History Trivia / TheWarOfTheWorlds

2nd Apr '18 9:21:20 PM Mdumas43073
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* The mass panic associated with the radio broadcast? [[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false Not as massive as we've been led to believe]], but [[https://books.google.com/books/about/Broadcast_Hysteria.html?id=pGMGCAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q&f=false not entirely faked or over-reported, either]]. Most people would have reacted as most probably would today: call the police or friends and find out. CBS had unusually high calls, as did police and fire stations, so people were trying to verify one way or the other. Caches of letters to CBS, Welles and the FCC have been found, from people who had believed it -- many congratulating Welles for a job well done. The listening audience size was six million, and it's estimated that about a million of those, however briefly, believed the program. (Because it was Halloween, some stupid things were bound to happen anyway; a lot of extreme reactions came from people who hadn't heard the show, but heard ''of'' a "Martian invasion" (or a "deadly meteor crash") from friends or neighbors. Others who thought it was real simply tuned in late, heard "invasion" and "poison gas" and thought "Nazis".
* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who'd switched over late from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The mass panic associated with the radio broadcast? [[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false Not as massive as we've been led to believe]], but [[https://books.google.com/books/about/Broadcast_Hysteria.html?id=pGMGCAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q&f=false not entirely faked or over-reported, either]]. Most people would have reacted as most probably would today: call the police or friends and find out. CBS had got an unusually high volume of calls, as did police and fire stations, so people were trying to verify one way or the other. Caches of letters to CBS, Welles and the FCC have been found, from people who had believed it -- many congratulating Welles for a job well done. The listening audience size was six million, and it's estimated that about a million of those, however briefly, believed the program. (Because it was Halloween, some stupid things were bound to happen anyway; a lot of extreme reactions came from people who hadn't heard the show, but heard ''of'' a "Martian invasion" (or a "deadly meteor crash") from friends or neighbors. Others who thought it was real simply tuned in late, heard "invasion" and "poison gas" and thought "Nazis".
* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who'd switched over late from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others Still others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
2nd Apr '18 9:19:12 PM Mdumas43073
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* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over late from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who who'd switched over late from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
2nd Apr '18 9:18:30 PM Mdumas43073
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* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over late from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change, plus an erroneous newspaper listing that Welles and co. were doing "The Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
2nd Apr '18 9:17:56 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow "lowbrow" comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; change, plus a an erroneous newspaper misprint, listing that ''Mercury Theatre'' was Welles and co. were doing "Pickwick "The Pickwick Papers" that night; night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
2nd Apr '18 9:15:38 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie [=McCarthy=], so researchers assume assumed that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
2nd Apr '18 9:14:47 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, [=McCarthy=], so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
12th Aug '17 12:04:21 AM CaptEquinox
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* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]A newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters and telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted.[[note]]A [[note]]The fact that ''Mercury Theatre'' had just had a time-slot change; plus a newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night, night; didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations.stations and could only hear parts of what happened. Many heard "invasion" without the "Martians" which would have told them it was a play. Others heard "meteor crash" and thought it was a natural disaster. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
9th Aug '17 3:38:03 AM CaptEquinox
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* The mass panic associated with the radio broadcast? [[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false Not as massive as we've been led to believe]], but [[https://books.google.com/books/about/Broadcast_Hysteria.html?id=pGMGCAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q&f=false not entirely faked or over-reported, either]]. Most people would have reacted as most probably would today: call the police or friends and find out. CBS had unusually high calls, as did police and fire stations, so people were trying to verify one way or the other. Caches of letters to CBS, Welles and the FCC have been found, from people who had believed it -- many congratulating Welles for a job well done. The listening audience size was six million, and it's estimated that about a million of those, however briefly, believed the program. (Because it was Halloween, some stupid things were bound to happen anyway; a lot of extreme reactions came from people who hadn't heard the show, but heard ''of'' a "Martian invasion" from friends or neighbors. Others who thought it was real simply tuned in late, heard "invasion" and "poison gas" and thought "Nazis".
* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters to Welles, the FCC and CBS revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted. Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:

to:

* The mass panic associated with the radio broadcast? [[http://books.google.ca/books?id=GeWm-zM3NEoC&lpg=PP1&dq=Little+Green+Men,+Meowing+Nuns+and+Head-Hunting+Panics:&pg=PA219&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false Not as massive as we've been led to believe]], but [[https://books.google.com/books/about/Broadcast_Hysteria.html?id=pGMGCAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q&f=false not entirely faked or over-reported, either]]. Most people would have reacted as most probably would today: call the police or friends and find out. CBS had unusually high calls, as did police and fire stations, so people were trying to verify one way or the other. Caches of letters to CBS, Welles and the FCC have been found, from people who had believed it -- many congratulating Welles for a job well done. The listening audience size was six million, and it's estimated that about a million of those, however briefly, believed the program. (Because it was Halloween, some stupid things were bound to happen anyway; a lot of extreme reactions came from people who hadn't heard the show, but heard ''of'' a "Martian invasion" (or a "deadly meteor crash") from friends or neighbors. Others who thought it was real simply tuned in late, heard "invasion" and "poison gas" and thought "Nazis".
* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters to Welles, the FCC and CBS telegrams revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted. interrupted.[[note]]A newspaper misprint, that ''Mercury Theatre'' was doing "Pickwick Papers" that night, didn't help.[[/note]] Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
8th Aug '17 11:11:11 PM CaptEquinox
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* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters to Welles, the FCC and CBS revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted. Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations.

to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters to Welles, the FCC and CBS revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted. Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations. Brad Schwartz in his book ''Broadcast Hysteria'' writes:
--> Above all, what late listeners heard and understood were the references to real organizations and figures of authority. Their ears pricked up at the mentions of the governor of New Jersey, the Red Cross, the vice president of CBS, and Princeton University. This, more than perhaps anything else, made the broadcast seem real to those that it deceived.
8th Aug '17 6:39:50 PM CaptEquinox
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to:

* The idea that a lot of the panic came from people who switched over from ''The Chase & Sanborn Hour'' is based on the fact that ''Chase & Sanborn'' was lowbrow comedy with Creator/EdgarBergen and Charlie Mc Carthy, so researchers assume that anyone who believed in a Martian invasion must be [[ThisLoserIsYou dumb or naive]]. Letters to Welles, the FCC and CBS revealed listeners who'd had CBS on as background noise; others were fans of ''Mercury Theatre'' who had tuned in late or didn't hear the first couple of minutes and thought ''Mercury Theatre'' was being interrupted. Others were listening on faraway static-ridden stations.
* Welles was deeply involved in producing a theatrical play at the time and was only peripherally involved with the preparation for ''War of the Worlds''; but he emphasized that it must be as realistic as possible because the story was an old classic and he feared listeners would be bored and tune out.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.TheWarOfTheWorlds