History Trivia / TheWho

24th May '17 10:11:27 AM CumbersomeTercel
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24th May '17 10:09:50 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* CashCowFranchise: They broke up in 1982, but seemingly never stopped performing comeback shows once a 1989 tour proved a huge hit.
* CoveredUp:



** The band hated their iconic performance at Woodstock. Roger Daltrey declared it as "the worst gig [they] ever played" and Pete Townshend said, "I thought the whole of America had gone mad."
* CreatorBreakdown: ''Lifehouse'', ''[[LampshadeHanging The Who By Numbers]]''.
** Pete Townshend [[WordOfGod claimed]] in his 2013 memoir, ''Who I Am'', that ''The Who By Numbers'' turned out the way it did almost [[EnforcedTrope by accident]], as a result of Roger Daltrey handpicking the tracks which were released on the album:
--> ''[Roger] called the next day, very positive about what he heard. I had come up with a broad sweep of material, some upbeat, some R&B influenced, some reggae, some very light in tone, and some introspective and angry. I was surprised by the songs he liked best - the angry, cynical, depressive ones. The music was only partly complete, though; what I lacked on this collection, once again, was a defining context, a theme or concept. The songs Roger selected may have been the ones he liked best, but as a group they were later described as a kind of "suicide note" from me, and better suited to a solo album. I wasn't feeling suicidal at all, but I was terribly tired. ''

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** The band hated their iconic performance at Woodstock.UsfulNotes/{{Woodstock}}. Roger Daltrey declared it as "the worst gig [they] ever played" and Pete Townshend said, "I thought the whole of America had gone mad."
* CreatorBreakdown: ''Lifehouse'', ''[[LampshadeHanging The Who By Numbers]]''.
**
Pete Townsend had several:
** The first and most notable breakdown occurred during the production of his ambitious ''Lifehouse'' project, which was to be a massive concept album/film/audience participation project, made with the intention of creating the greatest event in music history. The story was set in a dystopian future in which the cities of Earth are so polluted that everyone has to stay inside, and that everyone is hooked up to a massive network which provides entertainment through what is essentially virtual reality. [[Film/TheMatrix (Sound familiar?)]] It was going to end with a Universal Chord of pure music being struck and everyone ascending to a higher plane of existence. It broke down because no one else seemed to understand the concept - especially not the other members of the band. The idea had to be scrapped, and a more "conventional" non-concept album was released based on some of the songs. The result of this "failure" was ''Music/WhosNext'', and is considered to be one of (if not THE) best album the Who ever released.
** The second occurred after the release of ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'', which was not as popular or as well-received at the time as
Townshend [[WordOfGod claimed]] had hoped it would be. This, in conjunction with his 2013 memoir, ''Who I Am'', that drinking problem, caused him to take a brief break from songwriting before returning two years later with the stripped-down and alarmingly cynical ''The Who By Numbers'' turned out Numbers''.
** The third occurred after
the way it did almost [[EnforcedTrope by accident]], as a result death of Roger Daltrey handpicking Keith Moon and the tracks which were released Who's breakup in 1982 after years running on autopilot. Townshend wrote the album:
--> ''[Roger] called the next day, very positive about what he heard. I had come up with a broad sweep of material, some upbeat, some R&B influenced, some reggae, some very light in tone, and some introspective and angry. I was surprised by the songs he liked best - the angry, cynical, depressive ones. The music was only partly complete, though; what I lacked on this collection, once again, was a defining context, a theme or concept. The songs Roger selected may have been the ones he liked best, but as a group they were later described as a kind of "suicide note" from me, and better suited to a
contemplative, [[TrueArtIsIncomprehensible abstract]], synth-heavy solo album. I wasn't feeling suicidal at all, but I was terribly tired. ''album "All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes".



* SerendipityWritesThePlot: Pete Townshend developed his signature guitar-smashing quite by accident one night when he was frustrated with the low ceiling at the venue they were playing at.



* TroubledProduction[=/=]WhatCouldHaveBeen: ''Lifehouse'', the project that started out as an idea for another RockOpera but failed and became ''Music/WhosNext'' partially due to Townshend's inability to explain the idea and make anyone understand it.
** A second abandoned ConceptAlbum project, ''Rock Is Dead--Long Live Rock'' chronicling the history of the Who, was worked on in 1972. According the TheOtherWiki, tracks salvaged from the piece included the singles-only tracks, "Join Together", "Relay" and ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Long Live Rock]]", "Put The Money Down" from ''Odds And Sods'', and early versions of the ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tracks, "Is It In My Head", "The Punk And The Godfather" and "Love Reign O'er Me", among other tracks.

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* TroubledProduction[=/=]WhatCouldHaveBeen: ''Lifehouse'', the project that started out as an idea for TroubledProduction:
** Pete Townshend, after ''Music/{{Tommy}}'''s immense success, intended to create
another RockOpera but failed rock opera, this time with a sci-fi bent, called ''Lifehouse''. Its plot would involve a dystopian heavily polluted virtual reality-based future (virtual reality before the term was even coined), where a Scottish farmer family go to the Lifehouse concert in London, the [[BrownNote perfect note]] rings out and became ''Music/WhosNext'' partially due the concertgoers disappear after having achieved musical Nirvana (no, [[Music/{{Nirvana}} not that kind]]). The Who would take over the Young Vic theatre, develop new material with influence from the audience and a story would evolve. It would be a movie. Pete would modify his new synths to Townshend's pick up information from audience members to create musical portraits (something basically impossible then and still pretty complicated now). Unsurprisingly, this was a recipe for disaster. Pete's inability to explain figure out just what the idea fuck he wanted caused him to have a nervous breakdown, and make anyone understand it.
** A second abandoned ConceptAlbum project, ''Rock Is Dead--Long Live Rock'' chronicling
after spending four months of live concerts at the history of Young Vic and unproductive studio sessions, he finally junked the Who, whole RockOpera concept. The band gathered up their best songs, and entered Olympic Studios with producer Glyn Johns. The result was worked on in 1972. According ''Music/WhosNext'', widely considered the TheOtherWiki, tracks salvaged from the piece included the singles-only tracks, "Join Together", "Relay" and ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Long Live Rock]]", "Put The Money Down" from ''Odds And Sods'', and early versions of the ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tracks, "Is It In My Head", "The Punk And The Godfather" and "Love Reign O'er Me", among other tracks.band's best album.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: "Magic Bus" manages to still sound reasonably timeless until it betrays the fact that it was written before British currency was decimalised with "Thruppence and sixpence every day just to drive to my baby".

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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: "Magic Bus" manages to still sound reasonably timeless until it betrays the fact that it was written before British currency was decimalised with "Thruppence and sixpence every day just to drive to my baby".baby".
* WhatCouldHaveBeen: A second abandoned ConceptAlbum project, ''Rock Is Dead--Long Live Rock'' chronicling the history of the Who, was worked on in 1972. According the TheOtherWiki, tracks salvaged from the piece included the singles-only tracks, "Join Together", "Relay" and ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Long Live Rock]]", "Put The Money Down" from ''Odds And Sods'', and early versions of the ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tracks, "Is It In My Head", "The Punk And The Godfather" and "Love Reign O'er Me", among other tracks.
21st May '17 5:21:15 AM CumbersomeTercel
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Added DiffLines:

** The band hated their iconic performance at Woodstock. Roger Daltrey declared it as "the worst gig [they] ever played" and Pete Townshend said, "I thought the whole of America had gone mad."
21st May '17 5:09:28 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* CreatorBacklash: Pete Townshend's ''Scoop'' liner notes include a rather bitter comment of "It's the silly songs they like, daft punters." after mentioning how their concerts always included shouted requests for "Magic Bus" and "Boris the Spider".

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* CreatorBacklash: CreatorBacklash:
**
Pete Townshend's ''Scoop'' liner notes include a rather bitter comment of "It's the silly songs they like, daft punters." after mentioning how their concerts always included shouted requests for "Magic Bus" and "Boris the Spider".



* DevelopmentHell: A biopic of Keith Moon, with MikeMyers in the lead, was teased in the early 2000s but has since dropped off the radar (possibly owing to Myers' [[TheCatInTheHat increasingly bad]] [[TheLoveGuru role choices]]).

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* DevelopmentHell: A Since at least the early 1990s, Roger Daltrey has been attempting to put a Keith Moon biopic of Keith Moon, with MikeMyers in on the lead, big screen. Creator/RobertDowneyJr. was once considered for the lead role before, in Daltrey's words, he read the script and did everything in it. Creator/MikeMyers was teased in all throughout the early 2000s to be playing the man himself, but after its intended release day in 2007 passed, nothing has since dropped off come of it. Currently, IMDB lists the radar (possibly owing film as "Untitled Keith Moon Project", with Myers still attached to Myers' [[TheCatInTheHat increasingly bad]] [[TheLoveGuru role choices]]).the title role.



* MagnumOpusDissonance:
** When the band were in the process of recording ''Music/{{Tommy}}'', Pete Townshend slapped together a PowerPop ballad with no real relation to the story in order to get the attention of New York Times music critic Nik Cohn, who was known to be a fan of certain arcade novelties. That song was "Pinball Wizard", which easily became the most recognizable song off the album.
** And while ''Tommy'' came to be considered their finest work to date, Townshend's aspirations were pegged on its ambitious followup, ''Lifehouse'' - which ultimately fell apart due to miscommunication and the Who parting ways with their manager, and stayed dead until Townshend revived it as a solo album and radio play nearly 30 years later, by which time his work was no longer receiving notice on the pop charts. (On the other hand, the album which resulted of the failed ''Lifehouse'' sessions, ''Music/WhosNext'', competes with ''Tommy'' as the band's most acclaimed)



* ThePeteBest: The drummer before Keith Moon came along named Doug Sandom, who himself had replaced Harry Wilson. Before that they had Colin Dawson, the lead singer whose departure led rhythm guitarist Roger Daltrey to take up the vocals himself.



** ''The Who By Numbers'' took an unusually long time to complete. This was not because of technical difficulties, but because of the band members's lack of interest and because of Pete's [[CreatorBreakdown writer's block and feeling of disenchantment from his music]]

to:

** ''The Who By Numbers'' took an unusually long time to complete. This was not because of technical difficulties, but because of the band members's lack of interest and because of Pete's [[CreatorBreakdown writer's block and feeling of disenchantment from his music]]music]].
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: "Magic Bus" manages to still sound reasonably timeless until it betrays the fact that it was written before British currency was decimalised with "Thruppence and sixpence every day just to drive to my baby".
2nd Apr '17 9:03:52 AM NWolfman
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** Also, when the Who made a guest appearance on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Pete Townshend had lost his voice and was unable to read his parts. His brother Paul recorded them instead.

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** Also, when When the Who made a guest appearance on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', Pete Townshend had lost his was voice by his brother Paul. Pete was under the assumption that they would be voiced by sound-alikes, and was unable to read his parts. His brother Paul recorded them instead.too busy when he found out otherwise.



** The first verse of "Who Are You" describes an actual incident. Pete, depressed from having just reached a settlement in a dispute with the band's management, got very drunk at the Speakeasy club with [[Music/SexPistols Steve Jones and Paul Cook]], tried to leave and passed out in a doorway not far from the club. He was recognised by a policeman, who woke him up and told him he could go free if he was able to walk away by himself. Pete managed to get himself together long enough to walk into a nearby tube station and catch a train home.

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** Several of the lines in "Behind Blue Eyes" about violent outbursts reflect on Roger Daltrey's own history of violence. In the early days of the band, Daltrey would often solve disputes by letting the other person talk to his fist. In one instance, he actually K.O.'d Pete and was immediately fired, only to be let back in (under the proviso that he clean up his act) when "My Generation" became a hit.
** The first verse of "Who Are You" describes an actual incident. Pete, depressed from having just reached a settlement in a dispute with the band's management, got very drunk at the Speakeasy club with [[Music/SexPistols Steve Jones and Paul Cook]], tried to leave and passed out in a doorway not far from the club. He was recognised recognized by a policeman, who woke him up and told him he could go free if he was able to walk away by himself. Pete managed to get himself together long enough to walk into a nearby tube station and catch a train home.
25th Jan '17 7:16:51 AM Gosicrystal
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Added DiffLines:

* MissingEpisode:
** Several of the songs the group recorded for ''Lifehouse'', such as "Mary", were lost due to the master tapes being inadequately preserved, and decayed to uselessness by the time the group sought to remaster them in the '90s. Some, like "Put the Money Down" and "Time is Passing", were partially restored with new vocals and overdubs added to what could be retrieved from the originals.
** The group's cover of "Under My Thumb", as reissued in the CD era, is missing the lead guitar part, which was lost due to a damaged master tape.
21st Dec '16 4:49:55 PM DavidDelony
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Added DiffLines:

** This is how instrument smashing became part of the band's live sets. Pete Townshend accidentally broke his guitar neck on a club's low ceiling and decided to smash his guitar both out of frustration and [[IMeantToDoThat to make it look like he'd done it on purpose]]. The band's manager Keith Lambert loved it and asked Townshend to keep doing it as [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity the stunt got the band a lot of attention]].
10th Oct '16 3:24:10 PM Roemilus
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* PromotedFanboy: Scot Halpin, a nineteen-year old fan who played with the band during one concert. Keith Moon had passed out mid-show and was unable to play the drums, so Halpin stepped in for him.

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* PromotedFanboy: Scot Halpin, a nineteen-year old fan who played performed with the band during one concert. Keith Moon had passed out mid-show and was unable to play the drums, so Halpin stepped in for him.
10th Oct '16 3:22:59 PM Roemilus
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** ''The Who By Numbers'' took an unusually long time to complete. This was not because of technical difficulties, but because the band members's lack of interest and because of Pete's [[HeroicBSOD writer's block and feeling of disenchantment from his music]]

to:

** ''The Who By Numbers'' took an unusually long time to complete. This was not because of technical difficulties, but because of the band members's lack of interest and because of Pete's [[HeroicBSOD [[CreatorBreakdown writer's block and feeling of disenchantment from his music]]
10th Oct '16 3:19:29 PM Roemilus
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* PromotedFanboy: Scot Halpin.

to:

* PromotedFanboy: Scot Halpin.Halpin, a nineteen-year old fan who played with the band during one concert. Keith Moon had passed out mid-show and was unable to play the drums, so Halpin stepped in for him.
**Jeff Stein, an American fan who pitched and directed ''The Kids Are Alright''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.TheWho