History UsefulNotes / AlexanderTheGreat

13th Dec '17 10:33:54 AM JulianLapostat
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Born in 356 B.C., full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. Alexander is in fact the Roman/Latin form of his name which is in fact (Ἀλέξανδρος) Aléxandros in Greek. During his conquests in Persia, he adopted the customs of the Persian rulers (who called their rulers "The Great King", most famously UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat, who Alexander saw as a role model) and became Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας[=/=]Aléxandros ho Mégas[=/=]Alexander the Great.

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Born in 356 B.C., full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. Alexander is in fact [[AncientGrome the Roman/Latin Roman/Latin]] form of his name which is in fact (Ἀλέξανδρος) Aléxandros in Greek.Greek, and was how he was known in his lifetime, by his peers, and by himself. During his conquests in Persia, he adopted the customs of the Persian rulers (who called their rulers "The Great King", most famously UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat, who Alexander saw as a role model) and became Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας[=/=]Aléxandros ho Mégas[=/=]Alexander the Great.
13th Dec '17 10:33:05 AM JulianLapostat
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Born in 356 B.C., full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. In his lifetime he came to acquire the following the titles: Basileus (King) of Macedon, [[ElectiveMonarchy Hegemon of the Hellenic League]], [[TheEmperor Shahanshah of Persia]], [[TheConqueror Pharaoh of Egypt]], [[UpToEleven Lord of Asia]]. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan and UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography and on Homer (he was known for carrying his copy of ''Literature/TheIliad'' with him wherever he went). As a young man he served in his father's army as a commander in his campaigns and he came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He benefited greatly from his father's military reforms who developed the Macedonian phalanx formation and introduced the spear weapon sarissa which gave his army an edge over the rest of Greece and a force that could potentially expand the power of Greece outside the Peloponnese peninsula. Alexander promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and attracted other allies and fence-sitters to support an invasion of Persia. He was elected Hegemon of the Hellenic League (composed of Macedonian allies, subjects and other city-states and kingdoms, except of course for the Spartans[[note]]This was a famous mockery of the Spartans for turning down this offer of invasion, more or less intended by Alexander to note that they missed out on their chance of participating in the greatest glory of Greece and that they cannot claim any part of Alexander's glory[[/note]]).

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Born in 356 B.C., full name Alexander III of Macedon, he was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias of Epirus. Alexander is in fact the Roman/Latin form of his name which is in fact (Ἀλέξανδρος) Aléxandros in Greek. During his conquests in Persia, he adopted the customs of the Persian rulers (who called their rulers "The Great King", most famously UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat, who Alexander saw as a role model) and became Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας[=/=]Aléxandros ho Mégas[=/=]Alexander the Great.

In his lifetime he came to acquire the following the titles: Basileus (King) of Macedon, [[ElectiveMonarchy Hegemon of the Hellenic League]], [[TheEmperor Shahanshah of Persia]], [[TheConqueror Pharaoh of Egypt]], [[UpToEleven Lord of Asia]]. He is generally considered one of four great conquerors (alongside UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan and UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte) whose military and political activities literally changed the world. He was taught by Creator/{{Aristotle}} until he was about 16; it's said he was particularly interested in his teacher's lessons in geography and on Homer (he was known for carrying his copy of ''Literature/TheIliad'' with him wherever he went). As a young man he served in his father's army as a commander in his campaigns and he came to power after the assassination of his father by the captain of his bodyguard. He benefited greatly from his father's military reforms who developed the Macedonian phalanx formation and introduced the spear weapon sarissa which gave his army an edge over the rest of Greece and a force that could potentially expand the power of Greece outside the Peloponnese peninsula. Alexander promptly put down a series of rebellions around the Balkans and attracted other allies and fence-sitters to support an invasion of Persia. He was elected Hegemon of the Hellenic League (composed of Macedonian allies, subjects and other city-states and kingdoms, except of course for the Spartans[[note]]This was a famous mockery of the Spartans for turning down this offer of invasion, more or less intended by Alexander to note that they missed out on their chance of participating in the greatest glory of Greece and that they cannot claim any part of Alexander's glory[[/note]]).
4th Dec '17 10:16:57 AM DustSnitch
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* The historical novel ''Literature/ThaisOfAthens'' has Alexander as a recurring character and the eponymous heroine's occasional lover.

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* The historical novel ''Literature/ThaisOfAthens'' has He is referenced in Saint Augustine's MagnumOpus ''The City of God'' and is one of the most famed examples were he is treated in an unfavorable light since his actions are judged by Christian Morality rather than the Pagan Morality of the Classical world and his role is that of a proxy to St. Augustine's criticism that were also meant to Rome itself. For instance, the book makes reference to a conversation between Alexander as and a recurring character pirate with the latter arguing that both were [[NotSoDifferent deep down the same]], with the difference being the scale of their acts (the pirate robbed gold while Alexander took land) and features a mention to a letter Alexander sent to his mother Olimpia of a conversation he had with a priest in Egypt who told him that the gods were essentially self-serving creations made for the interest of the rulers (in opposition to what Christianity, Islam or Judaism teach about God's relation with those that rule). Indeed, Saint Augustine's criticism of Alexander and the eponymous heroine's occasional lover.ideal of the virtuous conqueror that he came to represent in Antiquity was one of the first foundations on the modern concept of what we call a "Just War".



* Alexander burns in Hell for Violence against Neighbor, at least according to ''Literature/TheDivineComedy''.



* He is referenced in Saint Augustine's MagnumOpus ''The City of God'' and is one of the most famed examples were he is treated in an unfavorable light since his actions are judged by Christian Morality rather than the Pagan Morality of the Classical world and his role is that of a proxy to St. Augustine's criticism that were also meant to Rome itself. For instance, the book makes reference to a conversation between Alexander and a pirate with the latter arguing that both were [[NotSoDifferent deep down the same]], with the difference being the scale of their acts (the pirate robbed gold while Alexander took land) and features a mention to a letter Alexander sent to his mother Olimpia of a conversation he had with a priest in Egypt who told him that the gods were essentially self-serving creations made for the interest of the rulers (in opposition to what Christianity, Islam or Judaism teach about God's relation with those that rule). Indeed, Saint Augustine's criticism of Alexander and the ideal of the virtuous conqueror that he came to represent in Antiquity was one of the first foundations on the modern concept of what we call a "Just War".

to:

* He is referenced in Saint Augustine's MagnumOpus ''The City of God'' and is one of the most famed examples were he is treated in an unfavorable light since his actions are judged by Christian Morality rather than the Pagan Morality of the Classical world and his role is that of a proxy to St. Augustine's criticism that were also meant to Rome itself. For instance, the book makes reference to a conversation between The historical novel ''Literature/ThaisOfAthens'' has Alexander and as a pirate with the latter arguing that both were [[NotSoDifferent deep down the same]], with the difference being the scale of their acts (the pirate robbed gold while Alexander took land) and features a mention to a letter Alexander sent to his mother Olimpia of a conversation he had with a priest in Egypt who told him that the gods were essentially self-serving creations made for the interest of the rulers (in opposition to what Christianity, Islam or Judaism teach about God's relation with those that rule). Indeed, Saint Augustine's criticism of Alexander recurring character and the ideal of the virtuous conqueror that he came to represent in Antiquity was one of the first foundations on the modern concept of what we call a "Just War".
eponymous heroine's occasional lover.

3rd Dec '17 10:32:50 AM CuteNegativityCloud
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* Creator/MaryRenault 's uncritical and romanticized Alexander trilogy: ''Fire from Heaven'', ''The Persian Boy'' and ''Funeral Games''. She did a questionable amount of research, which she wrote up in the nonfiction book ''The Nature of Alexander''. Her writings were among the materials utilized by Oliver Stone in the creation of his Alexander film.

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* Creator/MaryRenault 's uncritical and romanticized Alexander trilogy: ''Fire from Heaven'', ''The Persian Boy'' and ''Funeral Games''. She did a questionable amount Her interpretation of research, which she wrote up in the source material (mainly Plutarch, Arrian and Curtius) went into her nonfiction book ''The Nature of Alexander''. Her writings were among the materials utilized by Oliver Stone in the creation of his Alexander film.
27th Nov '17 8:01:21 AM Thorion
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* Creator/MaryRenault 's Alexander trilogy: ''Fire from Heaven'', ''The Persian Boy'' and ''Funeral Games''. She did an intense amount of research, which she wrote up in the nonfiction book ''The Nature of Alexander''. Her writings were among the materials utilized by Oliver Stone in the creation of his Alexander film.

to:

* Creator/MaryRenault 's uncritical and romanticized Alexander trilogy: ''Fire from Heaven'', ''The Persian Boy'' and ''Funeral Games''. She did an intense a questionable amount of research, which she wrote up in the nonfiction book ''The Nature of Alexander''. Her writings were among the materials utilized by Oliver Stone in the creation of his Alexander film.
20th Nov '17 7:34:25 PM lorgskyegon
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* Implied to be one of the lives of Winters in ''WesternAnimation/TMNT''.

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* Implied to be one of the lives of Winters in ''WesternAnimation/TMNT''.
''WesternAnimation/{{TMNT}}''.
20th Nov '17 7:32:46 PM lorgskyegon
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* Implied to be one of the lives of Winters in ''WesternAnimation/TMNT''.
10th Nov '17 6:10:40 PM raziel365
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* He is referenced in Saint Augustine's MagnumOpus ''The City of God'', unlike other examples however he is treated in an unfavorable light since he's judged by Christian Morality rather than the Classical (and pagan) Morality of before and references a conversation between Alexander and a pirate who argues that both were [[NotSoDifferent deep down the same]], with the difference being the scale of their acts (the pirate robbed gold while Alexander took land) and further debunks his piety by also making an allusion to a letter he sent to his mother Olimpia by which he mentioned that the gods of Antiquity were essentially self-serving creations made for the interest of the rulers (in opposition to what Christianity, Islam or Judaism teach about God's relation with those that rule). Indeed, Saint Augustine's criticism of Alexander and the ideal of the virtuous conqueror that he had represented in Antiquity and had been followed by the likes of Julius Caesar and Rome itself was one of the first foundations on the modern concept of what we call a "Just War".

to:

* He is referenced in Saint Augustine's MagnumOpus ''The City of God'', unlike other God'' and is one of the most famed examples however were he is treated in an unfavorable light since he's his actions are judged by Christian Morality rather than the Classical (and pagan) Pagan Morality of before the Classical world and references his role is that of a proxy to St. Augustine's criticism that were also meant to Rome itself. For instance, the book makes reference to a conversation between Alexander and a pirate who argues with the latter arguing that both were [[NotSoDifferent deep down the same]], with the difference being the scale of their acts (the pirate robbed gold while Alexander took land) and further debunks his piety by also making an allusion features a mention to a letter he Alexander sent to his mother Olimpia by which of a conversation he mentioned had with a priest in Egypt who told him that the gods of Antiquity were essentially self-serving creations made for the interest of the rulers (in opposition to what Christianity, Islam or Judaism teach about God's relation with those that rule). Indeed, Saint Augustine's criticism of Alexander and the ideal of the virtuous conqueror that he had represented came to represent in Antiquity and had been followed by the likes of Julius Caesar and Rome itself was one of the first foundations on the modern concept of what we call a "Just War". War".
5th Nov '17 12:04:44 PM JM1982
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All the surviving sources we have about Alexander's conquests and reign come several centuries after his death [[RashomonStyle and as such there's a lot of inner contradictions and diverging accounts]]. One thing that comes through clearly and which is borne out by archaeological evidence is that the man was a bunch of contradictions piled on top of each other. He was intelligent, rational, loved the arts, philosophy and poetry but he was also an alcoholic with TestosteronePoisoning and prone to bouts of brutal violence and sadism. He was capable of acts of generosity and kindness to conquered peoples and his subjects but he was also capable of sadistically tying up Batis, the commander of Gaza to a chariot, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath while the man was still alive]] and [[WhatADrag dragging his body around]] apparently, if we can believe the chronicles, [[ComedicSociopathy to cosplay]] as Achilles in ''Literature/TheIliad''. He and his allies claimed to be liberating Persian cities from the tyranny of Darius, only to more or less sack the cities and sell people and inhabitants into slavery. As for patron of arts and philosophy, he famously destroyed Persepolis, the center of Persian learning and burnt many of its libraries, which he apparently did feel remorse about later. In Iranian chronicles under the Parthian and Sassanian empires, Alexander is remembered and vilified as the man who destroyed their culture and heritage. To his own soldiers, he was AFatherToHisMen and a FrontlineGeneral willing to banquet and party with them even after he became Pharaoh, Shahanshah (King of Kings in Persia, which is the title all Persian rulers used) and other titles, but his bouts of rage, fueled by alcoholism often led him to take his anger out on them. In one notable incident, Alexander murdered one of his companions, Cleitus in the middle of an alcoholic binge. Likewise, Alexander claimed divine heritage and according to some reports, starting claiming to be a GodEmperor or in some cases seemed to [[AGodAmI see himself as a God]], which even his fellow countrymen found too much even in their time and place.

to:

All the surviving sources we have about Alexander's conquests and reign come several centuries after his death [[RashomonStyle and as such there's a lot of inner contradictions and diverging accounts]]. One thing that comes through clearly and which is borne out by archaeological evidence is that the man was a bunch of contradictions piled on top of each other. He was intelligent, rational, loved the arts, philosophy and poetry but he was also an alcoholic with TestosteronePoisoning and prone to bouts of brutal violence and sadism. He was capable of acts of generosity and kindness to conquered peoples and his subjects but he was also capable of sadistically tying up Batis, the commander of Gaza to a chariot, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath while the man was still alive]] and [[WhatADrag dragging his body around]] apparently, if we can believe the chronicles, [[ComedicSociopathy to cosplay]] as Achilles in ''Literature/TheIliad''. He and his allies claimed to be liberating Persian cities from the tyranny of Darius, only to more or less sack the cities and sell people and inhabitants into slavery. As for patron of arts and philosophy, he famously destroyed Persepolis, the center of Persian learning and burnt many of its libraries, which he apparently did feel remorse about later. In Iranian chronicles under the Parthian and Sassanian empires, Alexander is remembered and vilified as the man who destroyed their culture and heritage.

To his own soldiers, he was AFatherToHisMen and a FrontlineGeneral willing to banquet and party with them even after he became Pharaoh, Shahanshah (King of Kings in Persia, which is the title all Persian rulers used) and other titles, but his bouts of rage, fueled by alcoholism often led him to take his anger out on them. In one notable incident, Alexander murdered one of his companions, Cleitus in the middle of an alcoholic binge. Notably, Alexander could be an extremely BadBoss, whether in [[ThePurge viciously purging officials he deemed corrupt or inept]] and even punishing his entire army when they revolted and refused to go any farther by leading them home through the [[ThirstyDesert Gedrosian Desert]], where thousands died. Likewise, Alexander claimed divine heritage and according to some reports, starting claiming to be a GodEmperor or in some cases seemed to [[AGodAmI see himself as a God]], which even his fellow countrymen found too much even in their time and place.
5th Nov '17 12:01:39 PM JM1982
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Added DiffLines:

In short, Alexander was the ''personification'' of HotBlooded, his fire leading him to amazing achievements and horrific brutalities at the same time.
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