History UsefulNotes / AndrewJackson

5th Apr '17 11:10:07 PM PaulA
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* He is a major character (though not the protagonist) in the Literature/TrailOfGlory series by EricFlint. Flint has mentioned that Jackson is wonderful to have as a character, since whatever he makes him do, the real-life Jackson did something just as outrageous. The characterisation feels very true to life.

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* He is a major character (though not the protagonist) in the Literature/TrailOfGlory ''Literature/TrailOfGlory'' series by EricFlint.Creator/EricFlint. Flint has mentioned that Jackson is wonderful to have as a character, since whatever he makes him do, the real-life Jackson did something just as outrageous. The characterisation feels very true to life.
28th Feb '17 11:02:33 AM 3DDowner
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony [[{{Irony}} he hated the idea of paper money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
23rd Feb '17 3:54:56 PM TristanJeremiah
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, he hated the idea of paper money, and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020. Funnily enough, [[Irony he hated the idea of paper money, money]], and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
19th Jan '17 11:59:58 AM SorPepita
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* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds of for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the TheTrailOfTears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history its difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]
* He's played by Creator/CharltonHeston in the 1953 film ''Film/ThePresidentsLady'' and the 1958 film ''The Buccaneer''.

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* In ''Okla Hannali'', a rare historical novel written by science fiction author RALafferty, Andrew Jackson figures in the background during the first half of the book. Though not part of the narrative directly he is depicted as an outright villain, and the author blames him not only for laying the seeds of for the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar but for [[TheChessmaster deliberately enacting the Indian removals in the winter]] so that as many Indians as possible could die of exposure. This makes sense in context of the story as the book deals largely with the build-up to the TheTrailOfTears the Trail of Tears and its aftermath, and centers on vignettes from the life of a Choctaw 'Mingo' called Hannali Innominee and his family. Because the book's prose is a blend of non-fiction and oral history its it's difficult to say which are facts and which are opinions of the author. [[SignatureStyle All of this is on par with Lafferty's usual style.]]
* He's played by Creator/CharltonHeston in the 1953 film ''Film/ThePresidentsLady'' ''The President's Lady'' and the 1958 film ''The Buccaneer''.
12th Dec '16 10:35:47 AM VutherA
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->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... and then came Andrew Jackson."''

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->''"Up until 1829 all of our presidents had been aristocratic, dignified, educated, and presidential... [[WellThisIsNotThatTrope and then came Andrew Jackson.Jackson]]."''
16th Jul '16 8:06:22 AM ZimFan89
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Added DiffLines:

* In the AlternateHistory classic ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'', Jackson is among those who join the exodus from the British colonies after the failure of the American Revolution, eventually settling in the new nation of Jefferson (our universe's Texas). Later, when Jefferson went to war with Mexico, he was in command of the victorious Jefferson armies, and after the two nations are joined together as the United States of Mexico, Jackson becomes the first President.
12th Jul '16 7:32:30 AM DoctorCooper
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'''Andrew Jackson''' (March 15, 1767 June 8, 1845) was the seventh president of the United States of America, serving from [[UsefulNotes/AntebellumAmerica 1829 to 1837]], right after UsefulNotes/JohnQuincyAdams and right before UsefulNotes/MartinVanBuren, and was the first president from the Democratic Party. He was also a living testament to how {{Badass}} a man can be; no future president was near as badass until UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt came to office.

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'''Andrew Jackson''' (March 15, 1767 June 8, 1845) was the seventh president of the United States of America, serving from [[UsefulNotes/AntebellumAmerica 1829 to 1837]], right after UsefulNotes/JohnQuincyAdams and right before UsefulNotes/MartinVanBuren, and was the first president from the Democratic Party. He was also a living testament to how {{Badass}} badass a man can be; no future president was near as badass until UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt came to office.
21st May '16 4:38:50 PM pku
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This all took place during an era of rapid change in the United States. The Industrial Revolution began to really get going in the years after the War of 1812 and the small businesses of the post-independence years were giving way to large factories, resulting in previously self-reliant farmers and craftsmen being forced to turn to "wage slavery" to make a living. Meanwhile, thanks to the spread of the cotton gin, the rise of large slave plantations in the South began, forcing out many farmers and slaveholders. Additionally, the federal government enacted policies to help spur economic growth and modernization, policies which were often perceived as being pro-Northern and pro-wealthy. Horrified to see their way of living change right before their eyes, the common people made demands for populist reforms, such as an end to federal aid to businesses, universal white manhood suffrage, and expansion west to provide land for farmers and settlers. Jackson, now a wealthy plantation owner but sympathetic to their plight, openly sided with the little guys against big business and big government, and he rode this populist wave to a national political career. Jackson ran for the presidency in 1824 and won a plurality of the popular vote, but, in a very confusing election in which three other people ran, he did not have enough votes to win the White House, so the matter went to the House of Representatives. There, the Speaker of the House UsefulNotes/HenryClay, who was fourth place in the presidential race and a sworn enemy of Jackson, used his political influence to swing the House vote narrowly in favor of John Quincy Adams, who then became President. Outraged at this "corrupt bargain" of Washington insiders, Jackson and his supporters formed the Democratic Party and announced he would run again in 1828, and Jacksonians in Congress stopped most of Adams' policies from passing. The 1828 election, however, was just Adams against Jackson, and Jackson, benefiting from perceived corruption and incompetence in the Adams administration and from commoners in the Southern and frontier states gaining the vote, easily won in a landslide.

to:

This all took place during an era of rapid change in the United States. The Industrial Revolution began to really get going in the years after the War of 1812 and the small businesses of the post-independence years were giving way to large factories, resulting in previously self-reliant farmers and craftsmen being forced to turn to "wage slavery" to make a living. Meanwhile, thanks to the spread of the cotton gin, the rise of large slave plantations in the South began, forcing out many farmers and slaveholders. Additionally, the federal government enacted policies to help spur economic growth and modernization, policies which were often perceived as being pro-Northern and pro-wealthy. Horrified to see their way of living change right before their eyes, the common people made demands for populist reforms, such as an end to federal aid to businesses, universal white manhood suffrage, and expansion west to provide land for farmers and settlers. Jackson, now a wealthy plantation owner but sympathetic to their plight, openly sided with the little guys against big business and big government, and he rode this populist wave to a national political career. Jackson ran for the presidency in 1824 and won a plurality of the popular vote, but, in a very confusing election in which three other people ran, he did not have enough votes to win the White House, so the matter went to the House of Representatives. There, the Speaker of the House UsefulNotes/HenryClay, who was fourth place in the presidential race and a sworn enemy of Jackson, used his political influence to swing the House vote narrowly in favor of John Quincy Adams, who then became President. Outraged at this "corrupt bargain" of Washington insiders, Jackson and his supporters formed the Democratic Party and announced he would run again in 1828, and Jacksonians in Congress stopped most of Adams' policies from passing. The 1828 election, however, was just Adams against Jackson, and Jackson, benefiting from perceived corruption and incompetence in the Adams administration and from commoners in the Southern and frontier states gaining the vote, easily won in a landslide.
3rd May '16 12:11:51 PM Pren
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Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020.

to:

Jackson was first featured on the $20 bill in 1928; he will no longer be the only American face to appear on the bill, as UsefulNotes/HarrietTubman will also be printed sometime between 2016 and 2020.
2020. Funnily enough, he hated the idea of paper money, and the reason he ended up pictured on it has unfortunately been lost to history.
27th Apr '16 6:48:51 PM kill-it-with-ph1r3
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[[caption-width-right:350:''[[BookDumb "It is a damn poor mind indeed which can't think of at least two ways to spell any word."]]'']]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''[[BookDumb "It is a damn poor mind indeed which can't think of at least two ways to spell any word.wurd."]]'']]
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