History UsefulNotes / AmericanLawEnforcement

22nd Oct '17 2:25:08 PM nombretomado
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The Air Force has the Office of Special Investigations (OSI), the Army has the Criminal Investigation Command (CID), and the DOD Inspector General has the Defense Criminal investigative service (DCIS), all of which serve similar but not identical roles. None of the others has their own television shows on {{CBS}}, however.

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The Air Force has the Office of Special Investigations (OSI), the Army has the Criminal Investigation Command (CID), and the DOD Inspector General has the Defense Criminal investigative service (DCIS), all of which serve similar but not identical roles. None of the others has their own television shows on {{CBS}}, Creator/{{CBS}}, however.
7th Oct '17 10:21:47 PM bfunc
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The Sheriff's office or department is the typical name for a county-level local police agency, and handles crimes where people flee between cities, or where the crimes take place in areas not incorporated into a municipality below the county level. The Sheriff is usually an elected office. Most of the Sheriff's force are deputies, which are hired positions. Sheriffs or county marshals almost always serve as the primary enforcement arm of the local courts, serving warrants, writs, evictions, and other court orders, and running the local jail system (in many places, these roles may be all that the sheriff is responsible for). Sheriffs are also commonly designated in many places by law as the county coroner, often a position called the "Sheriff-Coroner," and has responsibility for finding and properly handling unclaimed dead bodies in the county (and, very often, also running the local medical examiner's office). Sheriff's offices may also handle specialized and expensive law enforcement resources, like evidence laboratories, bomb squads, search and rescue teams, or SWAT teams and make these available to local police agencies too small to have their own versions of these.

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The Sheriff's office or department is the typical name for a county-level local police agency, and handles crimes where people flee between cities, or where the crimes take place in areas not incorporated into a municipality below the county level. The Sheriff is usually an elected office. Most of the Sheriff's force are deputies, which are hired positions. Sheriffs or county marshals almost always serve as the primary enforcement arm of the local courts, serving warrants, writs, evictions, and other court orders, and running the local jail system (in many places, these roles may be all that the sheriff is responsible for). Sheriffs are also commonly designated in many places by law as the county coroner, coroner,[[note]]in some places the term "coroner" refer to a person with medical expertise, but more often it's a largely bureaucratic position that requires no medical training but may ''supervise'' medical professionals[[/note]] often a position called the "Sheriff-Coroner," and has responsibility for finding and properly handling unclaimed dead bodies in the county (and, very often, also running the local medical examiner's office). Sheriff's offices may also handle specialized and expensive law enforcement resources, like evidence laboratories, bomb squads, search and rescue teams, or SWAT teams and make these available to local police agencies too small to have their own versions of these.
4th Oct '17 9:51:42 AM DocWildNole
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Added DiffLines:

* Fourth, the current page illustration is probably the most representative visual for what American cops ''really'' spend their time doing: reports & paperwork. An early (1970) study in the ''Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology'' estimated that up to 50% of the average patrol officer's time was taken with administrative tasks. By the 2010s, a popular textbook, ''An Introduction to Policing'', reported that the percentage had been lowered to approximately 20%, largely due to computerization. Still, numerous online officer forums confirm that one felony arrest probably equals two hours of paperwork, or more.
2nd Oct '17 9:21:20 AM DocWildNole
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->''"That's nice work, boys!"''
-->-- '''Chief Clancy Wiggum''', ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''

[[quoteright:220:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/oU7M4_9695.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:220:[[DonutMessWithACop What, no donuts?]]]]

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->''"That's nice work, boys!"''
->''"Let's be careful out there."''
-->-- '''Chief Clancy Wiggum''', ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''

[[quoteright:220:http://static.
'''Sergeant Phil Esterhaus''', ''Series/HillStreetBlues''

[[quoteright:350:http://static.
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/oU7M4_9695.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:220:[[DonutMessWithACop What, no donuts?]]]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/139_1927074.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: What cops do that doesn't make the headlines -- or the tropes]]
16th Sep '17 4:36:38 PM nombretomado
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The National Guard aren't really a police force, more reservists for the YanksWithTanks. Each state has an Air National Guard, who play a part in US air defense and get to fly F-16s. 20 Presidents have been in the National Guard at some point in their lives.

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The National Guard aren't really a police force, more reservists for the YanksWithTanks.UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks. Each state has an Air National Guard, who play a part in US air defense and get to fly F-16s. 20 Presidents have been in the National Guard at some point in their lives.
9th Sep '17 6:17:27 AM DocWildNole
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Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Half civilian, this organization investigates crimes related to the US Navy and Marine Corps - any death on a vessel, aircraft or facility.

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Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Half civilian, this organization investigates crimes related to the US Navy and Marine Corps - Corps; it also conducts investigations into any death on a vessel, Naval vessels or in Navy or Marine Corps aircraft or facility.
facilities.



* Three, civilian control of the military have strong traditions in the US, but equally strong is the respect for military professionalism and the recognition of the military as a unique separate society. A specialized civilian agency is the tradeoff solution.

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* Three, civilian control of the military have is a part of government with both deep historical roots and very strong traditions bipartisan support in the US, but equally strong is the respect for military professionalism and the recognition of the military as a unique separate society. A specialized civilian agency is the tradeoff solution.
9th Sep '17 6:05:05 AM DocWildNole
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** During WWII, G-Men operated undercover in Latin America keeping tabs on the Germans (remember Cary Grant in ''Film/{{Notorious}}''). The CIA took over this function after 1947 (but probably became less focused on the Germans).

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** During WWII, G-Men operated undercover in Latin America keeping tabs on the Germans (remember Germans; probably the most famous fictional example is Cary Grant Grant's character in ''Film/{{Notorious}}'').''Film/{{Notorious}}''. The CIA took over this function after 1947 (but probably became less focused on the Germans).
9th Sep '17 6:01:40 AM DocWildNole
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* The FBI made its rep battling bank robbers and kidnappers like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson. The quantum leap forward in automotive technology in the late 20s and early 30s allowed criminals to rob or kidnap in one state and avoid prosecution by simply hotfooting it across a state line. To combat this, Congress passed the Federal Kidnapping Act of 1932 (in response to the infamous Lindbergh kidnapping), and the first of several federal laws against bank robbery in 1934 (most U.S. banks are federally-insured). Now the FBI is automatically called in in such cases.

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* The As noted above, the FBI made its rep battling bank robbers and kidnappers like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson. The quantum leap forward in automotive technology in the late 20s and early 30s allowed criminals to rob or kidnap in one state and avoid prosecution by simply hotfooting it across a state line. line; in ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'', Warren Beatty's character references this directly. To combat this, Congress passed the Federal Kidnapping Act of 1932 (in response to the infamous Lindbergh kidnapping), and the first of several federal laws against bank robbery in 1934 (most U.S. banks are federally-insured). Now the FBI is automatically called in in such cases.
9th Sep '17 5:47:36 AM DocWildNole
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** More or less concurrently with the "War on Drugs," departments across the country began switching to semi-automatic handguns with 10, 12 or even 16 round magazines, chambered in 9mm or .40 caliber; Glock, Beretta, Sig Sauer seem to be the most popular brands. Almost all jurisdictions also require [[ShotgunsAreJustBetter 12 gauge shotguns]] as standard equipment in patrol cars. [[SWATTeam Special Weapons And Tactics teams]], as you might expect, use even more lethal weaponry, including {{SniperRifle}}s, so-called "assault weapons" (semi-automatic rifles, usually based on the Armalite AR-15 design), and even [[MoreDakka submachine guns]]. And undercover officers may use almost anything that's easily concealable.

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** More or less concurrently with the "War on Drugs," departments across the country began switching to semi-automatic handguns with 10, 12 or even 16 round magazines, chambered in 9mm or .40 caliber; Glock, Beretta, Sig Sauer seem to be the most popular brands. Almost all jurisdictions also require [[ShotgunsAreJustBetter 12 gauge shotguns]] as standard equipment in patrol cars. [[SWATTeam Special Weapons And Tactics teams]], as you might expect, use even more specialized lethal weaponry, including {{SniperRifle}}s, so-called "assault weapons" (semi-automatic rifles, usually based on the Armalite AR-15 design), and even [[MoreDakka submachine guns]]. And undercover officers may use almost anything that's easily concealable.
8th Sep '17 11:33:21 AM GrammarNavi
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The ATF has been a highly controversial agency, in part for its role in the middle of AmericanGunPolitics, as well as several colossal blunders over the years (including their involvement in the Ruby Ridge and Waco sieges in the 1990s, as well as, more recently, the Operation "Fast and Furious" gunrunning scandal). Cynical observers of US politics have observed however that keeping the agency around, in a weakened and discredited state, has been more politically useful to gun rights proponents, such as the NRA, than seriously reforming the agency or abolishing it and giving its duties to another agency, like the FBI.

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The ATF has been a highly controversial agency, in part for its role in the middle of AmericanGunPolitics, UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics, as well as several colossal blunders over the years (including their involvement in the Ruby Ridge and Waco sieges in the 1990s, as well as, more recently, the Operation "Fast and Furious" gunrunning scandal). Cynical observers of US politics have observed however that keeping the agency around, in a weakened and discredited state, has been more politically useful to gun rights proponents, such as the NRA, than seriously reforming the agency or abolishing it and giving its duties to another agency, like the FBI.
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