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History UsefulNotes / ArabIsraeliConflict

12th May '16 2:10:34 AM Doug86
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It should also be noted that despite its length (well over 60 years) and the attention it gets on the international media, the ArabIsraeliConflict is actually one of the ''least'' bloody of the ongoing conflicts in the world today, with the combined death toll [[http://www.danielpipes.org/4990/arab-israeli-fatalities-rank-49th not even reaching the 60,000 mark.]] On the other hand, literally ''everyone'' in the area, Israelis and Palestinians, knows ''[[ItsPersonal someone]]'' [[ItsPersonal who was killed or injured by the other side]]... so perhaps the stubbornness involved is a little more understandable, no?

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It should also be noted that despite its length (well over 60 years) and the attention it gets on the international media, the ArabIsraeliConflict Arab-Israeli Conflict is actually one of the ''least'' bloody of the ongoing conflicts in the world today, with the combined death toll [[http://www.danielpipes.org/4990/arab-israeli-fatalities-rank-49th not even reaching the 60,000 mark.]] On the other hand, literally ''everyone'' in the area, Israelis and Palestinians, knows ''[[ItsPersonal someone]]'' [[ItsPersonal who was killed or injured by the other side]]... so perhaps the stubbornness involved is a little more understandable, no?
5th May '16 4:29:06 PM Faberlich
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Added DiffLines:

* The 2009 film ''Film/{{Lebanon}}'' follows a tank crew during the 1982 invasion in Lebanon.
12th Apr '16 11:02:40 PM SSJMagus
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As a result of the Oslo Accords, [[{{UsefulNotes/Jordan}} Jordan]] (whose population is at least 50% Palestinian refugees) became the second Arab country to formally recognize Israel (in 1994). Before this time, Jordan had had good relations with Israel under the table; the agreements allowed these relations to become more open.

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As a result of the Oslo Accords, [[{{UsefulNotes/Jordan}} Jordan]] (whose population is at least 50% Palestinian refugees) became the second Arab country to formally recognize Israel (in 1994). Before this time, Jordan had had good relations with Israel under the table; table (King Hussein, a military-trained helicopter pilot of considerable skill, would periodically fly his personal chopper under the radar to secret meetings in Israel); the agreements allowed these relations to become more open.
24th Jan '16 2:20:40 PM Morgenthaler
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* TheClash's ''Rock The Casbah'' has been interpreted to be about this, although it was really about [[BannedInChina censorship of popular music]] by Ayatollah Khomeini after seizing power in {{Iran}} in 1979. Subverted in the music video, where a [[AllJewsAreAshkenazi Haredi Jew]] and an [[ArabOilSheikh Arab sheikh]] are seen skank-dancing together all the way to a Clash concert.

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* TheClash's Music/TheClash's ''Rock The Casbah'' has been interpreted to be about this, although it was really about [[BannedInChina censorship of popular music]] by Ayatollah Khomeini after seizing power in {{Iran}} UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} in 1979. Subverted in the music video, where a [[AllJewsAreAshkenazi Haredi Jew]] and an [[ArabOilSheikh Arab sheikh]] are seen skank-dancing together all the way to a Clash concert.
24th Jan '16 12:58:39 PM Morgenthaler
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See also: IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles, EgyptiansWithEagleFighters, and WarriorsOfTheDesertWind.

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See also: IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles, EgyptiansWithEagleFighters, UsefulNotes/IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles, UsefulNotes/EgyptiansWithEagleFighters, and WarriorsOfTheDesertWind.
UsefulNotes/WarriorsOfTheDesertWind.



* WorldWarOne: Actually ''not'' an example, since the TurksWithTroops hated almost everybody equally and Arab Nationalists fought alongside Zionists in the Western Allied militaries to throw them out of what is now Israel/Palestine, which they eventually did to much rejoicing. What makes this important enough to list is that it sets the groundwork of the conflict when the time came to divvy up the spoils. This was because the British, in order to bring both the Jews and the Arabs as into the war, [[PlayingBothSides simultaneously promised]] Palestine to both the Zionists (in the Balfour Declaration) ''and'' the Arabs under Hussein bin Ali, Sharif of Mecca (in the [=McMahon=]–Hussein Correspondence).[[note]]Although Britain may have actually been planning to double-cross both sides and share the Ottoman territory with the French through the Sykes-Picot Agreement instead.[[/note]] And for the purposes of this article, ''that'' is [[StartOfDarkness where the big problems start]].
* The WorldWarOne Aftermath and the 1920's: What is now the British Mandate of Palestine receives two hordes of very different immigrants and sees the fault lines for what comes later. Jews and Zionists come in to create the dream project they've envisioned for so long and often to escape a war-torn Europe and Middle East while Arabs -- most of whom were poor tenant farmers from the North who were arguably worse than Serfs under Ottoman law -- take their chance to ditch their [[FeudalOverlord feudal overlords]] and the war ravaged homelands to try and run to what they hope will be greener pastures in Israel/Palestine. Both succeed rather well, and within a matter of months huge and relatively thriving immigrant communities have latched on to the pre-existing Israeli and Arab communities [[FromBadToWorse just in time to take sides in the tussle between the Western Empires and the Hashemites over who gets the Middle East]]. This eventually culminates in a French war to toss a Hashemite monarchy out of Syria that has some splash over into the Palestinian Mandate. This doesn't seem like much, but it does trigger ideological awakenings of Arab nationalism among the Palestinian Arabs and Zionism among the settler Jews. Quickly takes militant turns, and soon the decade is wracked by increasing tension and infighting. See the Battle of Tel-Hai and the pogroms of 1920, 1921, and 1929. In the midst of all this, the British decide to appoint a new Mufti of Jerusalem to legitimize their rule and decide on [[TheFundamentalist Amin al-Husseini]], a distinguished cleric and Haj. [[EveryoneHasStandards In spite of warnings from just about everybody else-including the Arab community]] they eventually do so. This proves to be a big mistake.

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* WorldWarOne: UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne: Actually ''not'' an example, since the TurksWithTroops hated almost everybody equally and Arab Nationalists fought alongside Zionists in the Western Allied militaries to throw them out of what is now Israel/Palestine, which they eventually did to much rejoicing. What makes this important enough to list is that it sets the groundwork of the conflict when the time came to divvy up the spoils. This was because the British, in order to bring both the Jews and the Arabs as into the war, [[PlayingBothSides simultaneously promised]] Palestine to both the Zionists (in the Balfour Declaration) ''and'' the Arabs under Hussein bin Ali, Sharif of Mecca (in the [=McMahon=]–Hussein Correspondence).[[note]]Although Britain may have actually been planning to double-cross both sides and share the Ottoman territory with the French through the Sykes-Picot Agreement instead.[[/note]] And for the purposes of this article, ''that'' is [[StartOfDarkness where the big problems start]].
* The WorldWarOne WWI Aftermath and the 1920's: What is now the British Mandate of Palestine receives two hordes of very different immigrants and sees the fault lines for what comes later. Jews and Zionists come in to create the dream project they've envisioned for so long and often to escape a war-torn Europe and Middle East while Arabs -- most of whom were poor tenant farmers from the North who were arguably worse than Serfs under Ottoman law -- take their chance to ditch their [[FeudalOverlord feudal overlords]] and the war ravaged homelands to try and run to what they hope will be greener pastures in Israel/Palestine. Both succeed rather well, and within a matter of months huge and relatively thriving immigrant communities have latched on to the pre-existing Israeli and Arab communities [[FromBadToWorse just in time to take sides in the tussle between the Western Empires and the Hashemites over who gets the Middle East]]. This eventually culminates in a French war to toss a Hashemite monarchy out of Syria that has some splash over into the Palestinian Mandate. This doesn't seem like much, but it does trigger ideological awakenings of Arab nationalism among the Palestinian Arabs and Zionism among the settler Jews. Quickly takes militant turns, and soon the decade is wracked by increasing tension and infighting. See the Battle of Tel-Hai and the pogroms of 1920, 1921, and 1929. In the midst of all this, the British decide to appoint a new Mufti of Jerusalem to legitimize their rule and decide on [[TheFundamentalist Amin al-Husseini]], a distinguished cleric and Haj. [[EveryoneHasStandards In spite of warnings from just about everybody else-including the Arab community]] they eventually do so. This proves to be a big mistake.
11th Dec '15 11:43:07 AM Voodoo
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* The Suez War, 1956: Nasser-having sponsored various terrorist strikes on Israel and the outgoing British forces for a while-closed the Suez to Western (especially Israeli and British) shipping in a game of oneupmanship to try and exert squatter's rights over the Suez Canal from the British who still theoretically owned it.[[note]]It is a ''little'' more complicated than that--the way the Canal got built has long been a point of resentment for Egyptians, as it involved a Frenchman convincing the somewhat gullible Egyptian monarch into borrowing unnecessarily large amounts of money from the French and British governments, only for Egypt to be unable to pay (in part because of those debts, and in part because of the ''other'' loans the monarch had taken out to fund his futile wars against UsefulNotes/{{Ethiopia}}), which led to the Brits and French basically putting Egypt under conservatorship, running the country themselves to ensure they were paid, and when that led to a native revolt, the British military came in and essentially took over. You can see why the Egyptian people were not happy about how the canal got there.[[/note]] In response Israel attacked Egypt as part of an Anglo-French ruse (namely a painfully-obvious BatmanGambit) to prevent the nationalization of the Suez Canal; Israel seized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, while Britain and France took over the Canal itself to "separate" the Egyptians and Israelis "in the cause of peace." While the unprepared Egyptians frankly got their asses kicked militarily, clever Cold War political maneuvering by the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser (convincing both the Soviet Union and United States to oppose the venture) made up for that; France and Britain soon folded and evacuated their troops. Israel withstood combined Soviet and American pressure into 1957, obtaining a new cease-fire agreement with Egypt that ended the blockade of Israel's access to the Red Sea, demilitarized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, and creating the UN peace-keeping force to place in those two territories as a means to keep them separate.[[note]]This particular idea was the brainchild of [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Canadian Prime Minister]] Lester B. Pearson; he received the 1957 Nobel Prize for Peace for this and his diplomatic efforts in ending the war.[[/note]] This was regarded as a humiliation by the Egyptians. Arabs often call this one ''Al-`Idwan al-Thalathi''-the Tripartite Aggression (i.e. Israel, Britain, and France; thanks to colonialism, the Arabs had plenty of reason to hate the last two).

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* The Suez War, 1956: Nasser-having sponsored various terrorist strikes on Israel and the outgoing British forces for a while-closed the Suez to Western (especially Israeli and British) shipping in a game of oneupmanship to try and exert squatter's rights over the Suez Canal from the British who still theoretically owned it.[[note]]It is a ''little'' more complicated than that--the way the Canal got built has long been a point of resentment for Egyptians, as it involved a Frenchman convincing the somewhat gullible Egyptian monarch into borrowing unnecessarily large amounts of money from the French and British governments, only for Egypt to be unable to pay (in part because of those debts, and in part because of the ''other'' loans the monarch had taken out to fund his futile wars against UsefulNotes/{{Ethiopia}}), which led to the Brits and French basically putting Egypt under conservatorship, running the country themselves to ensure they were paid, and when that led to a native revolt, the British military came in and essentially took over. You can see why the Egyptian people were not happy about how the canal got there.[[/note]] In response Israel attacked Egypt as part of an Anglo-French ruse (namely a painfully-obvious BatmanGambit) to prevent the nationalization of the Suez Canal; Israel seized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, while Britain and France took over the Canal itself to "separate" the Egyptians and Israelis "in the cause of peace." While the unprepared Egyptians frankly got their asses kicked militarily, clever Cold War political maneuvering by the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser (convincing both the Soviet Union and United States to oppose the venture) made up for that; France and Britain soon folded and evacuated their troops. Israel withstood combined Soviet and American pressure into 1957, obtaining a new cease-fire agreement with Egypt that ended the blockade of Israel's access to the Red Sea, demilitarized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, and creating the UN peace-keeping force to place in those two territories as a means to keep them separate.[[note]]This particular idea was the brainchild of Canadian poitician (and later [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Canadian Prime Minister]] Lester B. Pearson; he received the 1957 Nobel Prize for Peace for this and his diplomatic efforts in ending the war.[[/note]] This was regarded as a humiliation by the Egyptians. Arabs often call this one ''Al-`Idwan al-Thalathi''-the Tripartite Aggression (i.e. Israel, Britain, and France; thanks to colonialism, the Arabs had plenty of reason to hate the last two).
11th Dec '15 2:16:15 AM jormis29
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* The graphic novel ''{{Palestine}}'' by JoeSacco talks about the daily life in the Palestinian territories. ''FootnotesInGaza'' is a {{Rashomon}}-esque account on a single "footnote in history", the killing of 100 Palestinian men in the town of Rafah in 1956.

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* The graphic novel ''{{Palestine}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Palestine}}'' by JoeSacco talks about the daily life in the Palestinian territories. ''FootnotesInGaza'' is a {{Rashomon}}-esque RashomonStyle account on a single "footnote in history", the killing of 100 Palestinian men in the town of Rafah in 1956.
25th Nov '15 7:56:11 AM Morgenthaler
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The actual reasons behind the Arab invasion were a bit more complicated; while there were plenty among the Islamist and/or Arab ultra-nationalist factions that wanted to wipe the Israelis from the face of the map, the Arab governments were almost all very unpopular at home–most of them on the verge of revolution–and so they [[WagTheDog stirred up resentment against the Jewish settlers in Palestine to get the people's attention off the home front]]. Many historians–even Arab ones–now regard this as a huge but inevitable mistake: this [[GoneHorriblyRight worked too well]], and the Arab governments found themselves [[OhCrap facing a war that they knew they were going to lose.]] At the end, the Arab governments' plans all failed utterly: within the next ten years, Egypt and Iraq both had revolutions/coups d'etat, Jordan's king was assassinated by a disgruntled Palestinian, Syria entered a ten-year period where coups happened not once but ''twice'' a year, and Lebanon had to call in the [[SemperFi United States Marines]] [[FriendlyEnemy and make a deal with the Israelis]] to avert a civil war.

to:

The actual reasons behind the Arab invasion were a bit more complicated; while there were plenty among the Islamist and/or Arab ultra-nationalist factions that wanted to wipe the Israelis from the face of the map, the Arab governments were almost all very unpopular at home–most of them on the verge of revolution–and so they [[WagTheDog stirred up resentment against the Jewish settlers in Palestine to get the people's attention off the home front]].front. Many historians–even Arab ones–now regard this as a huge but inevitable mistake: this [[GoneHorriblyRight worked too well]], and the Arab governments found themselves [[OhCrap facing a war that they knew they were going to lose.]] At the end, the Arab governments' plans all failed utterly: within the next ten years, Egypt and Iraq both had revolutions/coups d'etat, Jordan's king was assassinated by a disgruntled Palestinian, Syria entered a ten-year period where coups happened not once but ''twice'' a year, and Lebanon had to call in the [[SemperFi United States Marines]] [[FriendlyEnemy and make a deal with the Israelis]] to avert a civil war.
27th Oct '15 9:33:26 PM Nohbody
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* Looms large in the {{backstory}} of the Creator/TomClancy novel ''Literature/TheSumOfAllFears'' (the film version [[WesternTerrorists substituted Nazis for Arabs).]]
* The novel and film of the novel ''[=Exodus=]'', by Leon Uris, deals with the events surrounding the 1948 creation of the state of Israel and the invasion by Arab states that immediately followed.

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* Looms The conflict in general looms large in the {{backstory}} of the Creator/TomClancy novel ''Literature/TheSumOfAllFears'' (the film version [[WesternTerrorists substituted Nazis for Arabs).]]
Arabs]]), with the primary PlotDevice having been lost during the Six Days War only to be discovered decades later, and a peace agreement is reached to end the conflict.
* The novel and film of the novel ''[=Exodus=]'', ''Exodus'', by Leon Uris, deals with the events surrounding the 1948 creation of the state of Israel and the invasion by Arab states that immediately followed.



* The ''LeftBehind'' series posits an end to the conflict (based on Israel's amazing advances in ''agriculture'' that lead it to become a breadbasket several times more productive per acre than the best farmland and crops today) and leading to the Arab countries (or rather what's left of them, with the Biblical "Nile-to-Euphrates" prophecy requiring Israel to absorb all of Syria and Jordan and good chunks of Egypt and Iraq) becoming Israeli puppets. All this is in preparation for Israel to miraculously survive an out-of-the-blue nuclear attack by Russia and Ethiopia.

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* The ''LeftBehind'' ''Literature/LeftBehind'' series posits an end to the conflict (based on Israel's amazing advances in ''agriculture'' that lead it to become a breadbasket several times more productive per acre than the best farmland and crops today) and leading to the Arab countries (or rather what's left of them, with the Biblical "Nile-to-Euphrates" prophecy requiring Israel to absorb all of Syria and Jordan and good chunks of Egypt and Iraq) becoming Israeli puppets. All this is in preparation for Israel to miraculously survive an out-of-the-blue nuclear attack by Russia and Ethiopia.
15th Oct '15 10:41:48 PM karstovich2
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* The Suez War, 1956: Nasser-having sponsored various terrorist strikes on Israel and the outgoing British forces for a while-closed the Suez to Western (especially Israeli and British) shipping in a game of oneupmanship to try and exert squatter's rights over the Suez Canal from the British who still theoretically owned it. In response Israel attacked Egypt as part of an Anglo-French ruse (namely a painfully-obvious BatmanGambit) to prevent the nationalization of the Suez Canal; Israel seized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, while Britain and France took over the Canal itself to "separate" the Egyptians and Israelis "in the cause of peace." While the unprepared Egyptians frankly got their asses kicked militarily, clever Cold War political maneuvering by the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser (convincing both the Soviet Union and United States to oppose the venture) made up for that; France and Britain soon folded and evacuated their troops. Israel withstood combined Soviet and American pressure into 1957, obtaining a new cease-fire agreement with Egypt that ended the blockade of Israel's access to the Red Sea, demilitarized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, and creating the UN peace-keeping force to place in those two territories as a means to keep them separate.[[note]]This particular idea was the brainchild of [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Canadian Prime Minister]] Lester B. Pearson; he received the 1957 Nobel Prize for Peace for this and his diplomatic efforts in ending the war.[[/note]] This was regarded as a humiliation by the Egyptians. Arabs often call this one ''Al-`Idwan al-Thalathi''-the Tripartite Aggression (i.e. Israel, Britain, and France; thanks to colonialism, the Arabs had plenty of reason to hate the last two).

to:

* The Suez War, 1956: Nasser-having sponsored various terrorist strikes on Israel and the outgoing British forces for a while-closed the Suez to Western (especially Israeli and British) shipping in a game of oneupmanship to try and exert squatter's rights over the Suez Canal from the British who still theoretically owned it. [[note]]It is a ''little'' more complicated than that--the way the Canal got built has long been a point of resentment for Egyptians, as it involved a Frenchman convincing the somewhat gullible Egyptian monarch into borrowing unnecessarily large amounts of money from the French and British governments, only for Egypt to be unable to pay (in part because of those debts, and in part because of the ''other'' loans the monarch had taken out to fund his futile wars against UsefulNotes/{{Ethiopia}}), which led to the Brits and French basically putting Egypt under conservatorship, running the country themselves to ensure they were paid, and when that led to a native revolt, the British military came in and essentially took over. You can see why the Egyptian people were not happy about how the canal got there.[[/note]] In response Israel attacked Egypt as part of an Anglo-French ruse (namely a painfully-obvious BatmanGambit) to prevent the nationalization of the Suez Canal; Israel seized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, while Britain and France took over the Canal itself to "separate" the Egyptians and Israelis "in the cause of peace." While the unprepared Egyptians frankly got their asses kicked militarily, clever Cold War political maneuvering by the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser (convincing both the Soviet Union and United States to oppose the venture) made up for that; France and Britain soon folded and evacuated their troops. Israel withstood combined Soviet and American pressure into 1957, obtaining a new cease-fire agreement with Egypt that ended the blockade of Israel's access to the Red Sea, demilitarized the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, and creating the UN peace-keeping force to place in those two territories as a means to keep them separate.[[note]]This particular idea was the brainchild of [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics Canadian Prime Minister]] Lester B. Pearson; he received the 1957 Nobel Prize for Peace for this and his diplomatic efforts in ending the war.[[/note]] This was regarded as a humiliation by the Egyptians. Arabs often call this one ''Al-`Idwan al-Thalathi''-the Tripartite Aggression (i.e. Israel, Britain, and France; thanks to colonialism, the Arabs had plenty of reason to hate the last two).
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