History UsefulNotes / AspergerSyndrome

28th Jun '15 2:08:57 AM SeptimusHeap
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* '''Narrowly defined interests'''. One of their more obvious traits. People with AS tend to build up a lot of knowledge about their interests, which run the gamut of... well, everything. Some people are interested in things that are age-appropriate, some will be interested in things that either are viewed as "too old" or "too young" for them. Some people will be interested in things that many people are interested in, others will find obscure interests. Interests can also change from time to time some end up defining their lives with a certain interest, while others may [[FleetingPassionateHobbies change it every other week]], but while they are into one thing, be passionately so. Some people have one obsessive hobby and then 'sub-hobbies'. For example, their obsessive hobby is writing, but this is made less obvious by the way that they have in the past obsessed over ''{{Transformers}}'', ''SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''SylvanianFamilies,'' and even add new fandoms to the rotation, and so end up compiling a great deal of trivia and expensive collectibles about ALL these fandoms, but what all the fandoms have in common is that they intensely enjoy ''writing'' about them.
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* '''Narrowly defined interests'''. One of their more obvious traits. People with AS tend to build up a lot of knowledge about their interests, which run the gamut of... well, everything. Some people are interested in things that are age-appropriate, some will be interested in things that either are viewed as "too old" or "too young" for them. Some people will be interested in things that many people are interested in, others will find obscure interests. Interests can also change from time to time some end up defining their lives with a certain interest, while others may [[FleetingPassionateHobbies change it every other week]], but while they are into one thing, be passionately so. Some people have one obsessive hobby and then 'sub-hobbies'. For example, their obsessive hobby is writing, but this is made less obvious by the way that they have in the past obsessed over ''{{Transformers}}'', ''SonicTheHedgehog'' ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'', ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' and ''SylvanianFamilies,'' ''Franchise/SylvanianFamilies,'' and even add new fandoms to the rotation, and so end up compiling a great deal of trivia and expensive collectibles about ALL these fandoms, but what all the fandoms have in common is that they intensely enjoy ''writing'' about them.
30th Aug '14 1:24:07 AM Telcontar
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Typo
A large number of psychologists, mental health groups and people with Asperger's have started referring to people with the condition as "aspies", though some have mixed feelings about the term, even if it does make talking about them ''much'' more convenient. There is still a lot unknown about Asperger's Syndrome, as with most mental conditions, and research into the condition continues today. Likewise, the term "Neurotypical" is sometimes used as an in joke by people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders to refer to people who aren't diagnosed with one, and some use it as an insult or slur. Allistic is another term used to refer to non-autistic people, as neurotypical or neurodivergent can also refer to people with, say, bipolar disorder or depression. Alternatively, some consider it more polite to refer to someone with Asperger's as someone who '''has''' Asperger's. For example, saying "I talked with John who has Asperger's" rather than "I talked to John the Aspie". Putting the person first, before the disorder, is important to many people who either see it as just another trait such as hair or eye color or don't want to define the person by what they see as a disease that h or she has. Of course, like every other issue as to how to treat autistic people, not everyone agrees on this, as some may see it as patronizing. Most of the people who push for people-first language are, in fact, parents, rather than people who actually have Asperger's. Often, people who actually have autism spectrum disorders prefer to be referred to as "an autistic person" or "an autistic" rather than "someone with autism", because their autism is such an integral part of their identity. They know that any negative aspects of it could not be gotten rid of without also getting rid of the positive aspects, such as an amazing memory, or visual thinking.
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A large number of psychologists, mental health groups and people with Asperger's have started referring to people with the condition as "aspies", though some have mixed feelings about the term, even if it does make talking about them ''much'' more convenient. There is still a lot unknown about Asperger's Syndrome, as with most mental conditions, and research into the condition continues today. Likewise, the term "Neurotypical" is sometimes used as an in joke by people diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders to refer to people who aren't diagnosed with one, and some use it as an insult or slur. Allistic is another term used to refer to non-autistic people, as neurotypical or neurodivergent can also refer to people with, say, bipolar disorder or depression. Alternatively, some consider it more polite to refer to someone with Asperger's as someone who '''has''' Asperger's. For example, saying "I talked with John who has Asperger's" rather than "I talked to John the Aspie". Putting the person first, before the disorder, is important to many people who either see it as just another trait such as hair or eye color or don't want to define the person by what they see as a disease that h he or she has. Of course, like every other issue as to how to treat autistic people, not everyone agrees on this, as some may see it as patronizing. Most of the people who push for people-first language are, in fact, parents, rather than people who actually have Asperger's. Often, people who actually have autism spectrum disorders prefer to be referred to as "an autistic person" or "an autistic" rather than "someone with autism", because their autism is such an integral part of their identity. They know that any negative aspects of it could not be gotten rid of without also getting rid of the positive aspects, such as an amazing memory, or visual thinking.
11th Apr '14 9:58:42 PM FastEddie
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This is tends to bloat up. The subject has been covered. Please run any changes you think are important through the Locked Article thread in the workshop forum..
* '''Delays in social interaction'''. It's been called a "social skills learning disability", and for good reason: People with AS (often referred to as "Aspies" within their common community)and other sorts of autism have difficulty learning the non-verbal parts of social interaction, whether that's making small talk, dating etiquette, or just looking someone in the eye. Like anyone with a learning disability, people with AS can learn social skills - but it takes them a great deal of time and effort, and may always be difficult to do and imperfect in execution. For those wondering, this is the thing that causes most people on the Internet to self-diagnose, as it's usually the most visible symptom of AS. However, there are many factors to this problem with social interaction.
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* '''Delays in social interaction'''. ** It's been called a "social skills learning disability", and for good reason: People with AS (often referred to as "Aspies" within their common community)and other sorts of autism have difficulty learning the non-verbal parts of social interaction, whether that's making small talk, dating etiquette, or just looking someone in the eye. Like anyone with a learning disability, people with AS can learn social skills - but it takes them a great deal of time and effort, and may always be difficult to do and imperfect in execution. For those wondering, this is the thing that causes most people on the Internet to self-diagnose, as it's usually the most visible symptom of AS. However, there are many factors to this problem with social interaction.

* '''Literal Thinking.''' Along with logical thinking, nearly every aspect of Asperger Syndrome links back to how strongly this characteristic presents itself. Generally associated with their difficulties with metaphors, sarcasm, and satire. But to pretend the world is other than you see it as, is to the literal-minded Aspie an illogical and irrational course of action. This leads to them speaking their mind with no regard for the opinions of others, which makes them ''terrible'' liars. Those who are taught to be 'polite' and keep their thoughts to themselves are still prone to outbursts of emotion which can come as an unpleasant surprise to others and obviously doesn't help in social situations at all. ** Commonly Disputed Point - Many Aspies understand sarcasm, metaphor, analogy, and satire very well. Many can also be very adept liars due to their understanding of language and nuance (though lying tends to be rare and is usually for a deliberate and specific reason due to the effect it has on the Aspie's strong conscience). The point of dispute is that while taking things literally and straightforward is the "default mode" for most Aspies, it is by no means the only mode of operation. Furthermore, for many Aspies, the illogical aspect of pretending the world is other than that which it is lies less in the literal and direct thinking and more in that such self-delusion makes little sense to the Aspie mind as a general rule.
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* '''Literal Thinking.''' ''' ** Along with logical thinking, nearly every aspect of Asperger Syndrome links back to how strongly this characteristic presents itself. Generally associated with their difficulties with metaphors, sarcasm, and satire. But to pretend the world is other than you see it as, is to the literal-minded Aspie an illogical and irrational course of action. This leads to them speaking their mind with no regard for the opinions of others, which makes them ''terrible'' liars. Those who are taught to be 'polite' and keep their thoughts to themselves are still prone to outbursts of emotion which can come as an unpleasant surprise to others and obviously doesn't help in social situations at all. ** Commonly Disputed Point - This is a frequently disputed point. Many Aspies understand sarcasm, metaphor, analogy, and satire very well. Many can also be very adept liars due to their understanding of language and nuance (though lying tends to be rare and is usually for a deliberate and specific reason due to the effect it has on the Aspie's strong conscience). The point of dispute is that while taking things literally and straightforward is the "default mode" for most Aspies, it is by no means the only mode of operation. Furthermore, for many Aspies, the illogical aspect of pretending the world is other than that which it is lies less in the literal and direct thinking and more in that such self-delusion makes little sense to the Aspie mind as a general rule.

* '''Speech issues'''. There are a lot of issues that can arise with AS speech. [[SpockSpeak Some speak too formally.]] Some speak in a manner that is [[MotorMouth too fast]] or [[NoIndoorVoice too loud]]. Others will maintain a [[CreepyMonotone monotone]], have [[VerbalTic tics]] or wildly inflect. Again, it varies from person to person. A desire to be as precise as possible will often lead to SesquipedalianLoquaciousness, and oblique references and metaphors can lead to BluntMetaphorsTrauma. There may also be some stuttering, which may be countered by speaking louder (helps in debate team), and using extravagant hand/arm gestures to help convey one's meaning, in lieu of appropriate facial expressions.
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* '''Speech issues'''. ** There are a lot of issues that can arise with AS speech. [[SpockSpeak Some speak too formally.]] Some speak in a manner that is [[MotorMouth too fast]] or [[NoIndoorVoice too loud]]. Others will maintain a [[CreepyMonotone monotone]], have [[VerbalTic tics]] or wildly inflect. Again, it varies from person to person. A desire to be as precise as possible will often lead to SesquipedalianLoquaciousness, and oblique references and metaphors can lead to BluntMetaphorsTrauma. There may also be some stuttering, which may be countered by speaking louder (helps in debate team), and using extravagant hand/arm gestures to help convey one's meaning, in lieu of appropriate facial expressions.

If somebody offends you, then tells you they have Asperger Syndrome and that's why they offended you, you can generally tell if this is true by a simple observation - If the admittance is followed (or preceded) by a genuine apology, it may be true. If it's followed by the expectation that ''you'' should now apologise to ''them'' for being offended, they're probably just jerks. If they do neither, simply mentioning it, it's almost (but of course not certainly) always true and simply an observation with no blame or excuse for either side attached. \\ \\

* '''NoSenseOfHumour'''. This one's definitely wrong; while an odd or [[BlackComedy dark]] sense of humour is common, plenty of people with Asperger's aren't afraid to make jokes about themselves. This one most likely came about because people with Asperger's may simply not get a joke, especially situational ones, and thus not laugh. As noted, many Aspies have an unusually strong sense of compassion for others, and thus may find humor [[ComedicSociopathy based on random cruelty]] or [[ButtMonkey characters' gratuitous suffering]] [[DudeNotFunny upsetting rather than amusing]]. Also, while ''some'' Aspies may have difficulties [[DoesNotUnderstandSarcasm understanding sarcasm]], and find [[{{Irony}} irony]] an even tougher beast, others will not only understand sarcasm and/or irony, but range from occasional DeadpanSnarker to TheSnarkKnight. It very much depends on the person. Often the sense of humour is very dry, or depends on peculiar word-play only understood by the individual--see the Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} article on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duclod_Man Duclod Man]] for some good examples.
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* '''NoSenseOfHumour'''. ** This one's definitely wrong; while an odd or [[BlackComedy dark]] sense of humour is common, plenty of people with Asperger's aren't afraid to make jokes about themselves. This one most likely came about because people with Asperger's may simply not get a joke, especially situational ones, and thus not laugh. As noted, many Aspies have an unusually strong sense of compassion for others, and thus may find humor [[ComedicSociopathy based on random cruelty]] or [[ButtMonkey characters' gratuitous suffering]] [[DudeNotFunny upsetting rather than amusing]]. Also, while ''some'' Aspies may have difficulties [[DoesNotUnderstandSarcasm understanding sarcasm]], and find [[{{Irony}} irony]] an even tougher beast, others will not only understand sarcasm and/or irony, but range from occasional DeadpanSnarker to TheSnarkKnight. It very much depends on the person. Often the sense of humour is very dry, or depends on peculiar word-play only understood by the individual--see the Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} article on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duclod_Man Duclod Man]] for some good examples.

''Website/SomethingAwful'' has actually made a running joke out of both self-misdiagnosis and the attempts of actual people with Asperger's to learn to function with others and build supportive communities for themselves, with catchphrases like "Ass Burgers," and "'spergin out". This has since spread to the Internet in general, leading to a lot of people with the condition being reluctant to "out" themselves for fear of being similarly mocked. Sadly, over-diagnosing in RealLife is not uncommon either, resulting in specialist schools for students with autism containing many mere badly behaved brats alongside the children with neurological problems. This is very much comparable to the overdiagnosis of AttentionDeficitOohShiny in the past few years. Conversely, Asperger's was very commonly diagnosed as everything from ADHD to schizophrenia to mental retardation before the condition became well known. This has resulted in a HypeBacklash due to this and may be at least partially responsible for the joking and piss-talking that has since occurred.
11th Apr '14 9:51:43 PM system
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moderator restored to earlier version
11th Apr '14 9:04:03 PM PinkRangerV
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I have Asperger's. We have *fantastic* imaginations, thank you very much.
* '''Lack of Imagination'''. Related to NoSenseOfHumour above, it is frequently reported that Aspies have little to no imagination, but this is verging on CriticalResearchFailure; there's a (fairly popular) theory that Aspies have excellent imaginations. What they lack (and probably what the reports in question mean by Aspies having no imagination) is ''Social Imagination''; i.e., the ability to grasp that not everybody feels the same way. It requires "imagining" what another person is feeling, since you can't know for certain. To an Aspie, this is logical because ''you're not them'', and it's rooted in their difficulty to recognize emotions in others. Combined with their literal thinking and tendency to spend time more alone, this makes it tough to play "let's pretend"-type games like "Doctor and Nurse" and "Mom and Dad"; that is, games which involve more obvious displays of imagination. This lack of social imagination leads to them making meticulous plans which sadly don't allow for others' difference of opinions, or random events. To pretend the world could be other than you see it as is inconceivable; the bus schedule ''says'' it will be there at 12 -- how can that not be so? And now we need a new plan. Fortunately Aspies can make up new plans so quickly with their logical thinking that they sometimes seem to be planning on the fly.
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* '''Lack of Imagination'''. Related to NoSenseOfHumour above, it is frequently reported that Aspies have little to no imagination, but this is verging on CriticalResearchFailure; there's a (fairly popular) theory that Aspies have excellent imaginations. wonderful imaginations and often have things like imaginary friends far into adulthood (though this is common in neurotypicals as well). What they is most likely meant is a lack (and probably what the reports in question mean by Aspies having no imagination) is ''Social Imagination''; i.e., of social imagination, the ability to grasp that not everybody feels the same way. It requires "imagining" instinctively guess what another person is feeling, since you can't know for certain. To an Aspie, this is logical because ''you're not them'', and it's rooted in their difficulty to recognize emotions in others. Combined with their literal thinking and tendency to spend time more alone, this makes it tough to play "let's pretend"-type games like "Doctor and Nurse" and "Mom and Dad"; that is, games which involve more obvious displays of imagination.others feel. This lack of social imagination leads to them making meticulous plans which sadly don't allow for others' difference of opinions, or random events. To pretend the world could be other than you see it as is inconceivable; the bus schedule ''says'' it will be there at 12 -- how can that not be so? And now we need a new plan. Fortunately Aspies can make up new plans so quickly with their logical thinking that they sometimes seem to be planning on the fly. fly. ** There is a definite issue with most Aspies and childhood games--the root cause lies in schema, the mental framework a person has for a concept, like 'Doctor' or 'Mom' or 'Dad'. Aspies have very definite schema, and when the schema are confronted with people claiming they're wrong, are usually just confused. It takes a lot of work to rewire the schema and get over the cognitive dissonance--a sort of clash of ideas--that this causes, and it makes childhood games incredibly difficult to understand. It doesn't help that children with Asperger's or autism don't always *understand* wanting to hurt others, and games like Truth or Dare or games with winners and losers don't make any sense on the basis of 'everyone is equal, why aren't we sharing?'.
11th Apr '14 8:48:22 PM PinkRangerV
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I have Asperger's. Apologizing is not a good litmus test and will result in hurt feelings for everyone.
* '''Lack of social 'empathy''''. Note: This doesnt mean sociopathy. Another biggie, the term "empathy" is misleading, as people with AS do feel and appreciate emotions, but they are unsure of what emotion ''others'' are feeling. Extreme literal thinking means they can't see why a person would ''pretend'' to feel otherwise than they do, and this difficulty is solved by the only logical course of action - to paste in the emotion of whose emotions they are aware - usually themselves. Thus, if they feel happy, they assume the other person feels happy until they are informed otherwise. Unfortunately, even when knowing how the other is truly feeling, they may not know what response is wanted. And if they want to help, logic dictates they respond with how ''they'' would want to be treated, even though [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenRule it isn't always accurate]].\\
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* '''Lack of social 'empathy''''. Note: This doesnt mean sociopathy. Another biggie, the term "empathy" is misleading, as people with AS do feel have higher 'sympathy' than most people, but cannot tell what 'other people' are feeling, and appreciate emotions, but they are unsure of what emotion ''others'' are feeling.have to guess. Extreme literal thinking means they can't see why a person would ''pretend'' to feel otherwise than they do, and this difficulty is solved by the only logical course of action - to paste in the emotion of whose emotions they are aware - usually themselves. Thus, if they feel happy, they assume the other person feels happy until they are informed otherwise. Unfortunately, even when knowing how the other is truly feeling, they may not know what response is wanted. And if they want to help, logic dictates they respond with how ''they'' would want to be treated, even though [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenRule it isn't always accurate]].\\

If somebody offends you, then tells you they have Asperger Syndrome and that's why they offended you, you can generally tell if this is true by a simple observation - If the admittance is followed (or preceded) by a genuine apology, it may be true. If it's followed by the expectation that ''you'' should now apologise to ''them'' for being offended, they're probably just jerks. If they do neither, simply mentioning it, it's almost (but of course not certainly) always true and simply an observation with no blame or excuse for either side attached. \\
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If somebody offends you, then tells you they have Asperger Syndrome and that's why they offended you, you can generally You cannot tell if this is true by someone has Asperger's Syndrome, or any other type of autism, without them telling you. Previously there was a simple observation - If the admittance is followed (or preceded) by a genuine apology, it may be true. If it's followed by the expectation note here saying that ''you'' should now apologise to ''them'' if someone with Asperger's apologizes for being offended, they're offending you, they probably just jerks. If they do neither, simply mentioning it, it's almost (but of course not certainly) always true and simply an observation have it. This is untrue; people with no blame autism of all forms often struggle with apologizing, giving\recieving thanks, and other forms of acknowledging emotions. Do not use apologies or excuse for either side attached. emotive skills as a 'test' of autism. There is none.\\
24th Mar '14 10:57:57 PM bt8257
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** In interaction with other Aspies, an Aspie will often be able to read them and their behaviour with surprising intuitiveness. They will also usually form tight, interdependent groups of friends with Aspgergers.
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** In interaction with other Aspies, an Aspie will often be able to read them and their behaviour with surprising intuitiveness. They will also usually form tight, interdependent groups of friends with Aspgergers.Asperger's.

There are a number of common fallacies, misconceptions and outright lies surrounding Asperger's and other autism spectrum disorders. These '''common misconceptions''' include:
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There are a number of common fallacies, misconceptions and outright lies surrounding Asperger's and other autism spectrum disorders. These '''common misconceptions''' include:
15th Mar '14 1:15:03 PM CodenameBravo
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* '''Motion and Motor Control'''. Associated with AS are various possible satellite traits: Physical clumsiness; tendency to move in repetitive ways, especially when stressed, called "stimming" (think everything from tapping your foot to rocking or flapping your hands); stiff and awkward walk; extreme sensitivity to sensory input (lights, noise, smells, fabrics...), social anxiety (not actually AS itself but often found alongside it), anxiety in general, a tendency towards epilepsy, difficulty planning and executing plans, [[LiteralMinded excessive literal thinking]], [[{{Keet}} hyper]][[GenkiGirl activity]], a strong attachment to routines or familiar objects, and food allergies. Being able to focus to an abnormal level or for an abnormal length of time is common, as is difficulty in multitasking and dividing attention. These may manifest in many different ways and combinations depending on the person.
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* '''Motion and Motor Control'''. Associated with AS are various possible satellite traits: Physical clumsiness; tendency to move in repetitive ways, especially when stressed, called "stimming" (think everything from tapping your foot to rocking or flapping your hands); stiff and awkward walk; extreme sensitivity to sensory input (lights, noise, smells, fabrics...fabrics, information...), social anxiety (not actually AS itself but often found alongside it), anxiety in general, a tendency towards epilepsy, difficulty planning and executing plans, [[LiteralMinded excessive literal thinking]], [[{{Keet}} hyper]][[GenkiGirl activity]], a strong attachment to routines or familiar objects, and food allergies. Being able to focus to an abnormal level or for an abnormal length of time is common, as is difficulty in multitasking and dividing attention. These may manifest in many different ways and combinations depending on the person.
13th Feb '14 12:53:20 PM Midna
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** Unusual friends. People with AS often have trouble making friends their own age, since the hobbies they developed as children, say for a cartoon show, are not so common among the 30+ age range. They don't always notice if their friends make jokes at their expense (which leads to some people mistakenly assuming that they don't care. If they ''do'' notice, the chance is 90% that they ''[[BerserkButton will]]'' [[BerserkButton care]]), or what their background is, or their age, or their political or religious beliefs, or if they have disabilities, just as long as they show some interest in the "aspies's" own field of interest. This is part of what makes those with AS so accepting of others and often results in them being friends with other social outcasts. They also tend to prefer a small, close-knit group of friends as opposed to a wide social network. In some unfortunate cases this can result in them making very poor choices for their friends.
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** Unusual friends. People with AS often have trouble making friends their own age, since the hobbies they developed as children, say for a cartoon show, are not so common among the 30+ age range. They don't always notice if their friends make jokes at their expense (which leads to some people mistakenly assuming that they don't care. If they ''do'' notice, the chance is 90% that they ''[[BerserkButton ''[[DudeNotFunny will]]'' [[BerserkButton [[DudeNotFunny care]]), or what their background is, or their age, or their political or religious beliefs, or if they have disabilities, just as long as they show some interest in the "aspies's" own field of interest. This is part of what makes those with AS so accepting of others and often results in them being friends with other social outcasts. They also tend to prefer a small, close-knit group of friends as opposed to a wide social network. In some unfortunate cases this can result in them making very poor choices for their friends.
24th Jan '14 12:27:18 PM LongLiveHumour
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namespaces
Asperger Syndrome was discovered by Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger in 1944. He noticed that some of the children in his practice were somewhat socially awkward, and began studying them. Since obviously there wasn't a name for it at the time, his official term for them was 'Autistic Psychopaths', though at the time 'psychopath' didn't quite have the negative tone it has today. Indeed, good old Hans had a generally positive view of what he called the "[[ChildProdigy Little Professors]]" due to their ability to memorize facts, and unlike his colleagues at the time was very positive about what Autistic children, if given a supportive attitude, could achieve.[[note]]ValuesDissonance: the highly disciplined, militaristic and religious background of people born before WorldWarOne and who lived in [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany the Third Reich]] frowned on "unruly and misbehaving" children and tended to sympathize with those "disciplined and bookish".[[/note]]
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Asperger Syndrome was discovered by Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger in 1944. He noticed that some of the children in his practice were somewhat socially awkward, and began studying them. Since obviously there wasn't a name for it at the time, his official term for them was 'Autistic Psychopaths', though at the time 'psychopath' didn't quite have the negative tone it has today. Indeed, good old Hans had a generally positive view of what he called the "[[ChildProdigy Little Professors]]" due to their ability to memorize facts, and unlike his colleagues at the time was very positive about what Autistic children, if given a supportive attitude, could achieve.[[note]]ValuesDissonance: the highly disciplined, militaristic and religious background of people born before WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne and who lived in [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany the Third Reich]] frowned on "unruly and misbehaving" children and tended to sympathize with those "disciplined and bookish".[[/note]]

** Asperger's was previously thought to be around four times as common among men as women, but is now believed to have roughly the same rate of frequency. There are several reasons for the apparent discrepancy, including that the obsessions associated with female Asperger's (ex. reading the same book many times) are less obvious than those associated with male Asperger's (ex. learning everything about WorldWarI airplane engines), and many ASD traits (e.g. shyness) are not seen as unusual in women, or as socially crippling. Part of the problem is that most of the data comes from male subjects and thus may bias diagnoses, such that Asperger's is diagnosed more frequently among men.
to:
** Asperger's was previously thought to be around four times as common among men as women, but is now believed to have roughly the same rate of frequency. There are several reasons for the apparent discrepancy, including that the obsessions associated with female Asperger's (ex. reading the same book many times) are less obvious than those associated with male Asperger's (ex. learning everything about WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI airplane engines), and many ASD traits (e.g. shyness) are not seen as unusual in women, or as socially crippling. Part of the problem is that most of the data comes from male subjects and thus may bias diagnoses, such that Asperger's is diagnosed more frequently among men.
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