified as the party of social liberalism (but also led to them being out of government for all but three of the next 23 years); by the time they returned to power, they had shifted to a social-democratic party that was accommodating to a certain measure of privatisation privatization and deregulation. The Labor Party most recently held government from 2007 to 2013. Its support bases are the outer suburbs of the major cities, industrial provincial areas (the Hunter Valley, the Illawarra, and Geelong are the most prominent), and certain gentrified inner-city seats. As with the Coalition, Labor members have a very wide range of political views ranging from old-style socialism to Christian social conservatism to 'third-way' centralism, averaging out to a more or less centre-left position.



* '''Australian Greens''': Essentially like Greens everywhere, the Australian Greens promote the environment, but are also notable for its policies on drugs and immigration.[[note]]Many people believe they're for legalising illegal drugs. They're not.[[/note]] Internationally famous for being one of the few Green parties to exert any meaningful pull at all, they tend to have very strong support in the inner-most city suburbs. Federally, they hold one seat in the House of Representatives and nine seats in the Australian Senate; under the 2010-13 Labor minority government the Greens held the balance of power. On a state level the Greens have elected representatives in at least one chamber of each Parliament except in Queensland and the Northern Territory, and also hold balance of power in the ACT Legislative Assembly.

to:

* '''Australian Greens''': Essentially like Greens everywhere, the Australian Greens promote the environment, but are also notable for its policies on drugs and immigration.[[note]]Many people believe they're for legalising legalizing illegal drugs. They're not.[[/note]] Internationally famous for being one of the few Green parties to exert any meaningful pull at all, they tend to have very strong support in the inner-most city suburbs. Federally, they hold one seat in the House of Representatives and nine seats in the Australian Senate; under the 2010-13 Labor minority government the Greens held the balance of power. On a state level the Greens have elected representatives in at least one chamber of each Parliament except in Queensland and the Northern Territory, and also hold balance of power in the ACT Legislative Assembly.Assembly.
[[quoteright:304:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/one_nation_logo_web.jpg]]



** How did Hanson win as an independent in 1996, in a safe Labor seat? She was a Liberal who was dropped when they realised what she thought. Before the election, but too late to take her off the ballot.

to:

** How did Hanson win as an independent in 1996, in a safe Labor seat? She was a Liberal who was dropped when they realised realized what she thought. Before the election, but too late to take her off the ballot.



* '''Nick Xenophon Team''' or '''NXT''' ([[Wrestling/{{WWENXT}} no, not that NXT]]): A political party founded by South Australian politician [[AwesomeMcCoolname Nick Xenophon]], as one of the latest in the trend of high-profile independent politicians forming minor political parties in their own image. Xenophon was first elected to the federal Senate in 2007, and is known for being centrist, anti-gambling and pro-pork-barrelling for his state. Thanks to Xenophon's popularity in South Australia, NXT's status in that state has rapidly risen to rival the major parties: in the 2016 federal election they won three of South Australia's Senate seats and one House seat. (Outside the state, their results were respectable but unimpressive.) This has effectively given them the balance of power in the Senate along with One Nation.
* '''Katter's Australian Party''': Founded in 2011 by federal MP Bob Katter and his NiceHat, the party's positions are heavily based on those of Katter himself. A former Independent from North Queensland well known for his [[BunnyEarsLawyer eccentricity]], Katter shot to national fame in 2010 when the federal election resulted in a hung parliament. The party is best described as "agrarian socialist", with strong social conservatism combined with a protectionist and anti-privatisation economic policy. Originally named "The Australian Party", it was forced to change its name on the grounds of it being too generic. They currently hold Katter's own seat in the federal House of Representatives, plus two seats in the Queensland Parliament (one of which is held by Katter's son). Made their strongest showing to date in the 2012 Queensland state election, where they first won those two seats and got 11.5% of the primary vote. However, while their sitting [=MPs=] have all since been re-elected, their primary vote share plummeted in subsequent elections as voters turned to other minor parties: first Palmer United, then One Nation. They have also consistently failed to win a Senate seat, and haven't caught on at all outside Queensland.

to:

[[quoteright:256:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nick_xenophon_team_logo_og_2.png]]
* '''Nick Xenophon Team''' or '''NXT''' ([[Wrestling/{{WWENXT}} no, not that NXT]]): A political party founded by South Australian politician [[AwesomeMcCoolname Nick Xenophon]], as one of the latest in the trend of high-profile independent politicians forming minor political parties in their own image. Xenophon was first elected to the federal Senate in 2007, and is known for being centrist, anti-gambling and pro-pork-barrelling pro-pork-barreling for his state. Thanks to Xenophon's popularity in South Australia, NXT's status in that state has rapidly risen to rival the major parties: in the 2016 federal election they won three of South Australia's Senate seats and one House seat. (Outside the state, their results were respectable but unimpressive.) This has effectively given them the balance of power in the Senate along with One Nation.
[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/header_logo_print.gif]]
* '''Katter's Australian Party''': Founded in 2011 by federal MP Bob Katter and his NiceHat, the party's positions are heavily based on those of Katter himself. A former Independent from North Queensland well known for his [[BunnyEarsLawyer eccentricity]], Katter shot to national fame in 2010 when the federal election resulted in a hung parliament. The party is best described as "agrarian socialist", with strong social conservatism combined with a protectionist and anti-privatisation anti-privatization economic policy. Originally named "The Australian Party", it was forced to change its name on the grounds of it being too generic. They currently hold Katter's own seat in the federal House of Representatives, plus two seats in the Queensland Parliament (one of which is held by Katter's son). Made their strongest showing to date in the 2012 Queensland state election, where they first won those two seats and got 11.5% of the primary vote. However, while their sitting [=MPs=] have all since been re-elected, their primary vote share plummeted in subsequent elections as voters turned to other minor parties: first Palmer United, then One Nation. They have also consistently failed to win a Senate seat, and haven't caught on at all outside Queensland.Queensland.
[[quoteright:316:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/family_first_2013.png]]



[[quoteright:306:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/logo_low_res.png]]



* '''Australian Sex Party''': Assuredly not ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. A new party which grabbed a lot of attention long before any electoral success, due to the name. Its official launch was conducted at Sexpo in Melbourne in 2008. The party was initially founded as a double issue party opposed to an Internet filter and for the legalisation of gay marriage; they're also in favour of compulsory and accurate non-biased sex education in Australian schools, an R18+ video game category, legalising abortion, making the laws regarding pornography more consistent with other sex related laws, decriminalisation of prostitution, creating Federal anti-discrimination laws for employment and (as a TakeThat to Family First) ending the tax exemption status to religious institutions that are not primarily a charity or some other community aid organisation. Finally in 2014 they won a single seat in the Victorian upper house.
* '''Liberal Democratic Party''': Another new party which gained a federal Senate seat in 2013, representing New South Wales (where it notably out-polled the Greens). Formed in the mid 2000's by economist John Humphreys and allied with the Australian Libertarian Society. Unlike the British party of the same name, the LDP supports both social liberalism (being socially to the left of even the Greens; supporting ending the drug war, monopolising the gambling market, and supporting same-sex marriage and freer immigration) and economic liberalism (in the [[{{UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies}} classical liberal]] sense of the term (being economically to the right of the Liberal party); supporting free markets, deregulation of the labor market, ending barriers to international trade). Roughly the Australian equivalent to the Libertarian Party in the United States or the Free Democratic Party in Germany.
* '''Australian Motoring Enthusiasts Party''': A micro-party that no one expected to win anything, least of all themselves, until they did: thanks to a complicated web of preference deals, Victorian candidate Ricky Muir was elected to the Australian Senate in 2013 with just 0.5% of the primary vote. The party's policies are meagre, amounting mainly to "We like cars!" Muir initially formed an electoral alliance with the Palmer United Party before striking out on his own; he ran for re-election in 2016 and lost.

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sex_party_logo.png]]
* '''Australian Sex Party''': Assuredly not ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. A new party which grabbed a lot of attention long before any electoral success, due to the name. Its official launch was conducted at Sexpo in Melbourne in 2008. The party was initially founded as a double issue party opposed to an Internet filter and for the legalisation legalization of gay marriage; they're also in favour of compulsory and accurate non-biased sex education in Australian schools, an R18+ video game category, legalising legalizing abortion, making the laws regarding pornography more consistent with other sex related laws, decriminalisation decriminalization of prostitution, creating Federal anti-discrimination laws for employment and (as a TakeThat to Family First) ending the tax exemption status to religious institutions that are not primarily a charity or some other community aid organisation. Finally in 2014 they won a single seat in the Victorian upper house.
[[quoteright:259:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/liberal_democratic_party_australia.png]]
* '''Liberal Democratic Party''': Another new party which gained a federal Senate seat in 2013, representing New South Wales (where it notably out-polled the Greens). Formed in the mid 2000's by economist John Humphreys and allied with the Australian Libertarian Society. Unlike the British party of the same name, the LDP supports both social liberalism (being socially to the left of even the Greens; supporting ending the drug war, monopolising monopolizing the gambling market, and supporting same-sex marriage and freer immigration) and economic liberalism (in the [[{{UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies}} classical liberal]] sense of the term (being economically to the right of the Liberal party); supporting free markets, deregulation of the labor market, ending barriers to international trade). Roughly the Australian equivalent to the Libertarian Party in the United States or the Free Democratic Party in Germany.
[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/970324_660813223944753_2103485153_n.jpg]]
* '''Australian Motoring Enthusiasts Party''': A micro-party that no one expected to win anything, least of all themselves, until they did: thanks to a complicated web of preference deals, Victorian candidate Ricky Muir was elected to the Australian Senate in 2013 with just 0.5% of the primary vote. The party's policies are meagre, meager, amounting mainly to "We like cars!" Muir initially formed an electoral alliance with the Palmer United Party before striking out on his own; he ran for re-election in 2016 and lost.


Added DiffLines:



Added DiffLines:

2nd Aug '17 2:20:04 AM KnightofLsama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''John Curtin''' (Labor Party), Prime Minister 1941 to 1945, and also the first agnostic PM. Led Australia during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and is credited with starting Australia's close alliance with the US. Considered one of our great Prime Ministers, for his war-time leadership, great oratory and general sympathy for the poor guy. Had ill health all through his tenure and ended up being the second Australian Prime Minister to die in office - from heart disease on the eve of victory in the Pacific, in July 1945.

to:

* '''John Curtin''' (Labor Party), Prime Minister 1941 to 1945, and also the first agnostic PM. Led Australia during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and is credited with starting Australia's close alliance with the US. Considered one of our great Prime Ministers, for his war-time leadership, great oratory and general sympathy for the poor guy. Had ill health all through his tenure and ended up being the second Australian Prime Minister to die in office - from heart disease on the eve of victory in the Pacific, in July 1945. Chosen as the Australian Leader when Australia finally became a playable Civ in ''{{VideoGame/Civilization}} [=VI=]''
5th Jun '17 3:33:26 AM Doc_Loki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Australia is one of the very few nations on the planet to have compulsory voting at all levels. As such, voter turnout at Australian elections in generally in the 98%-99% range (there's [[HumansAreBastards always a few]]), which - along with the preferential voting system - means that it can take literally weeks to count all the votes for the Senate.

to:

* Australia is one of the very few nations on the planet to have compulsory voting at all levels. As such, voter turnout at Australian elections in generally in the 98%-99% range (there's [[HumansAreBastards always a few]]), which - along with the preferential voting system - means that it can take literally weeks to count all the votes for the Senate.
Senate. One of the odder side effects of this is that pre-election polls in Australian are more reliable than in many other democracies, because almost everyone polled '''is''' actually going to vote.
13th May '17 12:27:59 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Malcolm Fraser''' (Liberal Party), Prime Minister from 1975 to 1983. Instrumental in bringing down ''two'' Prime Ministers - Gorton and Whitlam. Won the 1975 election against Whitlam after getting media support from Rupert Murdoch's papers, economic problems, the numerous scandals by Whitlam government ministers, and giving the reassurance that, unlike Gough, you could trust him not to change too much too quickly. His time as PM isn't approved of by the left or right -- the left revile him for his role in "The Dismissal", while the right regard his government as a wasted opportunity because he wasn't enough like MargaretThatcher. After being voted out of office he gradually became estranged from the Liberal Party, eventually leaving them altogether in 2009 when Tony Abbott became the Liberal Leader (saying that the Liberal Party was "no longer a liberal party but a conservative party"), and patched things up with Gough (the two campaigned together in support of a republic for the 1999 referendum). Died in 2015.

to:

* '''Malcolm Fraser''' (Liberal Party), Prime Minister from 1975 to 1983. Instrumental in bringing down ''two'' Prime Ministers - Gorton and Whitlam. Won the 1975 election against Whitlam after getting media support from Rupert Murdoch's papers, economic problems, the numerous scandals by Whitlam government ministers, and giving the reassurance that, unlike Gough, you could trust him not to change too much too quickly. His time as PM isn't approved of by the left or right -- the left revile him for his role in "The Dismissal", while the right regard his government as a wasted opportunity because he wasn't enough like MargaretThatcher.UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher. After being voted out of office he gradually became estranged from the Liberal Party, eventually leaving them altogether in 2009 when Tony Abbott became the Liberal Leader (saying that the Liberal Party was "no longer a liberal party but a conservative party"), and patched things up with Gough (the two campaigned together in support of a republic for the 1999 referendum). Died in 2015.
20th Mar '17 9:27:33 PM WaterBlap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Despite the above issues as well as some questionable comments by her other senators, One Nation continued to ride high in the polls, encouraged by DonaldTrump's victory in the USA. They hoped to translate this into seats in the Western Australian election in March 2017, where some polls had them picking up to 13% of the vote in a largely conservative state. The campaign ended up backfiring after One Nation arranged a controversial preference deal with the now-unpopular but governing Liberal Party where they would preference each other in a number of marginal seats. A number of candidates from both parties were critical of the deal, resulting in Hanson kicking some of the candidates out of the party while others resigned. The party ended up wining less than 5% of the statewide as a result.

to:

** Despite the above issues as well as some questionable comments by her other senators, One Nation continued to ride high in the polls, encouraged by DonaldTrump's UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's victory in the USA. They hoped to translate this into seats in the Western Australian election in March 2017, where some polls had them picking up to 13% of the vote in a largely conservative state. The campaign ended up backfiring after One Nation arranged a controversial preference deal with the now-unpopular but governing Liberal Party where they would preference each other in a number of marginal seats. A number of candidates from both parties were critical of the deal, resulting in Hanson kicking some of the candidates out of the party while others resigned. The party ended up wining less than 5% of the statewide as a result.
12th Mar '17 5:09:05 AM TheAndyman14
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Hanson attempted another political comeback in 2015, returning as One Nation leader and contesting a seat in the Queensland Parliament. She lost by 200 votes.
** She finally won a seat in the 2016 federal election, being elected as a senator from Queensland. It was a double-dissolution election, so thanks to the reduced quota a second One Nation senator from Queensland was elected along with her.

to:

** Hanson attempted another political comeback in 2015, returning as One Nation leader and contesting a seat in the Queensland Parliament. She lost by 200 votes.
** She
votes.However, she finally won a seat in the 2016 federal election, being elected as a senator from Queensland. It was a double-dissolution election, so thanks to the reduced quota a second One Nation senator from Queensland was elected along with her.her, along with one senator each from NSW and WA. But the gravy train didn't last long, as the WA One Nation senator was found to be in the process of being convicted over the theft of a vehicle key in NSW. This led to a public falling out between the senator and Hanson, leading to him eventually quitting the party. The court eventually ruled him [[RoleEndingMisdemeanor bankrupt]] in early 2017, rendering his position in the Senate vacant. One Nation regained the seat after a vote recount.
** Despite the above issues as well as some questionable comments by her other senators, One Nation continued to ride high in the polls, encouraged by DonaldTrump's victory in the USA. They hoped to translate this into seats in the Western Australian election in March 2017, where some polls had them picking up to 13% of the vote in a largely conservative state. The campaign ended up backfiring after One Nation arranged a controversial preference deal with the now-unpopular but governing Liberal Party where they would preference each other in a number of marginal seats. A number of candidates from both parties were critical of the deal, resulting in Hanson kicking some of the candidates out of the party while others resigned. The party ended up wining less than 5% of the statewide as a result.
11th Feb '17 3:30:58 AM AirofMystery
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Menzies had the nickname "Pig Iron Bob" due to his promotions of iron exports to Japan in the thirties. The joke (and it says a lot about Australians that this is a joke) is that the Japanese [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI gave it back]] soon after.

to:

*** Menzies had the nickname "Pig Iron Bob" due to his promotions of iron exports to Japan in the thirties. The joke (and it says a lot about Australians that this is a joke) is that the Japanese [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII gave it back]] soon after.
28th Dec '16 3:06:06 AM ClatoLawa
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Malcolm Turnbull''' (Liberal Party), since 14 September 2015. When things were getting ''really bad'' for the government, Turnbull finally stepped in and ousted Abbott in a quick and relatively bloodless contest that was over by midnight the day he announced it, with Julie Bishop supporting him as deputy leader of the Liberals. Turnbull's coup was largely welcomed by the Australian public, although it was a nightmare for the hard right, to say the least. For the left, it was a mixed blessing: Turnbull would be more moderate than Abbott, but probably harder to beat.\\
By the time Turnbull called the 2016 election, his honeymoon was over and he and the Coalition were facing a knife-edged battle to stay in power. They ultimately won, but with only 76 seats out of 150 including the non-voting Speaker literally the smallest majority government possible. Plus, despite changes in Senate rules to avoid "preference gaming" which resulted a rather hostile Senate in 2013, [[PyrrhicVictory the election returned an equally hostile Senate with an even larger cross-bench than before]] complete with ''two'' power blocs in the form of One Nation and the Nick Xenophon Team, both of whom hate each other and are likely much less inclined to capitulate to the government than Clive Palmer ever was, ''[[FromBadToWorse and the government needs both their support to pass anything not supported by Labor or the Greens.]]'' It's been barely a month since the election and Turnbull has already had to deal with plenty of party infighting and an emboldened right-wing who are still very bitter over the Abbot coup ([[http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/malcolm_turnbull_you_are_finished/ hell, the election result hadn't even been called before right-wing figures started calling for Turnbull's head]], forgetting that had Abbot taken his government to an election it would have been a ''bloodbath''). Turnbull has a monumental challenge before him, ''if'' he isn't the victim of a leadership coup during his term, [[HereWeGoAgain and people are already predicting he'll be out by the end of 2017...]]

to:

* '''Malcolm Turnbull''' (Liberal Party), since 14 September 2015. When things were getting ''really bad'' for the government, Turnbull finally stepped in and ousted Abbott in a quick and relatively bloodless contest that was over by midnight the day he announced it, with Julie Bishop supporting him as deputy leader of the Liberals. Turnbull's coup was largely welcomed by the Australian public, although it was a nightmare for the hard right, to say the least. For the left, it was initially seen as a mixed blessing: Turnbull would be more moderate than Abbott, but probably harder to beat.beat. However, it soon became apparent that Turnbull wasn't willing to change any Coalition policies, including those that he had publicly disagreed with Abbott on in the past (such as marriage equality and climate change).\\
By As a result, by the time Turnbull called the 2016 election, his honeymoon was over and he and the Coalition were facing a knife-edged battle to stay in power. They ultimately won, but with only 76 seats out of 150 including the non-voting Speaker literally the smallest majority government possible. Plus, despite changes in Senate rules to avoid "preference gaming" which resulted a rather hostile Senate in 2013, [[PyrrhicVictory the election returned an equally hostile Senate with an even larger cross-bench than before]] complete with ''two'' power blocs in the form of One Nation and the Nick Xenophon Team, both of whom hate each other and are likely much less inclined to capitulate to the government than Clive Palmer ever was, ''[[FromBadToWorse and the government needs both their support to pass anything not supported by Labor or the Greens.]]'' It's been barely Barely a month since after the election and election, Turnbull has had already had to deal with plenty of party infighting and an emboldened right-wing who are still very bitter over the Abbot coup ([[http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/malcolm_turnbull_you_are_finished/ hell, the election result hadn't even been called before right-wing figures started calling for Turnbull's head]], forgetting that had Abbot taken his government to an election it would have been a ''bloodbath''). Turnbull has a monumental challenge before him, ''if'' he isn't the victim of a leadership coup during his term, [[HereWeGoAgain and people are already predicting he'll be out by the end of 2017...]]
11th Oct '16 8:28:51 PM LorienTheYounger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In the technical sense, Australia does not have a two-party system. It's just that only two parties ever form government, two parties win the overwhelming majority of seats, and the only other party to have held a ministry in any government in the last 90 years is in a permanent, unending coalition with the Liberal Party. Other minor parties gaining any seats in the federal lower house at all is a very recent development, with the Greens first winning a single seat in 2010 (retained 2013) and Palmer United also winning one seat in 2013.

to:

In the technical sense, Australia does not have a two-party system. It's just that only two parties ever form government, two parties win the overwhelming majority of seats, and the only other party to have held a ministry in any government in the last 90 years is in a permanent, unending coalition with the Liberal Party. Other minor parties gaining any seats in the federal lower house at all is a very recent development, with the Greens first winning a their single seat in 2010 (retained 2013) and 2010, Palmer United also winning one seat in 2013.
2013 (since lost), and NXT winning one in 2016.
21st Aug '16 6:26:09 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Hughes was also instrumental in insisting that the Treaty of Versailles should oblige Germany to pay war reparations, ganging up with French PM Georges Clemenceau to browbeat Lloyd George into backing the measure. Reparations, of course, played a huge part in the collapse of the WeimarRepublic and the rise of Nazism. If only UsefulNotes/WoodrowWilson's style had been less HolierThanThou professorial lecturing and more annoying politicking...

to:

** Hughes was also instrumental in insisting that the Treaty of Versailles should oblige Germany to pay war reparations, ganging up with French PM Georges Clemenceau to browbeat Lloyd George into backing the measure. Reparations, of course, played a huge part in the collapse of the WeimarRepublic UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic and the rise of Nazism. If only UsefulNotes/WoodrowWilson's style had been less HolierThanThou professorial lecturing and more annoying politicking...
This list shows the last 10 events of 255. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.AustralianPolitics