History UsefulNotes / AmericanFootball

25th Feb '18 7:23:55 AM JamesShade
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Kick off'': A kick off begins both halves of football and resumes play after a score (except for a safety). The kickoffs take place from the kicking team's 35 yard line and the ball is kicked from a Tee (or held by a member of the kicking team, if the ball falls off the tee due to wind, the referee will require they have a member of the kicking team hold the ball like on a field goal attempt). The receiving team may not attempt to block this kick but both teams may contest for possession. The kicking team must stay behind the ball until it is kicked or the play will be offside. The ball must travel at least 10 yards before the kicking team can attempt to regain possession; though most kick offs are sent as far down the field as possible so the receiving team starts with poorer field position, under certain circumstances (usually a team that just scored still being behind late in the game) a kicking team will want to regain the ball immediately, and so will attempt an "onside kick", using a weak kick that travels the minimum distance while sending their own players to recover it instead of letting the other team get it and just blocking the return.

to:

* ''Kick off'': A kick off begins both halves of football and resumes play after a score (except for a safety). The kickoffs take place from the kicking team's 35 yard line and the ball is kicked from a Tee (or held by a member of the kicking team, if the ball falls off the tee due to wind, the referee will require they have a member of the kicking team hold the ball like on a field goal attempt). The receiving team may not attempt to block this kick but both teams may contest for possession. [[note]]this part of the rule burned the Buffalo Bills at the end of the 2016 season; in a game where they were already being blown out by division rival the New York Jets, they allowed a kickoff from a Jets touchdown to roll into their end zone untouched, at which point a Jets gunner landed on it for another touchdown; the Bills kick returner even chased down said ball...only to [[WhatAnIdiot stare stupidly at it for several seconds]] before making a belated lunge that was blocked by several other Jets who had run down with the gunner[[/note]] The kicking team must stay behind the ball until it is kicked or the play will be offside. The ball must travel at least 10 yards before the kicking team can attempt to regain possession; though most kick offs are sent as far down the field as possible so the receiving team starts with poorer field position, under certain circumstances (usually a team that just scored still being behind late in the game) a kicking team will want to regain the ball immediately, and so will attempt an "onside kick", using a weak kick that travels the minimum distance while sending their own players to recover it instead of letting the other team get it and just blocking the return.
25th Feb '18 6:49:05 AM JamesShade
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In Mexico, the ONEFA is a college league with 26 teams in 3 conferences. It was the most important championship in Latin America before the country established ''Liga Fútbol Americano'', a fully professional league (the first such gridiron football league outside the US and Canada) in 2016. The new league launched with four teams, with expansion to six announced for 2017. Mexicans have been playing college American football since the 1920s, and today's top Mexican college teams are seen as roughly equivalent to NCAA Division III (non-scholarship) teams, but steadily improving. In 2009, a Mexican college team beat Blinn College, a Texas junior college (two-year school), in an exhibition. Making that game more significant was that Blinn went on to win the US junior college national title, and the quarterback who lost the exhibition and won the national title was Cam Newton. Yes, ''that'' Cam Newton. When broadcasts of American football started in 1960s, games featuring the Dallas Cowboys were shown. Its popularity grew during the 1970s with returning migrants who were American football fans popularizing the sport. While its popularity can't compare with soccer, it's by far the most popular minor league sport there. It's also the most popular sport to bet on there, with the odds of winning at 50/50 as opposed to 1/3 of winning with soccer. The NFL has also expressed interest in playing at least one yearly game in Mexico City, like it does in London.

to:

In Mexico, the ONEFA is a college league with 26 teams in 3 conferences. It was the most important championship in Latin America before the country established ''Liga Fútbol Americano'', a fully professional league (the first such gridiron football league outside the US and Canada) in 2016. The new league launched with four teams, with expansion to six announced for 2017. Mexicans have been playing college American football since the 1920s, and today's top Mexican college teams are seen as roughly equivalent to NCAA Division III (non-scholarship) teams, but steadily improving. In 2009, a Mexican college team beat Blinn College, a Texas junior college (two-year school), in an exhibition. Making that game more significant was that Blinn went on to win the US junior college national title, and the quarterback who lost the exhibition and won the national title was Cam Newton. Yes, ''that'' Cam Newton. When broadcasts of American football started in 1960s, games featuring the Dallas Cowboys were shown. Its popularity grew during the 1970s with returning migrants who were American football fans popularizing the sport. While its popularity can't compare with soccer, it's by far the most popular minor league sport there. It's also the most popular sport to bet on there, with the odds of winning at 50/50 as opposed to 1/3 of winning with soccer. The NFL has also expressed interest in playing at least one yearly game in Mexico City, like it does in London.
London; this was achieved
in 2017, with the Patriots blowing out the Raiders 33-8 at Estadio Azteca.[[note]]in this game, Tom Brady became the first quarterback to throw for 300+ yards in three different countries, having previously done so in a UK game as well[[/note]]
15th Feb '18 1:45:29 PM lakingsif
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''placekicker'' attempts to kick field goals and extra points, for which the ball is snapped to another offensive player who then holds it to the ground (places it) for the kicker (unless the kicker is named [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]). Some teams employ two kickers, in which case one handles the above duties and one is a ''kickoff specialist'' who kicks the ball off of a tee to the other team at the start of play and after scores. Most teams have one kicker who handles both duties due to limited roster space. (A few teams have the punter double as the kickoff specialist instead of the placekicker.) Traditionally, holding the kick was the job of the starting quarterback, but this has changed in recent years (the now-retired Tony Romo of the Cowboys was one of the last starting [=QBs=] who still did this) and it is most typically the backup quarterback, or more often the punter, who handles the placement[[note]]this is due to practicalities of the practice schedule and roster rules. Because playbooks are so large in the NFL both the starting quarterback and backup quarterback are required to study and practice the plays the offense will be running during the game. If there is a third quarterback on the team he cannot take the field unless the starter and backup have both been ruled ineligible (injured or unable to play) for the remainder of the game. This makes it impractical to have the quarterback-skilled player receiving the snap and there is a small danger involved in handling the snaps if the [=QB's=] hand accidentally gets kicked. Finally, the special teams players are usually left to their own to practice kicks so the punter gets the most practice in holding the football for placekicks[[/note]] The most accurate kicker in NFL history is a tie between Nate Kaeding of the San Diego Chargers and Mike Vanderjagt of the Indianapolis Colts. Kickers are known for longevity; since they get defensively hit on plays only maybe about a few times a year they can go deep into their forties before retirement; Morten Andersen didn't retire until he was [[BadassGrandpa age 48]].

to:

* The ''placekicker'' attempts to kick field goals and extra points, for which the ball is snapped to another offensive player who then holds it to the ground (places it) for the kicker (unless the kicker is named [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]). Some teams employ two kickers, in which case one handles the above duties and one is a ''kickoff specialist'' who kicks the ball off of a tee to the other team at the start of play and after scores. Most teams have one kicker who handles both duties due to limited roster space. (A few teams have the punter double as the kickoff specialist instead of the placekicker.) Traditionally, holding the kick was the job of the starting quarterback, but this has changed in recent years (the now-retired Tony Romo of the Cowboys was one of the last starting [=QBs=] who still did this) and it is most typically the backup quarterback, or more often the punter, who handles the placement[[note]]this is due to practicalities of the practice schedule and roster rules. Because playbooks are so large in the NFL both the starting quarterback and backup quarterback are required to study and practice the plays the offense will be running during the game. If there is a third quarterback on the team he cannot take the field unless the starter and backup have both been ruled ineligible (injured or unable to play) for the remainder of the game. This makes it impractical to have the quarterback-skilled player receiving the snap and there is a small danger involved in handling the snaps if the [=QB's=] hand accidentally gets kicked. Finally, the special teams players are usually left to their own to practice kicks so the punter gets the most practice in holding the football for placekicks[[/note]] The most accurate kicker in NFL history is a tie between Nate Kaeding of the San Diego Chargers and Mike Vanderjagt of the Indianapolis Colts. Kickers are known for longevity; since they get defensively hit on plays only maybe about a few times a year they can go deep into their forties before retirement; Morten Andersen didn't retire until he was [[BadassGrandpa [[OldRetainer age 48]].
7th Feb '18 12:21:59 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, ''and'' the spot of recovery is closer to the defending team's goal line than the spot of the fumble (e.g., the offense fumbles on the opponent's 20-yard line and recovers it on the opponent's 10), a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.

to:

** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, ''and'' the spot of recovery is closer to the defending team's goal line than the spot of the fumble (e.g., the offense fumbles on the opponent's 20-yard line and recovers it on the opponent's 10), a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.
7th Feb '18 12:17:42 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, ''and'' the point of recovery is closer to the defending team's goal line than the spot of the fumble, a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.

to:

** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, ''and'' the point spot of recovery is closer to the defending team's goal line than the spot of the fumble, fumble (e.g., the offense fumbles on the opponent's 20-yard line and recovers it on the opponent's 10), a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.
7th Feb '18 12:15:27 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The quarterback may kick the ball as far downfield as possible (called a "punt") so that the opposing team will have further to travel in order to score on their ensuing possession. (The players doing the actual punting, while technically the quarterback on the play, are often a specialist called the punter, especially at higher levels. However, some players - including still active players in the NFL - do sometimes punt and sometimes throw passes,[[labelnote: example]]Ben Roethlisberger, starting Quarterback of the Pittsburgh Steelers since 2004 has kicked a couple of punts, mostly on third down to catch the defense off-guard. Most of the time on third down and too long to make a new first down a low risk run will be called to give the punter more room, sometimes high risk passes to achieve the first down will be attempted. So nobody is going to be prepared for a punt, so a halfway decent punter can pin the opposing side down deep in their own territory[[/labelnote]] mostly as a "trick play" that works mostly because it is so rare)

to:

* The quarterback may kick the ball as far downfield as possible (called a "punt") so that the opposing team will have further to travel in order to score on their ensuing possession. (The players doing the actual punting, while technically the quarterback on the play, are often a specialist called the punter, especially at higher levels. However, some players - including still active players in the NFL - do sometimes punt and sometimes throw passes,[[labelnote: example]]Ben Roethlisberger, starting Quarterback quarterback of the Pittsburgh Steelers since 2004 has kicked a couple of punts, mostly on third down to catch the defense off-guard. Most of the time on third down and too long to make a new first down a low risk run will be called to give the punter more room, sometimes high risk passes to achieve the first down will be attempted. So nobody is going to be prepared for a punt, so a halfway decent punter can pin the opposing side down deep in their own territory[[/labelnote]] mostly as a "trick play" that works mostly because it is so rare)



* The ''linebackers'' are two to four players who line up behind the defensive linemen (named because they back the defensive line). Linebackers are generally the most versatile players on the defense and can be used to rush the quarterback, support the run defense, or cover slower receivers like backs or tight ends. Typically, a middle linebacker is the play caller for the defense (sometimes called the "quarterback of the defense", not to be confused with a seventh defensive back in the "quarter" package; see below), as this position has a good view of the offense's formation and his location at the center of the defensive formation makes it easier for all the other defenders to hear him. The linebackers are known informally as the Mike (and Moe or Jack in a four-backer set) for inside linebackers and Will and Sam for the weak side and strong side (the side of the offensive line with the tight end) linebackers. The second number in the common naming system for defense (ex: 4-3 has 4 defensive linemen and 3 linebackers, while the 3-4 has 3 and 4, respectively.) Among the best recent linebackers in football are Ray Lewis, Patrick Willis, Brian Urlacher, [=DeMarcus=] Ware, James Harrison, and Von Miller. Both Dick Butkus and Lawrence Taylor, often considered in lists of "top defensive player of all-time" (or even "top player of all-time"), were linebackers.

to:

* The ''linebackers'' are two to four players who line up behind the defensive linemen (named because they back the defensive line). Linebackers are generally the most versatile players on the defense and can be used to rush the quarterback, support the run defense, or cover slower receivers like backs or tight ends. Typically, a middle linebacker is the play caller for the defense (sometimes called the "quarterback of the defense", not to be confused with a seventh defensive back in the "quarter" package; see below), as this position has a good view of the offense's formation and his location at the center of the defensive formation makes it easier for all the other defenders to hear him. The linebackers are known informally as the Mike (and Moe or Jack in a four-backer set) for inside linebackers and Will and Sam for the weak side and strong side (the side of the offensive line with the tight end) linebackers. The second number in the common naming system for defense (ex: 4-3 has 4 defensive linemen and 3 linebackers, while the 3-4 has 3 and 4, respectively.) Among the best recent linebackers in football are Ray Lewis, Patrick Willis, Brian Urlacher, [=DeMarcus=] Ware, James Harrison, and Von Miller. Both Dick Butkus and Lawrence Taylor, often considered in lists of "top defensive player of all-time" all time" (or even "top player of all-time"), all time"), were linebackers.



* The ''placekicker'' attempts to kick field goals and extra points, for which the ball is snapped to another offensive player who then holds it to the ground (places it) for the kicker (unless the kicker is named [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]). Some teams employ two kickers, in which case one handles the above duties and one is a ''kickoff specialist'' who kicks the ball off of a tee to the other team at the start of play and after scores. Most teams have one kicker who handles both duties due to limited roster space. (A few teams have the punter double as the kickoff specialist instead of the placekicker.) Traditionally, holding the kick was the job of the starting quarterback, but this has changed in recent years (Tony Romo of the Cowboys is one of the few starting QB's who still does this) and it is most typically the backup quarterback, or more often the punter, who handles the placement[[note]]this is due to practicalities of the practice schedule and roster rules. Because playbooks are so large in the NFL both the starting quarterback and backup quarterback are required to study and practice the plays the offense will be running during the game. If there is a third quarterback on the team he cannot take the field unless the starter and backup have both been ruled ineligible (injured or unable to play) for the remainder of the game. This makes it impractical to have the quarterback-skilled player receiving the snap and there is a small danger involved in handling the snaps if the [=QB's=] hand accidentally gets kicked. Finally, the special teams players are usually left to their own to practice kicks so the punter gets the most practice in holding the football for placekicks[[/note]] The most accurate kicker in NFL history is a tie between Nate Kaeding of the San Diego Chargers and Mike Vanderjagt of the Indianapolis Colts. Kickers are known for longevity; since they get defensively hit on plays only maybe about a few times a year they can go deep into their forties before retirement; Morten Andersen didn't retire until he was [[BadassGrandpa age 48]].

to:

* The ''placekicker'' attempts to kick field goals and extra points, for which the ball is snapped to another offensive player who then holds it to the ground (places it) for the kicker (unless the kicker is named [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Charlie Brown]]). Some teams employ two kickers, in which case one handles the above duties and one is a ''kickoff specialist'' who kicks the ball off of a tee to the other team at the start of play and after scores. Most teams have one kicker who handles both duties due to limited roster space. (A few teams have the punter double as the kickoff specialist instead of the placekicker.) Traditionally, holding the kick was the job of the starting quarterback, but this has changed in recent years (Tony (the now-retired Tony Romo of the Cowboys is was one of the few last starting QB's [=QBs=] who still does did this) and it is most typically the backup quarterback, or more often the punter, who handles the placement[[note]]this is due to practicalities of the practice schedule and roster rules. Because playbooks are so large in the NFL both the starting quarterback and backup quarterback are required to study and practice the plays the offense will be running during the game. If there is a third quarterback on the team he cannot take the field unless the starter and backup have both been ruled ineligible (injured or unable to play) for the remainder of the game. This makes it impractical to have the quarterback-skilled player receiving the snap and there is a small danger involved in handling the snaps if the [=QB's=] hand accidentally gets kicked. Finally, the special teams players are usually left to their own to practice kicks so the punter gets the most practice in holding the football for placekicks[[/note]] The most accurate kicker in NFL history is a tie between Nate Kaeding of the San Diego Chargers and Mike Vanderjagt of the Indianapolis Colts. Kickers are known for longevity; since they get defensively hit on plays only maybe about a few times a year they can go deep into their forties before retirement; Morten Andersen didn't retire until he was [[BadassGrandpa age 48]].



** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.

to:

** Another fumble trick was the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Roller_%28American_football%29 Holy Roller]] of 1978, in which the Raiders' quarterback fumbled the ball forward as he was about to be sacked, causing the ball to roll toward the end zone, and then two other Raiders batted it forward into the end zone where one recovered it for a touchdown. This was ruled legal on the field because the officials ''couldn't tell'' if the fumble and the batting forward of the ball were intentional. The players involved all admitted that it was a deliberate fumble and that they only ''pretended'' to attempt to recover it prior to the ball reaching the end zone. This evasion of the "advancing a forward fumble" rule resulted in further restrictions on advancing a fumble by the offense: if the ball is recovered by an offensive player other than the one who fumbled it in the first place, ''and'' the point of recovery is closer to the defending team's goal line than the spot of the fumble, a recovery on 4th down or after the two-minute warning results in the ball being placed at the spot of the fumble rather than wherever it had rolled to.
5th Feb '18 1:09:26 AM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Group of Five" (also called "mid-majors") The other five FBS conferences: the American Athletic Conference (The American), Conference USA ([=C-USA=]), Mid-American Conference (MAC), Mountain West (MW), and Sun Belt. The other three independents ([[MilitaryAcademy Army]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}} BYU]], [=UMass=]) also fall in this group.

to:

* "Group of Five" (also called "mid-majors") The other five FBS conferences: the American Athletic Conference (The American), Conference USA ([=C-USA=]), Mid-American Conference (MAC), Mountain West (MW), and Sun Belt. The other three five independents ([[MilitaryAcademy Army]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}} BYU]], [[StrawmanU Liberty]], New Mexico State, [=UMass=]) also fall in this group.
31st Jan '18 6:03:48 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Recently, there's renewed interest in the game with Sky Sports showing the early doubleheader and NFL Network games, the [[ForegoneConclusion local ESPN airs]] ''MondayNightFootball'', while the terrestrial Five network gets Sunday Night Football, all live (though in the latter cases the night games air in the [[NotAMorningPerson early mornings after midnight London time]] due to time zones).

to:

Recently, there's renewed interest in the game with Sky Sports showing the early doubleheader and NFL Network games, the [[ForegoneConclusion local ESPN airs]] ''MondayNightFootball'', ''Series/MondayNightFootball'', while the terrestrial Five network gets Sunday Night Football, all live (though in the latter cases the night games air in the [[NotAMorningPerson early mornings after midnight London time]] due to time zones).
25th Jan '18 5:59:34 PM Gsueagle31049
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very divisive move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''. Nearly two decades after the demise of the XFL, [=McMahon=] announced plans to relaunch the league in 2020; however, the new XFL [[InNameOnly eschew the gimmicks of its predecessor]], with [=McMahon=] launching a new holding company, Alpha Entertainment, to oversee the league.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very divisive move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''. Nearly two decades after the demise of the XFL, [=McMahon=] announced plans to relaunch the league in 2020; however, the new XFL is [[InNameOnly eschew planned to be a more serious league]], eschewing the gimmicks of its predecessor]], predecessor, particularly crossovers with [=McMahon=] launching a new holding company, Alpha Entertainment, to oversee the league.WWE.
25th Jan '18 1:57:51 PM Gsueagle31049
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very divisive move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''.

to:

* '''[[LetXBeTheUnknown X]]FL''' (2000-2001): Founded by Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, it represented the first new nationwide pro football league in nearly twenty years. Strong promotion by UPN and NBC gave it incredibly high ratings for the first two weeks of games (in most cases, with over triple the viewership of the most optimistic projections), but those ratings quickly spiraled downward as the curiosity crowd and [[Wrestling/{{WWE}} WWF]] audience went away and the remaining football fans realized that the game quality just wasn't very good. By the end of the season, games airing on Creator/{{NBC}} were drawing record low ratings for prime time programming. Was the home for a handful of very good players - mostly undrafted college players and NFL second-stringers who were never really given a chance and were just happy to be playing pro football at all. The league's best player was Los Angeles Xtreme QB Tommy Maddox, who became the league's lone MVP. The league's best known player -- even to this day -- is Rod Smart, a RB for the Las Vegas Outlaws whose jersey read "HE HATE ME" on the back instead of his own name. Most of the XFL's {{Hatedom}} was a result of [=McMahon=]'s attempt to promote certain players as "characters" with a focus on interpersonal storylines rather than interteam stories, which, while interesting, was a very divisive move that did little to encourage the watching of the game. Also criticized was the XFL ruleset's focus on smashmouth football, encouraging hard hits with a lesser emphasis on penalties. Which served as a reminder of ''why'' the rules evolved the way they did. Aside from the gameplay itself, several factors worked against it, including the fact that it was owned and operated in partnership with NBC to field their own "in-house" football league. [[note]] In the abstract, this seemed like a risk worth taking. Whatever else his faults, Vince [=McMahon=] is a hell of a businessman. The teams were not independently owned; [=McMahon=] owned the league and all the teams and instituted a leaguewide salary structure that helped limit costs, with NBC helping foot the bill in exchange for broadcasting rights. If the league were a success, or at least broke even, then NBC would be on the ground floor to a viable alternative to the NFL and could garner the high ratings of airing football at a fraction of the cost of constantly negotiating for NFL programming. The high ratings for the first few weeks were encouraging, but when they began to tank, NBC didn't have the patience to let the league evolve and recover. There was talk of going forward with a second season, but the price would have been shutting down [=McMahon's=] "[=SmackDown!=]" wrestling show. He wasn't willing to do so, and that was that.[[/note]] That, combined with Vince [=McMahon's=] tendency to cross-promote with the WWF, eventually led to a perfect storm of casual fans not taking it seriously as a legit football alternative (most saw it as the same kind of "sports entertainment" as pro wrestling, with some even convinced that the game results were scripted) and professional sportscasters having no incentive to show results of a league owned by a rival network. This meant no game recaps on ''Series/SportsCenter'' or FOX Sports, no scores recorded in newspaper sports pages, and almost no coverage in ''Sports Illustrated''. Nearly two decades after the demise of the XFL, [=McMahon=] announced plans to relaunch the league in 2020; however, the new XFL [[InNameOnly eschew the gimmicks of its predecessor]], with [=McMahon=] launching a new holding company, Alpha Entertainment, to oversee the league.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1160. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.AmericanFootball