History UsefulNotes / AllTheLittleGermanies

4th Apr '16 2:30:02 PM SmoCro
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His fatherland must be greater!
[...]
The whole of Germany it shall be!
Oh God from Heaven see to it,
And give us true german bravery,
that we shall love it well and true!
|: That it shall be! That it shall be!
The whole Germany it shall be! :|

''

to:

His fatherland must be greater!
greater!\\
[...]
]\\
The whole of Germany it shall be!
be!\\
Oh God from Heaven see to it,
it,\\
And give us true german bravery,
bravery,\\
that we shall love it well and true!
true!\\
|: That it shall be! That it shall be!
be!\\
The whole Germany it shall be! :|

''
:|\\''
4th Apr '16 2:29:01 PM SmoCro
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His fatherland must be greater!''

to:

His fatherland must be greater!''greater!
[...]
The whole of Germany it shall be!
Oh God from Heaven see to it,
And give us true german bravery,
that we shall love it well and true!
|: That it shall be! That it shall be!
The whole Germany it shall be! :|

''



----

to:

----
9th Feb '16 3:29:06 PM Adept
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* The ''Am Rhein'' section of Thackeray's ''VanityFair''

to:

* The ''Am Rhein'' section of Thackeray's ''VanityFair''''Literature/VanityFair''
6th Feb '16 9:39:00 PM BatmanKalEl
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* PrussiansInPickelhauben: The ''Pickelhaube'' helmet (in a much larger size than the models worn in 1870 or 1914) was introduced as the new standard headdress of the Prussian army shortly after Frederick William IV's accession to the throne in 1840. The 1840s also saw the Prussians introduce the Dreyse needle-gun, one of the first standard breech-loading rifles.

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* PrussiansInPickelhauben: UsefulNotes/PrussiansInPickelhauben: The ''Pickelhaube'' helmet (in a much larger size than the models worn in 1870 or 1914) was introduced as the new standard headdress of the Prussian army shortly after Frederick William IV's accession to the throne in 1840. The 1840s also saw the Prussians introduce the Dreyse needle-gun, one of the first standard breech-loading rifles.
20th Sep '15 6:53:59 PM nombretomado
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* BadassBeard: Came into its own during this period. During the 18th century most men were clean-shaven, only a few, especially certain types of soldiers like grenadiers or hussars, wore [[BadassMoustache moustaches]]. Moustaches (and muttonchops) became much more common in Germany during the UsefulNotes/NapoleonicWars, and in the period that followed full beards became associated with radicals and revolutionaries like Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, Friedrich Hecker, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, before the fashion became "mainstream" after the Revolution of 1848. The changing fashion for facial hair can be seen for instance with the kings of Prussia (whose styles obviously became imitated by many): Frederick William III grew a moustache after the defeat of 1806, of his two eldest sons Frederick William IV went clean-shaven and William I wore a moustache and sideburns, while William's son Frederick William (the future Frederick III) grew a full beard.

to:

* BadassBeard: Came into its own during this period. During the 18th century most men were clean-shaven, only a few, especially certain types of soldiers like grenadiers or hussars, wore [[BadassMoustache moustaches]]. Moustaches (and muttonchops) became much more common in Germany during the UsefulNotes/NapoleonicWars, UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars, and in the period that followed full beards became associated with radicals and revolutionaries like Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, Friedrich Hecker, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, before the fashion became "mainstream" after the Revolution of 1848. The changing fashion for facial hair can be seen for instance with the kings of Prussia (whose styles obviously became imitated by many): Frederick William III grew a moustache after the defeat of 1806, of his two eldest sons Frederick William IV went clean-shaven and William I wore a moustache and sideburns, while William's son Frederick William (the future Frederick III) grew a full beard.
27th Jun '15 10:54:18 PM Random888
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When Francis II abdicated as Holy Roman Emperor in 1806 and fell back on his title of Francis I of the Empire of Austria (1804), the implied acceptance of the death of the [[HolyRomanEmpire Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation]], though dictated by Napoleon, was simply a recognition of reality. Napoleon, however, having shattered German unity legally, ironically went a good way toward re-establishing it politically by amalgamating the tiny imperial states into larger units. He also rewarded his German allies and relatives with title upgrades, in the process creating new kingdoms. Bavaria and Württemberg became kingdoms on January 1, 1806, Saxony followed on December 20, and Westphalia was created as a kingdom for Napoleon's youngest brother Jérôme in 1807. After the fall of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna in 1815 recognized most of these (Westphalia being a notable exception) while restoring some of the larger earlier units such as Hanover (now also raised to a Kingdom). {{Prussia}}, which had been halved in size after its defeat in 1807, was awarded substantial territories in the Rhineland and Saxony, in recognition of the magnitude of her efforts against Napoleon - and of her army.[[note]]This included the restoration of the territories west of the Elbe that had belonged to Prussia until 1806 and was in part considered a compensation for those territories in the east that were not restored to Prussia but used to form the Russian-controlled new Kingdom of Poland.[[/note]] After the Empire itself ceased, the run-up to the establishment of the ''[[ImperialGermany Deutsches Reich]]'' may be considered the period of AllTheLittleGermanies. (The first part, from 1815 to the March Revolution of 1848, is usually called the ''Biedermeier'' period[[note]] The name is taken from Gottlieb Biedermaier (note the "a"), a fictitious bourgeois Swabian poet, the alleged simple-minded writer of a number of parody poems that were published between 1848 and 1855[[/note]] in Germany).

to:

When Francis II abdicated as Holy Roman Emperor in 1806 and fell back on his title of Francis I of the Empire of Austria (1804), the implied acceptance of the death of the [[HolyRomanEmpire Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation]], though dictated by Napoleon, was simply a recognition of reality. Napoleon, however, having shattered German unity legally, ironically went a good way toward re-establishing it politically by amalgamating the tiny imperial states into larger units. He also rewarded his German allies and relatives with title upgrades, in the process creating new kingdoms. Bavaria and Württemberg became kingdoms on January 1, 1806, Saxony followed on December 20, and Westphalia was created as a kingdom for Napoleon's youngest brother Jérôme in 1807. After the fall of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna in 1815 recognized most of these (Westphalia being a notable exception) while restoring some of the larger earlier units such as Hanover (now also raised to a Kingdom). {{Prussia}}, which had been halved in size after its defeat in 1807, was awarded substantial territories in the Rhineland and Saxony, in recognition of the magnitude of her efforts against Napoleon - and of her army.[[note]]This included the restoration of the territories west of the Elbe that had belonged to Prussia until 1806 and was in part considered a compensation for those territories in the east that were not restored to Prussia but used to form the Russian-controlled new Kingdom of Poland.[[/note]] After the Empire itself ceased, the run-up to the establishment of the ''[[ImperialGermany Deutsches Reich]]'' may be considered the period of AllTheLittleGermanies. (The first part, from 1815 to the [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 March Revolution of 1848, 1848]], is usually called the ''Biedermeier'' period[[note]] The name is taken from Gottlieb Biedermaier (note the "a"), a fictitious bourgeois Swabian poet, the alleged simple-minded writer of a number of parody poems that were published between 1848 and 1855[[/note]] in Germany).
2nd Jun '15 6:14:02 AM LongLiveHumour
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The flip side of ''Restauration'' during the Biedermeier period is called ''Vormärz'', "Before-March", referring to the European Revolution that broke out in Germany in March 1848. ''Vormärz'' refers to the diverse oppositional movements of the time: liberals, democrats, nationalists, early socialists etc., often associated with student societies (''Burschenschaften'') and the literary movement that came to be called "Young Germany". Discontent with the stagnation of the political development at home, many of them went to exile in Paris or Brussels after the Revolutions of 1830 and 1831. A wind of change did sweep through Germany in 1848 and 1849, and for the first time Germans (well, German men at any rate) elected a National Assembly, which convened in Frankfurt and framed a constitution. However, the attempt to set up a German national state failed, as Prussia, Austria and many other states the old monarchs, who never had entirely lost the hold over their armies, regained control of the situation. The last remnants of the more radical revolutionaries were put down with harsh military force, and many of them went into exile. Many of them ended up in the United States, where they became known as "Forty-Eighters", associated with the radical abolitionist wing of the nascent Republican party and went on to fight [[AmericanCivilWar another war for freedom]] some years later. Others ended up in Switzerland, like Music/RichardWagner, or in London, like Creator/KarlMarx. Nevertheless, the dream of a united Germany lived on, and things did not return to those of the ''Restauration'' era. Even Prussia now had to enact a written constitution, and states all over Germany got in the habit of having elected legislatures (even if some of them, like Prussia, elected them in systems which favoured the rich). The parties that would characterize German party politics for the next ca. 70 years began to take shape, and one of them, the Social Democratic Party (founded in the 1860s), continues to this day.

to:

The flip side of ''Restauration'' during the Biedermeier period is called ''Vormärz'', "Before-March", referring to the European Revolution that broke out in Germany in March 1848. ''Vormärz'' refers to the diverse oppositional movements of the time: liberals, democrats, nationalists, early socialists etc., often associated with student societies (''Burschenschaften'') and the literary movement that came to be called "Young Germany". Discontent with the stagnation of the political development at home, many of them went to exile in Paris or Brussels after the Revolutions of 1830 and 1831. A wind of change did sweep through Germany in 1848 and 1849, and for the first time Germans (well, German men at any rate) elected a National Assembly, which convened in Frankfurt and framed a constitution. However, the attempt to set up a German national state failed, as Prussia, Austria and many other states the old monarchs, who never had entirely lost the hold over their armies, regained control of the situation. The last remnants of the more radical revolutionaries were put down with harsh military force, and many of them went into exile. Many of them ended up in the United States, where they became known as "Forty-Eighters", associated with the radical abolitionist wing of the nascent Republican party and went on to fight [[AmericanCivilWar [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar another war for freedom]] some years later. Others ended up in Switzerland, like Music/RichardWagner, or in London, like Creator/KarlMarx. Nevertheless, the dream of a united Germany lived on, and things did not return to those of the ''Restauration'' era. Even Prussia now had to enact a written constitution, and states all over Germany got in the habit of having elected legislatures (even if some of them, like Prussia, elected them in systems which favoured the rich). The parties that would characterize German party politics for the next ca. 70 years began to take shape, and one of them, the Social Democratic Party (founded in the 1860s), continues to this day.
17th May '15 11:03:20 PM nombretomado
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* SpareToTheThrone: If anyone had a princeling they couldn't figure out what to do with they dumped him here. If one of the royal families here had one of these they dumped them somewhere else. As a result, almost every monarchy in Europe had/has some minor German prince in the ancestry--if indeed the royal family wasn't already of German origin (such as TheHouseOfHanover).

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* SpareToTheThrone: If anyone had a princeling they couldn't figure out what to do with they dumped him here. If one of the royal families here had one of these they dumped them somewhere else. As a result, almost every monarchy in Europe had/has some minor German prince in the ancestry--if indeed the royal family wasn't already of German origin (such as TheHouseOfHanover).UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover).
11th May '15 9:22:34 PM Patachou
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* Various films about KingLudwigII begin in this era.

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* Various films about KingLudwigII King UsefulNotes/LudwigIIOfBavaria begin in this era.
8th May '15 3:57:14 PM Odon
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Instead of a national state the Germans got the fairly loose German Confederation (''Deutscher Bund''), which consisted of 42 states (38 monarchies and four free cities), or more correctly, states and parts of states, as e. g. big chunks of Prussia and Austria lay outside its borders. The Confederation's legislative debating forum, the ''Bundestag'', unlike its [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany modern namesake]], was a no more than a permanent conference of ambassadors. It soon enabled Metternich to institute repressive measures to protect the ''[[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]]'' in Germany and Europe and to combat revolutionary and nationalist movements. This was institutionalized in the Karlsbad decrees of 1819, which most notably involved a tightening of the screws in the censorship of newspapers, periodicals and books. This aspect of the ''Biedermeier'' period goes under the headline of "Restoration" (''Restauration''), and some of the smaller states took it to ludicrous extremes. For instance in Electoral Hesse (''Kurhessen'', capital Kassel) it was even attempted for a time to restore the pre-1806 pigtails and to forbid state officials from wearing "seditious" moustaches.

to:

Instead of a national state the Germans got the fairly loose German Confederation (''Deutscher Bund''), which consisted of 42 states (38 monarchies and four free cities), or more correctly, states and parts of states, as e. g. big chunks of Prussia and Austria lay outside its borders. The Confederation's legislative debating forum, the ''Bundestag'', unlike its [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany modern namesake]], was a no more than a permanent conference of ambassadors. It soon enabled Metternich to institute repressive measures to protect the ''[[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]]'' in Germany and Europe and to combat revolutionary and nationalist movements. This was institutionalized in the Karlsbad decrees of 1819, which most notably involved a tightening of the screws in the censorship of newspapers, periodicals and books. This aspect of the ''Biedermeier'' period goes under the headline of "Restoration" (''Restauration''), and some of the smaller states took it to ludicrous extremes. For instance in Electoral Hesse (''Kurhessen'', capital Kassel) it was even attempted for a time to restore the pre-1806 pigtails and to forbid state officials from wearing "seditious" moustaches.
mustaches.



* FunnyForeigner: Germany, especially the newly "discovered" Rhine valley and the Elbe valley south of Dresden, began to attract much larger numbers of foreign tourists than ever before, including e. g. Creator/VictorHugo, Creator/HansChristianAndersen, and painter J.M.W. Turner. This led to foreign tourists, especially excentric Englishmen with more money than sense to become popular comedy figures in German media.

to:

* FunnyForeigner: Germany, especially the newly "discovered" Rhine valley and the Elbe valley south of Dresden, began to attract much larger numbers of foreign tourists than ever before, including e. g. Creator/VictorHugo, Creator/HansChristianAndersen, and painter J.M.W. Turner. This led to foreign tourists, especially excentric eccentric Englishmen with more money than sense to become popular comedy figures in German media.
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