History UsefulNotes / AmericanFootball

15th Aug '16 3:05:01 AM KYCubbie
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* ''Film/TheBlindSide'' a BasedOnATrueStory movie about Michael Oher surviving high school, becoming an offensive lineman and eventually getting courted by a number of universities, and finally being drafted by the Baltimore Ravens.

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* ''Film/TheBlindSide'' ''Literature/TheBlindSide'' a BasedOnATrueStory movie about Michael Oher surviving high school, becoming an offensive lineman and eventually getting courted by a number of universities, and finally being drafted by the Baltimore Ravens.


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* ''The Blind Side'' was actually a book before it became a movie. ''The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game'', by Michael Lewis, is roughly half the story of Michael Oher and half the story of the evolution of the position of offensive tackle from the 1980s to the 21st century.
15th Aug '16 2:57:26 AM KYCubbie
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* The ''offensive line'' consists of five players: one center (the center of the line, expected to assign blocking schemes to the rest of the line and usually snaps the ball to the quarterback), two guards (who line up to either side of the center), and two tackles (who line up to either side of the guards). Their job is to block for the offensive backs - in other words, prevent the other defense from getting to the backs. This includes both pass blocking by simply diverting the defense from reaching the quarterback, and run blocking, where the linemen actively create running routes for the backs. The backs include anyone behind the line of scrimmage at the beginning of the play and usually include the quarterback, between zero and three running backs, and a tight end or wide receiver (there must be seven players on and four players behind the line for an offensive formation to be legal). The center's job is also to snap the ball to the quarterback. Offensive linemen are ineligible to touch a forward pass before another member of the offense or defense and cannot move more than five yards beyond the line of scrimmage (in the NFL they may not move past the "neutral zone", area defined by the distance between the tips of the ball before the ball is snapped) before the ball passes them (unless the offensive team publicly declares otherwise). Offensive linemen generally only touch the ball on fumbles, but there are a very few plays that have a tackle as an eligible receiver. Probably the best known center in recent years is Jeff Saturday, who retired after the 2012 season; he spent most of his career snapping the ball to Peyton Manning for the Indianapolis Colts and played his final season with the Green Bay Packers. The Tennessee Titans' Michael Oher, of ''Literature/TheBlindSide'' fame, is an offensive lineman (the term "the blind side", in football, refers to the side of the field that the quarterback is not facing when he turns to make a pass or a handoff; thus the offensive line position protecting that side - generally the tackle, Oher's position - is key to a successful offensive line.) In most cases (including Oher's) it's the the left tackle who plays this key role, as most quarterbacks (as with most of the general population) are right-handed (notable exceptions to ''that'' rule include Michael Vick and Tim Tebow.)

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* The ''offensive line'' consists of five players: one center (the center of the line, expected to assign blocking schemes to the rest of the line and usually snaps the ball to the quarterback), two guards (who line up to either side of the center), and two tackles (who line up to either side of the guards). Their job is to block for the offensive backs - in other words, prevent the other defense from getting to the backs. This includes both pass blocking by simply diverting the defense from reaching the quarterback, and run blocking, where the linemen actively create running routes for the backs. The backs include anyone behind the line of scrimmage at the beginning of the play and usually include the quarterback, between zero and three running backs, and a tight end or wide receiver (there must be seven players on and four players behind the line for an offensive formation to be legal). The center's job is also to snap the ball to the quarterback. Offensive linemen are ineligible to touch a forward pass before another member of the offense or defense and cannot move more than five yards beyond the line of scrimmage (in the NFL they may not move past the "neutral zone", area defined by the distance between the tips of the ball before the ball is snapped) before the ball passes them (unless the offensive team publicly declares otherwise). Offensive linemen generally only touch the ball on fumbles, but there are a very few plays that have a tackle as an eligible receiver. Probably the best known center in recent years is Jeff Saturday, who retired after the 2012 season; he spent most of his career snapping the ball to Peyton Manning for the Indianapolis Colts and played his final season with the Green Bay Packers. The Tennessee Titans' Carolina Panthers' Michael Oher, of ''Literature/TheBlindSide'' fame, is an offensive lineman (the term "the blind side", in football, refers to the side of the field that the quarterback is not facing when he turns to make a pass or a handoff; thus the offensive line position protecting that side - generally the tackle, Oher's position - is key to a successful offensive line.) In most cases (including Oher's) it's the the left tackle who plays this key role, as most quarterbacks (as with most of the general population) are right-handed (notable exceptions to ''that'' rule include Michael Vick and Tim Tebow.)
15th Aug '16 2:54:06 AM KYCubbie
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* "Group of Five" (also called "mid-majors") ó The other five FBS conferences: the American Athletic Conference (The American), Conference USA ([=C-USA=]), Mid-American Conference (MAC), Mountain West (MW), and Sun Belt.

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* "Group of Five" (also called "mid-majors") ó The other five FBS conferences: the American Athletic Conference (The American), Conference USA ([=C-USA=]), Mid-American Conference (MAC), Mountain West (MW), and Sun Belt.
Belt. The other three independents ([[MilitaryAcademy Army]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}} BYU]], [=UMass=]) also fall in this group.
3rd Jun '16 6:43:45 PM C2
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[[/folder]]
3rd Jun '16 6:43:18 PM C2
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[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Short-lived and much criticized Creator/MarvelComics hero NFL Superpro was an NFL player.
3rd Jun '16 6:38:29 PM C2
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* '''Arena Football League''' (1987-2008, 2010-present): Just based on longevity and popularity, the Arena Football League is probably the best known alternative league since the 60's American Football League, even though the Arena League isn't technically a competitor to the NFL. The league plays "Arena football" which is different in several ways to regular football, stuff we'll let TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arena_football explain better]]; the most obvious difference is that it's played on smaller fields in indoor arenas. Did decently in the ratings and in popularity until the league surprisingly crashed and burned in 2008. The [=AFL's=] second-tier league, being a subsidiary, was dissolved in the [=AFL's=] bankruptcy, but since they were at least reasonably profitable, they soon reformed into a new legal entity and bought the rights to the [=AFL=] name, effectively reinstating the league in 2010. Like the AFL, a list of notable NFL players who also played/currently play in the Arena league would be way too long for this page.

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* '''Arena Football League''' (1987-2008, 2010-present): Just based on longevity and popularity, the Arena Football League is probably the best known alternative league since the 60's American Football League, even though the Arena League isn't technically a competitor to the NFL. The league plays "Arena football" which is different in several ways to regular football, stuff we'll let TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arena_football explain better]]; the most obvious difference is that it's played on smaller fields in indoor arenas. Did decently in the ratings and in popularity until the league surprisingly crashed and burned in 2008. The [=AFL's=] second-tier league, being a subsidiary, was dissolved in the [=AFL's=] bankruptcy, but since they were at least reasonably profitable, they soon reformed into a new legal entity and bought the rights to the [=AFL=] name, effectively reinstating the league in 2010. Like the AFL, a list of notable NFL players who also played/currently play in the Arena league would be way too long for this page. There are other, smaller (low-paying) indoor football leagues in America's small to mid-sized cities which don't use AFL rules (since they were patented at the league's launch) and are generally unstable, with teams folding or changing leagues seemingly every year.
4th May '16 4:51:03 PM oknazevad
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* ''PAT or Conversion Attempt'': After scoring a touchdown a team receives [[BonusStage one additional play in which they can attempt to score bonus points]].The ball is placed two or three yards from the defending team's goal line and the scoring team attempts one of two possible plays.
** '''P'''oint '''A'''fter '''T'''ouchdown, or PAT: Attempt a placekick or dropkick[[note]]dropping the ball to the ground and kicking it after it has touched the ground, but don't be surprised if you've never seen a dropkick PAT attempted; the technique fell into disuse decades ago[[/note]] through the upright goal at the back of the end zone for one extra point. As such, it's often simply called "the extra point". The defense will attempt to block the PAT kick, but it is extremely difficult to do so. It is also possible for the kicker to miss the PAT, but due to the very short range required, this is likewise infrequent. Teams will opt for a PAT kick the vast majority of the time, thus a "touchdown" usually entails scoring 7 points total. Over the years, the PAT has become such a matter of routine that attempts have been made on the organizational level to increase the difficulty. In 2015, the NFL moved the line of scrimmage for kick attempts to the 15-yard line (among other things, making blocks more likely), and in the first season of the change, the league's success rate dropped from over 99% to a hair over 94%. That may not sound like a big changeóbut the last time the success rate on PAT kicks was this low was in ''1982''. Additionally, blocked attempts are now live balls, allowing more scoring possibilities. See below.

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* ''PAT or Conversion Attempt'': ''Conversion'': After scoring a touchdown touchdown, a team receives [[BonusStage one additional play additional, untimed down in which they can attempt to score]] at one-third the normal value. This is formally known as a "try" (though the term is exceedingly rarely used), and a successful score bonus points]].is known as "converting the try", or just a "conversion". The ball is placed two or three yards from the defending team's goal line and the scoring team attempts one of two possible plays.
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** '''P'''oint '''A'''fter '''T'''ouchdown, or PAT: Attempt a placekick or dropkick[[note]]dropping the ball to the ground and kicking it after it has touched the ground, but don't be surprised if you've never seen a dropkick PAT attempted; the technique fell into disuse decades ago[[/note]] ago, though Doug Flutie did successfully use one on a PAT in 2006.[[/note]] through the upright goal at the back of the end zone for one extra point. As such, it's often simply called "the extra point". The defense will attempt to block the PAT kick, but it is extremely difficult to do so. It is also possible for the kicker to miss the PAT, but due to the very short range required, this is likewise infrequent. Teams will opt for a PAT kick the vast majority of the time, thus a "touchdown" usually entails scoring 7 points total. Over the years, the PAT has become such a matter of routine that attempts have been made on the organizational level to increase the difficulty. In 2015, the NFL moved the line of scrimmage for kick attempts to the 15-yard line (among other things, making blocks more likely), and in the first season of the change, the league's success rate dropped from over 99% to a hair over 94%. That may not sound like a big changeóbut the last time the success rate on PAT kicks was this low was in ''1982''. Additionally, blocked attempts are now live balls, allowing more scoring possibilities. See below.
22nd Apr '16 6:49:31 PM Taskmaster123
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* ''Quarterback'': This player will touch the ball on nearly every offensive play. The role of the quarterback is to hand off the ball to an eligible receiver or pass the ball. Occasionally, the quarterback will run with the ball himself; some offensive systems use quarterback runs more than others. The mobile quarterback has become more prevalent in the [=NFL=] in recent years, but has been a staple of the high school and college game for decades. At the beginning of the play, the quarterback stands either directly under (behind) the center (a ''quarter'' of the way back from the offensive line, relative to the rest of the formation, hence the name quarterback), or seven yards behind the center. The latter formation is called "shotgun." A variation of the shotgun formation where the quarterback lines up 4 yards from the center and a running back is directly behind him is called the "pistol." As a result of nearly always being the preeminent decision-making player on a team's offense (the recent "Wildcat" formation notwithstanding), a quarterback is usually considered TheAce in the popular consciousness, and [="QBs"=] generally receive an out-sized portion of attention from the media and fans. This is good news for the quarterback when the team is winning. It is bad news when the team is not. The all-time leading passer in NFL history is Creator/PeytonManning. He played most of his career with the Indianapolis Colts and now plays for the Denver Broncos.

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* ''Quarterback'': This player will touch the ball on nearly every offensive play. The role of the quarterback is to hand off the ball to an eligible receiver or pass the ball. Occasionally, the quarterback will run with the ball himself; some offensive systems use quarterback runs more than others. The mobile quarterback has become more prevalent in the [=NFL=] in recent years, but has been a staple of the high school and college game for decades. At the beginning of the play, the quarterback stands either directly under (behind) the center (a ''quarter'' of the way back from the offensive line, relative to the rest of the formation, hence the name quarterback), or seven yards behind the center. The latter formation is called "shotgun." A variation of the shotgun formation where the quarterback lines up 4 yards from the center and a running back is directly behind him is called the "pistol." As a result of nearly always being the preeminent decision-making player on a team's offense (the recent "Wildcat" formation notwithstanding), a quarterback is usually considered TheAce in the popular consciousness, and [="QBs"=] generally receive an out-sized portion of attention from the media and fans. This is good news for the quarterback when the team is winning. It is bad news when the team is not. The all-time leading passer in NFL history is Creator/PeytonManning. He played most of his career with the Indianapolis Colts and now plays for Colts, then finished his career with the Denver Broncos.Broncos and retired in 2016 after winning Super Bowl 50, his second Super Bowl win.
12th Apr '16 2:13:56 PM Jhonny
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The European Federation of American Football is the governing body in Europe (for the most part, there have been squabbles between IFAF and EFAF in the past, mostly fueled by the egos of the respective leaders). It's main business is organizing pan-European competition like the Eurobowl (now renamed to {=Big6=}) or the European Championship. Judging from the media interest and spectator numbers of the 2014 European Championship (all games live in Austrian TV, 27 000 turned out for the final) they are doing a pretty decent job of it. However, the lack of competitive balance between Germany, Austria, France on one hand and pretty much the rest of Europe on the other as well as the lack of enthusiasm for the sport in many countries make their job rather difficult. The next European championship is to be held in Germany in 2018 who are also defending champions twice over (2010 & 2014).
12th Apr '16 2:09:12 PM Jhonny
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Finland has traditionally had the strongest European national side (holding a record 5 European titles out of 12, with two each for Italy, the UK and Germany (the current holders) and one for Sweden) and Finnish teams winning the first two Eurobowls (a playoff competition between the winners of the European leagues) but has faded since.

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Finland has traditionally had the strongest European national side (holding a record 5 European titles out of 12, with two each for Italy, the UK and three for Germany (the current holders) and one for Sweden) and Finnish teams winning the first two Eurobowls (a playoff competition between the winners of the European leagues) but has faded since.
since. Traditionally Finnish teams relied on huge physical guys and Finnish linemen and tight ends are still sought after in the top leagues of Europe.



The International Federation of American Football is the governing body for American football with 45 member associations from North and South America, Europe, Asia and Oceania. The IFAF also oversees the American Football World Cup, which is held every four years. Japan won the first two World Cups, held in 1999 and 2003. Team USA, which had not participated in the first two tournaments, won the next two in 2007 and 2011.

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The International Federation of American Football is the governing body for American football with 45 member associations from North and South America, Europe, Asia and Oceania. The IFAF also oversees the American Football World Cup, which is held every four years. Japan won the first two World Cups, held in 1999 and 2003. Team USA, which had not participated in the first two tournaments, won the next two thre in 2007 2007, 2011 and 2011.
2015. The American and Canadian National teams don't include any NFL or CFL players (and the few NFL players from other countries are not allowed to play for their national teams either) and in fact even top college talent is conspicuously absent. Still, the US team has only lost one game during its entire existence - against a "rest of the world" all star team, which sent many members to top colleges and the NFL later on. [[note]] That was the point of the game - for players from both sides [[/note]]
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