History UsefulNotes / AlexanderTheGreat

13th Jul '17 9:38:33 PM lalalei2001
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* In the ''Anime/YuGiOhCapsuleMonsters'' miniseries, Alexander is [[spoiler: the antagonist]], and is also [[spoiler:reincarnated as Alex Brisbane.]]

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* In the ''Anime/YuGiOhCapsuleMonsters'' miniseries, ''Anime/YuGiOhCapsuleMonsters'', Alexander is [[spoiler: the antagonist]], and is also [[spoiler:reincarnated as antagonist, possessing his descendant Alex Brisbane.]]Brisbane, and [[spoiler:wielded the Millennium Ring, which aided his historical conquests]].
13th Jul '17 9:22:35 PM Kadorhal
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-->-- '''Website/{{Cracked}}}''', [[http://www.cracked.com/funny-3139-alexander-great/ on Alexander]].

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-->-- '''Website/{{Cracked}}}''', '''Website/{{Cracked}}''', [[http://www.cracked.com/funny-3139-alexander-great/ on Alexander]].
13th Jul '17 6:40:51 PM Kadorhal
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-->-- '''Cracked [[http://www.cracked.com/funny-3139-alexander-great/ on Alexander]]'''.

to:

-->-- '''Cracked '''Website/{{Cracked}}}''', [[http://www.cracked.com/funny-3139-alexander-great/ on Alexander]]'''.
Alexander]].



* He is the protagonist of a ''VideoGame/RomeTotalWar'' expansion pack, appropriately named ''Alexander''. You get a automatic NonStandardGameOver if Alexander ever routes from a battle.

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* He is the protagonist of a ''VideoGame/RomeTotalWar'' expansion pack, appropriately named ''Alexander''. You get a an automatic NonStandardGameOver if Alexander ever routes from a battle.
26th Jun '17 1:57:38 AM CashSloth
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* In ''VideoGame/DantesInferno'', [[{{Satan}} Lucifer]] mentions that Alexander was one of the many people throughout history who failed to free him from Cocytus.
21st Jun '17 2:27:38 PM SorPepita
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All the surviving sources we have about Alexander's conquests and reign come several centuries after his death [[RashomonStyle and as such there's a lot of inner contradictions and diverging accounts]]. One thing that comes through clearly and which is borne out by archaeological evidence is that the man was a bunch of contradictions piled on top of each other. He was intelligent, rational, loved the arts, philosophy and poetry but he was also an alcoholic with TestosteronePoisoning and prone to bouts of brutal violence and sadism. He was capable of acts of generosity and kindness to conquered peoples and his subjects but he was also capable of sadistically tying up Batis, the commander of Gaza to a chariot, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath while the man was still alive]] and [[WhatADrag dragging his body around]] apparently, if we can believe the chronicles, [[ComedicSociopathy to cosplay]] as Achilles in ''Literature/TheIliad''. He and his allies claimed to be liberating Persian cities from the tyranny of Darius, only to more or less sack the cities and sell people and inhabitants into slavery. As for patron of arts and philosophy, he famously destroyed Persepolis, the center of Persian learning and burnt many of its libraries, which he apparently did feel remorse about later. In Iranian chronicles under the Parthian and Sassanian empires, Alexander is remembered and vilified as the man who destroyed their culture and heritage. To his own soldiers, he was AFatherToHisMen and a FrontlineGeneral willing to banquet and party with them even after he became Pharoah, Shahanshah (King of Kings in Persia, which is the title all Persian rulers used) and other titles, but his bouts of rage, fueled by alcoholism often led him to take his anger out on them. In one notable incident, Alexander murdered one of his companions, Cleitus in the middle of an alcoholic binge. Likewise, Alexander claimed divine heritage and according to some reports, starting claiming to be a GodEmperor or in some cases seemed to [[AGodAmI see himself as a God]], which even his fellow countrymen found too much even in their time and place.

to:

All the surviving sources we have about Alexander's conquests and reign come several centuries after his death [[RashomonStyle and as such there's a lot of inner contradictions and diverging accounts]]. One thing that comes through clearly and which is borne out by archaeological evidence is that the man was a bunch of contradictions piled on top of each other. He was intelligent, rational, loved the arts, philosophy and poetry but he was also an alcoholic with TestosteronePoisoning and prone to bouts of brutal violence and sadism. He was capable of acts of generosity and kindness to conquered peoples and his subjects but he was also capable of sadistically tying up Batis, the commander of Gaza to a chariot, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath while the man was still alive]] and [[WhatADrag dragging his body around]] apparently, if we can believe the chronicles, [[ComedicSociopathy to cosplay]] as Achilles in ''Literature/TheIliad''. He and his allies claimed to be liberating Persian cities from the tyranny of Darius, only to more or less sack the cities and sell people and inhabitants into slavery. As for patron of arts and philosophy, he famously destroyed Persepolis, the center of Persian learning and burnt many of its libraries, which he apparently did feel remorse about later. In Iranian chronicles under the Parthian and Sassanian empires, Alexander is remembered and vilified as the man who destroyed their culture and heritage. To his own soldiers, he was AFatherToHisMen and a FrontlineGeneral willing to banquet and party with them even after he became Pharoah, Pharaoh, Shahanshah (King of Kings in Persia, which is the title all Persian rulers used) and other titles, but his bouts of rage, fueled by alcoholism often led him to take his anger out on them. In one notable incident, Alexander murdered one of his companions, Cleitus in the middle of an alcoholic binge. Likewise, Alexander claimed divine heritage and according to some reports, starting claiming to be a GodEmperor or in some cases seemed to [[AGodAmI see himself as a God]], which even his fellow countrymen found too much even in their time and place.



* In TabletopGame/{{Traveller}} ''Rim of Fire'' there was a Terran commander in the InterstellerWars whose hero was Alexander the Great. As the Intersteller Wars era does sometimes look like the relations between the Greeks and the Persians, it kind of makes sense.

to:

* In TabletopGame/{{Traveller}} ''Rim of Fire'' there was a Terran commander in the InterstellerWars Interstellar Wars whose hero was Alexander the Great. As the Intersteller Interstellar Wars era does sometimes look like the relations between the Greeks and the Persians, it kind of makes sense.



21st Jun '17 2:21:27 PM SorPepita
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Born in 356 B.C., Full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. In his lifetime he came to acquire the following the titles: Basileus (King) of Macedon, [[ElectiveMonarchy Hegemon of the Hellenic League]], [[TheEmperor Shahanshah of Persia]], [[TheConqueror Pharaoh of Egypt]], [[UpToEleven Lord of Asia]]. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography and on Homer (he was known for carrying his copy of ''Literature/TheIliad'' with him wherever he went). As a young man he served in his father's army as a commander in his campaigns and he came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He benefited greatly from his father's military reforms who developed the Macedonian phalanx formation and introduced the spear weapon sarissa which gave his army an edge over the rest of Greece and a force that could potentially expand the power of Greece outside the Peloponnese peninsula. Alexander promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and attracted other allies and fence-sitters to support an invasion of Persia. He was elected Hegemon of the Hellenic League (composed of Macedonian allies, subjects and other city-states and kingdoms, except of course for the Spartans[[note]]This was a famous mockery of the Spartans for turning down this offer of invasion, more or less intended by Alexander to note that they missed out on their chance of participating in the greatest glory of Greece and that they cannot claim any part of Alexander's glory[[/note]]).

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Born in 356 B.C., Full full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. In his lifetime he came to acquire the following the titles: Basileus (King) of Macedon, [[ElectiveMonarchy Hegemon of the Hellenic League]], [[TheEmperor Shahanshah of Persia]], [[TheConqueror Pharaoh of Egypt]], [[UpToEleven Lord of Asia]]. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan and UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography and on Homer (he was known for carrying his copy of ''Literature/TheIliad'' with him wherever he went). As a young man he served in his father's army as a commander in his campaigns and he came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He benefited greatly from his father's military reforms who developed the Macedonian phalanx formation and introduced the spear weapon sarissa which gave his army an edge over the rest of Greece and a force that could potentially expand the power of Greece outside the Peloponnese peninsula. Alexander promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and attracted other allies and fence-sitters to support an invasion of Persia. He was elected Hegemon of the Hellenic League (composed of Macedonian allies, subjects and other city-states and kingdoms, except of course for the Spartans[[note]]This was a famous mockery of the Spartans for turning down this offer of invasion, more or less intended by Alexander to note that they missed out on their chance of participating in the greatest glory of Greece and that they cannot claim any part of Alexander's glory[[/note]]).
14th May '17 4:51:32 PM nombretomado
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* In {{Traveller}} ''Rim of Fire'' there was a Terran commander in the InterstellerWars whose hero was Alexander the Great. As the Intersteller Wars era does sometimes look like the relations between the Greeks and the Persians, it kind of makes sense.

to:

* In {{Traveller}} TabletopGame/{{Traveller}} ''Rim of Fire'' there was a Terran commander in the InterstellerWars whose hero was Alexander the Great. As the Intersteller Wars era does sometimes look like the relations between the Greeks and the Persians, it kind of makes sense.
2nd May '17 4:55:12 PM TalonsofIceandFire
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Alexander's own policies also created divisions among his generals. He started syncretizing aspects of Greek mythology and culture with that of Egypt and Media. He called himself Pharoah, and identified Ammon as an aspect of Zeus. To the eyes of his Greek soldiers, he was GoingNative to an unacceptable degree, dressing in Persian fashion and custom, asking his men to [[KneelBeforeZod kneel before him]] and most offensively to them, recruiting and promoting Persian soldiers and commanders to ranks in his combined armies, on the basis of merit and competence, seemingly treating the Macedonians and allied Greeks no differently from the others. The challenge of ruling the large empire of Persia was quite a difficult feat for the Achaemenids and Alexander after wrecking and destabilizing it, more or less wanted to put that back in place [[MeetTheNewBoss only with himself in charge]]. Alexander seemed to want to reconcile the unfamiliar and seemingly strange culture of the East with the European West, and he encouraged [[AssimilationPlot syncretism, cultural contact, intermarriage with locals]], and even seemed to suggest resettlement and exchanges of natives from Persia and Media to Greece and vice versa. [[ValuesResonance This rather positive aspect]] of his reign was valued and admired in Asia even after his death and the dissolution of his conquest. In UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} after the fall of the Sassanids and the rise of Shia Islam, Alexander came to be seen positively and even acknowledged as a Shah in ''Literature/TheShahnameh'' and in Afghanistan, Pakistan and North India (around Punjab where the River Beas was the furthest in India he ever came), the name Sikander (derived from Alexander) is a name for warrior, champion, victor well into the 21st Century.

Alexander's conquests led to Greek culture getting spread to the east, and ideas from the east going back to the West, marking the start of the Hellenistic Age, which led to Greek becoming the lingua franca or common tongue of the Ancient Middle-East, influencing Persia (Greek remained the language of administration well into the Sassanid Empires of 5th Century CE), India, Ancient Arabia, and Judea. In a 2009 poll conducted on Greek television, Alexander the Great was voted the greatest Greek of all time. Still, it cannot be denied that even if his conquests led to the Hellenistic Empire and spread Greek culture across the Middle East and North-West India, it more or less marked the end of Greece's classical era and the last real independent state it could claim on its own. His poor handling of his succession and addiction for war led to the UsefulNotes/MacedonianSuccessionWars where his generals (Diadochi) ended up fighting each other. Eventually in the Mediterranean, Greece would be swallowed by the Romans who crushed the successor kingdoms of Pyrrhus, Mithriadates and other Macedonian holdouts and there after Greece would become part of the Roman Era, and be DemotedToExtra. Likewise, modern historians noted that Alexander set a bad example for the likes of UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, Caesar and later Napoleon, who all sought to invade, expand and conquer in imitation of their hero, and much of this came at the expense of land, life and dignity of people on the ground, and it led many of them to a sticky end.

to:

Alexander's own policies also created divisions among his generals. He started syncretizing aspects of Greek mythology and culture with that of Egypt and Media. He called himself Pharoah, and identified Ammon as an aspect of Zeus. To the eyes of his Greek soldiers, he was GoingNative to an unacceptable degree, dressing in Persian fashion and custom, asking his men to [[KneelBeforeZod kneel before him]] and most offensively to them, recruiting and promoting Persian soldiers and commanders to ranks in his combined armies, on the basis of merit and competence, seemingly treating the Macedonians and allied Greeks no differently from the others. The challenge of ruling the large empire of Persia was quite a difficult feat for the Achaemenids and Alexander after wrecking and destabilizing it, more or less wanted to put that back in place [[MeetTheNewBoss only with himself in charge]]. Alexander seemed to want to reconcile the unfamiliar and seemingly strange culture of the East with the European West, and he encouraged [[AssimilationPlot syncretism, cultural contact, intermarriage with locals]], and even seemed to suggest resettlement and exchanges of natives from Persia and Media to Greece and vice versa. [[ValuesResonance [[PetTheDog This rather positive aspect]] of his reign was valued and admired in Asia even after his death and the dissolution of his conquest. In UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} after the fall of the Sassanids and the rise of Shia Islam, Alexander came to be seen positively and even acknowledged as a Shah in ''Literature/TheShahnameh'' and in Afghanistan, Pakistan and North India (around Punjab where the River Beas was the furthest in India he ever came), the name Sikander (derived from Alexander) is a name for warrior, champion, victor well into the 21st Century.

Alexander's conquests led to Greek culture getting spread to the east, and ideas from the east going back to the West, marking the start of the Hellenistic Age, which led to Greek becoming the lingua franca or common tongue of the Ancient Middle-East, influencing Persia (Greek remained the language of administration well into the Sassanid Empires of 5th 6th Century CE), India, Ancient Arabia, and Judea. In a 2009 poll conducted on Greek television, Alexander the Great was voted the greatest Greek of all time. Still, it cannot be denied that even if his conquests led to the Hellenistic Empire and spread Greek culture across the Middle East and North-West India, it more or less marked the end of Greece's classical era and the last real independent state it could claim on its own.era. His poor handling of his succession and addiction for war led to the UsefulNotes/MacedonianSuccessionWars where his generals (Diadochi) ended up fighting each other. Eventually in the Mediterranean, Greece would be swallowed by the Romans who crushed the successor kingdoms of Pyrrhus, Mithriadates and other Macedonian holdouts and there after Greece would become part of the Roman Era, and be DemotedToExtra. Likewise, modern historians noted that Alexander set a bad example for the likes of UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, Pompey The Great, Caesar and later Napoleon, who all sought to invade, expand expand, and conquer in imitation of their hero, and much of this came at the expense of land, life and dignity of people on the ground, and it led many of them to a sticky end.
2nd May '17 12:05:39 PM JulianLapostat
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Born in 356 B.C., Full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. One of those extremely rare historical figures whose actual achievements have regularly outshined numerous fictional portrayals. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography. He came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and marched his army into the Achaemaenid Empire of Persia that governed over Asia Minor, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf, Bactria and North-West Frontier. To the Greeks of the Ancient World, this was more or less the edge of the known world and Alexander's invasion was more or less synonymous of conquering the world. In actual fact, Alexander's empire was only slightly smaller than the Achaemaenid Empire at its height, and exceeded by the Han and Tang dynasties and would also be exceeded in size by other land empires such as the Mongol Empire and the Russian Empire, albeit in terms of territory it was bigger in size than UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire at its height.

Alexander made his way through the Persian Empire in a famous campaign that began in Egypt and marched alongside the coastal era, taking over cities, winning over allies, sacking and murdering rebels and holdouts and wrecking the BalanceOfPower on which the Persian Empire was based. After Alexander's forces defeated the enormously numerically superior Persian armies and forced [[WorthyOpponent King Darius III]] to flee the battle of Gaugamela, Darius was assassinated by a general who fled with him and Alexander seized control of the empire. Alexander never lost a battle, one of the few military leaders of whom this can be said. Later, Alexander's forces marched into Bactria and India, where Alexander was forced to stop his expansion under the threat of revolt from his army, who were beginning to wonder if he truly would march to the very end of the world, circumstances permitting. Alexander married a Bactrian woman named Roxana, who later bore him a son after his death. Alexander died on 323 BC after a period of sickness in Babylon. It's unclear exactly what killed him. Some historians have suggested that he died of alcohol poisoning after a drinking contest with some of his soldiers, others suggest that he was poisoned, and still others believe that he may have caught some form of disease, specifically untreated typhoid fever. His empire collapsed shortly afterwards, with his generals dividing up Persia, Egypt, and Macedonia amongst themselves.

to:

Born in 356 B.C., Full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. One In his lifetime he came to acquire the following the titles: Basileus (King) of those extremely rare historical figures whose actual achievements have regularly outshined numerous fictional portrayals.Macedon, [[ElectiveMonarchy Hegemon of the Hellenic League]], [[TheEmperor Shahanshah of Persia]], [[TheConqueror Pharaoh of Egypt]], [[UpToEleven Lord of Asia]]. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography. He geography and on Homer (he was known for carrying his copy of ''Literature/TheIliad'' with him wherever he went). As a young man he served in his father's army as a commander in his campaigns and he came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He benefited greatly from his father's military reforms who developed the Macedonian phalanx formation and introduced the spear weapon sarissa which gave his army an edge over the rest of Greece and a force that could potentially expand the power of Greece outside the Peloponnese peninsula. Alexander promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and attracted other allies and fence-sitters to support an invasion of Persia. He was elected Hegemon of the Hellenic League (composed of Macedonian allies, subjects and other city-states and kingdoms, except of course for the Spartans[[note]]This was a famous mockery of the Spartans for turning down this offer of invasion, more or less intended by Alexander to note that they missed out on their chance of participating in the greatest glory of Greece and that they cannot claim any part of Alexander's glory[[/note]]).

He
marched his army into the Achaemaenid Empire of Persia that governed over Asia Minor, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf, Bactria and North-West Frontier. To the Greeks of the Ancient World, this was more or less the edge of the known world and Alexander's invasion was more or less synonymous of conquering the world. In actual fact, Alexander's empire was only slightly smaller than the Achaemaenid Empire at its height, and exceeded by the Han and Tang dynasties and would also be exceeded in size by other land empires such as the Mongol Empire and the Russian Empire, albeit in terms of territory it was bigger in size than UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire at its height. \n\nAlexander made his way through the Persian Empire in a His famous campaign that began in Egypt and marched alongside the coastal era, taking over cities, winning over allies, sacking and murdering rebels and holdouts and wrecking the BalanceOfPower on which the Persian Empire was based. After Alexander's forces defeated the enormously numerically superior Persian armies and forced [[WorthyOpponent King Darius III]] to flee the battle of Gaugamela, Darius was assassinated by a general who fled with him and Alexander seized control of the empire. Alexander never lost a battle, one of the few military leaders of whom this can be said. Later, Alexander's forces marched into Bactria and India, where Alexander was forced to stop his expansion under the threat of revolt from his army, who were beginning to wonder if he truly would march to the very end of the world, circumstances permitting. Alexander married a Bactrian woman named Roxana, who later bore him a son after his death. Alexander died on 323 BC after a period of sickness in Babylon. It's unclear exactly what killed him. Some historians have suggested that he died of alcohol poisoning after a drinking contest with some of his soldiers, others suggest that he was poisoned, and still others believe that he may have caught some form of disease, specifically untreated typhoid fever. His empire collapsed shortly afterwards, with his generals dividing up Persia, Egypt, and Macedonia amongst themselves.
1st May '17 10:34:28 AM JulianLapostat
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Born in 356 B.C., Full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. One of those extremely rare historical figures whose actual achievements have regularly outshined numerous fictional portrayals. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography. He came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and marched his army into the Achaemaenid Empire of Persia that governed over Asia Minor, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf, Bactria and North-West Frontier. To the Greeks of the Ancient World, this was more or less the edge of the known world and Alexander's invasion was more or less going to the edge of the known world.

to:

Born in 356 B.C., Full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. One of those extremely rare historical figures whose actual achievements have regularly outshined numerous fictional portrayals. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan, UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography. He came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and marched his army into the Achaemaenid Empire of Persia that governed over Asia Minor, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf, Bactria and North-West Frontier. To the Greeks of the Ancient World, this was more or less the edge of the known world and Alexander's invasion was more or less going to synonymous of conquering the edge of world. In actual fact, Alexander's empire was only slightly smaller than the known world.Achaemaenid Empire at its height, and exceeded by the Han and Tang dynasties and would also be exceeded in size by other land empires such as the Mongol Empire and the Russian Empire, albeit in terms of territory it was bigger in size than UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire at its height.
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