History TroubledProduction / ThemeParks

16th Aug '16 8:04:05 AM Sapphirea2
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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) had its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) aren't as well-known in mainland China as elsewhere. Budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015-16, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments. And even though it was hugely popular from day one, the Walt Disney Company [[TooSoon couldn't trumpet their success internationally]] -- '''the night before''' the grand opening took place, a toddler at one of their Florida complex's hotels was dragged into a lake by an alligator and drowned, making ''that'' the Disney-related story that made headlines in North America for days instead.

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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) had its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, (except Mickey Mouse) aren't as well-known in mainland China as elsewhere. Budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015-16, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments. And even though it was Shanghai Disneyland ended up hugely popular from day one, one -- it welcomed its one millionth guest in mid-August -- the Walt Disney Company initially [[TooSoon couldn't trumpet their success internationally]] -- '''the internationally]]. '''The night before''' the grand opening took place, a toddler at one of their Florida complex's hotels was dragged into a lake by an alligator and drowned, making ''that'' the Disney-related story that made headlines in North America for days instead.
5th Aug '16 4:14:24 PM mlsmithca
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** What was the nail in the coffin for the ''Western River Expedition'' happened in January 1979, when groundbreaking took place in Frontierland for ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'', a mine train roller coaster, on the plot of land that had been reserved for the ''Western River Expedition''. While ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' was under construction, Marc Davis, desperate to save his project, tried to offer a compromise, where the roller coaster could be built as long as a scaled down ''Western River Expedition'' was built opposite the railroad tracks. This version would only contain the boat ride. Unfortunately, this was not the way things turned out. The proposed compromise never was enacted on, and construction of ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' continued.

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** What was the The nail in the coffin for the ''Western River Expedition'' happened in January 1979, when groundbreaking took place in Frontierland for ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'', a mine train roller coaster, on the plot of land that had been reserved for the ''Western River Expedition''. While ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' was under construction, Marc Davis, desperate to save his project, tried to offer a compromise, where the roller coaster could be built as long as a scaled down ''Western River Expedition'' was built opposite the railroad tracks. This version would only contain the boat ride. Unfortunately, this was not the way things turned out. The proposed compromise never was enacted on, and construction of ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' continued.
5th Aug '16 12:20:30 PM dmcreif
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* The never-built ''Western River Expedition'' was a planned ride pavilion at the Magic Kingdom, designed by Animator-Imagineer Marc Davis, and would have been built in Frontierland. If built, it would've contained a western-themed boat ride, a runaway mine train roller coaster, themed hiking trails, a Pueblo Indian village, and a pack mule attraction. Lots of things conspired to doom the originally planned pavilion:
**For one, the most common complaint from parkgoers in the first few months of the Magic Kingdom was, "Where are the pirates?" as the park had not been built with the popular ''Ride/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' ride that Disneyland had received, especially since pirates are a major part of Florida's history. To pacify these people, Disney hastily built a second ''Pirates of the Caribbean'' ride in the Magic Kingdom. This 86ed plans for the ''Western River Expedition'' because much of the budget planned to build it was used in building ''Pirates of the Caribbean'', not to mention that it would be redundant to have two boat rides.
**The economic downturn of the early 1970s and changes in Disney management also contributed to keeping the project from going through, along with concerns over the stereotypes of Indians and the loss of popularity of Westerns.
**Towards the end of the 1970s, there was the possibility that the ''Western River Expedition'' would be built. Unfortunately, such chances were very slim, due to several factors, which besides changes in management and an economic downturn, included the construction of a massive expansion of Tomorrowland, which resulted in the addition of ''Space Mountain'', the ''Tomorrowland Transit Authority [=PeopleMover=]'', Walt Disney's ''Carousel of Progress'', and the ''Astro Orbiter''. The construction of these four attractions meant that money and resources couldn't be allocated to construction of attractions in other lands.
**What was the nail in the coffin for the ''Western River Expedition'' happened in January 1979, when groundbreaking took place in Frontierland for ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'', a mine train roller coaster, on the plot of land that had been reserved for the ''Western River Expedition''. While ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' was under construction, Marc Davis, desperate to save his project, tried to offer a compromise, where the roller coaster could be built as long as a scaled down ''Western River Expedition'' was built opposite the railroad tracks. This version would only contain the boat ride. Unfortunately, this was not the way things turned out. The proposed compromise never was enacted on, and construction of ''Big Thunder Mountain Railroad'' continued.
**Despite the plans for the ''Western River Expedition'' being axed, many of its would-be elements would be incorporated into the Magic Kingdom's Frontierland as well as into other parks:
***Florida's Frontierland would eventually receive a water-based attraction in 1992, when ''Splash Mountain'', a log flume themed to the film ''Film/SongoftheSouth'', opened.
***More notably, Disneyland Paris's Frontierland is themed as the mining town of ''Thunder Mesa'', named in tribute to the ''Western River Expedition''.
***Marc Davis's plans for the ''Western River Expedition'' boat ride included a section where riders would pass through a mining town called Dry Gulch. Dry Gulch would be the basis for the literal ghost town of Phantom Canyon in ''[[Ride/TheHauntedMansion Phantom Manor]]''[[note]]Disneyland Paris's version of the Haunted Mansion[[/note]].



* In 2000, Kings Island built a wooden roller coaster called the ''Son of Beast''. It was the world's first wooden hypercoaster (coaster with a height between 200 and 299 feet) and the first to feature an inversion (a vertical loop), and the second longest wooden roller coaster in the world behind only ''The Beast'' on the other side of the park. ''Son of Beast'' was plagued with problems from the start, compared to ''The Beast'':
** Then-Kings Island owner Paramount fired the Roller Coaster Company of America, the company hired to engineer and build the ride, before the construction was completed and had to make several design corrections in the ride’s initial year.

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* In 2000, Kings Island built a wooden roller coaster called the ''Son of Beast''. It The fourth wooden roller coaster to be built at the park, it was the world's first wooden hypercoaster (coaster with a height between 200 and 299 feet) and the first to feature an inversion (a vertical loop), and the second longest wooden roller coaster in the world behind only ''The Beast'' on the other side of the park. ''Son of Beast'' was plagued with problems from the start, compared to ''The Beast'':
** Then-Kings Island owner Paramount Parks fired the Roller Coaster Company Corporation of America, the company hired to engineer and build the ride, before the construction was completed and had to make several design corrections in the ride’s initial year.
17th Jul '16 9:34:46 PM mlsmithca
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** Nobody felt the effects of Six Flags Ohio's growth more than the park across the lake, Ride/SeaWorld Ohio, which had traditionally been the bigger of the two parks in the area and existed in a symbiotic relationship with its neighbor. However, for various reasons (local ordinances, a non-compete clause with the former Geauga Lake park, and simple spite for Six Flags), [=SeaWorld=] Ohio couldn't or wouldn't build the thrill rides that were now starting to pop up at its sister parks in San Diego, Orlando, and San Antonio. Attendance began to suffer as a result, leading to [=SeaWorld=] Ohio getting sold to Six Flags in 2001. Under new management, the two parks were merged into '''Six Flags Worlds of Adventure''', a 700-acre megapark with thrill rides, a waterpark, and all of [=SeaWorld=]'s old marine zoo. To this day, it was the largest single theme park in history (if one counts the [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Walt Disney World Resort]]'s multiple parks as separate rather than part of one complex), and on paper, it was perhaps the ultimate theme park, a serious rival to Cedar Point (Northern UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}}'s other major theme park, and typically held to be one of the best in the world)........
** .......And it was doomed. Six Flags' overinvestment in this and other parks put them deep in the red (the company filed for bankruptcy in 2009), turning Worlds of Adventure into a financial liability despite its popularity. Furthermore, the two combined local parks simply did not have the infrastructure for the Cedar Point-sized crowds that showed up daily. By all accounts, Worlds of Adventure was hopelessly cramped, crowded, and filthy despite its massive size, and given that one of Six Flags' main selling points at the time was cheap ticket prices (a season pass cost only ''$50''), many of the guests were rowdy teenagers and {{Lower Class Lout}}s who created a bad image in the minds of locals who remembered when Geauga Lake was a small family park. Finally, while the park had previously been able to avoid direct competition with Cedar Point by virtue of its smaller size and different market, its mammoth expansion meant that it no longer had that luxury -- and given the above problems, the comparisons were not flattering.

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** Nobody felt the effects of Six Flags Ohio's growth more than the park across the lake, Ride/SeaWorld Ohio, which had traditionally been the bigger of the two parks in the area and existed in a symbiotic relationship with its neighbor. However, for various reasons (local ordinances, a non-compete clause with the former Geauga Lake park, and simple spite for Six Flags), [=SeaWorld=] Ohio couldn't or wouldn't build the thrill rides that were now starting to pop up at its sister parks in San Diego, Orlando, and San Antonio. Attendance began to suffer as a result, leading to [=SeaWorld=] Ohio getting sold to Six Flags in 2001. Under new management, the two parks were merged into '''Six Flags Worlds of Adventure''', a 700-acre megapark with thrill rides, a waterpark, and all of [=SeaWorld=]'s old marine zoo. To this day, it was the largest single theme park in history (if one counts the [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Walt Disney World Resort]]'s multiple parks as separate rather than part of one complex), and on paper, it was perhaps the ultimate theme park, a serious rival to Cedar Point (Northern UsefulNotes/{{Ohio}}'s other major theme park, and typically held to be one of the best in the world)........
** .......
world)...
** ...
And it was doomed. Six Flags' overinvestment in this and other parks put them deep in the red (the company filed for bankruptcy in 2009), turning Worlds of Adventure into a financial liability despite its popularity. Furthermore, the two combined local parks simply did not have the infrastructure for the Cedar Point-sized crowds that showed up daily. By all accounts, Worlds of Adventure was hopelessly cramped, crowded, and filthy despite its massive size, and given that one of Six Flags' main selling points at the time was cheap ticket prices (a season pass cost only ''$50''), many of the guests were rowdy teenagers and {{Lower Class Lout}}s who created a bad image in the minds of locals who remembered when Geauga Lake was a small family park. Finally, while the park had previously been able to avoid direct competition with Cedar Point by virtue of its smaller size and different market, its mammoth expansion meant that it no longer had that luxury -- and given the above problems, the comparisons were not flattering.



** Binkowski postulated that giving the theme park a brand name would attract more people as opposed to a generic approach with typical carnival rides. A relationship between Renaissance Entertainment and Hard Rock International (the two had been together on prior projects like Universal’s [=CityWalk=] and the Hard Rock Café restaurant chain) allowed him to get the Hard Rock license with ease. The Fantasy Harbor project was dropped, and work on Hard Rock Park began in the early 2000s. Some of the attractions included a [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion “British Invasion”]]-themed area, a dark ride based off of [[Music/TheMoodyBlues The Moody Blues’]] 1967 song ''Nights in White Satin'', and a [[Music/LedZeppelin Led Zeppelin]] roller coaster.

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** Binkowski postulated that giving the theme park a brand name would attract more people as opposed to a generic approach with typical carnival rides. A relationship between Renaissance Entertainment and Hard Rock International (the two had been together on prior projects like Universal’s [=CityWalk=] and the Hard Rock Café restaurant chain) allowed him to get the Hard Rock license with ease. The Fantasy Harbor project was dropped, and work on Hard Rock Park began in the early 2000s. Some of the attractions included a [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion “British Invasion”]]-themed area, a dark ride based off of [[Music/TheMoodyBlues The Moody Blues’]] Music/TheMoodyBlues' 1967 song ''Nights "Nights in White Satin'', Satin", and a [[Music/LedZeppelin Led Zeppelin]] Music/LedZeppelin roller coaster.
7th Jul '16 10:15:55 AM Sapphirea2
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* ''Film/CaptainEO'', the first attraction at the Ride/DisneyThemeParks launched under the Michael Eisner/Jeffrey Katzenberg regime at the Walt Disney Company, [[http://www.mouseplanet.com/9085/The_Untold_Story_of_Captain_EO quickly got]] [[http://www.mouseplanet.com/9123/More_Untold_Tales_of_Captain_EO out of hand]]. To summarize those articles: The company's famed Imagineers weren't happy that outside creators and companies were contributing so much to it, and it was greenlit on a ''premise'' rather than a full-fledged script. The three weeks of principal photography under Francis Ford Coppola were followed up with ''six months'' of second unit work -- that both Coppola and executive producer George Lucas moved on to other projects by that time didn't help -- partially to address story problems in a film that was ''only 17 minutes long''! And the final cost was easily as big as, or bigger than, many feature films of the era. Yahoo! put together a brief oral history of the whole business [[https://www.yahoo.com/movies/the-making-of-captain-eo-lucas-coppola-and-162110246.html here]] that also discusses such problems as Shelley Duvall dropping out of the role of the villainess due to claustrophobia and Jackson almost having his weak speaking voiced redubbed by another actor.

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* ''Film/CaptainEO'', the first attraction at the Ride/DisneyThemeParks launched under the Michael Eisner/Jeffrey Katzenberg regime at the Walt Disney Company, [[http://www.mouseplanet.com/9085/The_Untold_Story_of_Captain_EO quickly got]] [[http://www.mouseplanet.com/9123/More_Untold_Tales_of_Captain_EO out of hand]]. To summarize those articles: The company's famed Imagineers weren't happy that outside creators and companies were contributing so much to it, and it was greenlit on a ''premise'' rather than a full-fledged script. The three weeks of principal photography under Francis Ford Coppola were followed up with ''six months'' of second unit work -- that both Coppola and executive producer George Lucas moved on to other projects by that time didn't help -- partially to address story problems in a film that was ''only 17 minutes long''! And the final cost was easily as big as, or bigger than, many feature films of the era. Yahoo! put together a brief oral history of the whole business [[https://www.yahoo.com/movies/the-making-of-captain-eo-lucas-coppola-and-162110246.html here]] that also discusses such problems as Shelley Duvall dropping out of the role of the villainess due to claustrophobia and Jackson almost having his weak speaking voiced voice redubbed by another actor.



** The Florida counterpart Magic Kingdom had successfully updated the concept of a nighttime parade with light-up floats a few years prior with ''Spectromagic'', which was content with updating the technology and featured characters. ''Light Magic'' tried to reinvent the wheel by comparison: Two sets of identical stages were wheeled into position and remained stationary for what was mostly a ''Riverdance''-inspired show that climaxed with the surrounding buildings lighting up alongside the floats. Unfortunately, the new technology was extremely buggy; notoriously an effect with a wire-mounted, flying sparkler representing Tinkerbell nearly started a fire and had to be scrapped when it proved unworkable.
** Rather than delay the special, extra-admission-required premiere performance of the show for the park's annual passholders, which predated the start of regular performances by less than two weeks, Pressler told the assembled crowd that they were ''really'' seeing a dress rehearsal of the show...and it looked it with the many mishaps that followed. Refunds ensued.
** Regular performances weren't quite so unfortunate, but the bad buzz the disastrous premiere generated only worsened. The "streetacular" concept, which left audience members only seeing one float for most of the show, was a comedown from the traditional procession of a parade. Attempts at AudienceParticipation with a set of unique pixie characters intended as the show's breakout stars failed when children ran away screaming from them, owing to UncannyValley masks that reminded some adults of burn victims. The show lasted less than four months (opening Memorial Day weekend, closing Labor Day weekend) and was pulled for a promised {{Retool}} that never materialized. Disneyland would not have a true nighttime parade again until [[MilestoneCelebration the park's 60th anniversary in 2015]], when the Paint the Night Parade debuted.
* Disney’s ''Mission: Space'' was a $100 million dollar attraction at Epcot, with a joint partnership between Disney and {{NASA}} to produce a ride that would push the limits of theme park tourism like no other. Its [[http://www.themeparktourist.com/features/20160407/31867/sordid-history-misson-space-sickest-ride-epcot?page=3 sordid history]], however, highlights the worst ramifications that can come from poor ride design.
** The attraction was previously called ''Horizons'', which was sponsored by General Electric and cost Disney $60 million to create. The attraction would later close following dwindling interest of it among guests – despite Disney’s best efforts to advertise the ride -- and the loss of its sponsorship in the 1990s. Later, Imagineers demolished the building that once housed ''Horizons'' to make way for a new space-themed attraction inspired by a defunct Disneyland attraction called ''Mission to Mars''. Disney began a partnership with NASA to produce what would eventually become ''Mission: Space'', which opened on August 15, 2003.
** The ride’s simulation of zero-gravity through a centrifuge-based design -- which had to potential to make riders nauseous and claustrophobic – resulted in the placement of several cautionary signs in the queue. Disney began to offer onsite service to sick riders. In a one-year period, there were already 194 instances of paramedics having to treat guest, and ''Mission: Space'' became referred to as the “sickest” ride in Epcot (a park normally not known for thrill rides). It was also plagued with plenty of accidents, including a boy who stopped breathing during the ride and died upon its conclusion.
** Casting a shadow over the attraction was a five-year lawsuit between Disney and Pennsylvanian company Environmental Tectonics, the latter claiming that Disney refused to pay the full amount due, prevented them from winning more work with other entertainment companies, and shared confidential details of the ride’s design with a rival vendor. Disney, however, claimed that Environmental Tectonics failed to live up to contractual commitments and made Disney pay $20 million more in producing the attraction. The lawsuit was eventually settled on January 7, 2009.
** Eventually, it came to the point where, in May 2006 (two weeks after the ride’s second death), the ride was given a massive overhaul -- there were now two versions of the attraction offered: the Green Team version drastically lowered the intensity while the Orange Team version offered the original experience unchanged. Instantly, ''Mission: Space'' became a hit amongst guests -- and still is to this day -- and no other fatalities have been reported.

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** The Florida counterpart Magic Kingdom had successfully updated the concept of a its nighttime parade with light-up floats a few years prior with ''Spectromagic'', which was content with ''Spectromagic'' via simply updating the technology that made the floats light up and the featured characters. ''Light Magic'' tried to reinvent the wheel by comparison: wheel: Two sets of identical stages were wheeled into position and remained stationary for what was mostly a ''Riverdance''-inspired show that climaxed with the surrounding buildings lighting up alongside the floats. Unfortunately, the new technology was extremely buggy; notoriously an effect with a wire-mounted, flying sparkler representing Tinkerbell nearly started a fire and had to be scrapped when it proved unworkable.
** Rather than delay the special, extra-admission-required premiere performance of the show for the park's annual passholders, which predated the start of regular performances by less than two weeks, Pressler told the assembled crowd that they were ''really'' seeing a dress rehearsal of the show...and it looked it with the many mishaps that followed. Refunds Between the poor quality of the show and the ultimately dishonest promotion, refunds ensued.
** Regular performances weren't quite so unfortunate, unfortunate but the bad buzz the that disastrous premiere generated generated, particularly online, only worsened. The "streetacular" concept, which left audience members only seeing one float for most of the show, was a comedown from the traditional procession of a parade. Attempts at AudienceParticipation with a set of unique pixie characters intended as the show's breakout stars failed when children ran ''ran away screaming screaming'' from them, owing to UncannyValley masks that reminded some adults of burn victims. The show lasted less than four months (opening Memorial Day weekend, closing Labor Day weekend) and was pulled for a promised {{Retool}} that never materialized. Disneyland would not have a true nighttime parade again until [[MilestoneCelebration the park's 60th anniversary in 2015]], when the Paint the Night Parade debuted.
* Disney’s ''Mission: Space'' was a $100 million dollar million-dollar attraction at Epcot, with Epcot: a joint partnership between Disney and {{NASA}} to produce a ride that would push the limits of theme park tourism like no other. Its [[http://www.themeparktourist.com/features/20160407/31867/sordid-history-misson-space-sickest-ride-epcot?page=3 sordid history]], however, highlights the worst ramifications that can come from poor ride design.
** The attraction ride's predecessor in that particular part of the park was previously called ''Horizons'', which was Horizons, a dark ride featuring a history of technology, sponsored by General Electric and cost costing Disney $60 million (in 1982 dollars!) to create. The attraction would later close following dwindling interest Like most of the charter attractions in the Future World half of the park, it among guests – quickly became dated, visitors ignored it despite Disney’s best efforts to advertise the ride -- it, and the loss of its sponsorship in the 1990s. Later, 1990s lost corporate sponsorship. So the Imagineers demolished the show building that once housed ''Horizons'' to make way for a new space-themed attraction inspired by a the defunct Disneyland Disneyland/Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom attraction called ''Mission to Mars''. Disney began a partnership with NASA to produce what would eventually become ''Mission: Space'', which Space'' opened on August 15, 2003.
** The ride’s simulation of zero-gravity through a centrifuge-based design -- which had to potential to make riders nauseous and ''and'' claustrophobic -– resulted in the placement of several cautionary signs in the queue. queue, but it wasn't enough; soon Disney began to offer onsite service to sick riders. riders and airsickness bags in the ride vehicles. In a one-year period, there were already 194 instances of paramedics having to treat guest, guests, and ''Mission: Space'' became referred to known as the “sickest” ride in Epcot (a -- a park normally not known for thrill rides). rides. It was also plagued with plenty of accidents, including more dangerous accidents -- the worst came when a boy who stopped breathing during the ride and died upon its conclusion.
** Casting a another shadow over the attraction was a five-year lawsuit between Disney and Pennsylvanian company Environmental Tectonics, the latter claiming that Disney refused to pay the full amount due, prevented them from winning more work with other entertainment companies, and shared confidential details of the ride’s design with a rival vendor. Disney, however, claimed that Environmental Tectonics failed to live up to contractual commitments and made Disney pay $20 million more in producing the attraction. The lawsuit was eventually settled on January 7, 2009.
** Eventually, it came to the point where, in In May 2006 (two -- two weeks after the ride’s second death), '''second''' death -- the ride was given a massive overhaul -- there were overhaul. There are now two versions of the attraction offered: the Green Team version drastically lowered lowers the intensity while the Orange Team version offered offers the original experience unchanged. Instantly, ''Mission: Space'' became a hit amongst guests -- and still is to this day -- and no other fatalities have been reported.
22nd Jun '16 8:39:52 AM dmcreif
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* ''The Smiler'' roller coaster at Ride/AltonTowers was responsible for a multitude of various accidents right from the beginning. As if to foreshadow of all of the problems to come afterwards, during the coaster's ''preview event'', 16 people were stranded on the ride, dangling at a steep angle. Four days later, the ride was closed after it stalled during a test run, and a week later closed again with a computer malfunction. The following month, a metal bolt fell off and closed the coaster again, resulting in a rescue of 48 people on the ride. Then, in 2013, cracks were found at the surface of the coaster and the wheels fell off and hit four people, leading to two more closings. In April 2014, over a dozen people got stranded on the ride, and a year later, two carriages crashed into one another, resulting in injuries. Needless to say, Alton Towers was smart enough to remove the branding of ''The Smiler'' in 2015 after all of ''this''.

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* ''The Smiler'' roller coaster at Ride/AltonTowers was responsible for a multitude of various accidents right from the beginning. As
**As
if to foreshadow of all of the problems to come afterwards, during the coaster's ''preview event'', 16 people were stranded on the ride, dangling at a steep angle. Four angle.
**Four
days later, the ride was closed after it stalled during a test run, and a week later closed again with a computer malfunction. The following month, a metal bolt fell off and closed the coaster again, resulting in a rescue of 48 people on the ride. Then,
**Then,
in 2013, cracks were found at the surface of the coaster and the wheels fell off and hit four people, leading to two more closings. In closings.
**In
April 2014, over a dozen people got stranded on the ride, and a year later, two carriages crashed into one another, resulting in injuries. Needless to say, Alton Towers was smart enough to remove the branding of ''The Smiler'' in 2015 after all of ''this''.
* In 2000, Kings Island built a wooden roller coaster called the ''Son of Beast''. It was the world's first wooden hypercoaster (coaster with a height between 200 and 299 feet) and the first to feature an inversion (a vertical loop), and the second longest wooden roller coaster in the world behind only ''The Beast'' on the other side of the park. ''Son of Beast'' was plagued with problems from the start, compared to ''The Beast'':
**Then-Kings Island owner Paramount fired the Roller Coaster Company of America, the company hired to engineer and build the ride, before the construction was completed and had to make several design corrections in the ride’s initial year.
**On July 9, 2006 at 4:45 pm, a structural failure in the 'Rose Bowl' section of the ride (one of the two massive helices) created a bump on the track that caused a train to come to an abrupt stop. Twenty-seven injuries were reported in the accident and rescue units were required to evacuate the riders. Most of the injuries were of the chest or neck. Seventeen people were released from the hospital within five hours of the accident, and two were admitted to local hospitals with non life-threatening injuries. After an inspection the following day, the park stated that the accident was caused by a crack or split in the wood. But the ride was closed for the remainder of the year.
**The cause of the structural failure was determined to be likely the result of stress caused by the weight of the custom-designed trains built for the ride (due to the vertical loop). Thus, during the 2006-2007 off-season, the loop was removed. The original trains were replaced with Gerstlauer-built trains from the demolished ''Hurricane: Category 5'' at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion in South Carolina, which were lighter than the original trains. The lighter trains were used to reduce the overall load on the wooden structure. The loop was also removed during this time to assist the lighter trains in completing the circuit.
**The ride ran with no problems from mid-2007 to early June 2009. On June 16, 2009, a woman claimed to have suffered a head injury from riding Son of Beast during her visit to the park on May 31, 2009. She did not report the incident to Kings Island officials prior to June 16. She claimed to have suffered from a burst blood vessel in her brain, after riding Son of Beast, that required admission to an intensive care unit at a nearby hospital. While no irregularities were found with the ride, it was the nail in the coffin for the Son of Beast. The ride sat standing but not operating for three years, and then was demolished in summer 2012. In 2014, a Bolliger & Mabillard inverted roller coaster called ''Banshee'' was opened on the former ''Son of Beast'' site.
**With that said, technology eventually advanced enough to allow inversions to be built on wooden roller coasters, with companies like Rocky Mountain Construction proceeding to convert existing coasters and/or build all-new wooden roller coasters.

*Kings Island also laid claim to being the location of the world's first suspension coaster, ''The Bat'', built by Arrow Dynamics and opened in 1981. However, the ride was plagued with mechanical difficulties that caused it to close only two years after opening. One of the problems was that the track was not banked, leading to premature wear on each train's shock absorbers as well as excessive steel stress on both the track and trains (some absorbers had to replaced after only a week of operation). Inspections attributed the flaws to the ride's lateral movement design and brake configuration. As a result, the ride was closed frequently while attempts were made to reconfigure support beams and patch cracks. The efforts proved costly and ineffective, and after assessing the cost of a complete overhaul, the park decided to permanently close the ride following the 1983 season. ''Vortex'', a looping coaster, occupies the former site.
**One positive thing came out of the failures of ''The Bat'': Arrow Dynamics went back to the drawing board and improved the suspended roller coaster design in future installations, like actually banking the turns. This was evident when they built a new suspended roller coaster at Kings Island in 1993, known as ''Top Gun'', which has operated ever since then. The ride was renamed ''Flight Deck'' in 2007 after Cedar Fair acquired the Paramount parks. In 2014, ''Flight Deck'' was repainted orange and renamed ''The Bat'' as a tribute to the original coaster.

18th Jun '16 6:08:36 AM Sapphirea2
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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015-16, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments.

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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having had its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that as well-known in mainland China. And budget China as elsewhere. Budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015-16, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments. refurbishments. And even though it was hugely popular from day one, the Walt Disney Company [[TooSoon couldn't trumpet their success internationally]] -- '''the night before''' the grand opening took place, a toddler at one of their Florida complex's hotels was dragged into a lake by an alligator and drowned, making ''that'' the Disney-related story that made headlines in North America for days instead.
11th May '16 9:34:24 AM Sapphirea2
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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments.

to:

* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015, 2015-16, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments.
11th May '16 9:34:07 AM Sapphirea2
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* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015, delaying new attractions, refurbishments, and general upkeep.

to:

* Shanghai Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening -- itself delayed by a few months from the spring. Smog issues could be distracting for visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections of the park to appeal to local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the American resorts in 2015, delaying new attractions, refurbishments, leading to cuts in operating hours and general upkeep.upkeep and delays for new attractions and refurbishments.
6th May '16 7:14:58 AM Sapphirea2
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* The entire existence and construction for Shanghai Disney Resort at Mainland China, Disney's sixth theme park. From the opening dates being switched from Spring 2016 to June 2016, to the smog issues in China which could be distracting for non-Chinese visitors, to the budget cuts affecting Walt Disney World and Disneyland due to the construction of the resort as of February 2016, to the fact that Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections at the park to appeal to Chinese guests due to people not being very familiar with anything Disney in China outside of Hong Kong, the park has appeared doomed from the start.

to:

* The entire existence and construction for Shanghai Disney Resort at Mainland China, Disneyland, Disney's sixth theme park. From park resort and their first in mainland China (Hong Kong Disneyland opened in 2005) is having its share of troubles too on the way to its June 2016 opening dates being switched -- itself delayed by a few months from Spring 2016 to June 2016, to the smog spring. Smog issues in China which could be distracting for non-Chinese visitors, to the budget cuts affecting Walt Disney World and Disneyland due to the construction of the resort as of February 2016, to the fact that visitors from other countries. Disney had to make a lot of changes to certain sections at of the park to appeal to Chinese guests due to people not being very familiar with anything Disney local guests, since their characters and properties (except, perhaps, Mickey Mouse) just aren't that well-known in China outside of Hong Kong, mainland China. And budget overruns in Shanghai were made up for by budget ''cuts'' at the park has appeared doomed from the start.American resorts in 2015, delaying new attractions, refurbishments, and general upkeep.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.ThemeParks