History UsefulNotes / AmericanFootball

23rd May '17 10:24:59 AM RallyBot2
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The length of quarters and overtime format differ depending on level, but typically a football game consists of four 15-minute quarters with an option for overtime if both teams are tied at the end of regulation. In college, overtime consists of the teams taking turns having possessions; if one team is ahead after both have had a possession, they win, otherwise they take another set of turns. In the NFL, overtime is a sudden-death quarter, beginning with another coin toss. The first team to score wins the game; the exception is that if the first team to get the ball only gets a field goal, the other team gets one possession to keep the game tied or take the lead, or else they lose. Excepting playoff games, a tie is possible if the score remains tied at the end of overtime, but this is rare, happening about once a season. Before the 2012 season added the "first-possession field goal doesn't win" rule to regular-season games (it had previously been added in the 2010 season for postseason games), it was even rarer; the last two tied games before the rule change had a six-year gap between them, and because of the rules differences between NFL and college, even some of the ''players'' didn't know a tie game was possible.

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The length of quarters and overtime format differ depending on level, but typically a football game consists of four 15-minute quarters with an option for overtime if both teams are tied at the end of regulation. In college, overtime consists of the teams taking turns having possessions; if one team is ahead after both have had a possession, they win, otherwise they take another set of turns. In the NFL, overtime is a sudden-death quarter, 10-minute period, beginning with another coin toss. The first team to score wins the game; the exception is that if the first team to get the ball only gets a field goal, the other team gets one possession to keep the game tied or take the lead, or else they lose. Excepting playoff games, a tie is possible if the score remains tied at the end of overtime, but this is rare, happening about once a season. Before the 2012 season added the "first-possession field goal doesn't win" rule to regular-season games (it had previously been added in the 2010 season for postseason games), it was even rarer; the last two tied games before the rule change had a six-year gap between them, and because of the rules differences between NFL and college, even some of the ''players'' didn't know a tie game was possible.
17th May '17 1:37:29 AM PaulA
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* ''Playing For Pizza'' by JohnGrisham, details the not oft seen world of [[strike:European]] Italian "American Football". The teams are mostly fielded from various odd workers, craftsmen and athletes of other sports past their prime, bank-rolled by the nearest top businessman/politician in the area (and just barely; the title comes from the players' "pay"), and their local supporters would be shamed by most high school booster clubs. The rivalries and dedication to the game, however, are "REAL football". There's also some nice bits about Italian history, art, food and opera. Bene.

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* ''Playing For Pizza'' by JohnGrisham, Creator/JohnGrisham, details the not oft seen world of [[strike:European]] Italian "American Football". The teams are mostly fielded from various odd workers, craftsmen and athletes of other sports past their prime, bank-rolled by the nearest top businessman/politician in the area (and just barely; the title comes from the players' "pay"), and their local supporters would be shamed by most high school booster clubs. The rivalries and dedication to the game, however, are "REAL football". There's also some nice bits about Italian history, art, food and opera. Bene.
13th May '17 1:33:42 PM nombretomado
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* '''Legends Football League''' (2010-present): Formerly known as the '''Lingerie Football League''', it is, at this point, the only "major" [[DistaffCounterpart female football league]] with any media attention, though most of it is [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity negative attention]] because the players basically play in athletically-minded, two-piece sports-wear with padding and helmets, with games carried in edited form on networks like {{MTV}}2, YouTube, and Fuse TV. Some of the female players are just glad to play at all (using the example of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League seen in ''ALeagueOfTheirOwn'') and try to ignore the criticism. Uses a 7-on-7 indoor format with no punts and field goals. Started to exploit the publicity that came with the Lingerie Bowl, a pay-per-view event that counterprograms the Super Bowl yearly. Between 2012 & 2013, the LFL made significant changes in hopes of legitimizing the league. The league expanded by adding new teams in Canada for 2012, and Australia for 2013, with the launch of a European league now delayed to 2015, with each country/region acting as its own separate league. The US teams shifted their schedule from a fall schedule to a spring-summer schedule similar to Arena Football and other indoor leagues. In 2013, the league rebranded itself by changing its name and announcing that it would downplay the "sexiness" factor of the league; depictions of sexualized women will be removed from team logos, and the "lingerie" aspect will be removed.

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* '''Legends Football League''' (2010-present): Formerly known as the '''Lingerie Football League''', it is, at this point, the only "major" [[DistaffCounterpart female football league]] with any media attention, though most of it is [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity negative attention]] because the players basically play in athletically-minded, two-piece sports-wear with padding and helmets, with games carried in edited form on networks like {{MTV}}2, YouTube, {{Creator/MTV}}2, Website/YouTube, and Fuse TV. Some of the female players are just glad to play at all (using the example of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League seen in ''ALeagueOfTheirOwn'') and try to ignore the criticism. Uses a 7-on-7 indoor format with no punts and field goals. Started to exploit the publicity that came with the Lingerie Bowl, a pay-per-view event that counterprograms the Super Bowl yearly. Between 2012 & 2013, the LFL made significant changes in hopes of legitimizing the league. The league expanded by adding new teams in Canada for 2012, and Australia for 2013, with the launch of a European league now delayed to 2015, with each country/region acting as its own separate league. The US teams shifted their schedule from a fall schedule to a spring-summer schedule similar to Arena Football and other indoor leagues. In 2013, the league rebranded itself by changing its name and announcing that it would downplay the "sexiness" factor of the league; depictions of sexualized women will be removed from team logos, and the "lingerie" aspect will be removed.
12th May '17 3:09:10 PM kquinn0830
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* '''American Football League''' (1960-1969): Actually the ''fourth'' league to use this name, although they were the most successful. Probably the most visible competition to the NFL, and the two leagues merged in 1970, creating the current AFC and NFC conferences. All of the AFL's teams are now NFL franchises (though the Houston Oilers are now the Tennessee Titans; also the Seattle Seahawks, which were placed in the AFC in 1977, were switched to the NFC when the Houston Texans were created as an expansion team). The NFL occasionally celebrates the history of the AFL, with the most notable being the 50th anniversary celebrations in 2010 (which included numerous "throwback" games in which teams and even referees wore AFL-style uniforms, even if the team name and/or location on the old uniform was no longer accurate). A list of notable players who started out in the AFL (even just a list of Hall of Famers) would be too large for this page. However, there is only ''one'' player in the Hall of Fame who played only in the AFL and never in the NFL: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Shaw offensive guard Billy Shaw]].

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* '''American Football League''' (1960-1969): Actually the ''fourth'' league to use this name, although they were the most successful. Probably the most visible competition to the NFL, and the two leagues merged in 1970, creating the current AFC and NFC conferences. Notably, none of the league's teams ever folded nor were excluded from the merger. All of the AFL's teams are now NFL franchises (though the Houston Oilers are now the Tennessee Titans; also the Seattle Seahawks, which were placed in the AFC in 1977, were switched to the NFC when the Houston Texans were created as an expansion team). The NFL occasionally celebrates the history of the AFL, with the most notable being the 50th anniversary celebrations in 2010 (which included numerous "throwback" games in which teams and even referees wore AFL-style uniforms, even if the team name and/or location on the old uniform was no longer accurate). A list of notable players who started out in the AFL (even just a list of Hall of Famers) would be too large for this page. However, there is only ''one'' player in the Hall of Fame who played only in the AFL and never in the NFL: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Shaw offensive guard Billy Shaw]].
8th Apr '17 6:33:15 PM jamespolk
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* ''Knute Rockne All American'': the movie that made UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan famous and gave him his nickname, the Gipper.

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* ''Knute Rockne All American'': ''Film/KnuteRockneAllAmerican'': the movie that made UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan famous and gave him his nickname, the Gipper.


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* ''Film/TheFreshman'' features Creator/HaroldLloyd as a hopeless benchwarmer who manages to make his way into the BigGame.
7th Apr '17 3:53:40 PM nombretomado
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Recently, there's renewed interest in the game with Sky Sports showing the early doubleheader and NFL Network games, the [[ForegoneConclusion local ESPN airs]] ''MondayNightFootball'', while the terrestrial Five network gets Sunday Night Football, all live (though in the latter cases the night games air in the [[NotAMorningPerson early mornings after midnight London time]] due to time zones). The NFL currently plays two yearly regular season games at the new Wembley Stadium in London in order to stoke further interest in the American game with the Jaguars giving up one home date in order to play every year because their owner also owns former UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague side Fulham, thus twice a year two team's "home games" takes place at least 2,000 miles away across ThePond at a neutral venue. The NFL, while doing well in the US, sees its future in expanding the league in other countries, and regular season NFL games abroad are a part of this plan. The Arena Football League has stated similar aspirations, and has established a subsidiary to build a 6-team league in China by 2014, featuring both American and local talent.

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Recently, there's renewed interest in the game with Sky Sports showing the early doubleheader and NFL Network games, the [[ForegoneConclusion local ESPN airs]] ''MondayNightFootball'', while the terrestrial Five network gets Sunday Night Football, all live (though in the latter cases the night games air in the [[NotAMorningPerson early mornings after midnight London time]] due to time zones). The NFL currently plays two yearly regular season games at the new Wembley Stadium in London in order to stoke further interest in the American game with the Jaguars giving up one home date in order to play every year because their owner also owns former UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague side Fulham, thus twice a year two team's "home games" takes place at least 2,000 miles away across ThePond UsefulNotes/ThePond at a neutral venue. The NFL, while doing well in the US, sees its future in expanding the league in other countries, and regular season NFL games abroad are a part of this plan. The Arena Football League has stated similar aspirations, and has established a subsidiary to build a 6-team league in China by 2014, featuring both American and local talent.
17th Feb '17 12:04:56 PM Jhonny
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In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.

to:

In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.Series/RanNFL.
17th Feb '17 12:03:17 PM Jhonny
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In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "Big6" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad.

to:

In Germany the sport got a foothold because of the American troops stationed at bases there. The German Football League[[note]] Not a translation—that's the ''actual German name''.[[/note]] organizes roughly 200 teams, the elite division is called German Football League and comprises 16 (less in the event of bankruptcies) teams partitioned into north and south divisions. The finalists from the playoffs determine the German champion during the German Bowl. All but one of the NFL Europa teams[[note]]It was renamed NFL Europa starting after its penultimate season[[/note]] were based in Germany by the time it folded. Curiously, although American soldiers were stationed mostly in the southern parts, the north dominates strongly, having won all but two German Bowls since 1993 as of 2016. The Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns are the only exception to Northern dominance, having won the German Bowl[[note]] Again, this is the actual German name [[/note]] in 2011 and 2012 and often giving a fierce fight in the Playoffs. German teams (especially the Brunswick Lions and the Hamburg Blue Devils) dominated European football in the mid to late 90s but had an Austrian caused drought until a win in 2010. The most successful teams are Brunswick (New Yorker) Lions, Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns, Kiel Baltic Hurricanes and Dresden Monarchs[[note]]They have not yet won a championship and have gotten quite a EveryYearTheyFizzleOut reputation[[/note]]. Historically teams like Berlin Adler or Hamburg Blue Devils were also quite good until budget woes kept them from signing good American talent and coaches and their German players left. As of 2016 the rules put a limit of two on the amount of "American" players (Mexicans, Canadians and Japanese also count as "Americans") that can be on the field at any given time. However, [[LoopholeAbuse there is no such limit]] for European players from outside Germany, which means that the best teams are often an assortment of "European all stars" with the French national Quarterback playing in the second league in Germany for many years. When the European competitions were reorganized into the "Big6" "[=Big6=]" and the "EFL Bowl", both competitions were dominated by German teams (three out of six [=big6=] teams have been German since its first season) and as of and including 2016 all winners of either competition have been German as well. The 2016 edition of the EFL Bowl was even won by a team that had just earned promotion to the first tier that season - Frankfurt Universe. On the spectator side, Football in Germany has had its ebbs and flows, being introduced thanks to American soldiers in the area (Ansbach and Frankfurt dominated the league in 1979 and the next couple of years largely on the strength of nearby US military bases) and steadily growing thanks to decent coverage by the main Pay TV provider[[note]] For the most part there is only one Pay TV provider of note at any given time in Germany. At the time it was called ''Premiere'' and - as is usual - carried live soccer as well as the NFL, so people who bought it for the former stuck around for the latter[[/note]], however the bankruptcy of the Hamburg Blue Devils, the shutdown of NFL Europe (which never made a cent in profits and had only one arguably financially sustainable franchise - Frankfurt) and a slump of the Braunschweig Lions dealt a serious blow to the sport and for some time even having the Super Bowl on German TV was hit and miss. However, quality of play stayed high and Germany won the European championship of 2010 with the league slowly but surely recovering on a broader base instead of the Hamburg-Braunschweig duopoly of the 1990s and early 2000s. By 2014 more NFL games could be found on TV and Germany defended its European title in Austria against Austria in front of 27,000 people. Someone at [=Sat1=] took note and the 2015 regular season was to be the first to be carried in free TV. Ratings exploded and the NFL has become a social phenomenon in Germany ever since, way past what even the best NFL Europe days could have hoped for. In 2016, Schwäbisch Hall wide receiver Moritz Böhringer became the first European ever drafted by an NFL team without having played American college ball, and is now on the Minnesota Vikings' practice squad.
squad. However, the 2016 NFL season also saw struggles for many of the German NFL players. Björn Werner failed to make a team after his contract with the Colts ran out as did Markus Kuhn after he was released by the New York Giants - both would announce their retirement at the end of the season on German TV. Sebastian Vollmer was on injured reserve for the Patriots throughout the season (though that did make him eligible for a Super Bowl ring nonetheless) while the aforementioned Böhringer couldn't crack the roster but stayed on the practice squad, he has since signed a futures contract with the Vikings. Kasim Edebali of the New Orleans Saints meanwhile played solidly but failed to become a starter - much to the chagrin of fellow Hamburger Patrick Esume who works as an expert for the TV show carrying the NFL in Germany.
17th Feb '17 6:26:45 AM AgProv
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[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://www.sandraandwoo.com/2016/02/04/0758-poor-choice-of-words/ This strip]] from ''Webcomic/SandraAndWoo''[[note]]originates in Germany[[/note]] shows up the gulf between European and North American interpretations of the word "football". A Spanish-American girl taken to an American Football game says exactly the wrong thing as to which sort of football she prefers. Sparks fly.
[[/folder]]
7th Feb '17 7:30:37 AM ScrewySqrl
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* ''{{Gus}}'': a live-action Disney film about a donkey that can kick soccer ball for 100 meters, and thus a 99-yard field goal, and the hapless pro team than hires the animal and its handler to rescue their season.

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* ''{{Gus}}'': ''{{Film/Gus}}'': a live-action Disney film about a donkey that can kick soccer ball for 100 meters, and thus a 99-yard field goal, and the hapless pro team than hires the animal and its handler to rescue their season.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.AmericanFootball