History UsefulNotes / AndrewJackson

11th Mar '18 10:53:52 PM infernape612
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Meanwhile, Jackson was also a strong supporter of western expansion, believing that it would provide cheap land for the poor farmers who supported him. When he entered office, there were still several regions in the Southwest occupied by Native American tribes, and up until this point the federal government mostly protected their claims to much of these lands, to the outrage of the pioneers crossing the Appalachians who wanted to settle these areas. Jackson had Congress pass the Indian Removal Act, which granted the federal government more power to negotiate land purchases from tribal governments. However, this quickly turned into the federal government forcing these people off of their ancestral homes and sending them on a long march west to what is now Oklahoma, and it is estimated that around 100,000 American Indians were displaced because of this. While for years history books, which used to be notoriously hateful to Native Americans, ''praised'' Jackson for this, in recent years he has been justly criticized for the policy and his reputation with historians has fallen. Thousands died along the way, and today these policies would probably be labelled ethnic cleansing (it's not genocide, since the idea was not to deliberately kill them). In his defense, he passed these policies in part because he feared that, if the tribes would not move, white settlers would simply massacre them, though this still means Indian removal was good only in comparison to an even worse possibility. The Bureau of Indian Affairs was also created during his presidency. When the Cherokee nation's case reached the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that Georgia's state government could not override the tribal rights negotiated with the federal government; Jackson ignored this decision and allegedly declared "Marshall has made is decision, [[BadassBoast now let's see him enforce it!]]" The removal of the Cherokee, which was so brutal that it was called the Trail of Tears, actually happened after Jackson left office, contrary to how most people remember it. Jackson himself had revenge when Marshall died during his second term, and he nominated the pro-Indian removal Roger B. Taney as Chief Justice; you may remember Taney was the Chief Justice who gave the ruling for ''Dred Scott v. Sandford'', making him among the most hated Justices in American history. Speaking of westward expansion, the Texas Revolution, fought by American settlers who settled into northern Mexico but didn't want to follow its rules, happened and was swiftly won and they won their independence. While he was sympathetic to their cause (it was led by Sam Houston, an old comrade of his), he also believed [[{{Foreshadowing}} annexing Texas would lead to war with Mexico]], and he only recognized their government.

to:

Meanwhile, Jackson was also a strong supporter of western expansion, believing that it would provide cheap land for the poor farmers who supported him. When he entered office, there were still several regions in the Southwest occupied by Native American tribes, and up until this point the federal government mostly protected their claims to much of these lands, to the outrage of the pioneers crossing the Appalachians who wanted to settle these areas. Jackson had Congress pass the Indian Removal Act, which granted the federal government more power to negotiate land purchases from tribal governments. However, this quickly turned into the federal government forcing these people off of their ancestral homes and sending them on a long march west to what is now Oklahoma, and it is estimated that around 100,000 American Indians were displaced because of this. While for years history books, which used to be notoriously hateful to Native Americans, ''praised'' Jackson for this, in recent years he has been justly criticized for the policy and his reputation with historians has fallen. Thousands died along the way, and today these policies would probably be labelled ethnic cleansing (it's not genocide, since the idea was not to deliberately kill them). In his defense, he passed these policies in part because he feared that, if the tribes would not move, white settlers would simply massacre them, though this still means Indian removal was good only in comparison to an even worse possibility. The Bureau of Indian Affairs was also created during his presidency. When the Cherokee nation's case reached the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that Georgia's state government could not override the tribal rights negotiated with the federal government; Jackson ignored this decision and allegedly declared "Marshall has made is his decision, [[BadassBoast now let's see him enforce it!]]" The removal of the Cherokee, which was so brutal that it was called the Trail of Tears, actually happened after Jackson left office, contrary to how most people remember it. Jackson himself had revenge when Marshall died during his second term, and he nominated the pro-Indian removal Roger B. Taney as Chief Justice; you may remember Taney was the Chief Justice who gave the ruling for ''Dred Scott v. Sandford'', making him among the most hated Justices in American history. Speaking of westward expansion, the Texas Revolution, fought by American settlers who settled into northern Mexico but didn't want to follow its rules, happened and was swiftly won and they won their independence. While he was sympathetic to their cause (it was led by Sam Houston, an old comrade of his), he also believed [[{{Foreshadowing}} annexing Texas would lead to war with Mexico]], and he only recognized their government.
20th Feb '18 5:27:48 PM LordSeth
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Meanwhile, Jackson was also a strong supporter of western expansion, believing that it would provide cheap land for the poor farmers who supported him. When he entered office, there were still several regions in the Southwest occupied by Native American tribes, and up until this point the federal government mostly protected their claims to much of these lands, to the outrage of the pioneers crossing the Appalachians who wanted to settle these areas. Jackson had Congress pass the Indian Removal Act, which granted the federal government more power to negotiate land purchases from tribal governments. However, this quickly turned into the federal government forcing these people off of their ancestral homes and sending them on a long march west to what is now Oklahoma, and it is estimated that around 100,000 American Indians were displaced because of this. While for years history books, which used to be notoriously hateful to Native Americans, ''praised'' Jackson for this, in recent years he has been justly criticized for the policy and his reputation with historians has fallen. Thousands died along the way, and today these policies would probably be labelled ethnic cleansing (it's not genocide, since the idea was not to deliberately kill them). In his defense, he passed these policies in part because he feared that, if the tribes would not move, white settlers would simply massacre them, though this still means Indian removal was good only in comparison to an even worse possibility. The Bureau of Indian Affairs was also created during his presidency. When the Cherokee nation's case reached the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that Georgia's state government could not override the tribal rights negotiated with the federal government; Jackson ignored this decision and infamously declared "Marshall has made is decision, [[BadassBoast now let's see him enforce it!]]" The removal of the Cherokee, which was so brutal that it was called the Trail of Tears, actually happened after Jackson left office, contrary to how most people remember it. Jackson himself had revenge when Marshall died during his second term, and he nominated the pro-Indian removal Roger B. Taney as Chief Justice; you may remember Taney was the Chief Justice who gave the ruling for ''Dred Scott v. Sandford'', making him among the most hated Justices in American history. Speaking of westward expansion, the Texas Revolution, fought by American settlers who settled into northern Mexico but didn't want to follow its rules, happened and was swiftly won and they won their independence. While he was sympathetic to their cause (it was led by Sam Houston, an old comrade of his), he also believed [[{{Foreshadowing}} annexing Texas would lead to war with Mexico]], and he only recognized their government.

to:

Meanwhile, Jackson was also a strong supporter of western expansion, believing that it would provide cheap land for the poor farmers who supported him. When he entered office, there were still several regions in the Southwest occupied by Native American tribes, and up until this point the federal government mostly protected their claims to much of these lands, to the outrage of the pioneers crossing the Appalachians who wanted to settle these areas. Jackson had Congress pass the Indian Removal Act, which granted the federal government more power to negotiate land purchases from tribal governments. However, this quickly turned into the federal government forcing these people off of their ancestral homes and sending them on a long march west to what is now Oklahoma, and it is estimated that around 100,000 American Indians were displaced because of this. While for years history books, which used to be notoriously hateful to Native Americans, ''praised'' Jackson for this, in recent years he has been justly criticized for the policy and his reputation with historians has fallen. Thousands died along the way, and today these policies would probably be labelled ethnic cleansing (it's not genocide, since the idea was not to deliberately kill them). In his defense, he passed these policies in part because he feared that, if the tribes would not move, white settlers would simply massacre them, though this still means Indian removal was good only in comparison to an even worse possibility. The Bureau of Indian Affairs was also created during his presidency. When the Cherokee nation's case reached the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that Georgia's state government could not override the tribal rights negotiated with the federal government; Jackson ignored this decision and infamously allegedly declared "Marshall has made is decision, [[BadassBoast now let's see him enforce it!]]" The removal of the Cherokee, which was so brutal that it was called the Trail of Tears, actually happened after Jackson left office, contrary to how most people remember it. Jackson himself had revenge when Marshall died during his second term, and he nominated the pro-Indian removal Roger B. Taney as Chief Justice; you may remember Taney was the Chief Justice who gave the ruling for ''Dred Scott v. Sandford'', making him among the most hated Justices in American history. Speaking of westward expansion, the Texas Revolution, fought by American settlers who settled into northern Mexico but didn't want to follow its rules, happened and was swiftly won and they won their independence. While he was sympathetic to their cause (it was led by Sam Houston, an old comrade of his), he also believed [[{{Foreshadowing}} annexing Texas would lead to war with Mexico]], and he only recognized their government.
24th Aug '17 8:32:30 PM TheFallofElDorado
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[{{Irony}} he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. 2020 (it was originally supposed to be the $10 bill due to [[UsefulNotes/AlexanderHamilton Hamilton]] originally not being considered especially important anymore, but [[Theatre/{{Hamilton}} you can guess what changed that mindset]]). Funnily enough, [[{{Irony}} he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
history. But it's safe to assume he "[[WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce wouldn't have given a shit]]" about this change.
24th Aug '17 12:40:25 AM PaulA
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* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the the Trail of Tears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history it's difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]

to:

* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Creator/RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the the Trail of Tears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history it's difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]
4th May '17 11:03:30 AM JamesAustin
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/andrew_jackson_9337.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:''[[BookDumb "It is a damn poor mind indeed which can't think of at least two ways to spell any wurd."]]'']]

->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... [[WellThisIsNotThatTrope and then came Andrew Jackson]]."''

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/andrew_jackson_9337.org/pmwiki/pub/images/andrew_jackson_9338.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:''[[BookDumb "It [[caption-width-right:350:''"It is a damn poor mind indeed which can't think of at least two ways to spell any wurd."]]'']]

word."'']]

->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... [[WellThisIsNotThatTrope and then came Andrew Jackson]].Jackson."''
5th Apr '17 11:10:07 PM PaulA
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* He is a major character (though not the protagonist) in the Literature/TrailOfGlory series by EricFlint. Flint has mentioned that Jackson is wonderful to have as a character, since whatever he makes him do, the real-life Jackson did something just as outrageous. The characterisation feels very true to life.

to:

* He is a major character (though not the protagonist) in the Literature/TrailOfGlory ''Literature/TrailOfGlory'' series by EricFlint.Creator/EricFlint. Flint has mentioned that Jackson is wonderful to have as a character, since whatever he makes him do, the real-life Jackson did something just as outrageous. The characterisation feels very true to life.
28th Feb '17 11:02:33 AM 3DDowner
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony [[{{Irony}} he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
23rd Feb '17 3:54:56 PM TristanJeremiah
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, he hated the idea of paper money, and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony he hated the idea of paper money, money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
19th Jan '17 11:59:58 AM SorPepita
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* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds of for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the TheTrailOfTears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history its difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]
* He's played by Creator/CharltonHeston in the 1953 film ''Film/ThePresidentsLady'' and the 1958 film ''The Buccaneer''.

to:

* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds of for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the TheTrailOfTears the Trail of Tears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history its it's difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]
* He's played by Creator/CharltonHeston in the 1953 film ''Film/ThePresidentsLady'' ''The President's Lady'' and the 1958 film ''The Buccaneer''.
12th Dec '16 10:35:47 AM VutherA
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->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... and then came Andrew Jackson."''

to:

->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... [[WellThisIsNotThatTrope and then came Andrew Jackson.Jackson]]."''
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