History UsefulNotes / ArabIsraeliConflict

3rd Jul '17 3:50:23 PM yisfidri
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* ''West Bank Story'', the 2007 Academy Award winner for Best Live-Action short film, a musical (based on another musical; [[Theatre/WestSideStory which one]] should be obvious to anyone not living under a rock) about a pair of StarCrossedLovers and their families [[MundaneMadeAwesome feuding falafel huts]] keeping them apart. A real-life CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming occurred at the Oscars when the delighted filmmaker collected his statuette, and he thanked the Academy and ''meant'' it, for once, adding that "Hope is not hopeless."

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* ''West Bank Story'', ''Theatre/WestBankStory'', the 2007 2006 Academy Award winner for Best Live-Action short film, a musical (based on another musical; [[Theatre/WestSideStory which one]] should be obvious to anyone not living under a rock) about a pair of StarCrossedLovers and their families families' [[MundaneMadeAwesome feuding falafel huts]] keeping them apart. A real-life CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming occurred at the Oscars when the delighted filmmaker collected his statuette, and he thanked the Academy and ''meant'' it, for once, adding that "Hope is not hopeless."
2nd Jul '17 10:05:01 AM nombretomado
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* The JohnLeCarre novel ''The Little Drummer Girl''.

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* The JohnLeCarre Creator/JohnLeCarre novel ''The Little Drummer Girl''.
25th Jun '17 10:37:06 AM nombretomado
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The conflict can fall into the lines in the WithUsOrAgainstUs category as well. Countries and groups taking sides of this conflict will often find themselves with ''really'' negative attitudes and diplomatic relations with the other party. This is one of the main reasons why the United States's support of Israel makes it extremely difficult to maintain good diplomatic relations with many Arab majority countries. At the same time, Russia's military and economic support with many Arab regimes like Syria's Assad's regime[[note]]Along with Russia's bad history of antisemitism.[[/note]] made it difficult [[note]]But improving when compared to the Soviet Union times.[[/note]] to maintain good relations with Israel. On the other hand, many countries managed to TakeAThirdOption and decided ''not'' to take sides in the conflict; many of said countries have managed to maintain stable and reasonable relations with both parties.[[note]]China fits into this group; see TheOtherWiki's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Arab_relations articles]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China-Israel_relations on this]].[[/note]] However, taking a neutral stance in the conflict can actually lead to a NeutralityBacklash, especially from the most extreme fringe groups such as the Palestinian Hamas and many far-right Zionist political parties.

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The conflict can fall into the lines in the WithUsOrAgainstUs category as well. Countries and groups taking sides of this conflict will often find themselves with ''really'' negative attitudes and diplomatic relations with the other party. This is one of the main reasons why the United States's support of Israel makes it extremely difficult to maintain good diplomatic relations with many Arab majority countries. At the same time, Russia's military and economic support with many Arab regimes like Syria's Assad's regime[[note]]Along with Russia's bad history of antisemitism.[[/note]] made it difficult [[note]]But improving when compared to the Soviet Union times.[[/note]] to maintain good relations with Israel. On the other hand, many countries managed to TakeAThirdOption and decided ''not'' to take sides in the conflict; many of said countries have managed to maintain stable and reasonable relations with both parties.[[note]]China fits into this group; see TheOtherWiki's Wiki/TheOtherWiki's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Arab_relations articles]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China-Israel_relations on this]].[[/note]] However, taking a neutral stance in the conflict can actually lead to a NeutralityBacklash, especially from the most extreme fringe groups such as the Palestinian Hamas and many far-right Zionist political parties.
18th Jun '17 6:03:41 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* UsefulNotes/WorldWarII: From a base in nominally Vichy Syria-Lebanon, Haj Amin al-Husseini casts his lot with the Axis and takes part in a coup in Baghdad in 1941 that unseated the British-installed Iraqi Monarch, declared itself for the Axis, and began a bloody purge (the Farhud) in Baghdad.... For all of a few weeks before [[CurbStompBattle the British shifted enough troops over and smashed the revolt with the help of loyalists.]] From there, the British track down the source of Axis air support for the coup and where a lot of the fighters fled to the largely nationalist-run Syria-Lebanon colony and promptly invade that too, along with Iran for good measure. Al-Husseini spends the remainder of the war making propaganda broadcasts in Germany and recruiting Muslims into the Waffen-SS. Al-Husseini [[UnfortunateImplications even befriended]] UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and was rumored to help UsefulNotes/NaziGermany in the Holocaust, up to and including plans for a death camp at Nablus and recruitment and propagandizing for Arab and Muslim recruits to the Axis militaries. At the same time, Mussolini tries to cash in by claiming UsefulNotes/FascistItaly as a protector of the Muslims of the world, and various other pro-Axis conspirators move around in dark alleys and try to support Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Ironically this is the same time a group of Zionist militants, Lehi, who were out there even by the low standards of paramilitarism in British Palestine try to [[TooDumbToLive make an alliance with Hitler]], possibly up to a death camp of their own for use on the resident Arabs in Israel. To their credit, most don't really notice. But a lot of the conspirators either leave a lasting mark on the discourse the issue will be fought with (Haj Amin in particular is often credited as the founder of Palestinian nationalism) or would later become important, like Nasser, Sadat, and Lehi leader Yitzhak Shamir (a future Israeli Prime Minister).

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* UsefulNotes/WorldWarII: From a base in nominally Vichy Syria-Lebanon, Haj Amin al-Husseini casts his lot with the Axis and takes part in a coup in Baghdad in 1941 that unseated the British-installed Iraqi Monarch, declared itself for the Axis, and began a bloody purge (the Farhud) in Baghdad.... For all of a few weeks before [[CurbStompBattle the British shifted enough troops over and smashed the revolt with the help of loyalists.]] loyalists]]. From there, the British track down the source of Axis air support for the coup and where a lot of the fighters fled to the largely nationalist-run Syria-Lebanon colony and promptly invade that too, along with Iran for good measure. Al-Husseini spends the remainder of the war making propaganda broadcasts in Germany and recruiting Muslims into the Waffen-SS. Al-Husseini [[UnfortunateImplications even befriended]] UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and was rumored to help UsefulNotes/NaziGermany in the Holocaust, up to and including plans for a death camp at Nablus and recruitment and propagandizing for Arab and Muslim recruits to the Axis militaries. At the same time, Mussolini tries to cash in by claiming UsefulNotes/FascistItaly as a protector of the Muslims of the world, and various other pro-Axis conspirators move around in dark alleys and try to support Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Ironically this is the same time a group of Zionist militants, Lehi, who were out there even by the low standards of paramilitarism in British Palestine try to [[TooDumbToLive make an alliance with Hitler]], possibly up to a death camp of their own for use on the resident Arabs in Israel. To their credit, most don't really notice. But a lot of the conspirators either leave a lasting mark on the discourse the issue will be fought with (Haj Amin in particular is often credited as the founder of Palestinian nationalism) or would later become important, like Nasser, Sadat, and Lehi leader Yitzhak Shamir (a future Israeli Prime Minister).



The actual reasons behind the Arab invasion were a bit more complicated; while there were plenty among the Islamist and/or Arab ultra-nationalist factions that wanted to wipe the Israelis from the face of the map, the Arab governments were almost all very unpopular at home–most of them on the verge of revolution–and so they stirred up resentment against the Jewish settlers in Palestine to get the people's attention off the home front. Many historians–even Arab ones–now regard this as a huge but inevitable mistake: this [[GoneHorriblyRight worked too well]], and the Arab governments found themselves [[OhCrap facing a war that they knew they were going to lose.]] At the end, the Arab governments' plans all failed utterly: within the next ten years, Egypt and Iraq both had revolutions/coups d'etat, Jordan's king was assassinated by a disgruntled Palestinian, Syria entered a ten-year period where coups happened not once but ''twice'' a year, and Lebanon had to call in the [[SemperFi United States Marines]] [[FriendlyEnemy and make a deal with the Israelis]] to avert a civil war.

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The actual reasons behind the Arab invasion were a bit more complicated; while there were plenty among the Islamist and/or Arab ultra-nationalist factions that wanted to wipe the Israelis from the face of the map, the Arab governments were almost all very unpopular at home–most of them on the verge of revolution–and so they stirred up resentment against the Jewish settlers in Palestine to get the people's attention off the home front. Many historians–even Arab ones–now regard this as a huge but inevitable mistake: this [[GoneHorriblyRight worked too well]], and the Arab governments found themselves [[OhCrap facing a war that they knew they were going to lose.]] At the end, the Arab governments' governments plans all failed utterly: within the next ten years, Egypt and Iraq both had revolutions/coups d'etat, Jordan's king was assassinated by a disgruntled Palestinian, Syria entered a ten-year period where coups happened not once but ''twice'' a year, and Lebanon had to call in the [[SemperFi United States Marines]] [[FriendlyEnemy and make a deal with the Israelis]] to avert a civil war.



* The Six Day War, 1967: Yet another war caused by [[IdiotPlot most if not all sides acting like gibbering morons]]; Israel gets props for being the ''least'' idiotic country in this festival of stupidity (when your situation is "oh shit, we might all be dead within a week", you get a pass for making the occasional stupid decision). Nasser said "ILied" and kicks out the UN Peacekeeping forces, starts making increasingly ugly noises about what should happen to the Israelis, starts cobbling together an alliance, and eventually shuts the Straits of Tiran-Israel's main waterway-, marking the Rubicon at which war becomes inevitable if he does not pull back. [[TooDumbToLive He doesn't]], and Israel makes a preemptive strike on the Egyptian, Syrian, and Jordanian Air Forces to prevent a war they could see a mile away; Egypt, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq had been massing troops for weeks (although King Hussein of Jordan had to be dragged kicking and screaming into doing so). Ironically, the reason that the Arabs had been massing troops was that the Soviet Union informed the Egyptian government that Israel was planning to invade Syria (it wasn't). By the time the Soviets had a chance to say "whoops, they weren't, our bad," the Israelis had already mobilized and the Arab populations, stirred up by [[PatrioticFervor nationalistic propaganda]], were itching for war (both the Syrian and Egyptian leaders feared that they'd be overthrown if they backed down). The war was an unqualified Israeli victory: in less than a week, the IDF had taken Jordanian-held Jerusalem, the West Bank--which the Israelis never had any intention of taking and which they literally just stumbled into because they were pursuing the Jordanian defenders--the Golan Heights--which there was also no official plan to take starting off, but which Defense Minister [[EyepatchOfPower Moshe Dayan]] reversed himself on the fourth day and decided it was worth taking after all in order to stop the bad habit Syrian artillerists had of [[ObligatoryWarCrimeScene shelling the Israeli territory below even in times of peace]]-the Gaza Strip, and the Sinai Peninsula. Due to this last seizure, the Suez Canal remained closed for the next eight years. When Arabs don't just call it "the '67 War" or something similar, they call it ''An-Naksa'': The Setback. In the aftermath of the war, the Arab League met at Khartoum in Sudan and drafted the Khartoum Declaration that largely serves as a benchmark for the League's stance on the Arab-Israeli conflict even if not that of all its' individual states. One of the more important and most quoted parts is the resolution that there be "No peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with it." Summed up as the "Three Nos", this would lead to yet another decade of more or less direct conflict, as well as major roadblocks to peace that remain today.

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* The Six Day War, 1967: Yet another war caused by [[IdiotPlot most if not all sides acting like gibbering morons]]; Israel gets props for being the ''least'' idiotic country in this festival of stupidity (when your situation is "oh shit, we might all be dead within a week", you get a pass for making the occasional stupid decision). Nasser said "ILied" and kicks out the UN Peacekeeping forces, starts making increasingly ugly noises about what should happen to the Israelis, starts cobbling together an alliance, and eventually shuts the Straits of Tiran-Israel's main waterway-, marking the Rubicon at which war becomes inevitable if he does not pull back. [[TooDumbToLive He doesn't]], and Israel makes a preemptive strike on the Egyptian, Syrian, and Jordanian Air Forces to prevent a war they could see a mile away; Egypt, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq had been massing troops for weeks (although King Hussein of Jordan had to be dragged kicking and screaming into doing so). Ironically, the reason that the Arabs had been massing troops was that the Soviet Union informed the Egyptian government that Israel was planning to invade Syria (it wasn't). By the time the Soviets had a chance to say "whoops, they weren't, our bad," the Israelis had already mobilized and the Arab populations, stirred up by [[PatrioticFervor nationalistic propaganda]], were itching for war (both the Syrian and Egyptian leaders feared that they'd be overthrown if they backed down). The war was an unqualified Israeli victory: in less than a week, the IDF had taken Jordanian-held Jerusalem, the West Bank--which the Israelis never had any intention of taking and which they literally just stumbled into because they were pursuing the Jordanian defenders--the Golan Heights--which there was also no official plan to take starting off, but which Defense Minister [[EyepatchOfPower Moshe Dayan]] reversed himself on the fourth day and decided it was worth taking after all in order to stop the bad habit Syrian artillerists had of [[ObligatoryWarCrimeScene shelling the Israeli territory below even in times of peace]]-the Gaza Strip, and the Sinai Peninsula. Due to this last seizure, the Suez Canal remained closed for the next eight years. When Arabs don't just call it "the '67 War" or something similar, they call it ''An-Naksa'': The Setback. In the aftermath of the war, the Arab League met at Khartoum in Sudan and drafted the Khartoum Declaration that largely serves as a benchmark for the League's stance on the Arab-Israeli conflict even if not that of all its' its individual states. One of the more important and most quoted parts is the resolution that there be "No peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with it." Summed up as the "Three Nos", this would lead to yet another decade of more or less direct conflict, as well as major roadblocks to peace that remain today.



Israel is currently keeping a wary eye on someone else, namely Iran, whose atomic noises and sponsorship of Hezbollah have tossed the PLO and its' offshoots off the top of the "to-worry-about" list. Since Iran is also a major enemy of the Sunni Arab mainstream that includes most of the PLO and especially its' financiers, the Gulf States have found it convenient to [[EnemyMine work with Tel Aviv for a while]] against what they believe is a bigger threat. Meanwhile, Hamas is still licking its wounds in a besieged Gaza, while the PA has managed to keep the peace with Israel and start something of an economic boom in the West Bank, supposedly building transparent institutions and a professional police force that have managed to create stability and attract serious investment. Terrorism and Israeli settlement expansion continues despite a freeze set to end soon.

Internal conflicts on both sides are a problem for peace deals: between Hamas, refusing to recognize Israel, and Fatah, which is open to the peace process, on the Palestinian side, and between those Israelis favoring withdrawal from the West Bank in order to achieve peace, and those insisting Israel must continue expanding settlements and moving more of its population into the occupied territories. In many cases, internal politics frustrates both sides' attempts to get or keep the peace ball rolling: in Israel, religious parties like Shas keep making ridiculous demands on things like Jerusalem not out of any particular position on peace, but because they want more money and entitlements for their poor, large-familied voter base; among the Palestinians... well, let's just say that Hamas taking over Gaza in 2007 is merely the most extreme example of Palestinian WeAreStrugglingTogether. Extremist rhetoric and undisguised bigotry also comes from the elected leadership of both, with a rise in power of the extremist nationalistic parties in Israel, and Hamas continuing to call for the destruction of Israel and ethnic cleansing of Jews (the latter of which is uncomfortably similar to the activities of ThoseWackyNazis). While a lot of this is just rhetoric (both Hamas leader Ismail Haniya and Yisrael Beitenu leader Avigdor Lieberman have proven far more level-headed in practice than their speeches might lead you to believe), a lot of it isn't, and optimism about peace tends to be regarded as at least a touch naive.

On the other hand, 2011 brought a development out of nowhere: the protest movement/revolutionary wave that swept across the Arab world. Though it didn't get that much press, the Palestinians did that as well, chiefly directed at Hamas and Fatah, asking them to give up their petty differences and ''get done with the independence thing already''. Under pressure, the parties have already signed a national unity pact, which sent the Israelis into hysterics, not the least of which because it involves the "legal" Palestinian Government making a major alliance with what most of the developed world brands a terrorist organization. This comes ahead of the culmination of Mahmoud Abbas' big Plan B, launched upon the failure of the most recent round of talks (on account of the aforementioned settlement thing): try to get the UsefulNotes/UnitedNations to admit Palestine as a member in its upcoming meeting in September 2011, though this failed. As for the rest of the world, it appears that at least some countries would like Palestine to have a government at least theoretically capable of running its territory in one piece (rather than divided against itself) before considering voting in favor of the motion, which is where the unity pact comes in. Unfortunately, yet ''another'' complication arises...

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Israel is currently keeping a wary eye on someone else, namely Iran, whose atomic noises and sponsorship of Hezbollah have tossed the PLO and its' its offshoots off the top of the "to-worry-about" list. Since Iran is also a major enemy of the Sunni Arab mainstream that includes most of the PLO and especially its' its financiers, the Gulf States have found it convenient to [[EnemyMine work with Tel Aviv for a while]] against what they believe is a bigger threat. Meanwhile, Hamas is still licking its wounds in a besieged Gaza, while the PA has managed to keep the peace with Israel and start something of an economic boom in the West Bank, supposedly building transparent institutions and a professional police force that have managed to create stability and attract serious investment. Terrorism and Israeli settlement expansion continues despite a freeze set to end soon.

Internal conflicts on both sides are a problem for peace deals: between Hamas, refusing to recognize Israel, and Fatah, which is open to the peace process, on the Palestinian side, and between those Israelis favoring withdrawal from the West Bank in order to achieve peace, and those insisting Israel must continue expanding settlements and moving more of its population into the occupied territories. In many cases, internal politics frustrates both sides' sides attempts to get or keep the peace ball rolling: in Israel, religious parties like Shas keep making ridiculous demands on things like Jerusalem not out of any particular position on peace, but because they want more money and entitlements for their poor, large-familied voter base; among the Palestinians... well, let's just say that Hamas taking over Gaza in 2007 is merely the most extreme example of Palestinian WeAreStrugglingTogether. Extremist rhetoric and undisguised bigotry also comes from the elected leadership of both, with a rise in power of the extremist nationalistic parties in Israel, and Hamas continuing to call for the destruction of Israel and ethnic cleansing of Jews (the latter of which is uncomfortably similar to the activities of ThoseWackyNazis). While a lot of this is just rhetoric (both Hamas leader Ismail Haniya and Yisrael Beitenu leader Avigdor Lieberman have proven far more level-headed in practice than their speeches might lead you to believe), a lot of it isn't, and optimism about peace tends to be regarded as at least a touch naive.

On the other hand, 2011 brought a development out of nowhere: the protest movement/revolutionary wave that swept across the Arab world. Though it didn't get that much press, the Palestinians did that as well, chiefly directed at Hamas and Fatah, asking them to give up their petty differences and ''get done with the independence thing already''. Under pressure, the parties have already signed a national unity pact, which sent the Israelis into hysterics, not the least of which because it involves the "legal" Palestinian Government making a major alliance with what most of the developed world brands a terrorist organization. This comes ahead of the culmination of Mahmoud Abbas' big Plan B, launched upon the failure of the most recent round of talks (on account of the aforementioned settlement thing): try to get the UsefulNotes/UnitedNations to admit Palestine as a member in its upcoming meeting in September 2011, though this failed. As for the rest of the world, it appears that at least some countries would like Palestine to have a government at least theoretically capable of running its territory in one piece (rather than divided against itself) before considering voting in favor of the motion, which is where the unity pact comes in. Unfortunately, yet ''another'' complication arises...
arises....



* ''West Bank Story'', the 2007 Academy Award winner for Best Live-Action short film, a musical (based on another musical; [[Theatre/WestSideStory which one]] should be obvious to anyone not living under a rock) about a pair of StarCrossedLovers and their families' [[MundaneMadeAwesome feuding falafel huts]] keeping them apart. A real-life CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming occurred at the Oscars when the delighted filmmaker collected his statuette, and he thanked the Academy and ''meant'' it, for once, adding that "Hope is not hopeless."

to:

* ''West Bank Story'', the 2007 Academy Award winner for Best Live-Action short film, a musical (based on another musical; [[Theatre/WestSideStory which one]] should be obvious to anyone not living under a rock) about a pair of StarCrossedLovers and their families' families [[MundaneMadeAwesome feuding falafel huts]] keeping them apart. A real-life CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming occurred at the Oscars when the delighted filmmaker collected his statuette, and he thanked the Academy and ''meant'' it, for once, adding that "Hope is not hopeless."



* The controversial 2008 Creator/Channel4 mini-series ''The Promise'', directed by the equally controversial British director Peter Kosminsky (who himself is of Polish Jewish descent). It focuses on British paratroopers fighting the Irgun (real-life Zionist [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters freedom fighters/terrorists]]) post-1945, as well as contemporary Israel fighting off Palestinian extremism in Gaza in very much the same way. Arguably has a pro-Palestinian slant,[[note]]It delves a lot into the radical Jewish militants' atrocities, but ignores that of the Palestinians.[[/note]] but blames the British mandate more than anyone else.[[note]]The series ''does'' however take a lot of time to explore and explain the Jewish fighters' motivations.[[/note]]

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* The controversial 2008 Creator/Channel4 mini-series ''The Promise'', directed by the equally controversial British director Peter Kosminsky (who himself is of Polish Jewish descent). It focuses on British paratroopers fighting the Irgun (real-life Zionist [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters freedom fighters/terrorists]]) post-1945, as well as contemporary Israel fighting off Palestinian extremism in Gaza in very much the same way. Arguably has a pro-Palestinian slant,[[note]]It delves a lot into the radical Jewish militants' atrocities, but ignores that of the Palestinians.[[/note]] but blames the British mandate more than anyone else.[[note]]The series ''does'' however take a lot of time to explore and explain the Jewish fighters' fighters motivations.[[/note]]
31st May '17 8:49:25 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Oh, and due to this conflict, many Jews will suffer from the same MisplacedNationalism as Iranians if someone suggests that the Middle East is all Arabs.

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Oh, and due to this conflict, many Jews will suffer from the same MisplacedNationalism as Iranians and Turks if someone suggests that the Middle East is all Arabs.
3rd May '17 4:17:47 AM pmorgan97
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A 60[[note]]depending on how one counts; some would say 80, or even longer[[/note]] year long ongoing conflict involving Jews, Arabs, a few Iranians, [[SuicideAttack suicide bombings]], F-15s, hatred, Jerusalem, and refugees. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment Don't start here on the rights and wrongs of it]], as this ''will'' cause an InternetBackdraft.

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A 60[[note]]depending 70[[note]]depending on how one counts; some would say 80, or even longer[[/note]] year longer[[/note]]-year long ongoing conflict involving Jews, Arabs, a few Iranians, [[SuicideAttack suicide bombings]], F-15s, hatred, Jerusalem, and refugees. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment Don't start here on the rights and wrongs of it]], as this ''will'' cause an InternetBackdraft.
4th Mar '17 9:02:44 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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2012 saw the UsefulNotes/UnitedNations accept Palestine as a non-member observer state, a sovereign nation free to submit a petition to join as a full member at their discretion. It basically means that Palestine can now be considered an "ally" of the United Nations. For reference, the Vatican is also a non-member observer state, as was Switzerland until 2002 (when it became a full member).

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2012 saw the UsefulNotes/UnitedNations accept Palestine as a non-member observer state, a sovereign nation free to submit a petition to join as a full member at their discretion. It basically means that Palestine can now be considered an "ally" of the United Nations. For reference, the Vatican is also a non-member observer state, as was Switzerland UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} until 2002 (when it became a full member).
3rd Mar '17 2:22:11 PM Jhonny
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* The WWI Aftermath and the 1920's: What is now the British Mandate of Palestine receives two hordes of very different immigrants and sees the fault lines for what comes later. Jews and Zionists come in to create the dream project they've envisioned for so long and often to escape a war-torn Europe and Middle East while Arabs -- most of whom were poor tenant farmers from the North who were arguably worse than Serfs under Ottoman law -- take their chance to ditch their [[FeudalOverlord feudal overlords]] and war-ravaged homelands to try and run to what they hope will be greener pastures in Israel/Palestine. Both succeed rather well, and within a matter of months huge and relatively thriving immigrant communities have latched on to the preexisting Jewish and Arab communities [[FromBadToWorse just in time to take sides in the tussle between the Western Empires and the Hashemites over who gets the Middle East]].[[note]]The Hashemite kingdom is roughly the same as Jordan (the country, not the river or basketball player).[[/note]] This eventually culminates in a French war to toss a Hashemite monarchy out of Syria that has some splash over into the Palestinian Mandate. This doesn't seem like much, but it does trigger ideological awakenings of Arab nationalism among the Palestinian Arabs and Zionism among the settler Jews. It quickly takes militant turns, and soon the decade is wracked by increasing tension and infighting. See the Battle of Tel-Hai and the pogroms of 1920, 1921, and 1929. In the midst of all this, the British decide to appoint a new Mufti of Jerusalem to legitimize their rule and decide on [[TheFundamentalist Amin al-Husseini]], a distinguished cleric and Haj. [[EveryoneHasStandards In spite of warnings from just about everybody else-including the Arab community]] they eventually do so. This proves to be a big mistake.

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* The WWI Aftermath and the 1920's: What is now the British Mandate of Palestine receives two hordes significant groups of very different immigrants and sees the fault lines for what comes later. Jews and Zionists come in to create the dream project they've envisioned for so long and often to escape a war-torn Europe and Middle East while Arabs -- most of whom were poor tenant farmers from the North who were arguably worse than Serfs under Ottoman law -- take their chance to ditch their [[FeudalOverlord feudal overlords]] and war-ravaged homelands to try and run to what they hope will be greener pastures in Israel/Palestine. Both succeed rather well, and within a matter of months huge and relatively thriving immigrant communities have latched on to the preexisting Jewish and Arab communities [[FromBadToWorse just in time to take sides in the tussle between the Western Empires and the Hashemites over who gets the Middle East]].[[note]]The Hashemite kingdom is roughly the same as Jordan (the country, not the river or basketball player).[[/note]] This eventually culminates in a French war to toss a Hashemite monarchy out of Syria that has some splash over into the Palestinian Mandate. This doesn't seem like much, but it does trigger ideological awakenings of Arab nationalism among the Palestinian Arabs and Zionism among the settler Jews. It quickly takes militant turns, and soon the decade is wracked by increasing tension and infighting. See the Battle of Tel-Hai and the pogroms of 1920, 1921, and 1929. In the midst of all this, the British decide to appoint a new Mufti of Jerusalem to legitimize their rule and decide on [[TheFundamentalist Amin al-Husseini]], a distinguished cleric and Haj. [[EveryoneHasStandards In spite of warnings from just about everybody else-including the Arab community]] they eventually do so. This proves to be a big mistake.
3rd Mar '17 2:15:10 PM Jhonny
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This is one of the reasons why Right of Return is so emphasized; in addition to one of the original reasons (and one still used by hardliners) being to more or less "flood out" the Israelis and force them demographically back, one of the main reasons *now* is that Egypt/Lebanon/Syria/Jordan want to get rid of what a lot of them view as TheLoad.

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This is one of the reasons why Right of Return is so emphasized; in addition to one of the original reasons (and one still used by hardliners) being to more or less "flood out" the Israelis and force them demographically back, one of the main reasons *now* is that Egypt/Lebanon/Syria/Jordan want to get rid of what a lot of them view as TheLoad.
TheLoad. This issue is further complicated by some people who are classified as Palestinian refugees being born in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria or the likes and raises the very legitimate question whether they actually ''want to'' return to a country they've never set foot in - yet they are still treated as "foreigners" by the governments of their country of residence who want to get rid of them ASAP, making them stuck between a rock and a hard place.
3rd Mar '17 2:10:43 PM Jhonny
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On top of everything else, for a patch of land the size of New Jersey and without a single drop of oil or gas ([[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-15037533 until 2011]], and not much even then), the conflict has become a massive fodder for [[GambitPileUp international diplomatic machinations and shady dealings]]. For whatever else it was, Israel was a secure democratic foothold into the rest of the Middle East at a time when the closest other thing to it was [[CivilWarcraft Lebanon]], and the rest was divided between pro-Soviet revolutionary dictatorships and dubiously reliable (from a Western POV) reactionary autocratic dictatorships, and that made it valuable for Washington. Thanks to the GambitPileup involving both regional and international politics, this meant it was yet another battleground at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. In that time, Israel served as a NATO surrogate against Soviet-backed allies in UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}} under [[UsefulNotes/GamalAbdelNasser Nasser]] or Sadat and UsefulNotes/{{Syria}} under Assad. Nowadays, Israel currently works as an enemy of UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}, a business partner of both UsefulNotes/{{China}} and UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}, an ally of America, and a grudging de facto one of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia, despite Saudi Arabia not maintaining official diplomatic relations - [[EnemyMine their common enmity towards the Iranian regime is greater than any issues they might have with one another]].

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On top of everything else, for a patch of land the size of New Jersey and without a single drop of oil or gas ([[http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-15037533 until 2011]], and not much even then), the conflict has become a massive fodder for [[GambitPileUp international diplomatic machinations and shady dealings]]. For whatever else it was, Israel was a secure democratic foothold into the rest of the Middle East at a time when the closest other thing to it was [[CivilWarcraft Lebanon]], and the rest was divided between pro-Soviet revolutionary dictatorships and dubiously reliable (from a Western POV) reactionary autocratic dictatorships, and that made it valuable for Washington. Thanks to the GambitPileup involving both regional and international politics, this meant it was yet another battleground at the height of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. In that time, Israel served as a NATO surrogate against Soviet-backed allies in UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}} under [[UsefulNotes/GamalAbdelNasser Nasser]] or Sadat and UsefulNotes/{{Syria}} under Assad. Nowadays, Israel currently works as an enemy of UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}, a business partner of both UsefulNotes/{{China}} and UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}, an ally of America, and a grudging de facto one of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia, despite Saudi Arabia not maintaining official diplomatic relations with Israel - [[EnemyMine their common enmity towards the Iranian regime is greater than any issues they might have with one another]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.ArabIsraeliConflict