History UsefulNotes / AmericanFootball

25th Sep '17 5:01:55 PM penguinist
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High schools usually play football on Saturday afternoons or Friday evenings (hence ''Literature/FridayNightLights'') during the fall semester, and are governed by state-level athletic associations. They are divided into tiers based on school size and athletic program quality, and sometimes into regional divisions as well. There may be separate organizations for public and private schools, or they may all play together; there may be a statewide championship tournament or only regional titles within a state, with any championship game usually played at either the state's largest university stadium, a professional stadium or whichever adequately large stadium is most centrally located. There is no national high school football championship; there are altogether too many high schools for this to work, never mind added expense. Unofficial championships are given out by media organizations such as ''USA Today'' or sites devoted solely to high school sports via polling, but are subject to opinion. Despite high school football being organized on a state basis, there are sometimes individual cross-state games during a regular season, and a high school located near a state border might even have an established rivalry with a school in the neighboring state. These are very much the exception, though, and can be complicated by the fact that different states have slight differences in the rules.

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High schools usually play football on Saturday afternoons or Friday evenings (hence ''Literature/FridayNightLights'') during the fall semester, and are governed by state-level athletic associations. They are divided into tiers based on school size and athletic program quality, and sometimes into regional divisions as well. There may be separate organizations for public and private schools, or they may all play together; there may be a statewide championship tournament or only regional titles within a state, with any championship game usually played at either the state's largest university stadium, a professional stadium or whichever adequately large stadium is most centrally located. There is no national high school football championship; there are altogether too many high schools for this to work, never mind added expense. Unofficial championships are given out by media organizations such as ''USA Today'' or sites devoted solely to high school sports via polling, but are subject to opinion. Despite high school football being organized on a state basis, there are sometimes individual cross-state games during a regular season, and a high school located near a state border might even have an established rivalry with a school in the neighboring state. These are very much the exception, though, and can be complicated by the fact that different states have slight differences in the rules.
rules, the fact that since play is based on a state basis means that such games will have little/no impact on a season, and the legal/liability headache involved in carrying dozens of minors [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism across state lines.]]
9th Sep '17 5:23:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[BackyardSports Backyard Football]]''

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* ''[[BackyardSports ''[[VideoGame/BackyardSports Backyard Football]]''
31st Jul '17 2:55:01 PM KYCubbie
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* ''Safety'': A somewhat rare but humiliating situation where an offensive player has possession of the ball in his own end zone and is either tackled, steps out-of-bounds, accidentally or purposefully hikes the ball past the back line of the end zone (this happened to Peyton Manning when his center hiked the ball too high on the opening play of Super Bowl XLVIII), or another offensive player commits a penalty while trying to prevent either from happening. The defensive team scores 2 points ''and'' gets the ball (the safetied team kicks the ball to them).This situation is technically called a "free kick", as is the kickoff after a touchdown or field goal. However, the free kick following a safety has one major difference from other free kicks: After a touchdown or field goal, the ball ''must'' be kicked off a tee (sometimes, if winds are high enough, another player will have to hold the ball on the tee). After a safety, the kicker may either kick from a tee or ''punt'', beginning with the ball in his hands. Most free kicks after safeties are punts because their higher trajectory allows better coverage for the kicking team.[[note]]For fans of soccer, this is basically the same thing as an own goal, only not ''quite'' as humiliating. Except when it's an accidental safety (as in an inattentive quarterback steps out of bounds in the end zone on his own rather than being tackled or forced out by the defense). Dan Orlovsky infamously did this while playing for the Detroit Lions in their 0-16 2008 season, in a game that was ultimately lost by 2 points. That ''is'' as humiliating as an own goal.[[/note]]

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* ''Safety'': A somewhat rare but humiliating situation where an offensive player has possession of the ball in his own end zone and is either tackled, steps out-of-bounds, accidentally or purposefully hikes the ball past the back line of the end zone (this happened to Peyton Manning when his center hiked snapped the ball too high on the opening play of Super Bowl XLVIII), or another offensive player commits a penalty while trying to prevent either from happening. The defensive team scores 2 points ''and'' gets the ball (the safetied team kicks the ball to them). This situation is technically called a "free kick", as is the kickoff after a touchdown or field goal. However, the free kick following a safety has one major difference from other free kicks: After a touchdown or field goal, the ball ''must'' be kicked off a tee (sometimes, if winds are high enough, another player will have to hold the ball on the tee). After a safety, the kicker may either kick from a tee or ''punt'', beginning with the ball in his hands. Most free kicks after safeties are punts because their higher trajectory allows better coverage for the kicking team.[[note]]For fans of soccer, this is basically the same thing as an own goal, only not ''quite'' as humiliating. Except when it's an accidental safety (as in an inattentive quarterback steps out of bounds in the end zone on his own rather than being tackled or forced out by the defense). Dan Orlovsky infamously did this while playing for the Detroit Lions in their 0-16 2008 season, in a game that was ultimately lost by 2 points. That ''is'' as humiliating as an own goal.[[/note]]



** Then there's the [[http://quirkyresearch.blogspot.com/2006/08/one-point-safety.html extremely strange one-point safety]]. This is possible if a team tries for a two point conversion, drops the ball and the defending team knocks the ball out of the end zone (presumably to prevent the offense from picking up the ball in the end-zone for two points). It's also possible if the defending team blocks a PAT, recovers it, and then either fumbles through the end zone or gets tackled after backing up into it. This has happened twice in Division I play, the most recent time (the 2013 Fiesta Bowl) resulting in the referee beginning his announcement of the result with "On the previous play, we have an unusual ruling," correctly judging that he was one of the few people familiar with the rule. This became possible in the NFL only in 2015. It is also now theoretically possible for a the kicking team to give up a safety for one point as well, but such a play would require an extremely unlikely set of circumstances, such as a blocked PAT being recovered by the defense, run back to near the opposing endzone, only for a fumble to happen, then be recovered by the kicking team, only for the kicking team player to be tackled in their own endzone. This is the only way (except for a forfeit) for a team to have a total score of 1 point, as all other plays worth one point award the point to a team that has already scored a touchdown.

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** Then there's the [[http://quirkyresearch.blogspot.com/2006/08/one-point-safety.html extremely strange one-point safety]]. This is possible if a team tries for a two point conversion, drops the ball and the defending team knocks the ball out of the end zone (presumably to prevent the offense from picking up the ball in the end-zone for two points). It's also possible if the defending team blocks a PAT, recovers it, and then either fumbles through the end zone or gets tackled after backing up into it. This has happened twice in Division I play, the most recent time (the 2013 Fiesta Bowl) resulting in the referee beginning his announcement of the result with "On the previous play, we have an unusual ruling," correctly judging that he was one of the few people familiar with the rule. This became possible in the NFL only in 2015. It is also now theoretically possible for a the kicking team to give up a safety for one point as well, but such a play would require an extremely unlikely set of circumstances, such as a blocked PAT being recovered by the defense, run back to near the opposing endzone, end zone, only for a fumble to happen, then be recovered by the kicking team, only for the kicking team player to be tackled in their own endzone.end zone. This is the only way (except for a forfeit) for a team to have a total score of 1 point, as all other plays worth one point award the point to a team that has already scored a touchdown.



* The ''offensive line'' consists of five players: one center (the center of the line, expected to assign blocking schemes to the rest of the line and usually snaps the ball to the quarterback), two guards (who line up to either side of the center), and two tackles (who line up to either side of the guards). Their job is to block for the offensive backs - in other words, prevent the other defense from getting to the backs. This includes both pass blocking by simply diverting the defense from reaching the quarterback, and run blocking, where the linemen actively create running routes for the backs. The backs include anyone behind the line of scrimmage at the beginning of the play and usually include the quarterback, between zero and three running backs, and a tight end or wide receiver (there must be seven players on and four players behind the line for an offensive formation to be legal). The center's job is also to snap the ball to the quarterback. Offensive linemen are ineligible to touch a forward pass before another member of the offense or defense and cannot move more than five yards beyond the line of scrimmage (in the NFL they may not move past the "neutral zone", area defined by the distance between the tips of the ball before the ball is snapped) before the ball passes them (unless the offensive team publicly declares otherwise). Offensive linemen generally only touch the ball on fumbles, but there are a very few plays that have a tackle as an eligible receiver. Probably the best known center in recent years is Jeff Saturday, who retired after the 2012 season; he spent most of his career snapping the ball to Peyton Manning for the Indianapolis Colts and played his final season with the Green Bay Packers. The Carolina Panthers' Michael Oher, of ''Literature/TheBlindSide'' fame, is an offensive lineman (the term "the blind side", in football, refers to the side of the field that the quarterback is not facing when he turns to make a pass or a handoff; thus the offensive line position protecting that side - generally the tackle, Oher's position - is key to a successful offensive line.) In most cases (including Oher's) it's the the left tackle who plays this key role, as most quarterbacks (as with most of the general population) are right-handed (notable exceptions to ''that'' rule include Michael Vick and Tim Tebow.)
* The ''tight end'' usually lines up alongside or offset from the offensive line (in other words, they line up tight on the ends of the offensive line). Tight ends are often used to block and were originally intended solely for that role, but are eligible receivers and most passing plays are now designed with the tight end as an option. Any given play may have anywhere from 0 to 4 tight ends. Some famous recent tight ends are Shannon Sharpe, Tony Gonzalez, Jason Witten (currently the top all-time receiver, in terms of number of catches, from the Dallas Cowboys, beating out all the actual wide receivers), Antonio Gates, and Rob Gronkowski, who in 2011 obliterated virtually every single season record ever posted at the position.

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* The ''offensive line'' consists of five players: one center (the center of the line, expected to assign blocking schemes to the rest of the line and usually snaps the ball to the quarterback), two guards (who line up to either side of the center), and two tackles (who line up to either side of the guards). Their job is to block for the offensive backs - in other words, prevent the other defense from getting to the backs. This includes both pass blocking by simply diverting the defense from reaching the quarterback, and run blocking, where the linemen actively create running routes for the backs. The backs include anyone behind the line of scrimmage at the beginning of the play and usually include the quarterback, between zero and three running backs, and a tight end or wide receiver (there must be seven players on and four players behind the line for an offensive formation to be legal). The center's job is also to snap the ball to the quarterback. Offensive linemen are ineligible to touch a forward pass before another member of the offense or defense and cannot move more than five yards beyond the line of scrimmage (in the NFL they may not move past the "neutral zone", area defined by the distance between the tips of the ball before the ball is snapped) before the ball passes them (unless the offensive team publicly declares otherwise). Offensive linemen generally only touch the ball on fumbles, but there are a very few plays that have a tackle as an eligible receiver. Probably the best known center in recent years is Jeff Saturday, who retired after the 2012 season; he spent most of his career snapping the ball to Peyton Manning for the Indianapolis Colts and played his final season with the Green Bay Packers. The Carolina Panthers' Michael Oher, of ''Literature/TheBlindSide'' fame, is an offensive lineman (the term "the blind side", in football, refers to the side of the field that the quarterback is not facing when he turns to make a pass or a handoff; thus the offensive line position protecting that side - generally the tackle, Oher's position - is key to a successful offensive line.) In most cases (including Oher's) it's the the left tackle who plays this key role, as most quarterbacks (as with most of the general population) are right-handed (notable exceptions to ''that'' rule include Michael Vick and Tim Tebow.)
Tebow).
* The ''tight end'' usually lines up alongside or offset from the offensive line (in other words, they line up tight on the ends of the offensive line). Tight ends are often used to block and were originally intended solely for that role, but are eligible receivers and most passing plays are now designed with the tight end as an option. Any given play may have anywhere from 0 to 4 tight ends. Some famous recent tight ends are Shannon Sharpe, Tony Gonzalez, Jason Witten (currently the top all-time receiver, in terms of number of catches, from the Dallas Cowboys, beating out all the actual wide receivers), Antonio Gates, Jimmy Graham, and Rob Gronkowski, who in 2011 obliterated virtually every single season record ever posted at the position.



* The ''linebackers'' are two to four players who line up behind the defensive linemen (named because they back the defensive line). Linebackers are generally the most versatile players on the defense and can be used to rush the quarterback, support the run defense, or cover slower receivers like backs or tight ends. Typically, a middle linebacker is the play caller for the defense (sometimes called the "quarterback of the defense", not to be confused with a seventh defensive back in the "quarter" package; see below), as this position has a good view of the offense's formation and his location at the center of the defensive formation makes it easier for all the other defenders to hear him. The linebackers are known informally as the Mike (and Moe or Jack in a four-backer set) for inside linebackers and Will and Sam for the weak side and strong side (the side of the offensive line with the tight end) linebackers. The second number in the common naming system for defense (ex: 4-3 has 4 defensive linemen and 3 linebackers, while the 3-4 has 3 and 4, respectively.) Among the best recent linebackers in football are Ray Lewis, Patrick Willis, Brian Urlacher, [=DeMarcus=] Ware, and James Harrison. Both Dick Butkus and Lawrence Taylor, often considered in lists of "top defensive player of all-time" (or even "top player of all-time"), were linebackers.

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* The ''linebackers'' are two to four players who line up behind the defensive linemen (named because they back the defensive line). Linebackers are generally the most versatile players on the defense and can be used to rush the quarterback, support the run defense, or cover slower receivers like backs or tight ends. Typically, a middle linebacker is the play caller for the defense (sometimes called the "quarterback of the defense", not to be confused with a seventh defensive back in the "quarter" package; see below), as this position has a good view of the offense's formation and his location at the center of the defensive formation makes it easier for all the other defenders to hear him. The linebackers are known informally as the Mike (and Moe or Jack in a four-backer set) for inside linebackers and Will and Sam for the weak side and strong side (the side of the offensive line with the tight end) linebackers. The second number in the common naming system for defense (ex: 4-3 has 4 defensive linemen and 3 linebackers, while the 3-4 has 3 and 4, respectively.) Among the best recent linebackers in football are Ray Lewis, Patrick Willis, Brian Urlacher, [=DeMarcus=] Ware, and James Harrison.Harrison, and Von Miller. Both Dick Butkus and Lawrence Taylor, often considered in lists of "top defensive player of all-time" (or even "top player of all-time"), were linebackers.



** ''Pistol'': A variant of the shotgun, in which the quarterback stands about a yard closer to the center, with a running back lined up about three yards directly behind him. The formation, popularized by former University of Nevada, Reno head coach Chris Ault, is designed to allow more options for the running game than the regular shotgun. Although it is seen as something of a gimmick at the highest levels, it can be seen from time to time in college and high school, and a few NFL teams will occasionally use it. One notable example of an NFL ream that includes the pistol in its offensive package is the San Francisco 49ers, whose current quarterback Colin Kaepernick ran that offense at Nevada.

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** ''Pistol'': A variant of the shotgun, in which the quarterback stands about a yard closer to the center, with a running back lined up about three yards directly behind him. The formation, popularized by former University of Nevada, Reno head coach Chris Ault, is designed to allow more options for the running game than the regular shotgun. Although it is seen as something of a gimmick at the highest levels, it can be seen from time to time in college and high school, and a few NFL teams will occasionally use it. One The most notable example of an NFL ream that includes the pistol in its offensive package is these was the San Francisco 49ers, whose current quarterback 49ers when their starting QB was Colin Kaepernick Kaepernick, who ran that offense at Nevada.



* ''Option'': A type of play in which the quarterback receives the snap, then tries to run to the left or right around the line of scrimmage, accompanied by a running back. At any point the quarterback has the "option" of keeping the ball and advancing himself or tossing a lateral to the running back. There are various types of option plays, but the most popular today involves the quarterback and running back. The option is a very popular play among teams up to the Division I-A level, and many of these teams treat the option as central to their offense (Nebraska was famous for using a run-oriented option offense into the early 2000s). In the NFL, the option is seen as a novelty play, and is used rarely because the quarterback risks injury and option plays tend to be relatively slow-developing, which is a lot more problematic in the NFL since defenses tend to be much faster than at lower levels.

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* ''Option'': A type of play in which the quarterback receives the snap, then tries to run to the left or right around the line of scrimmage, accompanied by a running back. At any point the quarterback has the "option" of keeping the ball and advancing himself or tossing a lateral to the running back. There are various types of option plays, but the most popular today involves the quarterback and running back. The option is a very popular play among teams up to the Division I-A I FBS level, and many of these teams treat the option as central to their offense (Nebraska was famous for using a run-oriented option offense into the early 2000s). In the NFL, the option is seen as a novelty play, and is used rarely because the quarterback risks injury and option plays tend to be relatively slow-developing, which is a lot more problematic in the NFL since defenses tend to be much faster than at lower levels.



* ''Flea Flicker'': A trick play in which the ball is handed off (or pitched) to a running back, who begins to run only to throw the ball back to the quarterback, who then targets receivers who are by now far downfield. An all-or-nothing play that nearly always results in big gains, big losses...or worse. The infamous 1985 Lawrence Taylor hit on Joe Theismann, which resulted in a career-ending compound fracture to Theismann's leg, came on a botched flea flicker. A simplified version, the "Halfback Option", has the running back simply throw to a receiver downfield himself.

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* ''Flea Flicker'': A trick play in which the ball is handed off (or pitched) to a running back, who begins to run only to throw the ball back to the quarterback, who then targets receivers who are by now far downfield. An all-or-nothing play that nearly always results in big gains, big losses... or worse. The infamous 1985 Lawrence Taylor hit on Joe Theismann, which resulted in a career-ending compound fracture to Theismann's leg, came on a botched flea flicker. A simplified version, the "Halfback Option", has the running back simply throw to a receiver downfield himself.



* ''No-Huddle Offense'': A tactic used by the offense in which they to rush into formation to begin play immediately after their last without going into a huddle, with the plays called at the line. This is normally done when a team must score and time is running out (in which case it is often called a "hurry-up" offense), but can also be used to wear down the opposing defense by giving them little time to make changes to their formation or substitutions, leaving them with personnel on the field not suited for what the offense is doing and possibly forcing the defensive team to use a timeout. Due to the frequent use of this during the final minutes of the game, the "hurry-up" version is sometimes called the "two-minute offense". Some teams are known for running a no-huddle offense for most if not all of the game, most notably the Oregon Ducks in college football, and the Denver Broncos and New Orleans Saints in the NFL. While, as noted, this tends to wear down an opposing defense, the risk incurred is that it gives your own defense less time to rest when the offense is on the field. The Denver Broncos (via Peyton Manning) run a slower version of the no-huddle by rushing to the line...then wait to snap the ball until either the defense attempts a substitution (incurring a penalty in the process), or until the play clock is down to a few seconds (forcing the defenders to hold their positions for a ''very'' long time, which they would be less used to than their offensive counterparts).

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* ''No-Huddle Offense'': A tactic used by the offense in which they to rush into formation to begin play immediately after their last without going into a huddle, with the plays called at the line. This is normally done when a team must score and time is running out (in which case it is often called a "hurry-up" offense), but can also be used to wear down the opposing defense by giving them little time to make changes to their formation or substitutions, leaving them with personnel on the field not suited for what the offense is doing and possibly forcing the defensive team to use a timeout. Due to the frequent use of this during the final minutes of the game, the "hurry-up" version is sometimes called the "two-minute offense". Some teams are known for running a no-huddle offense for most if not all of the game, most notably the Oregon Ducks in college football, and the Denver Broncos and New Orleans Saints in the NFL. While, as noted, this tends to wear down an opposing defense, the risk incurred is that it gives your own defense less time to rest when the offense is on the field. The When Peyton Manning was finishing his career with the Denver Broncos (via Peyton Manning) run Broncos, they ran a slower version of the no-huddle by rushing to the line...line... then wait waiting to snap the ball until either the defense attempts a substitution (incurring a penalty in the process), or until the play clock is down to a few seconds (forcing the defenders to hold their positions for a ''very'' long time, which they would be less used to than their offensive counterparts).



* '''United States Football League''' (1982-1987): The first serious competition with the NFL since the AFL's halcyon days. The league ran in the spring and signed several star college players (the first being Herschel Walker) before the NFL could snatch them up. The league had problems with solvency early on, and the more cash-strapped teams moved frequently making it hard to cultivate fanbases or secure long-term TV deals.[[labelnote: ultimate irony]]They would have gotten a four year TV deal with pretty impressive money for the season they would ultimately never play; there was only one condition: Keep the Spring schedule. They [[WhatAnIdiot decided to go to a fall schedule]] and try their luck with an antitrust lawsuit against the NFL. [[ForegoneConclusion It failed.]][[/labelnote]] Stories abounded of teams playing in near-empty stadiums and players having their paychecks bounce. Even so, it was rather popular in some markets and looked to be on the way towards success until Creator/DonaldTrump (yeah, ''[[Series/TheApprentice that]]'' [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Donald Trump]]) bought a team and slowly started to take over the league. He had the league sue the NFL for an anti-trust violation and planned on moving the USFL to the fall (possibly because he may have planned to have the more successful USFL teams folded into the NFL and acquire his own NFL franchise). The USFL won its anti-trust violation and was awarded...[[UndesirablePrize $3]]. The league folded shortly after that. Four USFL players (Steve Young [[hottip:*: Steve Young, in fact, signed the single most lucrative contract in football for the next twenty years when he signed a 10-year, $40 million deal, which he accepted as a long term annuity beyond the contract length in order to help his new team's finances. The league went out of business, but Young had taken out an insurance policy on his contract, which will let him collect the contract's full value. By the terms of his settlement, he will collect $1 million per year until 2027.]], Jim Kelly, Reggie White and Gary Zimmerman) are in the Hall of Fame. All of them signed with NFL teams. The USFL was also where players like Doug Flutie and the aforementioned Herschel Walker played their first pro seasons.

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* '''United States Football League''' (1982-1987): The first serious competition with the NFL since the AFL's halcyon days. The league ran in the spring and signed several star college players (the first being Herschel Walker) before the NFL could snatch them up. The league had problems with solvency early on, and the more cash-strapped teams moved frequently making it hard to cultivate fanbases or secure long-term TV deals.[[labelnote: ultimate irony]]They would have gotten a four year TV deal with pretty impressive money for the season they would ultimately never play; there was only one condition: Keep the Spring schedule. They [[WhatAnIdiot decided to go to a fall schedule]] and try their luck with an antitrust lawsuit against the NFL. [[ForegoneConclusion It failed.]][[/labelnote]] Stories abounded of teams playing in near-empty stadiums and players having their paychecks bounce. Even so, it was rather popular in some markets and looked to be on the way towards success until Creator/DonaldTrump UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump (yeah, ''[[Series/TheApprentice that]]'' [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Donald Trump]]) bought a team and slowly started to take over the league. He had the league sue the NFL for an anti-trust violation and planned on moving the USFL to the fall (possibly because he may have planned to have the more successful USFL teams folded into the NFL and acquire his own NFL franchise). The USFL won its anti-trust violation and was awarded... [[UndesirablePrize $3]]. The league folded shortly after that. Four USFL players (Steve Young [[hottip:*: Steve Young, in fact, signed the single most lucrative contract in football for the next twenty years when he signed a 10-year, $40 million deal, which he accepted as a long term annuity beyond the contract length in order to help his new team's finances. The league went out of business, but Young had taken out an insurance policy on his contract, which will let him collect the contract's full value. By the terms of his settlement, he will collect $1 million per year until 2027.]], Jim Kelly, Reggie White and Gary Zimmerman) are in the Hall of Fame. All of them signed with NFL teams. The USFL was also where players like Doug Flutie and the aforementioned Herschel Walker played their first pro seasons.



Major American leagues have also held some regular season games outside of the United States. On October 2, 2005, the Arizona Cardinals and San Francisco 49ers played the first regular season NFL game outside of the United States, in Mexico City's Estadio Azteca, From 2007, the NFL has played or has plans to play at least one regular season game outside of the United States, with London being the typical location. The NCAA will also play games outside of the U.S. In 2012, the United States Naval Academy played the University of Notre Dame in Dublin, Ireland. In 2014, Dublin again hosted the sport, though at a different stadium,[[note]]The 2012 game was held at Aviva Stadium, home to the Republic of Ireland [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] team and the Ireland [[UsefulNotes/RugbyUnion rugby]] team. The 2014 game was at Croke Park, home to the Gaelic Athletic Association.[[/note]] when Penn State and UCF (Central Florida) played, and the Bahamas began hosting a postseason bowl game. The 2016 season saw two season openers outside the U.S., with California and Hawaii playing in Sydney and a return to Dublin, this time with Boston College and Georgia Tech.

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Major American leagues have also held some regular season games outside of the United States. On October 2, 2005, the Arizona Cardinals and San Francisco 49ers played the first regular season NFL game outside of the United States, in Mexico City's Estadio Azteca, From 2007, the NFL has played or has plans to play at least one regular season game outside of the United States, with London being the typical location. The NCAA will also play games outside of the U.S. In 2012, the United States Naval Academy played the University of Notre Dame in Dublin, Ireland. In 2014, Dublin again hosted the sport, though at a different stadium,[[note]]The 2012 game was held at Aviva Stadium, home to the Republic of Ireland [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] team and the Ireland [[UsefulNotes/RugbyUnion rugby]] team. The 2014 game was at Croke Park, home to the Gaelic Athletic Association.[[/note]] when Penn State and UCF (Central Florida) played, and the Bahamas began hosting a postseason bowl game. The 2016 season saw two season openers outside the U.S., with California and Hawaii playing in Sydney and a return to Dublin, this time with Boston College and Georgia Tech.
Tech. Another Sydney game has been announced as a 2017 season opener, this time involving Stanford and Rice.



* ''Ashes To Glory'' is a 2000 documentary about the 1970-1971 Marshall University football team. The makers of ''Ashes To Glory'' sued the makers of ''Film/WeAreMarshall'' for plagiarism, but the case was dismissed as being without merit.

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* ''Ashes To Glory'' is a 2000 documentary about the said 1970-1971 Marshall University football team. The makers of ''Ashes To Glory'' sued the makers of ''Film/WeAreMarshall'' for plagiarism, but the case was dismissed as being without merit.



* VideoGame/MaddenNFL is one of the most successful video game franchises in history. A simulated game is played out every year before the Superbowl, which correctly predicted the winner every year for the first several years it was done.

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* VideoGame/MaddenNFL is one of the most successful video game franchises in history. A simulated game is played out every year before the Superbowl, Super Bowl, which correctly predicted the winner every year for the first several years it was done.



* One challenger to ''Madden NFL'''s dominance was [[TakeTwoInteractive 2K Games']] ''NFL 2K'' series. It disappeared after EA obtained the exclusive rights to the NFL Franchise for making video games, and has only made one last appearance with All-Pro Football 2K8, which used fictional teams and former/retired players.
* ''Tecmo Bowl'' was the first truly successful football video game. Because of a licensing snafu, it featured real players on BrandX teams. Tecmo Bo Jackson is considered the greatest athlete in video game history. Tecmo later obtained an NFL license and created the also successful Tecmo Super Bowl, which still retains a cult following for its easy and fun (if somewhat unrealistic) gameplay. There's a video series that amusingly follows Madden NFL's lead in simulating games to predict winners, starting with an explanation that both coaches completely dropped their full line-ups in favor of the now-retired players that were featured in Tecmo Bowl, and stright-laced announcing of impossible plays such as Jeff George's "Wonder Pass". Even to this day, there are hacking groups that mod Tecmo Super Bowl [=ROMs=] to include updated rosters, updated team graphics and expansion teams, and even managed to change the divisions to the way they are today (Tecmo Super Bowl was released back when the AFC and the NFC had East, Central, and West divisions. Modded versions of the game now include the North, East, South, and West Divisions for each conference.)

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* One challenger to ''Madden NFL'''s dominance was [[TakeTwoInteractive 2K Games']] ''NFL 2K'' series. It disappeared after EA obtained the exclusive rights to the NFL Franchise for making video games, and has only made one last appearance with All-Pro ''All-Pro Football 2K8, 2K8'', which used fictional teams and former/retired players.
* ''Tecmo Bowl'' was the first truly successful football video game. Because of a licensing snafu, it featured real players on BrandX teams. Tecmo Bo Jackson is considered the greatest athlete in video game history. Tecmo later obtained an NFL license and created the also successful Tecmo ''Tecmo Super Bowl, Bowl'', which still retains a cult following for its easy and fun (if somewhat unrealistic) gameplay. There's a video series that amusingly follows Madden NFL's lead in simulating games to predict winners, starting with an explanation that both coaches completely dropped their full line-ups in favor of the now-retired players that were featured in Tecmo Bowl, and stright-laced straight-laced announcing of impossible plays such as Jeff George's "Wonder Pass". Even to this day, there are hacking groups that mod Tecmo ''Tecmo Super Bowl Bowl'' [=ROMs=] to include updated rosters, updated team graphics and expansion teams, and even managed to change the divisions to the way they are today (Tecmo (''Tecmo Super Bowl Bowl'' was released back when the AFC and the NFC had East, Central, and West divisions. Modded versions of the game now include the North, East, South, and West Divisions for each conference.)



For more information, watch ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'' or ''Series/FridayNightLights''. Or show up at a sports bar full of drunk Americans on an autumn weekend afternoon. Or any part of UsefulNotes/{{Texas}}, with anyone, at any time, especially if you like high school football. Or anywhere near a public television in an American college campus on game day. Or on [[UsefulNotes/SuperBowl Super Bowl Sunday]] pretty much all around the globe and ask the person wearing the most NFL gear.

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For more information, watch ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'' or ''Series/FridayNightLights''. Or show up at a sports bar full of drunk Americans on an autumn weekend afternoon. Or any part of UsefulNotes/{{Texas}}, [[Main/EverythingIsBigInTexas Texas]], with anyone, at any time, especially if you like high school football. Or anywhere near a public television in an American college campus on game day. Or on [[UsefulNotes/SuperBowl Super Bowl Sunday]] pretty much all around the globe and ask the person wearing the most NFL gear.
20th Jul '17 12:04:06 PM KingLyger
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* ''Series/FridayNightLights''

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* ''Series/FridayNightLights''''Series/FridayNightLights''. Much like its literary and movie counterpart, it's a GenreDeconstruction of the mythos surrounding football and the feel-good sports movie. Odessa, Texas is a DyingTown that places all its hopes on the Permian Panthers high school football team. As a result, the players face major forms of scrutiny from just about everyone, and it leads to quite a bit of heartache.
17th Jul '17 3:23:13 AM Twiddler
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* ''Literature/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' is a story about "What football will look like in the future". Well, that and other things.



* ''Literature/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' begins as an article about the future of the sport, but quickly turns into a bizarre story about how humanity conquering all its ills and [[CompleteImmortality somehow becoming immortal]] causes football to become increasingly drawn-out and epic in scope.

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* ''Literature/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' ''WebOriginal/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' begins as an article about the future of the sport, but quickly turns into a bizarre story about how humanity conquering all its ills and [[CompleteImmortality somehow becoming immortal]] causes football to become increasingly drawn-out and epic in scope.
9th Jul '17 4:04:36 PM Ylimegirl
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' is a story about "What football will look like in the future". Well, that and other things.
9th Jul '17 7:01:27 AM Jhonny
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* The Chargin' Chuck in ''VideoGame/SuperMariOWorld'' is dressed in football padding. Some varieties kick footballs or [[GretzkyHasTheBall throw baseballs]] at you.

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* The Chargin' Chuck in ''VideoGame/SuperMariOWorld'' ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' is dressed in football padding. Some varieties kick footballs or [[GretzkyHasTheBall throw baseballs]] at you.
8th Jul '17 2:19:58 PM BlueGuy
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* For some reason, a generic enemy in VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld wears football padding--Chargin' Chuck. Naturally, if he's in a mood he'll [[GretzkyHasTheBall throw baseballs at you]].
** Some charging chucks do in fact kick footballs, they hurt you as well.

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* For some reason, a generic enemy The Chargin' Chuck in VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld wears ''VideoGame/SuperMariOWorld'' is dressed in football padding--Chargin' Chuck. Naturally, if he's in a mood he'll padding. Some varieties kick footballs or [[GretzkyHasTheBall throw baseballs baseballs]] at you]].
** Some charging chucks do in fact kick footballs, they hurt you as well.
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[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''Literature/SeventeenThousandSevenHundredSeventySix'' begins as an article about the future of the sport, but quickly turns into a bizarre story about how humanity conquering all its ills and [[CompleteImmortality somehow becoming immortal]] causes football to become increasingly drawn-out and epic in scope.
[[/folder]]
25th Jun '17 1:05:44 PM nombretomado
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High schools usually play football on Saturday afternoons or Friday evenings (hence ''FridayNightLights'') during the fall semester, and are governed by state-level athletic associations. They are divided into tiers based on school size and athletic program quality, and sometimes into regional divisions as well. There may be separate organizations for public and private schools, or they may all play together; there may be a statewide championship tournament or only regional titles within a state, with any championship game usually played at either the state's largest university stadium, a professional stadium or whichever adequately large stadium is most centrally located. There is no national high school football championship; there are altogether too many high schools for this to work, never mind added expense. Unofficial championships are given out by media organizations such as ''USA Today'' or sites devoted solely to high school sports via polling, but are subject to opinion. Despite high school football being organized on a state basis, there are sometimes individual cross-state games during a regular season, and a high school located near a state border might even have an established rivalry with a school in the neighboring state. These are very much the exception, though, and can be complicated by the fact that different states have slight differences in the rules.

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High schools usually play football on Saturday afternoons or Friday evenings (hence ''FridayNightLights'') ''Literature/FridayNightLights'') during the fall semester, and are governed by state-level athletic associations. They are divided into tiers based on school size and athletic program quality, and sometimes into regional divisions as well. There may be separate organizations for public and private schools, or they may all play together; there may be a statewide championship tournament or only regional titles within a state, with any championship game usually played at either the state's largest university stadium, a professional stadium or whichever adequately large stadium is most centrally located. There is no national high school football championship; there are altogether too many high schools for this to work, never mind added expense. Unofficial championships are given out by media organizations such as ''USA Today'' or sites devoted solely to high school sports via polling, but are subject to opinion. Despite high school football being organized on a state basis, there are sometimes individual cross-state games during a regular season, and a high school located near a state border might even have an established rivalry with a school in the neighboring state. These are very much the exception, though, and can be complicated by the fact that different states have slight differences in the rules.



* Among its various incarnations, ''Film/FridayNightLights''. It chronicles the 1988 Permian Panthers of Odessa, Texas (changed to the Dillon Panthers for the TV series), a DyingTown of dried up oilfields that places all of its dreams and aspirations on the local high school football team. Unlike most other films, it shows the darker side of football and the extreme pressure and expectations that many young players face in rural America.

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* Among its various incarnations, ''Film/FridayNightLights''. It chronicles the 1988 Permian Panthers of Odessa, Texas (changed to the Dillon Panthers for [[Series/FridayNightLights the TV series), series]]), a DyingTown of dried up oilfields that places all of its dreams and aspirations on the local high school football team. Unlike most other films, it shows the darker side of football and the extreme pressure and expectations that many young players face in rural America.



* ''FridayNightLights''

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* ''FridayNightLights''''Literature/FridayNightLights''



* ''FridayNightLights''

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* ''FridayNightLights''''Series/FridayNightLights''



* Music/KennyChesney's song "The Boys of Fall" is pretty much FridayNightLights set to country music.

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* Music/KennyChesney's song "The Boys of Fall" is pretty much FridayNightLights ''Series/FridayNightLights'' set to country music.
25th Jun '17 12:59:41 PM nombretomado
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* Among its various incarnations, ''FridayNightLights''. It chronicles the 1988 Permian Panthers of Odessa, Texas (changed to the Dillon Panthers for the TV series), a DyingTown of dried up oilfields that places all of its dreams and aspirations on the local high school football team. Unlike most other films, it shows the darker side of football and the extreme pressure and expectations that many young players face in rural America.

to:

* Among its various incarnations, ''FridayNightLights''.''Film/FridayNightLights''. It chronicles the 1988 Permian Panthers of Odessa, Texas (changed to the Dillon Panthers for the TV series), a DyingTown of dried up oilfields that places all of its dreams and aspirations on the local high school football team. Unlike most other films, it shows the darker side of football and the extreme pressure and expectations that many young players face in rural America.
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