History UsefulNotes / AmericanEducationalSystem

20th Feb '16 9:43:40 PM GrammarNavi
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College sports are SeriousBusiness in the United States, a multi-billion dollar enterprise with considerable investment by the television {{networks}}, the professional leagues and corporate sponsors. Some schools have teams so successful that the reputation of the team is stronger than that of the school it plays for. Playing well for a big team is often a surefire way to get noticed by the professional leagues. Schools with sports programs in NCAA Divisions I and II (but not Division III) are allowed to employ athletic scholarships — in exchange for a student playing on the team, the school will pay for that student's education, often in full. Big sports schools have "recruiters" that are sent to high schools (and sometimes even [[http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/blog/dr_saturday/post/13-year-old-commits-to-USC-and-pancakes-for-b?urn=ncaaf,217861 middle schools]]) to entice promising players to come and play for their team. College sports often produce rivalries comparable to the EnglishPremierLeague — witness the vitriol slung between fans of Ohio State and Michigan (called the greatest rivalry in North American sports by Creator/{{ESPN}}), or Duke and UNC, or Auburn and Alabama, or UCLA and USC, or...

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College sports are SeriousBusiness in the United States, a multi-billion dollar enterprise with considerable investment by the television {{networks}}, the professional leagues and corporate sponsors. Some schools have teams so successful that the reputation of the team is stronger than that of the school it plays for. Playing well for a big team is often a surefire way to get noticed by the professional leagues. Schools with sports programs in NCAA Divisions I and II (but not Division III) are allowed to employ athletic scholarships — in exchange for a student playing on the team, the school will pay for that student's education, often in full. Big sports schools have "recruiters" that are sent to high schools (and sometimes even [[http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/blog/dr_saturday/post/13-year-old-commits-to-USC-and-pancakes-for-b?urn=ncaaf,217861 middle schools]]) to entice promising players to come and play for their team. College sports often produce rivalries comparable to the EnglishPremierLeague UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague — witness the vitriol slung between fans of Ohio State and Michigan (called the greatest rivalry in North American sports by Creator/{{ESPN}}), or Duke and UNC, or Auburn and Alabama, or UCLA and USC, or...
10th Jan '16 4:56:29 PM phoenix
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It is the rule, not the exception, for a high school to have sports programs. School athletes tend to be at or near the top of the PopularityFoodChain, especially if they're on a winning team. A sizable chunk of a school's budget will be devoted to supporting its athletic programs, much to the ire of teachers and the more academically inclined. Student athletes are nominally required to maintain a certain GPA in order to stay on the team, and there is plenty of evidence to suggest that student athletes have better than average disciplinary records and academic performance. However, there is often a lot of pressure placed on teachers from coaches, the administration, and the community to give athletes special favors in the grading department. Sometimes, even school districts will be redrawn in order for a high school to get at a hot prospect for its team. All of this is especially true in rural communities, where the high school football field or basketball court is often, along with [[AmericanChurches the church]], one of the main focal points of community life (as seen in ''FridayNightLights''). The most popular sports at the high school level are usually [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] and UsefulNotes/{{basketball}}, although most schools also have [[TheBeautifulGame soccer]], UsefulNotes/{{ice hockey}} (mostly in New England and the Great Lakes states), wrestling, volleyball (mostly a girls' sport in the US, with California a partial exception), lacrosse (mainly in the eastern states), baseball and track programs.

to:

It is the rule, not the exception, for a high school to have sports programs. School athletes tend to be at or near the top of the PopularityFoodChain, especially if they're on a winning team. A sizable chunk of a school's budget will be devoted to supporting its athletic programs, much to the ire of teachers and the more academically inclined. Student athletes are nominally required to maintain a certain GPA in order to stay on the team, and there is plenty of evidence to suggest that student athletes have better than average disciplinary records and academic performance. However, there is often a lot of pressure placed on teachers from coaches, the administration, and the community to give athletes special favors in the grading department. Sometimes, even school districts will be redrawn in order for a high school to get at a hot prospect for its team. All of this is especially true in rural communities, where the high school football field or basketball court is often, along with [[AmericanChurches the church]], one of the main focal points of community life (as seen in ''FridayNightLights''). The most popular sports at the high school level are usually [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] and UsefulNotes/{{basketball}}, although most schools also have [[TheBeautifulGame [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]], UsefulNotes/{{ice hockey}} (mostly in New England and the Great Lakes states), wrestling, volleyball (mostly a girls' sport in the US, with California a partial exception), lacrosse (mainly in the eastern states), baseball and track programs.
22nd Dec '15 8:33:29 PM KYCubbie
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Fraternities often have nicknames: Delta Delta Delta, for example, will probably be called "Tri-Delt". They always have reputations (e.g. "mostly Hispanic women", "mostly biology students", [[BreadEggsMilkSquick "mostly alcoholic date-rapists"]]), and they almost always have rivalries and/or partnerships with other fraternities. They are almost always single-sex organizations (hence the delineation between fraternities and sororities), and until ''very'' recently, were just as likely to be all people of the same race or ethnic group. There ''are'' some coed Greek organizations (sometimes called "societies"), but these are pretty rare. Fraternities and sororities have developed a reputation for [[WackyFratboyHijinx partying and drinking alarming quantities of alcohol]], especially if they are not affiliated with a particular professional or religious attachment. This is largely TruthInTelevision, and has caused some college to ban all Greek organizations from the campus. Remember, college is where many Americans will be both 1) exposed to alcohol and 2) away from parents or other authority figures who are likely to enforce the 21-year-old drinking age mandated by law. Furthermore, any American college student who waits until 21 to drink was actively trying to avoid it — anyone who wants to drink at college is going to have no trouble finding an of-age buddy to buy them beer.

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Fraternities and sororities often have nicknames: the real-life sorority Delta Delta Delta, for example, will probably be is typically called "Tri-Delt". They always have reputations (e.g. "mostly Hispanic women", "mostly biology students", [[BreadEggsMilkSquick "mostly alcoholic date-rapists"]]), and they almost always have rivalries and/or partnerships with other fraternities. They are almost always single-sex organizations (hence the delineation between fraternities and sororities), and until ''very'' recently, were just as likely to be all people of the same race or ethnic group. There ''are'' some coed Greek organizations (sometimes called "societies"), but these are pretty rare. Fraternities and sororities have developed a reputation for [[WackyFratboyHijinx partying and drinking alarming quantities of alcohol]], especially if they are not affiliated with a particular professional or religious attachment. This is largely TruthInTelevision, and has caused some college to ban all Greek organizations from the campus. Remember, college is where many Americans will be both 1) exposed to alcohol and 2) away from parents or other authority figures who are likely to enforce the 21-year-old drinking age mandated by law. Furthermore, any American college student who waits until 21 to drink was actively trying to avoid it — anyone who wants to drink at college is going to have no trouble finding an of-age buddy to buy them beer.
11th Dec '15 6:23:13 PM DavidDelony
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This leads into another aspect of college culture — the politics. Since the student protests of TheSixties, colleges and academia in general have been a [[StrawmanU popular strawman target]] for conservatives, being stereotyped as hotbeds of flaky leftist politics pushed by radical professors and student groups. While this is sometimes TruthInTelevision, most colleges are also home to rival conservative groups, some of which may wield considerable influence. In particular, religious colleges and less elite state colleges have been known for their conservatism. For every {{Berzerkeley}}, there is a JimJonesUniversity. Modern universities have also been criticized from the left for the aforementioned college sports detracting from academics and the focus on corporate-friendly majors like computer science and engineering at the expense of liberal arts, the shift from stable tenure-track faculty positions to lower-paid adjuncts, as well as the massive debt that students take on to finance their educations.

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This leads into another aspect of college culture — the politics. Since the student protests of TheSixties, colleges and academia in general have been a [[StrawmanU popular strawman target]] for conservatives, being stereotyped as hotbeds of flaky leftist politics pushed by radical professors and student groups. While this is sometimes TruthInTelevision, most colleges are also home to rival conservative groups, some of which may wield considerable influence. In particular, religious colleges and less elite state colleges have been known for their conservatism. For every {{Berzerkeley}}, there is a JimJonesUniversity. Modern universities have also been criticized from the left for the aforementioned college sports detracting from academics and academics, the focus on corporate-friendly majors like computer science and engineering at the expense of liberal arts, the shift from stable tenure-track faculty positions to lower-paid adjuncts, as well as the massive debt that students take on to finance their educations.
10th Dec '15 8:25:41 AM HeraldAlberich
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Colleges in the United States may be public or private, as with primary and secondary schools, but these terms are used slightly differently at the tertiary educational level. A "public" university derives ''some'' of its funding from the state (about 20-25%, in the case of the University of California system), and scrapes up the rest through tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Private universities rely solely on tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Public universities (also called state universities[[note]]The general rule is, if it has "University of [STATE]" or "State University" as part of its name, it's probably public. However, the University of Pennsylvania is a tricky exception, as it is a prestigious IvyLeague school that's not funded by the state of Pennsylvania. In the other direction, the same is true for Rutgers University, which was once a private college but is now the public university system of UsefulNotes/NewJersey; its full, formal name is "Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey", but that's in the fine print.[[/note]]) generally tend to be less expensive than private universities, though this is not always the case. Neither public nor private universities are required to take everyone (with the exception of community colleges; see below) — you must apply, and admission can be very competitive indeed. However, public universities are usually easier to get into than private universities, if for no other reason than they are usually larger and can therefore afford to accept a larger number of students. Students are also much more likely to go to their home state's university for various reasons — they may have grown up cheering for the sports team, their parents are likely alumni, and tuition is often drastically reduced for in-state students (even if the students themselves aren't taxpayers, their parents are, after all). The ease of gaining entry to a private university is variable, as the tuition is often drastically higher, and the minimum standards are usually stricter (even, [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections oddly enough]], [[{{Nepotism}} if your parents own it]]).

to:

Colleges in the United States may be public or private, as with primary and secondary schools, but these terms are used slightly differently at the tertiary educational level. A "public" university derives ''some'' of its funding from the state (about 20-25%, in the case of the University of California system), and scrapes up the rest through tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Private universities rely solely on tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Public universities (also called state universities[[note]]The general rule is, if it has "University of [STATE]" or "State University" as part of its name, it's probably public. However, the University of Pennsylvania is a tricky exception, as it is a prestigious IvyLeague UsefulNotes/IvyLeague school that's not funded by the state of Pennsylvania. In the other direction, the same is true for Rutgers University, which was once a private college but is now the public university system of UsefulNotes/NewJersey; its full, formal name is "Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey", but that's in the fine print.[[/note]]) generally tend to be less expensive than private universities, though this is not always the case. Neither public nor private universities are required to take everyone (with the exception of community colleges; see below) — you must apply, and admission can be very competitive indeed. However, public universities are usually easier to get into than private universities, if for no other reason than they are usually larger and can therefore afford to accept a larger number of students. Students are also much more likely to go to their home state's university for various reasons — they may have grown up cheering for the sports team, their parents are likely alumni, and tuition is often drastically reduced for in-state students (even if the students themselves aren't taxpayers, their parents are, after all). The ease of gaining entry to a private university is variable, as the tuition is often drastically higher, and the minimum standards are usually stricter (even, [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections oddly enough]], [[{{Nepotism}} if your parents own it]]).



In reality, however, many people transfer to a four-year college after getting their two-year Associate's degree to a four-year school, to upgrade to a Bachelor's. It's often suggested, especially in the current economy, to recent high school grads that they go as cheap as possible with their Bachelor's degree, as unless it's from an elite IvyLeague school, most employers and post-graduate programs won't care about what college you got it from as long as it's properly accredited. Others feel that a four-year education isn't worth the time or money. Others still take courses for a vocational skill. Unlike the European master-apprentice system, most trades are now taught in community colleges. Auto repair, electricians, paralegals, plumbing, police, fire, emergency medical technician, cooking, and some forms of nursing are commonly but a few of the courses done at community colleges. Thus, college is more or less necessary for anyone but unskilled laborers.

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In reality, however, many people transfer to a four-year college after getting their two-year Associate's degree to a four-year school, to upgrade to a Bachelor's. It's often suggested, especially in the current economy, to recent high school grads that they go as cheap as possible with their Bachelor's degree, as unless it's from an elite IvyLeague UsefulNotes/IvyLeague school, most employers and post-graduate programs won't care about what college you got it from as long as it's properly accredited. Others feel that a four-year education isn't worth the time or money. Others still take courses for a vocational skill. Unlike the European master-apprentice system, most trades are now taught in community colleges. Auto repair, electricians, paralegals, plumbing, police, fire, emergency medical technician, cooking, and some forms of nursing are commonly but a few of the courses done at community colleges. Thus, college is more or less necessary for anyone but unskilled laborers.



Student athletes aren't allowed to be paid directly by the schools — the argument is that their education is payment enough, and that paying them in cash would allow richer schools to buy up all the best talent. Cases of Division I schools being punished by the NCAA for slipping money or perks to players under the table are all too common. However, there have been calls to change this, the argument being that college sports stopped being "amateur" a long time ago — there are massive amounts of money involved, many college teams have [[ProductPlacement sponsors]] and TV deals, and the entire system is essentially a "farm" for the big leagues, so it is argued that not paying the athletes is tantamount to exploiting them. Indeed, at [[http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/26/us/northwestern-football-union/ at least one university]], players have attempted to unionize. The fact that college sports has gotten big enough for such a debate to happen in the first place, of course, has itself raised concern among academics, who feel that the transformation of many colleges and universities into "sports schools" has detracted from their academic mission. This was the main reason why the IvyLeague schools, which had once been sports powerhouses, all but withdrew from the NCAA in TheFifties. The NCAA has been listening to these concerns, implementing [[http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/17/ncaas-stricter-academic-rules-what-does-it-mean-for-your-team/ new standards]] in 2011 regarding academic performance of student athletes — if a team doesn't graduate at least half of its players, then it's disqualified from post-season play.

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Student athletes aren't allowed to be paid directly by the schools — the argument is that their education is payment enough, and that paying them in cash would allow richer schools to buy up all the best talent. Cases of Division I schools being punished by the NCAA for slipping money or perks to players under the table are all too common. However, there have been calls to change this, the argument being that college sports stopped being "amateur" a long time ago — there are massive amounts of money involved, many college teams have [[ProductPlacement sponsors]] and TV deals, and the entire system is essentially a "farm" for the big leagues, so it is argued that not paying the athletes is tantamount to exploiting them. Indeed, at [[http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/26/us/northwestern-football-union/ at least one university]], players have attempted to unionize. The fact that college sports has gotten big enough for such a debate to happen in the first place, of course, has itself raised concern among academics, who feel that the transformation of many colleges and universities into "sports schools" has detracted from their academic mission. This was the main reason why the IvyLeague UsefulNotes/IvyLeague schools, which had once been sports powerhouses, all but withdrew from the NCAA in TheFifties. The NCAA has been listening to these concerns, implementing [[http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/08/17/ncaas-stricter-academic-rules-what-does-it-mean-for-your-team/ new standards]] in 2011 regarding academic performance of student athletes — if a team doesn't graduate at least half of its players, then it's disqualified from post-season play.
29th Nov '15 1:34:51 PM LentilSandEater
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Finally, homeschooling is often used by parents who feel that their children aren't being challenged by any of the schools they go to, for those who have children engaged in a hobby or early career (many child and teenage actors go this route in order to keep up with production schedules), or for those who believe the "gear-in-the-cog" mentality is counterproductive and not suited for children. In any event, [[HomeschooledKids children who are homeschooled]] are often stereotyped as socially awkward shut-ins who have trouble functioning in the outside world due to having not been educated in a classroom environment, interacting with a wide variety of other people. When faced with this argument against homeschooling, parents will usually retaliate that learning social skills from other kids who haven't learned them yet themselves is a horrible idea, and it ''is'', in fact, possible to make friends and socialize outside of school. (Many HomeschooledKids fit this stereotype, many don't.)
** Many homeschool parents put their kids in '''co-op''' (short for co-operative), which is like a weekly or twice a week public school for homeschoolers, with homework taking the place of the class for the rest of the week. Some co-ops will teach the core subjects and leave electives up to the parents (this setup is pretty much inevitable for small co-ops), while some co-ops will offer both electives and core subjects. \\

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Finally, homeschooling is often used by parents who feel that their children aren't being challenged by any of the schools they go to, for those who have children engaged in a hobby or early career (many child and teenage actors go this route in order to keep up with production schedules), or for those who believe the "gear-in-the-cog" mentality is counterproductive and not suited for children. In any event, [[HomeschooledKids children who are homeschooled]] are often stereotyped as socially awkward shut-ins who have trouble functioning in the outside world due to having not been educated in a classroom environment, interacting with a wide variety of other people. When faced with this argument against homeschooling, parents will usually retaliate that learning social skills from other kids who haven't learned them yet themselves is a horrible idea, and it ''is'', in fact, possible to make friends and socialize outside of school. (Many HomeschooledKids fit this stereotype, many don't.)
** Many homeschool parents put their kids in '''co-op''' (short for co-operative), which is like a weekly or twice a week public school for homeschoolers, with homework taking the place of the class for the rest of the week. Some co-ops will teach the core subjects and leave electives up to the parents (this setup is pretty much inevitable for small co-ops), while some co-ops will offer both electives and core subjects. \\
)\\


Added DiffLines:

Many homeschool parents put their kids in '''co-op''' (short for co-operative), which is like a weekly or twice a week public school for homeschoolers, with homework taking the place of the class for the rest of the week. Some co-ops will teach the core subjects and leave electives up to the parents (this setup is pretty much inevitable for small co-ops), while some co-ops will offer both electives and core subjects. \\
\\
2nd Oct '15 1:15:44 PM eyebones
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* A '''public school''' (sometimes called a "traditional public school" and "district-run public school" to disambiguate them from charter schools. [[note]] You'll also hear the term "government school" from either a conservative StrawmanPolitical or someone trying to be transatlantically unambiguous[[/note]] is the American term for a school run by the government and funded by taxes. This is [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage what the British call a]] "state school", a term used only in a post-secondary context in the US. Every American youth has the privilege to receive taxpayer-supported education in a public school, and it is the default form of schooling for the vast majority of them.

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* A '''public school''' (sometimes called a "traditional public school" and "district-run public school" to disambiguate them from charter schools. [[note]] You'll also hear the term "government school" from either a conservative StrawmanPolitical or someone trying to be transatlantically unambiguous[[/note]] "Public School" is the American term for a school run by the government and funded by taxes. This is [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage what the British call a]] "state school", a term used only in a post-secondary context in the US. Every American youth has the privilege to receive taxpayer-supported education in a public school, and it is the default form of schooling for the vast majority of them.majority.
6th Aug '15 12:19:32 PM SetsunasaNiWa
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This can lead to amusing situations when a BrilliantButLazy student drops out at age 16, promptly gets his/her GED, and has a diploma equivalent 2 years before their peers. Theoretically they could get an Associate's Degree while everyone else is graduating, but this is much rarer, hence the "lazy" part. A real-life example of this is current [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Washington Nationals]] star Bryce Harper, who took and passed his GED at 16 so he could enter junior college early, thus getting a head start on a professional baseball career.[[note]] Under MLB rules, U.S. players are eligible for the draft upon high school graduation. Harper chose junior college because of another draft rule—a player who enrolls in a four-year college is ineligible until three years after enrollment or turning 21, whichever is sooner. Junior college players, on the other hand, are always eligible. This meant that Harper could be drafted at age 17 with a year of college under his belt.[[/note]] To prevent students from gaming the system in this manner, some states require a GED candidate to be at least 18 years of age.[[note]]Harper's home state of Nevada is [[CaptainObvious obviously]] not one of them.[[/note]]

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This can lead to amusing situations when a BrilliantButLazy student drops out at age 16, promptly gets his/her GED, and has a diploma equivalent 2 years before their peers. Theoretically they could get an Associate's Degree while everyone else is graduating, but this is much rarer, hence the "lazy" part. A real-life example of this is current [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Washington Nationals]] star Bryce Harper, who took and passed his GED at 16 so he could enter junior college early, thus getting a head start on a professional baseball career.[[note]] Under MLB rules, U.S. players are eligible for the draft upon high school graduation. Harper chose junior college because of another draft rule—a player who enrolls in a four-year college is ineligible until three years after enrollment or turning 21, whichever is sooner. Junior college players, on the other hand, are always eligible. This meant that Harper could be drafted at age 17 with a year of college under his belt.[[/note]] To prevent students from gaming the system in this manner, some states require a GED candidate to be at least 18 years of age.[[note]]Harper's home state of Nevada is [[CaptainObvious obviously]] obviously not one of them.[[/note]]
16th Jul '15 11:50:47 PM KYCubbie
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Colleges in the United States may be public or private, as with primary and secondary schools, but these terms are used slightly differently at the tertiary educational level. A "public" university derives ''some'' of its funding from the state (about 20-25%, in the case of the University of California system), and scrapes up the rest through tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Private universities rely solely on tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Public universities (also called state universities[[note]]The general rule is, if it has "University of [STATE]" or "State University" as part of its name, it's probably public. However, the University of Pennsylvania is a tricky exception, as it is a prestigious IvyLeague school that's not funded by the state of Pennsylvania. In the other direction, the same is true for Rutgers University, which was once a private college but is now the public university system of UsefulNotes/NewJersey; its full, formal name is "Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey", but that's in the fine print.[[/note]]) generally tend to be less expensive than private universities, though this is not always the case. Neither public nor private universities are required to take everyone (with the exception of community colleges; see below) — you must apply, and admission can be very competitive indeed. However, public universities are usually easier to get into than private universities, if for no other reason than they are usually larger and can therefore afford to accept a larger number of students. Students are also much more likely to go to their home state's university for various reasons — they may have grown up cheering for the sports team, their parents are likely alumni, and tuition is often drastically reduced for in-state students (they are taxpayers, after all). The ease of gaining entry to a private university is variable, as the tuition is often drastically higher, and the minimum standards are usually stricter (even, [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections oddly enough]], [[{{Nepotism}} if your parents own it]]).

to:

Colleges in the United States may be public or private, as with primary and secondary schools, but these terms are used slightly differently at the tertiary educational level. A "public" university derives ''some'' of its funding from the state (about 20-25%, in the case of the University of California system), and scrapes up the rest through tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Private universities rely solely on tuition/patents/hitting up alums for money/etc. Public universities (also called state universities[[note]]The general rule is, if it has "University of [STATE]" or "State University" as part of its name, it's probably public. However, the University of Pennsylvania is a tricky exception, as it is a prestigious IvyLeague school that's not funded by the state of Pennsylvania. In the other direction, the same is true for Rutgers University, which was once a private college but is now the public university system of UsefulNotes/NewJersey; its full, formal name is "Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey", but that's in the fine print.[[/note]]) generally tend to be less expensive than private universities, though this is not always the case. Neither public nor private universities are required to take everyone (with the exception of community colleges; see below) — you must apply, and admission can be very competitive indeed. However, public universities are usually easier to get into than private universities, if for no other reason than they are usually larger and can therefore afford to accept a larger number of students. Students are also much more likely to go to their home state's university for various reasons — they may have grown up cheering for the sports team, their parents are likely alumni, and tuition is often drastically reduced for in-state students (they are (even if the students themselves aren't taxpayers, their parents are, after all). The ease of gaining entry to a private university is variable, as the tuition is often drastically higher, and the minimum standards are usually stricter (even, [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections oddly enough]], [[{{Nepotism}} if your parents own it]]).



College sports are SeriousBusiness in the United States, a multi-billion dollar enterprise with considerable investment by the television {{networks}}, the professional leagues and corporate sponsors. Some schools have teams so successful that the reputation of the team is stronger than that of the school it plays for. Playing well for a big team is often a surefire way to get noticed by the professional leagues. Schools with sports programs in NCAA Divisions I and II (but not Division III) are allowed to employ athletic scholarships — in exchange for a student playing on the team, the school will pay for that student's education, often in full. Big sports schools have "recruiters" that are sent to high schools (and sometimes even [[http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/blog/dr_saturday/post/13-year-old-commits-to-USC-and-pancakes-for-b?urn=ncaaf,217861 middle schools]]) to entice promising players to come and play for their team. College sports often produce rivalries comparable to the EnglishPremierLeague — witness the vitriol slung between fans of Ohio State and Michigan (called the greatest rivalry in North American sports by {{ESPN}}), or Duke and UNC, or Auburn and Alabama, or UCLA and USC, or...

to:

College sports are SeriousBusiness in the United States, a multi-billion dollar enterprise with considerable investment by the television {{networks}}, the professional leagues and corporate sponsors. Some schools have teams so successful that the reputation of the team is stronger than that of the school it plays for. Playing well for a big team is often a surefire way to get noticed by the professional leagues. Schools with sports programs in NCAA Divisions I and II (but not Division III) are allowed to employ athletic scholarships — in exchange for a student playing on the team, the school will pay for that student's education, often in full. Big sports schools have "recruiters" that are sent to high schools (and sometimes even [[http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/blog/dr_saturday/post/13-year-old-commits-to-USC-and-pancakes-for-b?urn=ncaaf,217861 middle schools]]) to entice promising players to come and play for their team. College sports often produce rivalries comparable to the EnglishPremierLeague — witness the vitriol slung between fans of Ohio State and Michigan (called the greatest rivalry in North American sports by {{ESPN}}), Creator/{{ESPN}}), or Duke and UNC, or Auburn and Alabama, or UCLA and USC, or...
16th Jul '15 11:45:41 PM KYCubbie
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It is the rule, not the exception, for a high school to have sports programs. School athletes tend to be at or near the top of the PopularityFoodChain, especially if they're on a winning team. A sizable chunk of a school's budget will be devoted to supporting its athletic programs, much to the ire of teachers and the more academically inclined. Student athletes are nominally required to maintain a certain GPA in order to stay on the team, and there is plenty of evidence to suggest that student athletes have better than average disciplinary records and academic performance. However, there is often a lot of pressure placed on teachers from coaches, the administration, and the community to give athletes special favors in the grading department. Sometimes, even school districts will be redrawn in order for a high school to get at a hot prospect for its team. All of this is especially true in rural communities, where the high school football field or basketball court is often, along with [[AmericanChurches the church]], one of the main focal points of community life (as seen in ''FridayNightLights''). The most popular sports at the high school level are usually [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] and UsefulNotes/{{basketball}}, although most schools also have [[TheBeautifulGame soccer]], UsefulNotes/{{ice hockey}} (field hockey is a girls' sport at most schools), wrestling, volleyball (mostly a girls' sport in the US, with California a partial exception), lacrosse (mainly in the eastern states), baseball and track programs.

Most schools offer both boys' and girls' sports. This is due to Title IX, a law passed in 1972 which mandates that schools offer sufficient athletic opportunities to female students. Controversy arises from the fact that schools with limited budgets are often forced to cut boys' sports in order to establish and maintain equivalent girls' sports programs (the general perception, more often than not, is that boys' sports are more worthy of attention). The benefit is that programs and opportunities for girls (and for women in college) have become dramatically better, and the results play out on the international stage — the United States is a powerhouse in international women's sports. For example, while the US men's national soccer team has long been viewed as a joke by the rest of the world (although nowadays, it's seen as a middle-tier team), the women's soccer team has won the FIFA Women's World Cup twice and the Olympic Gold Medal four times in the last twenty years. The main sports for female athletes tend to be basketball, soccer, softball, track, volleyball, field hockey, lacrosse (again, especially in the eastern US) and, of course, [[TheCheerleader cheerleading]].

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It is the rule, not the exception, for a high school to have sports programs. School athletes tend to be at or near the top of the PopularityFoodChain, especially if they're on a winning team. A sizable chunk of a school's budget will be devoted to supporting its athletic programs, much to the ire of teachers and the more academically inclined. Student athletes are nominally required to maintain a certain GPA in order to stay on the team, and there is plenty of evidence to suggest that student athletes have better than average disciplinary records and academic performance. However, there is often a lot of pressure placed on teachers from coaches, the administration, and the community to give athletes special favors in the grading department. Sometimes, even school districts will be redrawn in order for a high school to get at a hot prospect for its team. All of this is especially true in rural communities, where the high school football field or basketball court is often, along with [[AmericanChurches the church]], one of the main focal points of community life (as seen in ''FridayNightLights''). The most popular sports at the high school level are usually [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball football]] and UsefulNotes/{{basketball}}, although most schools also have [[TheBeautifulGame soccer]], UsefulNotes/{{ice hockey}} (field hockey is a girls' sport at most schools), (mostly in New England and the Great Lakes states), wrestling, volleyball (mostly a girls' sport in the US, with California a partial exception), lacrosse (mainly in the eastern states), baseball and track programs.

Most schools offer both boys' and girls' sports. This is due to Title IX, a law passed in 1972 which mandates that schools offer sufficient athletic opportunities to female students. Controversy arises from the fact that schools with limited budgets are often forced to cut boys' sports in order to establish and maintain equivalent girls' sports programs (the general perception, more often than not, is that boys' sports are more worthy of attention). The benefit is that programs and opportunities for girls (and for women in college) have become dramatically better, and the results play out on the international stage — the United States is a powerhouse in international women's sports. For example, while the US men's national soccer team has long been viewed as a joke by the rest of the world (although nowadays, it's seen as a middle-tier team), the women's soccer team has won the three FIFA Women's World Cup twice Cups and the four Olympic Gold Medal four times gold medals in the last twenty years. The main sports for female athletes tend to be basketball, soccer, softball, track, volleyball, field hockey, lacrosse (again, especially in the eastern US) US), ice hockey (again, mostly in its US heartland of the northern tier of states) and, of course, [[TheCheerleader cheerleading]].



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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.AmericanEducationalSystem