History UsefulNotes / ArabIsraeliConflict

20th Apr '18 1:29:49 PM azul120
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As a result of the Oslo Accords, [[{{UsefulNotes/Jordan}} Jordan]] (whose population is at least 50% Palestinian refugees) became the second Arab country to formally recognize Israel (in 1994). Before this time, Jordan had had good relations with Israel under the table (King Hussein, a military-trained helicopter pilot of considerable skill, would periodically fly his personal chopper under the radar to secret meetings in Israel); the agreements allowed these relations to become more open.

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As a result of the Oslo Accords, [[{{UsefulNotes/Jordan}} Jordan]] UsefulNotes/Jordan (whose population is at least 50% Palestinian refugees) became the second Arab country to formally recognize Israel (in 1994). Before this time, Jordan had had good relations with Israel under the table (King Hussein, a military-trained helicopter pilot of considerable skill, would periodically fly his personal chopper under the radar to secret meetings in Israel); the agreements allowed these relations to become more open.



* ''Jerusalem'' by Guy Delisle is based on his trip to the divided city, and serves as a microcosm of the conflict. He comments on this at length, and the book has a {{downer ending}} regarding it-a Jewish settler taking the house of a Palestinian in Hebron.

to:

* ''Jerusalem'' by Guy Delisle is based on his trip to the divided city, and serves as a microcosm of the conflict. He comments on this at length, and the book has a {{downer ending}} DownerEnding regarding it-a it - a Jewish settler taking the house of a Palestinian in Hebron.



* ''Sword of Gideon'', and the Spielberg remake ''{{Film/Munich}}''.

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* ''Sword of Gideon'', and the Spielberg remake ''{{Film/Munich}}''.''Film/{{Munich}}''.



* The Gabriel Allon novel series centers around the titular Mossad agent in his various exploits involving the conflict, and increasingly becomes an {{author tract}} over time regarding it.

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* The Gabriel Allon novel series centers around the titular Mossad agent in his various exploits involving the conflict, and increasingly becomes an {{author tract}} AuthorTract over time regarding it.
24th Mar '18 12:03:52 PM StarSword
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* Music/TheClash's ''Rock The Casbah'' has been interpreted to be about this, although it was really about [[BannedInChina censorship of popular music]] by Ayatollah Khomeini after seizing power in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} in 1979. Subverted in the music video, where a [[AllJewsAreAshkenazi Haredi Jew]] and an [[ArabOilSheikh Arab sheikh]] are seen skank-dancing together all the way to a Clash concert.

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* Music/TheClash's ''Rock The Casbah'' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJ9r8LMU9bQ "Rock the Casbah"]] has been interpreted to be about this, although it was really about [[BannedInChina censorship of popular music]] by Ayatollah Khomeini after seizing power in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} in 1979. Subverted in the music video, where a [[AllJewsAreAshkenazi Haredi Jew]] and an [[ArabOilSheikh Arab sheikh]] are seen skank-dancing together all the way to a Clash concert.concert.
* Music/{{Sabaton}}'s [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rix1VZOYfSU "Counterstrike"]] is about the Six-Day War from the Israeli perspective. Understandably it's a crowd-pleaser when the band plays Israel.
-->''[[Literature/BookOfGenesis Six days of fire]]\\
[[Literature/BookOfGenesis One day of rest]]\\
June '67 taught them respect\\
Control Jerusalem''
30th Jan '18 4:25:42 PM nombretomado
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Oh, and due to this conflict, many Jews will suffer from the same MisplacedNationalism as Iranians and Turks if someone suggests that the Middle East is all Arabs.

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Oh, and due to this conflict, many Jews will suffer from the same MisplacedNationalism UsefulNotes/MisplacedNationalism as Iranians and Turks if someone suggests that the Middle East is all Arabs.
28th Jan '18 1:10:58 PM Discar
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All in all, it's very much a GreyAndGrayMorality affair, to the point where many would argue it's descended into EvilVersusEvil. Depending on which side you take, you may see tropes in RealLife here such as TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified, TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized, TheEmpire, LaResistance, TheRemnant, WeAreStrugglingTogether, VillainWithGoodPublicity, HeroWithBadPublicity (and no one can agree on ''who has the good or bad publicity''), TheKingdom, TheFederation, NiceJobBreakingItHero, NiceJobFixingItVillain, HeWhoFightsMonsters and IdiotBall. There's also plenty of CulturalPosturing to go around on both sides. The exact combination of these you perceive depends on your nationality, religion, and political bent. And ''everyone'' can agree that foreign discussion of the conflict tends to suffer from the GoldenMeanFallacy and the WoundedGazelleGambit. Additionally, with [[GambitPileUp so many sides playing or trying to play subtle games]] to their own ends, you find that the whole thing is a mess [[IdiotPlot often conducted by gibbering idiots]], with a dash of nationalism to make things that much more explosive (we mean that [[StuffBlowingUp literally]] as well as figuratively).

to:

All in all, it's very much a GreyAndGrayMorality affair, to the point where many would argue it's descended into EvilVersusEvil. Depending on which side you take, you may see tropes in RealLife here such as TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified, TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized, TheEmpire, LaResistance, TheRemnant, WeAreStrugglingTogether, VillainWithGoodPublicity, HeroWithBadPublicity (and no one can agree on ''who has the good or bad publicity''), TheKingdom, TheFederation, NiceJobBreakingItHero, NiceJobFixingItVillain, HeWhoFightsMonsters and IdiotBall. There's also plenty of CulturalPosturing to go around on both sides. The exact combination of these you perceive depends on your nationality, religion, and political bent. And ''everyone'' can agree that foreign discussion of the conflict tends to suffer from the GoldenMeanFallacy and the WoundedGazelleGambit. Additionally, with [[GambitPileUp so many sides playing or trying to play subtle games]] to their own ends, you find that the whole thing is a mess [[IdiotPlot often conducted by gibbering idiots]], with a dash of nationalism to make things that much more explosive (we mean that [[StuffBlowingUp literally]] as well as figuratively).
4th Jan '18 8:52:58 PM costanton11
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Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Israel had declared Jerusalem (with Eastern neighborhoods and suburbs included that had been conquered by Jordan in 1948 and by Israel in 1967) its indivisible capital and part of its integral territory (unlike the West Bank, which is under a different set of laws) in 1980 and Congress has urged all Presidents to recognize this fact and move the embassy to Jerusalem in 1995 and numerous times since, but none of the Presidents in office since have acted on either this demand by Congress nor on Israeli domestic law. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.

to:

Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Israel had declared Jerusalem (with Eastern neighborhoods and suburbs included that had been conquered by Jordan in 1948 and by Israel in 1967) its indivisible capital and part of its integral territory (unlike the West Bank, which is under a different set of laws) in 1980 and Congress has urged all Presidents to recognize this fact and move the embassy to Jerusalem in 1995 and numerous times since, but none of the Presidents in office since have acted on either this demand by Congress nor on Israeli domestic law. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.



* In 1982 the PLO practically invades downtown Beirut in violation of the ceasefire they and the Israelis signed the July before, causing an acceleration in a messy ethnic and religious balkanization. In response Israel heavily bombs Beirut ''also'' in violation of said ceasefire; and unsurprisingly the ceasefire collapses and over 300 people are killed and a thousand wounded. A group known as the Abu Nidal Organization, headed by a man who had parted ways with the PLO a decade earlier and had since launched attacks on both Israeli and PLO officials, attempts to assassinate the Israeli ambassador to London; in response, Israel heavily bombs both the ANO and PLO in Lebanon. Rocket attacks are launched by the PLO as it steps up attempts to depose of the relatively Israeli-friendly Lebanese government and Israel invades Lebanon again, this time as part of a byzantine alliance with various Lebanese militias fighting against the PLO and other Lebanese militias aligned with it. Israeli troops and their allies besiege the PLO-held areas of Beirut for a month, inflicting heavy casualties on the PLO but leading to immense carnage among both both Palestinian refugees and Lebanese civilians caught in the crossfire. During the conflict, the Lebanese Christian Phalangist militia massacred up to three thousand Palestinian refugees in Sabra and Shatila. The independent Israeli Kahan Commission finds that the IDF was indirectly responsible for the business because of their failure to figure out what the Phalangists were about to do and stop them, and that then-Defense Minister ArielSharon had "personal responsibility" for the events as he was the CO who was caught with his pants down; Sharon was forced to resign. In the end the Israelis withdraw and the PLO leadership in Lebanon is exiled for nearly 20 years, but is quickly replaced by various Lebanese Shi'a militias. Hezbollah, a Shia organization whose name means "Party of God" comes to prominence in this period with shockingly effective attacks on Israeli and southern Lebanese Army bases, and effectively drives Israel out of Lebanon using the skills Iran taught it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBWEQpsFTFs A Multinational Coalition occupies downtown Beirut to help clean up in the aftermath of the Lebanese civil war by evacuating PLO and helping the Lebanese military maintain order in the city. The Marine barracks is bombed in October by Hezbollah suicide bombers, killing 241 American servicemen and 58 French servicemen. This effectively caused the civil war to resume as the Multinational force began to strike Hezbollah and its allies, Syria and the Shiite militias, in the city. It looked like there might be a full military intervention by the United States, but President RonaldReagan was pressured by Congress to order the withdrawal of the Marines in Beirut.

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* In 1982 the PLO practically invades downtown Beirut in violation of the ceasefire they and the Israelis signed the July before, causing an acceleration in a messy ethnic and religious balkanization. In response Israel heavily bombs Beirut ''also'' in violation of said ceasefire; and unsurprisingly the ceasefire collapses and over 300 people are killed and a thousand wounded. A group known as the Abu Nidal Organization, headed by a man who had parted ways with the PLO a decade earlier and had since launched attacks on both Israeli and PLO officials, attempts to assassinate the Israeli ambassador to London; in response, Israel heavily bombs both the ANO and PLO in Lebanon. Rocket attacks are launched by the PLO as it steps up attempts to depose of the relatively Israeli-friendly Lebanese government and Israel invades Lebanon again, this time as part of a byzantine alliance with various Lebanese militias fighting against the PLO and other Lebanese militias aligned with it. Israeli troops and their allies besiege the PLO-held areas of Beirut for a month, inflicting heavy casualties on the PLO but leading to immense carnage among both both Palestinian refugees and Lebanese civilians caught in the crossfire. During the conflict, the Lebanese Christian Phalangist militia massacred up to three thousand Palestinian refugees in Sabra and Shatila. The independent Israeli Kahan Commission finds that the IDF was indirectly responsible for the business because of their failure to figure out what the Phalangists were about to do and stop them, and that then-Defense Minister ArielSharon had "personal responsibility" for the events as he was the CO who was caught with his pants down; Sharon was forced to resign. In the end the Israelis withdraw and the PLO leadership in Lebanon is exiled for nearly 20 years, but is quickly replaced by various Lebanese Shi'a militias. Hezbollah, a Shia organization whose name means "Party of God" comes to prominence in this period with shockingly effective attacks on Israeli and southern Lebanese Army bases, and effectively drives Israel out of Lebanon using the skills Iran taught it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBWEQpsFTFs A Multinational Coalition occupies downtown Beirut to help clean up in the aftermath of the Lebanese civil war by evacuating PLO and helping the Lebanese military maintain order in the city. The Marine barracks is bombed in October by Hezbollah suicide bombers, killing 241 American servicemen and 58 French servicemen. This effectively caused the civil war to resume as the Multinational force began to strike Hezbollah and its allies, Syria and the Shiite militias, in the city. It looked like there might be a full military intervention by the United States, but President RonaldReagan UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan was pressured by Congress to order the withdrawal of the Marines in Beirut.
16th Dec '17 10:53:06 AM TruebloodJoe
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* FlamesOfWar released a version of their miniature wargaming system that took place during the Six Day War.
[[/folder]]
14th Dec '17 1:50:13 PM dracogeorge
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See also: UsefulNotes/IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles, UsefulNotes/EgyptiansWithEagleFighters, and UsefulNotes/WarriorsOfTheDesertWind.

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See also: UsefulNotes/IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles, UsefulNotes/EgyptiansWithEagleFighters, and UsefulNotes/WarriorsOfTheDesertWind.
UsefulNotes/WarriorsOfTheDesertWinds.
9th Dec '17 10:04:10 AM Jhonny
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There are two commonly spoken of solutions to the particular Palestinian/Israeli conflict, the so called "two-state" and "one-state/binational" solutions. The two-state solution, largely favored by the Israeli public, the United States, the European Union, and at least nominally the current governments of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, would end the Israeli presence in most of the West Bank (certain large settlement blocks close to the Green Line would probably be retained) and allow the PA to establish a capital in East Jerusalem and to rule over the Palestinians of the West Bank (and, assuming Hamas could be persuaded to join in, Gaza). Additionally, a certain amount of Palestinians who had been pushed out of their homes during the 1948/49 war would be allowed to move back to Israel, and most of the settlers whose settlement blocks haven't been absorbed into Israel would be moved (forcefully if necessary) back into Israel proper (although there have been occasional proposals to allow those Jewish settlers[[note]]despite what some media portrayals may show, many settlers actually reject the state of Israel in its current form in some way or another and many would like to keep living where they are (for religious or other reasons) no matter which state or regime it would be ''de jure'' under[[/note]] who wish to do so to become Palestinian citizens). The one-state solution, favored by a significant portion of the Palestinians, some Palestinian Israelis, and various left-wing pro-Palestinian groups, would essentially integrate the West Bank (and, again assuming it could be persuaded to join in, Gaza) into Israel with equal rights for everybody, possibly with Jewish and Arabic areas given some measure of self-rule. The issues with the two-state solution are that Israel and Palestine are largely entwined in a way that makes it hard for them to be separated, that the Palestinian state may not be viable, and also that both sides have extremist factions whose "one state solution" is to push the other side out of the land entirely (who may not stop their efforts even if a peace deal is struck). The problems with the one-state solution is dependent upon two different groups who've been fighting off and on for 70 years, who both have very different ideas of nationhood, and who have significant members with a history of [[ILied going back on their agreements and otherwise tearing up treaties]] to come together and try to become one unified nation, and that any unified state would have a Palestinian majority with any and all the problems that might entail (something that supporters of Israel both in and outside it are concerned about). As noted before, largely the international community (and therefore reluctantly the governments of both Israel and the Palestinian Authority) supports the two-state solution and the history books are full of many more binational states that split up than ones who came together, but commentators on both sides will often postulate about whether or not the one state solution is inevitable.

to:

There are two commonly spoken of solutions to the particular Palestinian/Israeli conflict, the so called "two-state" and "one-state/binational" solutions. The two-state solution, largely favored by the Israeli public, the United States, the European Union, and at least nominally the current governments of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, would end the Israeli presence in most of the West Bank (certain large settlement blocks close to the Green Line would probably be retained) and allow the PA to establish a capital in East Jerusalem and to rule over the Palestinians of the West Bank (and, assuming Hamas could be persuaded to join in, Gaza). Additionally, a certain amount of Palestinians who had been pushed out of their homes during the 1948/49 war would be allowed to move back to Israel, and most of the settlers whose settlement blocks haven't been absorbed into Israel would be moved (forcefully if necessary) back into Israel proper (although there have been occasional proposals to allow those Jewish settlers[[note]]despite what some media portrayals may show, many settlers actually reject the state of Israel in its current form in some way or another and many would like to keep living where they are (for religious or other reasons) no matter which state or regime it would be ''de jure'' under[[/note]] who wish to do so to become Palestinian citizens). The one-state solution, favored by a significant portion of the Palestinians, some Palestinian Israelis, and various left-wing pro-Palestinian groups, would essentially integrate the West Bank (and, again assuming it could be persuaded to join in, Gaza) into Israel with equal rights for everybody, possibly with Jewish and Arabic areas given some measure of self-rule. The issues with the two-state solution are that Israel and Palestine are largely entwined in a way that makes it hard for them to be separated, that the Palestinian state may not be viable, and also that both sides have extremist factions whose "one state solution" is to push the other side out of the land entirely (who may not stop their efforts even if a peace deal is struck). The problems with the one-state solution is dependent upon two different groups who've been fighting off and on for 70 years, who both have very different ideas of nationhood, and who have significant members with a history of [[ILied going back on their agreements and otherwise tearing up treaties]] to come together and try to become one unified nation, and that any unified state would might have a Palestinian majority either already or in some future soon to come[[note]] yes, even ''demographics'' are a source of contention and both Palestinian and Israeli statistics about ethnicity, religion and nationality are often doubted by the other side - this is even more so when it comes to birth rates[[/note]] with any and all the problems that might entail (something that supporters of Israel both in and outside it are concerned about). As noted before, largely the international community (and therefore reluctantly the governments of both Israel and the Palestinian Authority) supports the two-state solution and the history books are full of many more binational states that split up than ones who came together, but commentators on both sides will often postulate about whether or not the one state solution is inevitable.
9th Dec '17 10:02:00 AM Jhonny
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Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Israel had declared Jerusalem (with Eastern neighborhoods and suburbs included that had been conquered by Jordan in 1948 and by Israel in 1967) its indivisible capital and part of its integral territory (unlike the West Bank, which is under a different set of laws) in 1980 and Congress has urged all Presidents to recognize this fact and move the embassy to Jerusalem in 1995, but none of the Presidents in office since have acted on either this demand by Congress nor on Israeli domestic law. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.

There are two commonly spoken of solutions to the particular Palestinian/Israeli conflict, the so called "two-state" and "one-state/binational" solutions. The two-state solution, largely favored by the Israeli public, the United States, the European Union, and at least nominally the current governments of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, would end the Israeli presence in most of the West Bank (certain large settlement blocks close to the Green Line would probably be retained) and allow the PA to establish a capital in East Jerusalem and to rule over the Palestinians of the West Bank (and, assuming Hamas could be persuaded to join in, Gaza). Additionally, a certain amount of Palestinians who had been pushed out of their homes during the Nakba would be allowed to move back to Israel, and most of the settlers whose settlement blocks haven't been absorbed into Israel would be moved (forcefully if necessary) back into Israel proper (although there have been occasional proposals to allow those Jewish settlers who don't want to move-generally non-Zionist Ultra-Orthodox whose loyalty is more to the land of Israel than the State of Israel-to become Palestinian citizens). The one-state solution, favored by a significant portion of the Palestinians, some Palestinian Israelis, and various left-wing pro-Palestinian groups, would essentially integrate the West Bank (and, again assuming it could be persuaded to join in, Gaza) into Israel with equal rights for everybody, possibly with Jewish and Arabic areas given some measure of self-rule. The issues with the two-state solution are that Israel and Palestine are largely entwined in a way that makes it hard for them to be separated, that the Palestinian state may not be viable, and also that both sides have extremist factions whose "one state solution" is to push the other side out of the land entirely (who may not stop their efforts even if a peace deal is struck). The problems with the one-state solution is dependent upon two different groups who've been fighting off and on for 70 years, who both have very different ideas of nationhood, and who have significant members with a history of [[ILied going back on their agreements and otherwise tearing up treaties]] to come together and try to become one unified nation, and that any unified state would have a Palestinian majority with any and all the problems that might entail (something that supporters of Israel both in and outside it are concerned about). As noted before, largely the international community (and therefore reluctantly the governments of both Israel and the Palestinian Authority) supports the two-state solution and the history books are full of many more binational states that split up than ones who came together, but commentators on both sides will often postulate about whether or not the one state solution is inevitable.

to:

Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Israel had declared Jerusalem (with Eastern neighborhoods and suburbs included that had been conquered by Jordan in 1948 and by Israel in 1967) its indivisible capital and part of its integral territory (unlike the West Bank, which is under a different set of laws) in 1980 and Congress has urged all Presidents to recognize this fact and move the embassy to Jerusalem in 1995, 1995 and numerous times since, but none of the Presidents in office since have acted on either this demand by Congress nor on Israeli domestic law. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.

There are two commonly spoken of solutions to the particular Palestinian/Israeli conflict, the so called "two-state" and "one-state/binational" solutions. The two-state solution, largely favored by the Israeli public, the United States, the European Union, and at least nominally the current governments of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, would end the Israeli presence in most of the West Bank (certain large settlement blocks close to the Green Line would probably be retained) and allow the PA to establish a capital in East Jerusalem and to rule over the Palestinians of the West Bank (and, assuming Hamas could be persuaded to join in, Gaza). Additionally, a certain amount of Palestinians who had been pushed out of their homes during the Nakba 1948/49 war would be allowed to move back to Israel, and most of the settlers whose settlement blocks haven't been absorbed into Israel would be moved (forcefully if necessary) back into Israel proper (although there have been occasional proposals to allow those Jewish settlers[[note]]despite what some media portrayals may show, many settlers who don't want to move-generally non-Zionist Ultra-Orthodox whose loyalty is more to actually reject the land state of Israel than the State of Israel-to in its current form in some way or another and many would like to keep living where they are (for religious or other reasons) no matter which state or regime it would be ''de jure'' under[[/note]] who wish to do so to become Palestinian citizens). The one-state solution, favored by a significant portion of the Palestinians, some Palestinian Israelis, and various left-wing pro-Palestinian groups, would essentially integrate the West Bank (and, again assuming it could be persuaded to join in, Gaza) into Israel with equal rights for everybody, possibly with Jewish and Arabic areas given some measure of self-rule. The issues with the two-state solution are that Israel and Palestine are largely entwined in a way that makes it hard for them to be separated, that the Palestinian state may not be viable, and also that both sides have extremist factions whose "one state solution" is to push the other side out of the land entirely (who may not stop their efforts even if a peace deal is struck). The problems with the one-state solution is dependent upon two different groups who've been fighting off and on for 70 years, who both have very different ideas of nationhood, and who have significant members with a history of [[ILied going back on their agreements and otherwise tearing up treaties]] to come together and try to become one unified nation, and that any unified state would have a Palestinian majority with any and all the problems that might entail (something that supporters of Israel both in and outside it are concerned about). As noted before, largely the international community (and therefore reluctantly the governments of both Israel and the Palestinian Authority) supports the two-state solution and the history books are full of many more binational states that split up than ones who came together, but commentators on both sides will often postulate about whether or not the one state solution is inevitable.
9th Dec '17 9:57:35 AM Jhonny
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Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.

to:

Things seemed to settle down for a while, insofar as anything can be considered 'settled' in the region, but 2016 saw yet another change in the status quo as Creator/DonaldTrump unexpectedly won the American presidency. Israel had declared Jerusalem (with Eastern neighborhoods and suburbs included that had been conquered by Jordan in 1948 and by Israel in 1967) its indivisible capital and part of its integral territory (unlike the West Bank, which is under a different set of laws) in 1980 and Congress has urged all Presidents to recognize this fact and move the embassy to Jerusalem in 1995, but none of the Presidents in office since have acted on either this demand by Congress nor on Israeli domestic law. Trump his opponent Hillary Clinton, and several previous American presidents (including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton) had all pledged to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a recognition which Israel very much wanted and Palestinians very much did not want), but none of the previous presidents had actually done so for fear of sabotaging America's role as a neutral broker in the peace process. Trump, though, made good on his pledge and announced that the embassy would be moved to Jerusalem and the US would officially recognize Jerusalem as the ''de jure'' capital in December of 2017. The reaction was immediate; Israel praised the decision, but the Palestinian leadership and other major Arab nations denounced the move and said that America can no longer be trusted to oversee the peace process. Other countries - mainly in Africa - who are dependent on foreign aid and enjoy moderately good relations with the US and/or Israel have announced to follow suit in the US's action and wish to move their embassies, too (or open one in the first place). Hamas and affiliated groups also called for yet another intifida... which brings us to the present day.
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