History Trivia / Yes

23rd Jun '16 6:34:11 PM CassandraLeo
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** Rick Wakeman dislikes much of ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', in particular the "filler material" they used to spread the album's pieces across four sides of vinyl. He has, however, softened on it in recent years, saying that there is about an hour of really good music on it. He has also said that if the album had been produced in the CD era, it would likely have been better, since the impulse to fill sides of vinyl resulted in the album being longer than it probably merited being (there was too much material for a single LP, which tends to be best suited for about forty to forty-five minutes of content, but not enough for a double LP, which tends to be best suited for about eighty to ninety minutes of content. While some artists, such as Music/{{Genesis}} and Music/ToddRundgren, released longer LPs, the sound quality tends to suffer as a result). He's also been with the band when they've brought some of its tracks out of the vault (''Keys to Ascension'' contains a performance of "The Revealing Science of God (Dance of the Dawn)", for example).

to:

** Rick Wakeman dislikes much of ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', in particular the "filler material" they used to spread the album's pieces across four sides of vinyl. He has, however, softened on it in recent years, saying that there is about an hour of really good music on it. He has also said that if the album had been produced in the CD era, it would likely have been better, since the impulse to fill sides of vinyl resulted in the album being longer than it probably merited being (there was too much material for a single LP, which tends to be best suited for about forty to forty-five minutes of content, but not enough for a double LP, which tends to be best suited for about eighty to ninety minutes of content. While some artists, such as Music/{{Genesis}} and Music/ToddRundgren, released longer LPs, [=LPs=], the sound quality tends to suffer as a result).result due to needing to reduce the volume in order to fit all the content on the record, resulting in a higher noise floor). He's also been with the band when they've brought some of its tracks out of the vault (''Keys to Ascension'' contains a performance of "The Revealing Science of God (Dance of the Dawn)", for example).
23rd Jun '16 6:33:16 PM CassandraLeo
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** Rick Wakeman dislikes much of ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', in particular the "filler material" they used to spread the album's pieces across four sides of vinyl.

to:

** Rick Wakeman dislikes much of ''Tales from Topographic Oceans'', in particular the "filler material" they used to spread the album's pieces across four sides of vinyl. He has, however, softened on it in recent years, saying that there is about an hour of really good music on it. He has also said that if the album had been produced in the CD era, it would likely have been better, since the impulse to fill sides of vinyl resulted in the album being longer than it probably merited being (there was too much material for a single LP, which tends to be best suited for about forty to forty-five minutes of content, but not enough for a double LP, which tends to be best suited for about eighty to ninety minutes of content. While some artists, such as Music/{{Genesis}} and Music/ToddRundgren, released longer LPs, the sound quality tends to suffer as a result). He's also been with the band when they've brought some of its tracks out of the vault (''Keys to Ascension'' contains a performance of "The Revealing Science of God (Dance of the Dawn)", for example).
23rd Jun '16 6:28:59 PM CassandraLeo
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* FranchiseKiller: ''Drama'' subverted this when the band came back for ''90125''. ''Union'' played it straight, killing their commercial success, and all their albums have since been released on indie labels, though they're still an in-demand live act.

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* FranchiseKiller: ''Drama'' subverted this when the band came back for ''90125''. ''Union'' played it straight, killing their commercial success, and all their studio albums have since been released on indie labels, though they're still an in-demand live act.act and several of their albums have still charted in the UK and elsewhere.



** Vangelis was also seriously considered for a spot in the group after Rick Wakeman left but chose to go solo. He did collaborate with Jon Anderson in the early '80s.

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** Vangelis Music/{{Vangelis}} was also seriously considered for a spot in the group after Rick Wakeman left but chose to go solo. He did collaborate with Jon Anderson in the early '80s.



** "Love Will Find A Way" was originally written for Music/StevieNicks.

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** "Love Will Find A a Way" was originally written for Music/StevieNicks.



** The album that became ''Union'' started off as a second Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album, tentatively titled ''Dialogue''. However, "Take the Water To the Mountain" is the only piece from ''Dialogue'' that ended up making it intact onto ''Union'', with the rest of the tracks remaining unreleased until Jon Anderson finally included some of them in a rarities collection in 2006.

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** The album that became ''Union'' started off as a second Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album, tentatively titled ''Dialogue''. However, "Take the Water To to the Mountain" is the only piece from ''Dialogue'' that ended up making it intact onto ''Union'', with the rest of the tracks remaining unreleased until Jon Anderson finally included some of them in a rarities collection in 2006.
22nd Jun '16 5:29:17 PM DavidDelony
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Added DiffLines:

** Tony Kaye is not the director of ''Film/AmericanHistoryX''.
22nd Apr '16 4:02:04 PM 123456789
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** WordOfGod says that this is how ''Union'' was sabotaged. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe were recording their second album in Montserrat, while the official Yes were recording the followup to ''Big Generator'' in Los Angeles, while looking for a replacement for Jon Anderson (Billy Sherwood and [[Music/{{Supertramp}} Roger Hodgson]] were considered candidates). ABWH's label, Creator/AristaRecords, wanted more commercial material, and felt it would sell more copies if ABWH were called Yes. Arista approached Yes to contribute material for ABWH. Trevor Rabin reluctantly sent Arista demos of "Lift Me Up" and "Saving My Heart" for Jon to sing on. Squire and Billy Sherwood sent "The More We Live--Let Go". Meanwhile, Anderson sang backing vocals on Yes' project. Arista assembled all of the Yes and ABWH recordings, plus a Bill Bruford/Tony Levin instrumental, a Steve Howe acoustic solo piece, and "The More We Live" into ''Union''. Adding to the meddling was producer Jonathan Elias, who, as Arista wanted the project completed on schedule, changed guitar and keyboard parts Howe and Wakeman recorded for the band, and added myriad session musicians from L.A. to finish off Howe, Wakeman, and Bruford's playing without even any input from them. That's right, '''Bill Bruford was replaced by session musicians'''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] by the fact that Arista was in a financial rut following the Music/MilliVanilli controversy that caused negative impact.
** After ''Union'', the record label Victory offered a contract to record ''Talk'' only to the members who had been on the hit eighties albums, ''90125'' and ''Big Generator''. They then made sure an epic length song ("Endless Dream") and an old song by Rabin, "Walls", appeared on the record; the latter, much to Rabin's chagrin. In a bit of poetic justice, the label folded shortly after its release.

to:

** WordOfGod says that this is how ''Union'' was sabotaged. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe were recording their second album in Montserrat, while the official Yes were recording the followup to ''Big Generator'' in Los Angeles, while looking for a replacement for Jon Anderson (Billy Sherwood and [[Music/{{Supertramp}} Roger Hodgson]] were considered candidates). ABWH's label, Creator/AristaRecords, wanted more commercial material, and felt it would sell more copies if ABWH were called Yes. Arista approached Yes to contribute material for ABWH. Trevor Rabin reluctantly sent Arista demos of "Lift Me Up" and "Saving My Heart" for Jon to sing on. Squire and Billy Sherwood sent "The More We Live--Let Go". Meanwhile, Anderson sang backing vocals on Yes' project. Arista assembled all of the Yes and ABWH recordings, plus a Bill Bruford/Tony Levin instrumental, a Steve Howe acoustic solo piece, and "The More We Live" into ''Union''. Adding to the meddling was producer Jonathan Elias, who, as Arista wanted the project completed on schedule, changed guitar and keyboard parts Howe and Wakeman recorded for the band, and added myriad session musicians from L.A. to finish off Howe, Wakeman, and Bruford's playing without even any input from them. That's right, '''Bill Bruford was replaced by session musicians'''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] by the fact that Arista was in a financial rut following the Music/MilliVanilli controversy that caused negative impact.
one hell of a backlash.
** After ''Union'', the record label Victory offered a contract to record ''Talk'' only to the members who had been on the hit eighties albums, ''90125'' and ''Big Generator''. They then made sure an epic length song ("Endless Dream") and an old song by Rabin, "Walls", appeared on the record; the latter, much to Rabin's chagrin. In a bit of poetic justice, [[CreatorKiller the label folded shortly after its release.release]].
15th Apr '16 5:23:08 PM lalaTKG
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Added DiffLines:

* ColbertBump: For some young anime fans, and especially the Japanese audience, their first introduction to the band would be with Roundabout appearing as the first couple endings to the 2012 adaptation of''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventure''.
11th Mar '16 12:43:14 PM MarkLungo
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** This is the reason ''90125'' is a Yes album instead of a Cinema album. Cinema was originally Trevor Rabin, Chris Squire, and Alan White, with Tony Kaye added mainly for live shows (Rabin and Trevor Horn played most of the actual keyboard parts on the album). However, after Jon Anderson joined the fold, the record company insisted that the band be called Yes (but then again, consider the fact Squire, Kaye, and Anderson were founding members and Alan White had been the only drummer since Music/BillBruford left). Rabin wasn't happy about this, not wanting to be perceived as a replacement for Steve Howe.
** WordOfGod says that this is how ''Union'' was sabotaged. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe were recording their second album in Montserrat, while the official Yes were recording the followup to ''Big Generator'' in Los Angeles, while looking for a replacement for Jon Anderson (Billy Sherwood and [[{{Supertramp}} Roger Hodgson]] were considered candidates). ABWH's label, Arista, wanted more commercial material, and felt it would sell more copies if ABWH were called Yes. Arista approached Yes to contribute material for ABWH. Trevor Rabin reluctantly sent Arista demos of "Lift Me Up" and "Saving My Heart" for Jon to sing on. Squire and Billy Sherwood sent "The More We Live--Let Go". Meanwhile, Anderson sang backing vocals on Yes' project. Arista assembled all of the Yes and ABWH recordings, plus a Bill Bruford/Tony Levin instrumental, a Steve Howe acoustic solo piece, and "The More We Live" into ''Union''. Adding to the meddling was producer Jonathan Elias, who, as Arista wanted the project completed on schedule, changed guitar and keyboard parts Howe and Wakeman recorded for the band, and added myriad session musicians from L.A. to finish off Howe, Wakeman, and Bruford's playing without even any input from them. That's right, '''Bill Bruford was replaced by session musicians'''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] by the fact that Arista was in a financial rut following the Milli Vanilli controversy that caused negative impact.

to:

** This is the reason ''90125'' is a Yes album instead of a Cinema album. Cinema was originally Trevor Rabin, Music/TrevorRabin, Chris Squire, and Alan White, with Tony Kaye added mainly for live shows (Rabin and Trevor Horn played most of the actual keyboard parts on the album). However, after Jon Anderson joined the fold, the record company insisted that the band be called Yes (but then again, consider the fact Squire, Kaye, and Anderson were founding members and Alan White had been the only drummer since Music/BillBruford left). Rabin wasn't happy about this, not wanting to be perceived as a replacement for Steve Howe.
** WordOfGod says that this is how ''Union'' was sabotaged. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe were recording their second album in Montserrat, while the official Yes were recording the followup to ''Big Generator'' in Los Angeles, while looking for a replacement for Jon Anderson (Billy Sherwood and [[{{Supertramp}} [[Music/{{Supertramp}} Roger Hodgson]] were considered candidates). ABWH's label, Arista, Creator/AristaRecords, wanted more commercial material, and felt it would sell more copies if ABWH were called Yes. Arista approached Yes to contribute material for ABWH. Trevor Rabin reluctantly sent Arista demos of "Lift Me Up" and "Saving My Heart" for Jon to sing on. Squire and Billy Sherwood sent "The More We Live--Let Go". Meanwhile, Anderson sang backing vocals on Yes' project. Arista assembled all of the Yes and ABWH recordings, plus a Bill Bruford/Tony Levin instrumental, a Steve Howe acoustic solo piece, and "The More We Live" into ''Union''. Adding to the meddling was producer Jonathan Elias, who, as Arista wanted the project completed on schedule, changed guitar and keyboard parts Howe and Wakeman recorded for the band, and added myriad session musicians from L.A. to finish off Howe, Wakeman, and Bruford's playing without even any input from them. That's right, '''Bill Bruford was replaced by session musicians'''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] by the fact that Arista was in a financial rut following the Milli Vanilli Music/MilliVanilli controversy that caused negative impact.



* TheOtherDarrin: Alan White, after Bill Bruford left Yes in 1972 to join KingCrimson.

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* TheOtherDarrin: Alan White, after Bill Bruford left Yes in 1972 to join KingCrimson.Music/KingCrimson.



** ''Literally'' led to the final cover of ''Tormato''. Hipgnosis had been showing Yes the photographs taken for the cover at the Yes Tor, when the album was still planned to be named ''Yes Tor'', when a frustrated Wakeman threw a tomato at one of the images, annoyed by how poor he felt the proposal was. Hipgnosis ended up incorporating the effect into the final cover, and the album was renamed ''Tormato''.

to:

** ''Literally'' led to the final cover of ''Tormato''. Hipgnosis Creator/{{Hipgnosis}} had been showing Yes the photographs taken for the cover at the Yes Tor, when the album was still planned to be named ''Yes Tor'', when a frustrated Wakeman threw a tomato at one of the images, annoyed by how poor he felt the proposal was. Hipgnosis ended up incorporating the effect into the final cover, and the album was renamed ''Tormato''.
23rd Feb '16 11:15:29 PM DavidDelony
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** Vangelis was also seriously considered for a spot in the group but chose to go solo.

to:

** Vangelis was also seriously considered for a spot in the group after Rick Wakeman left but chose to go solo.solo. He did collaborate with Jon Anderson in the early '80s.
23rd Feb '16 11:13:20 PM DavidDelony
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** ''Drama'', thanks to Alan White's foot injury stopping recording, the disastrous [[Music/Queen Roy Thomas Baker]] sessions, and Wakeman and Anderson leaving the band.

to:

** ''Drama'', thanks to Alan White's foot injury stopping recording, the disastrous [[Music/Queen Roy [[Music/{{Queen}} Roy]] [[Music/TheCars Thomas Baker]] sessions, and Wakeman and Anderson leaving the band.
14th Feb '16 10:22:25 PM DavidDelony
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** ''Big Generator'' took over 2 years to make due to Trevor Horn leaving production early because him and Tony Kaye weren't getting along and Trevor Rabin becoming IAmTheBand and disagreeing with Jon Anderson. Anderson was looking to make a Yes album with the classic 70s style, while Rabin wanted to evolve ''90125'''s sound and score another Top 40 hit. Also, they recorded the album in 3 different studios, all in different countries. They started out in Los Angeles, but they decided to go to Italy to record it in an Italian palace. They recorded "Shoot High, Aim Low" there, then they went to the U.K. to record "Rhythm of Love", then ended up ''back where they started in Los Angeles'' to record the rest of the album. When Chris Squire was interview about the album, he said that he and Alan White recorded their parts on the album over and over during the ''whole two year period''.

to:

** ''Big Generator'' took over 2 two years to make due to Trevor Horn leaving production early because him he and Tony Kaye weren't getting along and along, Trevor Rabin becoming IAmTheBand and disagreeing with Jon Anderson. Anderson was looking to make a Yes album with the classic 70s style, while Rabin wanted to evolve ''90125'''s sound and score another Top 40 hit. Also, they recorded the album in 3 different studios, all in different countries. They started out in Los Angeles, but they decided to go to Italy to record it in an Italian palace. They recorded "Shoot High, Aim Low" there, then they went to the U.K. to record "Rhythm of Love", then ended up ''back where they started in Los Angeles'' to record the rest of the album. When Chris Squire was interview interviewed about the album, he said that he and Alan White recorded their parts on the album over and over during the ''whole two year period''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.Yes